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The view taken of a University in these dis-
courses is the following;: That it is a place of teach-
ing universal knowledge. This implies that its
object is, on the one hand, intellectual, not moral,
and, on the other hand that it is the diffusion and
extension of knowledge rather than the advance-
ment.

John Henr\ Cardinal NeuiJinn.



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PUBLISHED 1948

Editor
LEO C. INGLESBY

Associate Editors

EDWARD J. CARLIN

EDWARD \\^ EHRLICH

FRANCIS T. FOTI

HARRY J. GIBBONS

FRANCIS J. NATHANS

Photographic Editor
LAWRENCE CORNELL

Business Manager
JOSEPH R. GUERIN



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f L V A N 1 A





It has been almost a century since Cardinal New-
man delivered the lectures on education which sub-
sequently became known as the Idea of a University.
His views are as valid in our day as they were in his;
but though widely admired as theory, they were just
as widely neglected in educational practise. We have
designed this yearbook to be a fresh statement of our
Catholic conviction that the essence of education in
the fullest sense of the term is in fact the cultivation
of "the force, the steadiness, the comprehensiveness
and the versatility of the intellect, the command over
our own powers, the instinctive just estimate of things
as they pass before us" which Newman understood
it to be.

We are aware that the practical requirements of



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our age have made intensive technical training, par-
ticularly in the fields of science and business, an es-
sential element of the modem educational program,
and that the techniques of such training should in-
evitably modify our thinking on the subject. But we
feel that in the course of this modification it has be-
come habitual with us to regard the cultivation of the
whole of human nature, as such and for its own sake,
as secondary to the cultivation of some single func-
tion of human nature, inquisitive or acquisitive. It is
against precisely this inversion of value that a careful
attention to Newman's ideas on education would be
able to protect us; and we hope that one effect of this
publication will be a stimulation of interest in those
ideas among Catholic students.



In a world not yet freed from the chains of i<inor-
ance, doubt and mistrust, St. John Baptist de La Salle
and Cardinal Newman stand as two beacons lighting
the way to intellectual franchisement and religious
certitude.



History often belies the meaning of the word
"progress", and it is only in the field of education
that it can be accurately measured; for science has a
way of destroying itself and men have a way of per-
vertin" their religion.





Over two hundred and fifty years ago, St. John
Baptist de La Salle began to bring education to the
masses held ignorant by law lest they rise up to wreak
havoc on a system that enslaved them. This was the
start of an educational process destined to stimulate
learning throughout the world. The group-teaching
principle of St. John Baptist de La Salle made pos-
sible the wider spread of ideas and truths, primary
weapons in the eternal war against injustice and
oppression.



To these sons of St. John Baptist de La Salle on
their completion of a century of devotion in behalf of
Catholic youth and in grateful appreciation for what
they have accomplished for the Church of God in
America by keeping alive the ideals of their founder
and of giving life to the lofty conception of educa-
tion fostered by Cardinal Newman, we respectfully
dedicate this book.



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he phenomenon of the ever-changing and the changeless existing side by side
in the same institution is nowhere more apparent than in schools. Through our univers-
ities and colleges pass legions of students^^eir minds grasping new ideas, their hearts
supporting new ideals; yet, here at La Salle, we can see the ever-changing and the
changeless existing Together. Throughout Li Salle's eighty-n%e years, the growth of the
student body jind the expansion of the plivMcal plant manifest the dynamic aspect of our
college. Concnrrent with this is the unchangmg aspect: a Catholic Philosophy of a
Liberal Education.

The pictures on the following pages show how La Salle has expanded to fulfill its
declared aim of providing to thp s^wl^-^ifciire it, .1 .oilge for Catholic higher education.

of the necessar)- facilities and buildings,
i!i tl>c storJB the a^er-c4»anging t.icet of La Salle. Cameras, however




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wiTtin 3]OSG-'411! - -.-tO ciptuft: the spirit of a iireraj education which has

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it possible to drop in on'clas'ses comduaed at the original site of La Sa
s, we would be conscious of many similanties between the

The Christian Brother «4;pnductine the class^ —
5ay ar?||inspired with tht;.saiiie.|mr^ose, would
J ^Pb** t<^be the immediate predecessor or the Brother of today rather than separated^^
i)^%ia|i^yeai^*o '^e a liberal education, a■^eache^ needs ntorc than excellence of
"^ specialist_ifl.iu*' field. He must have a

id arr integrated ^ucation himself. These'



clothed



- ' p^Thali^yeats^ffo !^e a liberal educatron, a-

Ir' ■•»« ^cbolafihip; m^^dto^or rnB^t^efmore than a
I"*' ■%< ^ton^ptett»kno*ledt,'e';6l?^ie ?!%l*ire of rnan .and



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stress

into an educatloi

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hicl1«te.ue. lett out imrortant jBubjeas, that have put too much
ve prc^n^*all the subjects with no effort to integrate them
" e said tq be completely educated if Jie has no idJa'of
hn Cfeator.' 6ai a man been educatea% his setlboP'



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years are devoted solely to the mastery of one subject or the intense preparation for some
profession? Does a man have anything more than a grab-bag collection of subjects if
each subject is given as an entity unrelated to anything else? Obviously not.

