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courses above the 202 level, and must include
Spanish 301-302 (except for students who
demonstrate an exceptional command of the
Spanish language and petition the department to be
exempted from this requirement), and no more
than one course from 205 and 245. Students may
include Spanish 202 for the minor if they have
begun language study at the elementary or
intermediate-level at Gettysburg College.

Distribution Requirements

Prior to their first registration at the College, all
students receive pre-registration materials which give
detailed instructions on language placement and
fulfillment of the distribution requirement in foreign
languages. The following courses may be counted
toward the distribution requirement in literature:
Spanish 205, 304, 308, 313, 314, 315, 319, 320, 324,
325, 326, 400. Spanish 310 and 311 fulfill the
distribution requirement in history/ philosophy.

The distribution requirement in foreign languages
may be fulfilled by successful completion of Spanish
202, 205, 245, or a course at the 300 level or above.
Achievement equivalent to 202 may be demonstrated
by an advanced placement examination or a
departmental placement examination given during
orientation before the initial week of fall semester.

Intermediate Program in Seville

Students may complete the last two semesters of the
distribution requirement in foreign languages by
studying for a semester in Seville, Spain. The
intermediate program includes a two-credit course in
Spanish language and a two-credit course that
integrates the study of Spanish literature and
civilization. This course satisfies the distribution
requirement in literature. A professor from the
department leads students on an initial orientation
tour of Spain and teaches the literature/civilization
class. Students may live with Spanish families or in
Spanish student residencias. See listings for Spanish
251-252 and 253-254.



148



SPANISH



Study Abroad

Advanced studeiiLs may study at the Center for Cross-
Cultural Study in Seville, Spain, or at the Foreign
Student Study Center at the University of
Guadalajara in Guadalajara, Mexico, both of which
offer a wide variety of courses in Spanish, including
literature, history, sociology, political science, and
management "and more". See Study Abroad, Center for
Cross-Cultural Study, Seville, Spain, page 46, and Study
Abroad, Foreign Student Study Center, University of
Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico, page 46.

Language and Service Practicum in the
Hispanic Community

Students have the opportunity for cross-cultural
learning experience while serving the local Hispanic
community. Student projects may include tutoring,
translating, and helping families adjust to Anglo
culture. Prerequisite: Spanish 301. Grading option:
S/U. Receives half course credit. Can be repeated
once for credit.

101-102 Elementary Spanish

Elements of understanding, speaking, reading, and
writing Spanish. Use of language laboratory is
required. Enrollment limited to those who have
never previously studied Spanish. Students cannot
receive credit for both 101 and 103; 102 and 104.

Staff

103-104 Fundamental Spanish

Fundamentals of understanding, speaking, reading,
and writing Spanish. Use of language laboratory is
required. Enrollment is limited to those who have
previously studied Spanish and who are enrolled
according to achievement on the Departmental
Qualifying Examination. Students cannot receive
credit for both 101 and 103; 102 and 104

Staff

201-202 Intermediate Spanish

Practice in oral and written expression, grammar
review, readings, and discussions of Spanish writing
as contact with Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: Spanish
102 or 104 or consent of the department.

Staff

205 Readings in Spanish and Spanish American
Literature

Conducted in Spanish with the dual objective of
comprehension of material and reading of Spanish
and Latin American literature of cultural and literary
merit. Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or consent of the
department. Students whose native language is
Spanish may not elect this course.

Staff



245 Spanish Conversation

Conversation course beyond the intermediate level
with emphasis on everyday, applied usage of the
language for nonliterary purposes. Prerequisite:
Spanish 202 or consent of the department.
Enrollment limited to twelve students. This course
counts toward the minor but does not count toward
the major. To be offered annually. Students whose
native language is Spanish may not elect this course.

Staff

251-252 Courses in Spanish Language for

Intermediate-Level Students in Seville,
Spain

Practice in oral and written expression, grammar
review, readings, and discussions of Spanish culture,
with a particular emphasis on present-day language
usage and contemporary Spanish society. Offered
annually in the fall. For intermediate students
studying at the Center for Cross-Cultural Studies in
Seville, Spain. Prerequisite: Spanish 104 or equivalent;
concurrent enrollment in Spanish 253-254. Fulfills
language requirement. One credit each.