To avoid the pitfalls of this pseudo-education, the Brothers at La Salle have alwayj
sought to include all of those subjects which' ilttnm n r«t«): »4 t a m,^ i, f |m^|^ facets of th^
human personality. The litst of courses given can very neatly be summarized as thos
which will teach meriTiow to live and how to make a living.

The purpose of La Salle, the third integral of that trinity whence the spirit of a
liberal education springs, is anbther manifestation of constancy. Whether you look to
the charter issued in 1863 or to the 1947-48 handbook, you will tihd Catholic higher
education as the avowed purpose of the college. .To bring about the combined develop-
ment, of moral and intellectual powers, to cultivate intellectual excellence, to^emphasize
Christian morality as the vital force in character formation and sound citizenship —
these are the purposes to which the educator's labors are applied. As long as they
strive towafd these ends the spirit of a liberal education will survive at La Salle.

It IS indeed remarkable that such an elusive thing as this spirit has become the
.steadfast element at _ 'our college. This spirit must be inculcated in students even before
it is understood by them, and they o^tJgeeventually led to believe in it. The practical
demands of the day seem to be acting again.st it continuously, and diverse philo.sophies
discrediting it periodically.

In seeking a reason for this changelessness we arrive at two things intimately
connected with the colleges. The first is the teaching of the Church on the nature of
rfiah incorporated into a philosophy of education. The secortd is the religious order
tWHas labored at Xa Salle since its inception. As a reflection of the agelessness of
the Church and the constancy of its Catholic educators, the prevailing spirit at La Salle
c(mld<«be nothmg |)ut perpetual.

^^Wt w'^ld bd indeed vain wefe we to believe that La Salle was the perfect^ ihe
faultless example of the Liberal Arts College. We are consciou&^^of its shortcomings;
we haje seffrt "Row the real differs from the ideal. Such a realization is not discouraging,
we are grotSl^hat in a world where integrated education has often disintegrated, La
•SalTe has come so close to the ideal. We hope that La Salle, on the eve of post-war
^expansioti and consolidation, will rededicate itself to the ideals and goals proper to the
Liberal Arts College.




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The hundred years of Christian Brothers' actiMtv in this city has been marked hv pro-^ress in both
spiritual and temporal worlds. In 1863, La Salle wa situated at Filbert and Juniper Streets, present site
of the Philadelphia Eveninj^ Bulletin newspaper. The years to follow saw a <;radual movement toward
the northern sections of the city and in 1877 La Salle took up residence in . . .



845 — THE CENTENARY OF THE



ROTHERS OF



10




... the Bouvier Mansion at Broad and Stiles, recently razed. The larger photographs depict the front
entrance of the present building at 20th Street and Olney Avenue, home of La Salle since 1927, and the
Quadrangle, scene of many graduation exercises an d other less formal activities.



THE CHRISTIAN SCHOO LS IN AMERICA — 1945



11




McShain Hall, opened in 1941, included a mi'ch-nceded lounge and ^anie ri>om. Classrooms ac-
commodated the prep students from across the quad. During the post-war expansion period, McShain
was converted into a housinfj imit and the recreational activities were shifted in June, 1947, to . . .



1845 — THE CENTENARY OF THE BROTHERS OF



12







. . . Leonard Hall, a one-story building donated by the Government, revamped to contain a spacious
lounge, barber shop, book store, cafeteria, and administration offices. It has become the social and
some-time political center of the College besides an ideal spot to just sit and chat over a cup of coffee.



THE CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS IN AMERICA — 1945



13




When La Salle had a student hody of four hundred in the never-to-hc-returned-to ante-helium days,
the Faculty House was a leisurely abode where students and faculty would meet in passin<; and discuss
the finer points of education unhampered by the formalities of classroom dicta. Now the pace has
quickened and the increased staff has been moved into every available space. Post-war pressure on hous-
ing has led to the creation of new units, among which is . . .