Staff

253-254 Courses in Spanish Civihzation and
Literature for Intermediate-Level
Students in SeviUe, Spain

An integrated approach to the study of Spanish
literature and civilization. The courses provide an
overview of the evolution of Spanish culture from
prehistoric times to the present, based primarily on
the cultural characteristics of Andalusia. The courses
examine the origins of the most representative values
of Spanish culture in art, literature, and
contemporary life. Students will visit museums and
historical sites in Andalusia, and will attend ardstic
events. Offered annually in the fall. For intermediate
students studying at the Center for Cross-Cultural
Study in Seville, Spain. Prerequisite: Spanish 104 or
equivalent; concurrent enrollment in Spanish 251-
252. Fulfills literature requirement. One credit each.

301, 302 Spanish Composition and Conversation

Exercises in directed and free composition; group
discussion and presentation of individual oral work;
review of grammar and syntax at an advanced level.
Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or consent of the



department.

303 Spanish Phonology

Introduction to Spanish phonetic and phonemic
theory and analysis, applied to improve
pronunciadon skills. Study of variadon in
pronunciadon in Spain and Ladn America.



Staff



SPANISH



149



Prerequisite: Spanish 302 or approval of the
department. Offered 1993-94. Three lecture hours
and one laboratory.



Staff



304 Introduction to Literary Analysis

hitrodiiction to basic critical approaches to the
reading of prose fiction, poetry', and drama.
Through the careful study of works in each genre,
students will acquire a knowledge of analytical skills
and critical terminology in Spanish. Offered
annually. Prerequisite: Two Spanish courses beyond
Spanish 202 or consent of the department.

Staff

308 Literature of the Golden Age

Masterpieces of different genres of the late-sixteenth
through the seventeenth centuries. Emphasis will be
placed on major writers of theater, short prose
fiction, essay, and poetry. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or
consent of the department. Offered 1992-93.

Staff

309 Current Events in the Hispanic World

An advanced composition and conversation course
based on current events in the Hispanic world.
Students will read articles from a variety of Hispanic
periodicals and will view Spanish language news
programs in preparation for class discussion. This
course can either substitute for Spanish 302 in the
requirements for the major and minor in Spanish, or
it can be taken in addition to Spanish 302. The aim
of the course is both to strengthen students'
conversation and composition skills and to keep
students abreast of current affairs in the Spanish-
speaking world. _ „

Staff

310 Spanish Civilization

Study of the history and culture of Spain from the

earliest times to the present. Fulfills the distribution

requirement in history/ philosophy. Prerequisite:

Spanish 202 or consent of the department. Alternate

years. Offered 1993-94. ^ ,,

Staff

311 Latin American Civilization

Study of the history and culture of Latin America from
pre-Columbian times to the present. This course fulfills
distribution requirement in history/ philosophy.
Prerequisite: Spanish 202 or consent of the department.
Alternate years. Offered 1992-93.

Staff



319 Hispanic Theater

A study of the drama of both Spain and Spanish
America through the ages. The focus of the course will
vary from semester to semester, based on such aspects
as literary period, common theme, historical
development, and dramatic theory. Prerequisite: Sp2ims\\
304 or consent of the department. Offered 1993-94.

Staff

314 Cervantes

A study of the masterpiece, Don Quijote de la Mancha,

as well as some Novelas ejemplares and entremeses or

one-act plays. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent of

the department. Offered 1993-94. ^ ^^

^ Staff

315 An Introduction to Hispanic Cinema

A study of Hispanic cinema from its inception in

1896 through the present, with major emphasis on

films made since the advent of revisionary cinema

around 1960. The course will focus on the

development and renovation of cinematography, will

explore the relationship between cinema and other

forms of artistic expression, and will examine the

development of Hispanic cinema in the context of

the historical circumstances of the Hispanic

countries which have been most active in making

films. Offered 1993-94. ^ ^^

Staff

313 Nineteenth-Century Literature in Spain and
Latin America

Studies in the essay, the novel, the short story, the

drama, and poetry according to the essential literary

movements (romanticism, costumbrismo, realism,

naturalism, modernism) of the nineteenth century in

Spain and Latin America. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or

consent of the department. Offered 1992-93. ^ ^^

Staff

320 Lyric Poetry

A study of Spanish lyric poetry through the ages. The
course will concentrate on the interrelationship of
form, content, and idea, noting major influences
upon the poetry of each period. Appreciation is
considered a major goal of this course and much
poetry will be read orally and discussed. Alternate
years. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent of the
department. Offered 1992-93.