1845 — THE CENTENARY OF THE



ROTHERS OF



14




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. . . Benilde Hall, a two-story building which once saw service as part of an Ordinance Depot. This
building will house classrooms, faculty offices and a large reading room. Because of its ample space and
accommodations, Benilde Hall wall relieve conside ably the congestion in the College's main buildings
and provide a more comfortable atmosphere for all.



THE CHRISTIAN SCHOOLS IN AMERICA — 1945



15




Mr. Henry J. Sullivan, Division Enjjineer
of the Federal Works Ajjency, and Brother
G. Paul, President of the College, officially
open Leonard Hall, new student Lounge
buildin".




Doctor Max Jtirdan, center. Director of
Religious Pro<;rams for the National Hroad-
castin<>; System, receives the sixth annual Sig-
num Fidei Medal, an a\\ard made by the
Alumni of the Collcfje to tlic individual who
has "contributed in a note\\*>rthy manner to
the ad\ancemcnt of Christian principles."
Mr. J. Kemper Ryan, editor 4>f the Slcnidard
and Times, presents the avvarcf to Docti>r
Jordan as Brother G. Paul looks on.



EVE^
THE




Max Sorenson, National Commander of
the Catholic War Veterans, salutes as taps are
played during services at the War Memorial
on the campus during the Alumni Associa-
tion's tenth annual Communion Breakfast.



rs DF

YEAR




The Honorable James C. Crumlish receives
the Doctor of Laws degree from Brother
Emilian James (center), Provincial of the
Baltimore District and former President of
La Salle, as Doctor Joseph G. Cox, another
recipient of the degree, looks on.



m^m-





BROTHER G. PAUL.

President of the College

The College is fortunate in having
as its chief executive so capable a man
as Brother Paul. During the short
time since he has assumed the office,
the facilities of La Salle have been ex-
panded to meet the greatlv increased
enrollment. Quiet and good-humored,
he has led the college forward in the
most difficult period of its history.



Officers of ttie
Cailege



BROTHER G. LEW IS.

N'ice-Presidcnt of the College

As vice-president of La Salle,
Brother Lewis shares with Brother
Paul the administrative problems
which continuallv burden the leaders
of any large institution. Brother Lewis
has proved his indispensahility as
both vice-president and professor of
mathematics.



BROTHER E. STANISLAUS,

Dean of the Colley;e

Perhaps no one has felt the cur-
rent educational boom as much as
Brother Stanislaus. The ever-present
duties of the Dean of Studies would
have overwhelmed anyone less compe-
tent and good-humored than Brother
Stanislaus.







BROTHER G. JOSEPH,

Registrar

Brother Joseph spends the greater
part of the day in either the Physics
laboratory or the Registrar's office. As
registrar he supervises, among other
things, the recording of marks and the
issuing of transcripts for the profes-
sional schools and graduate schools
to which La Salle students apply.



BROTHER E. JOHN,

Bursar

The all-important business manage-
ment of the College is in the hands of
genial Brother John. The demanding
v/ork of this office is exceptionally
well done by Brother and his compe-
tent staff.





REV. EDWARD J. CURRAN,

College Historian





BROTHER G. THOMAS, F.S.C.,
Dean of Freshmen



ADMINIS



BROTHER E. JOSEPH, F.S.C.,

Librarian




JOHN J. KtlJ.V



Director of Public Relations



The successful operation of a large
institution such as La Salle depends
greatly on an efficient administrative
staff that is continually at work behind
the scenes, relieving the executive office
and student body of many duties which
otherwise would be theirs. Here at the
College we have a group of men and
women, who skilled in their respective
offices, devote themselves daily to the
proficient execution of their duties.

The end of the war in 1945 and the
immediate increase of La Salle's enroll-
ment presented problems so numerous

that the existing administration, because




REVEREND CHARLES GORMAN,

Chaplain of the College



T R AT I D N




DR. THOMAS F. McTEAR,

College Physician




MARGARET M. KIELY,

Assistant Registrar



of its small size, soon became inade-
quate. Since that time almost every
branch of the department has extended
its size to proportions never imagined
in the years before the war. Now, with
its increases in numbers and facilities,
the administration is again prepared to
meet, and has been meeting, the many
difficulties attending its work.

While at La Salle we have often re-
ceived help either directly or indirectly
from the members of the administration.
We owe each of them a great debt, for
through their industry our years at the
College have been made more pleasant.




JOSEPH J. SPRISSLER,



Comptroller



BRO. G. PAUL, F.S.C.,
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., LL.D.
President of the
College,
Professor of Chemistry.
Chairman: Administra-
tive Covmcil, Com-
mittee on Collejie
Policy.