324 Latin American Contemporary Prose

Emphasizes the novel of the "boom" in Latin
America. Major writers such as Gabriel Garcia-
Marquez, Mario Vargas Llosa, Carlos Fuentes, Julio
Cortazar, Juan Rulfo, and Jorge Luis Borges will be



150



SPANISH / WOMEN'S STUDIES



read. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent of the
department. Offerea 1993-94. ^^^rr

325 Generation of '98 and Pre-Civil War
Literature

Studies in the essay, poetry, prose fiction, and drama
of" the major writers of the late-nineteenth and early-
twentieth centuries in Spain. Prerequisite: Spanish 304
or consent of the department. Alternate years.
Offered 1993-94. staff

326 Post-Civil War Literature of Spain

A study of the major literary trends and works in
Spain, beginning with the resurgence of Spanish
literature in the 1940's and continuing to the
present day. Prerequisite: Spanish 304 or consent of
the department. Alternate years. Offered 1992-93.

Staff

351 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics

Introduction to linguistic theories, methods, and

problems as applied to Spanish. Some attention will

be given to typical areas of investigation, such as

Spanish dialectology, sociolinguistics, bilingualism.

Prerequisite: Spanish 302 or approval of the

department. Offered 1992-93.

Staff

400 Senior Seminar

Directed and specialized studies in Spanish and Latin
American literatures from the medieval period to the
present. This course is to be taken by seniors during
the final semester in order to complete their
undergraduate work in Hispanic literatures.
Prerequisite: Limited to seniors except with permission
of die department. Offered in the spring of every year.

Staff
Portuguese

101-102 Elementary Portuguese
Elements of understanding, speaking, reading, and
writing Portuguese. Course includes oral and written
work, graded elementary reading, and use of audio-
visual cultural materials and correlative drill in the
language laboratory.

Staff

201-202

Practice in oral and written expression, grammar
review, readings, and discussions of Portuguese
writing as contact with the culture of countries where
Portuguese is spoken. Prerequisite: Portuguese 102 or
its equivalent.

Staff



Women's Studies



Theatre Arts - See English



Women's Studies Program Advisory Council
Professors Armster, Berg, Cahoon, Cain, Gill,
Hardwick, Johnson, Light, Olinger, Potuchek
(Coordinator), Powers, Small, D. Tannenbaum,
Trevelyan, and Richardson Viti
Assistant Provost Floge, Ms. Beck, Ms. McCaskill, Ms.
Moyer (Readers' Services Librarian), Ms. Sprague,
Ms. Thomas (Associate Director of Development) , Ms.
Vogel

Overview

The objective of women's studies is to encourage
students to analyze the roles, perspectives, and
contributions of women. Through the examination
of women's past history, present condition, and
future possibilities, students come to understand
gender as a cultural experience. In women's studies
courses, students learn a number of methods for
examining, as well as strategies for modifying, the
conditions that affect all of our lives.

Women's studies emphasizes cross-cultural
perspectives and analysis. Through an array of
interdisciplinary courses and of courses that focus on
gender within particular disciplines, women's
studies seeks to integrate women and feminist
scholarship into all levels of the curriculum.

Requirements and Recommendations

Six courses are required for the minor in women's
studies. Students must take Women's Studies 120 and
Women's Studies 400. Two additional courses must be
from the list of core courses. The remaining two
courses may be drawn from any of the following: ( 1 )
core courses, (2) affiliated courses, and (3) approved
courses of individualized study in women's studies.
Prospective minors in women's studies are
encouraged to discuss their plans with a women's
studies faculty member as soon as possible in their
academic careers. Students minoring in women's
studies are strongly advised to take Women's Studies
120 in die first or second year of study and Women's
Studies 400 in the senior year.

Core Courses:

120 Introduction to Women's Studies

A study of the perspectives, methodologies, and
findings of the new scholarship in various disciplines
on women. We will look at how women have
influenced and been affected by such issues as
family, language, creativity, and labor. The course is
taught by an interdisciplinary team of instructors.

Staff



WOMEN'S STUDIES



151



216 Images of Women in Literature

An examination of the various ways women have been

imagined in literature. We will look at how and why

images of women and men and of their relationships

to one another change, and at how these images affect

us. Emphasis will be placed on developing the critical

power to imagine ourselves differendy. Fulfills

literature requirement.

Ms. Berg

217 Famous French Femmes Fatales

Today women are attempting to demystify the

feminine condition, for, as the late Simone de

Beauvoir observed, the "mythe de la femme" is a male

invention. Literary images of women have,

understandably, been a major focus of this

investigation. Thus, this course will examine some

famous French women, from the Princess of Cleves to

Emma Bovary, and scrutinize them from the

perspective of feminist criticism. Fulfills literature

requirement.

Ms. Richardson Viti

218 Images of Women in Contemporary Indian
Literature

A study of the evolving images of women in
contemporary Indo-Anglian literature. The course will
address such topics as the novel as an imported genre,
differences between the ways in which men and
women read and write, and Pan-Indian themes in
non-vernacular literature. Fulfills literature and non-
Western requirements.

Ms. Singh

219 Contemporary Women Writers: Cross-
Cultural Perspectives

An examination of the novels and short stories of

authors from diverse socio-cultural backgrounds, with

emphasis on the Third World. Particular attendon will

be given to the ways in which these writers represent

the female experience. The class will examine works

written from 1965 to the present. Fulfills literature

requirement.

Staff

300 Feminist Theories

An exploration of various feminist theories about

women — about their experiences, their

representations, and their relative positions in diverse

societies. Contemporary and earlier works will be

discussed in order to evaluate and synthesize the

multiple approaches to feminist theories.

Women's Studies 120.

Staff



320 Practicum in Feminist Theory and Collective
Action

An examinadon of the reladonship between feminist

theory and community acdon. The course combines

weekly seminar meeUngs with student internships in

organizaUons that use collecdve acdon to pursue change

in societal condidons for women. Readings from

feminist theory of organizadons, collecdve acdon, and

social policy are used as a basis for discussion and

analysis of students' internship experiences. Prerequisites:

Women's Studies 120 and one other core women's

studies course (or permission of the instructor) .

Staff

350 Women, Family and Public Policy

An examinadon of the effects of public policy both

on women's family roles and on the interaction of

those roles with other aspects of women's lives. The

course focuses primarily on industrialized nations

and examines such policies as birth control and

abortion, maternity benefits, family allowances,

childcare, housing policies, and social assistance.

Prerequisite: Women's Studies 120.

Ms. Potuchek

351 Women in Nazism

An examinadon of the effects of Nazism on women,
primarily (but not exclusively) in Germany beginning
in the 1920s and extending to post-war dmes. The
course focuses on women's perspectives as exhibited
in historical and literary documentation.

Ms. Armster

400 Issues in Feminist Theory and Methods

The capstone course in women's studies. This course

focuses on the variety of theories and methods in

women's studies scholarship by examining a pardcular

issue from a number of different feminist perspectives.

Topic for 1991-92: Intersecdons of Inequality: Race,

Class, and Gender. Prerequisites: 'Women s Studies 120

and two other women's studies courses.

Staff



152



WOMEN'S STUDIES



(See appropriate departmental listings for
descriptions of the following courses.)