BRO. E. FELIX, F.S.C.,

B.A., M.A., Ph.D.,

D.F.A.

Professor of Education



ROLAND HOLROYD
B.A., M.A., Ph.D.,

Sc.D.
Professor of Biolofjy
Member: Committee on
College Policy, Com-
mittee on Library,
Committee on Rec-
ommendations.



BRO. D. THOMAS,
F.S.C., B.A., M.A.,

Ph.D.

Professor of Latin

and Greek



BRO. F. NORBERT,
F.S.C., B.A., M.B.A.
Professor of Account-
ing
Chairman: Committee on
Recommendations
(Non-Science).



BRO. G. LEWIS, F.S.C..

B.A., M.A., Sc.D.

Vice-President of

the College

Professor of Mathematics

Member: Administrative

Council.



BRO. E. ABDON,

F.S.C., B.A., M.A.

Professor of German



BRO. G. JOSEPH,
F.S.C., B.A., M.A.

Registrar,
Professor of Physics.
Member: Committee on
Admissions, Com-
mittee on Academic
Standing and De-
grees.



BRO. E. STANISLAUS,
F.S.C., B.A., M.A.,
Ph.D.
Dean of the College,
Professor of Philosophy.
Chairman: Committee on
Academic Standing
and Degrees.
Member: Administrative
CiHuicil, Committee
on College Policy,
Committee on Cur-
riculum and Roster.



BRO. D. AUGUSTINE,
F.S.C., B.A., M.A.,
Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology.
Member: Committee on
College Policy, Com-
mittee on Academic
Standing and De-
grees, Committee on
Awards.











REV. CHAS. GORMAN

M.A.

Chaplain of the College,

Associate Professor

of Sociology.



BRO. E. LOUIS, F.S.C.,

B.A., M.A.

Associate Professor

of Spanish.



BRO. F. AZARIAS,

F.S.C., B.A., M.A.

Associate Professor

of Education.



BRO. G. RAYMOND,

F.S.C., B.A., M.A.

Associate Professor

of Chemistry.

Member: Committee on

Recommendations.



BRO. CLEMENTIAN,

F.S.C., B.A., M.A.

Assistant Professor

of English.



JAMES J. HENRY

B.S., M.S.

Director of Athletics,

Associate Professor

of Finance.

Member: Conimittee on

Awards.



BRO. F. CHRISTOPHER,
F.S.C., B.A., M.A.,

Ph.D.
Associate Professor
of Biology.
Chairman: Committee on
Recommendations.
(Science).
Member: Committee on
Awards.



JOSEPH F. FLUBACHER,
B.A., M.A., Ed.D.
Associate Professor
of Economics.
Chairman: Committee on
Recommendations
( Non-Professional ) .
Member: Committee on
Academic Standings
and Degrees.



BRO. G. THOMAS,

F.S.C., B.A., M.S.

Dean of Freshmen,

Assistant Professor

of Education.

Member: Committee on

Curriculum and

Roster.



BRO. EDWARD OF MARY

F.S.C., B.A., LL.M.

Assistant Professor

of Chemistry.




BRO. F. FRANCIS,

F.S.C., B.A., M.A.

Assistant Professor
of Economics.



BRO. E. PATRICK,

F.S.C., B.A.

Assistant Professor
of English.

Chairman: Committee on

Awards.
Member: Committee on

Recommendations.



BRO. D. VINCENT,

F.S.C., B.A., M.A.,
Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
of Philosophy.

Member: Committee on
Awards.



C. RICHARD CLEARY

B.A., M.A.

Assistant Professor
of Political Science.



ROBERT J. COURTNEY,

B.A., M.A.

Instructor in
Political Science.



UGO DONINI,

B.A., M.A.

Visitinji Lecturer
in History.



JOHN GUISCHARD,

B.A., M.A., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
of French.

Member: Committee on
College Policy, Con->-
mittee on Academic
Standing and De-
grees, Committee on
Library.



BRO. D. JOHN

F.S.C., B.A., Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
of Physics.

Chairman: Committee on
Curriculum and
Roster.

Meniber: Committee on
Recommendations.



CHARLES F. SMITH,

B.A., M.D.

Instructor in
Psychology.



CHARLES A. J. HALPIN,

B.S., M.A.
Instructor in Economics.



CLAUDE E. KOCH,

B.S.
Instructor in English.



JOHN J. KENNEDY,

B.E.E.

Instructor in
Mathematics.



DANIEL J. McCAULEY,

B.A., LL.B.

Instructor in
Business Law.



JOHN J. ROONEY,

B.A.,

Instructor in
Chemistry.



WALTER J. KAISER,

B.S.

Instructor in
Accounting.



JAMES F. KENNEDY

B.A.

Instructor in
Biology.



ALBERT J. CRAWFORD,

B.A., LL.B.

Instructor in
Business Law.



RICHARD T. HOAR,

B.A., M.A.

Instructor in
Sociology.



FRANCIS J. GUERIN,

B.S.

Instructor in
Accounting.



HERBERT S. WEBER.

B.A.
Instructor in History.




DONALD J. BARRETT. PLACIDO de MONTOLIU
B.A., Ph.L. B.A.

Instructor in Instructor in Spanish.

Philosophy.

Member Committee on
Recommendations.



LEO F. FITTABILE,

B.A., M.A.
Instructor in English.



JOSEPH M. CARRIO,

B.A.S.
Instructor in Spanish.



TIMOTHY G. HAGENS,

B.S.. M.S.

Instructor in

Chen'jistry.



CHARLES V. KELLY,
B.A.

Instructor in English.



JAMES L. MILLER,
B.A.. M.A.
Instructor in
Mathematics.



THEODORE L. LOWE,

B.A.

Instructor in German

and French.



MICHAEL DeANGELIS,

B.S.

Instructor in

Accounting.





JAMES F. REILEY,
B.A.

Instructor in En"lish.



THOMAS GAFFNEY,

B.A., LL.B.

Instructor in

Business Law.



BRO. G. THOMAS,

F.S.C., B.A., LL.M.

Instructor in

Accounting.



THOMAS J. RYAN,

B.A.

Instructor in

Accounting.



ROBERT A. GORSKl,

B.A.

Instructor in

Mathematics.



WILLIAM MARTINEZ,

B.A.

Instructor in Biology.



JOSEPH P. CONERTON, SAMUEL J. BOYLE,

B.A. B.A.

Instructor in English. Instructor m Enghsh.



GEORGE R. SWOYER,

B.S.

Instructor in

Economics.




NE CR



Within the short period of four months, the College
lost two of its more important community members. Both
educators of inestimable value, Brother E. Charles and
Brother E. Pius each worked in a separate function. Brother
Charles, by his nature, was a teacher, and spent most of his
life in tlie classrooms of various colleses and hij;h schools
of the Baltimore Province; Brother Pius, on the other hand,
had great ability as an administrator, an ability which he
exercised in some of the most prominent positions in this
same pro\ ince. Both of these men were at La Salle for many
years before their deaths, and their loss has been keenly felt
by those who knew them.

Brother Charles succumbed to a heart attack on No-
vember 3, 1947, having passed sixty-seven holy years in this
life. During his fifty years in the order, he enhanced im-
measurably the Brothers' long teaching tradition. A Doctor
of Science in chemistry, he had a complete knowledge of his
subject and an enthusiasm for it that instantly communi-
cated itself to his students. Brother Charles' gift as a teacher
was not limited to just a knowledge of chemistry, however.
Appreciating the aid which wit and humor give to both the
teacher and the student, he utilized these faculties in all of
his lectures. Tlic result of such a combination of fine quali-
ties was, as his many students will testify, a classroom ex-
perience rarely foimd in any college or university.

The last sixteen years of his life Brother Charles spent
at La Salle as Professor in chemistry. In that time he helped
prepare hundreds of men for medical and research careers,
infusing in them the ageless spirit of science and impressing
upon them the spiritual significance of science and life.
Our loss at his death is compensated somewhat only by the
beautiful memory he has left in the hearts of all of us.



1 L D G Y




Following a six weeks illness, Brother Pius, the former
Provincial of the Baltimore Province, died of a heart attack
on February 5, 1948, at the age of seventy-two. Three days
before his death. Brother Pius celebrated what was perhaps
the most important day of his life, his fiftieth anniversary
as a Christian Brother.

During the fifty years of his religious life, Brother Pius
achieved distinction in the field of education through his
hard work and comprehensive experience. He served in
almost every function connected with the Baltimore Prov-
ince, deriving from each both a knowledge of the intricacies
necessarily associated with a vast educational system and
an invaluable sense of the spirit of education. As a teacher
in the high schools, he developed an innate love of young
people, a characteristic which he retained throughout his
later years and the one by which most of us remember him.
While principal of Calvert Hall High School and later presi-
dent of Rock Hill College, Brother Pius became familiar with
the problems of administration. It was in such offices as
these that he prepared himself for his appointment as head
of the Baltimore Province. To this distinguished position he
brought a superior background and an acute sense of the
problems in the area, with the result that the period of his


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