Art 400 Seminar in Art History

Economics 302 Gender Issues in Economics

History 209 Women's History Since 1500

History 306 Women and Work

IDS 215 Contemporary French Women Writers

Political Science 209 Feminist Theory in American
Politics

Religion 323 American Women in a Man's
Religious World

Sociology 217 Gender Roles and Inequality



Affiliated Courses:

Art 227 Arts of the First Nations of North America

Classics 121 Survey of Greek Civilization

Classics 264 Ancient Tragedy

English 333 Victorian Aesthetics

History 204 History of England Smce 1603

History 310 History of Early Modem France

Music 108 Women and Music

Political Science 407 American Black/Feminist
Political Thought

ReUgion 113 Women in the Ancient World

ReUgion 124 Elizabeth to Irene: Women in
Christianity I

Religion 125 Theodora to Margery: Women in
Christianity II

Religion 156 Women in Buddhism

Sociology 206 Sociology of the Family



TM



College Life



The College recognizes that students develop
intellectually, emotionally, physically, socially, and
spiritually. The Office of the Dean of the College, an
administrative division within the College, has as its
central purpose the provision of an environment,
programs, and ser\ices which enhance the students'
liberal education. Under the direction of the dean,
the Office of the Dean of the College, College
Union, Residence Life, The Women's Center, Greek
Organizations, Counseling Ser\ices, Career Services,
Health Ser\'ices, and the Chapel Programs compose
the division.

Office of The Dean of the College

The Office of the Dean of the College strives to help
students see that the events in their lives out of the
classroom directly influence their in-class experiences
and achievements. This is accomplished by providing
a variety of programs and services. The college life
staff assists students in the following:

Information. Students require information about
many opportunities available to them. The Office of
the Dean of the College answers student questions
about the College, or, when appropriate, will refer
students to the proper source for information.

Advisement. Members of the staff work with various
student organizations, providing them with guidance
and training in leadership skills.

Living Accommodations. The many opportunities for
on-campus living are administered through the
Office of the Dean of the College. An undergraduate
residence life staff is directly supervised by two
professional, live-in Assistant Directors of Residence
Life. The overall area of Residence Life reports to the
Associate Dean of the College.

Change. Any healthy educational institution must
continually undergo change. Students often provide
the invaluable input which leads to change in
policies, programs, and services. By working
cooperatively with administrators, students have
successfully initiated changes in residential options,
dining options, informal educational programs,
facilities, and numerous rules and regulations.

Publications. On an annual basis, the Dean of the
College staff works with students in publishing the



Student Handbook. The College Union Staff advises
the publication of the yearbook, the Spectrum.

Research. In order to improve its services and
programs, the Office of the Dean of the College
often collects data on student needs, attitudes, and
evaluations. Recently, research has been conducted
on living accommodations, residence hall visitation
options, dining plan options, room reservation
procedures, and alcohol use.

Discipline. The Dean of the College is responsible for
the non-academic discipline of students. Staff
members work with the faculty and student members
of the Student Conduct Review Board to uphold the
regulations of the College and to protect the rights
of the individual.

Residential Life

Residential life at Gettysburg College has a major
impact on the total development of the sttident. The
residential environment (persons, policies, and
facilities) promotes the formation of a community and
encourages a style of life that is conducive to the
development of respect for the individual and the
society in which one lives. During a student's
experience at Gettysburg College, decisions are made
concerning personal values, occupational choices,
one's identity', personal responsibility, and a philosophy
of life. The residential program attempts to provide
opportunities for examining these areas of concern.

Recognizing the influence of the environment on
development, Gettysburg College requires all
students (unless married or residing with their
families) to live on campus. Exemptions from this
requirement are granted only by the associate dean
of the college.

Assistant directors of residence life are professional,
live-in staff members who direcdy select and supervise
the student staff of resident coordinators and resident
advisers. The student staff participates in an ongoing
training program, developed by the assistant directors
of residence life, which enables them to help other
students adjust to the college environment. The
residence hall staff provides a variety of educational
and social programs that enhance the educational
and social development of all residence hall students.
Students living in residence halls also have the
opportunity to work with members of the faculty and
administration in setting regulations which apply to
all College residences.



155



Gettysburg College offers a variety of options in living
environments. The students may choose to live in
one of eleven residence halls varying in occupancy
from 35 students to 219 students. There are also
coeducational and single sex hall options. Each of
the residence halls has a different visitation policy.
The visitation policies are as follows:

Option A — Open Visitation from 1 AM - 1 2



Online LibraryL SeamanGettysburg College Catalog (Volume 1992/93-1995/96) → online text (page 21 of 126)