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Lachlan Shaw.

The history of the province of Moray. Comprising the counties of Elgin and Nairn, the greater part of the county of Inverness and a portion of the county of Banff,--all called the province of Moray before there was a division into counties (Volume 3) online

. (page 1 of 37)
Online LibraryLachlan ShawThe history of the province of Moray. Comprising the counties of Elgin and Nairn, the greater part of the county of Inverness and a portion of the county of Banff,--all called the province of Moray before there was a division into counties (Volume 3) → online text (page 1 of 37)
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THE HISTORY



or THE



Province of Moray.



VOL. III.



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The Histoky



OF THE



Province of Moray.

Comprising the Counties of Elgin and Nairn, the greater part of the County of

Inverness, and a poHion of the County of Banff, — all called tlie Province

of Moi'ay before tliere was a division into Counties.

By LACHLAN SHAW.



NEW EDITION.— IN THREE VOLUMES.



Enlarged and brought down to the Present Time

By J. F. S. GORDON,

Author of " Scotichronicon," " Monasticon,'" <£t.



VOLUME III.



GLASGOW:

^^ciutcb at tk£ Enibcreitg §us3,

And Published by

HAMILTON, ADAMS, & CO., LONDON,

AND

THOMAS D. MORISON, GLASGOW.

1882.



'V.2)



CONTENTS OF VOLUME III.



Materials for Building.

Fuel.

Mines, Dyeing.

Salt Water.

Fresh Waters.

Animals.

Tame Beasts.

Wild Beasts.

Viporous Animals, Fowls.

Water Animals.

Rarities.



The Natural History of MORAY.

Air, Light, Cold, Heat.

The Rain, the Snow.

The Winds, the Mountains.

The Hills and Valleys.

The Plains, the Soil.

The Corn.

Flax and Hemp.

Potatoes and Mustard.

Garden Fruits.

Wild and Medicinal Herbs.

Forests, Woods.

The Civil and Political History

The Inhabitants.

Their Language.

Way of Living, Manners.

Genius.

Agriculture, Improvements.

Manufactures.

Trade and Commerce.

Commodities for Export.

Civil Government.

Feudal Customs.

Titles of Honour.

Count or Earl.

Thanes.



Dukes.
Marquis.
Earls.
Viscounts.



Pages 1-25
OF MORAY.

Lords.
Counties.

Inverness County.

Nairn County.

Moray County.
Regalities.
Baronies.

Jurisdictions Abolished.
Courts of Judicature.
Roll of Barons.
Burghs.

Inverness.

Elgin.

Nairn.

Forres.
Burghs of Barony.



The Military History of MORAY.

Abernethie.



Pages 26-76



Royal Forts.
At Elgin.

Forres.

Nairn.

Inverness.

Urquhart.

Oliver's Fort.

Fort-George at Inverness

Fort-Augustus.

Ruthven Barrack.

Fort-George at Ardersier
Fortalices.
At Duffus.

Raite.



Ruthven.

Lochiudort.
Battles, &C.
At Forres.

Obelisk at Forres.

Burgus.
At Mortlich, anno 1010.

Spey, anno 1078.

Spey, anno 1110.

Urquhart, anno 1160.

Invernahavon, anno 1386.

Perth, anno 1396.

Drumnacoub, anno 1427.



VI


CONTENTS.


Elgin, anno 1452.




Young Chiefs.


Clachnacharie, anno 1454.


Officers.


Cean-Loch-Lochie, an.


1544.


Ensigns.


Glenlivet, anno 1594.




Bards.


Aldern, anno 1G45.




Pipers.


Cromdale, anno 1690.




Fiery Cross.


Inverness, anno 1715.




Cry to War.


Culloden, anno 1746.




Badge.


Military Roads.




Bards.


Military Customs.




Omens, &c. Pages 77-137


The Ecclesiastic History of MORAY.


1. The


Druidical Church.


Druids.




Judges.


Whence so called.




Their Meetings.


Their Office.




The Vates.


Their Religion.




The Bards.


Priests.




Female Druids.


Their Worship.




Druid Temples.


Stated Worshi]).




Druid Deities.


Circles.




Druid Customs.


Solemn Worship.




In Hectic Fevers.


Cairns.




In Contagious Diseases.


March Solemnity.




The Moon's Changes.


May Solemnity.




Customs at Burials.


Mid-Summer Solemnity.




Conflagration.


Hallow-Eve Solemnity.




Druidism whence derived.


Sacrifices and Ceremonies.




Pages 138-157


^. The Primitive


Christian Church.


Christianity Planted in


Scot-


Keledees.


land.




Their Purity. Pages 158, 159



3. The Roman Church.



I. The Regular Clergy.
An Abbey.

Kinloss Abbey.
The Priories.

Urquhart Priory.

Pluscardine Priory.

Kingussie Priory.
The Convents.

Black Friars.

Gray Friars.

Gray Sifters.

Preceptory of Maison Dieu

St. Nicholas' Hospital.

Templar Knights.

Johannite Knights.



II. The Secular Clergy.
The Bishopric of Murtlac.

Its Erection, Diocess, Trans-
lation, Bishops.
The Bishopric of Moray.

List of the Bishops of Moray.

Diocess.
The Cathedral Church.

At Spynie.

At Elgin.
The Cathedral at Elgin founded
and built.

Burnt and rebuilt.
The Cathedral of Elgin De-
scribed.



CONTENTS.



Vll



The Chapter House.

Dimensions of the Cathedral

How Demolished.
The College.

Canons.

Prebendaries.

Erection of the College.

Transplanted.

List of the Canons.

The Precinct.

The Burgh.
The Bishop's Palace

At Kenedar.

At Spynie.

The Palace of Spynie De-
scribed.
Revenues of the Bishopric of

Moray
Dignified Clergy.

Dean.

Arch-Dean.



Chantor.

Chancellor.

Treasurer.

Chapter.
Inferior Clergy.

Parsons.

Vicars.

Mensal Churches.

Common Churches.

Chapels of Ease.

Free Chapels.

Domestic Chapels

Private Chapels.

Alterage.

Obit and Dirge.
Government of the Diocess.

Chapter.

Synod.

Deanries.

Consistory.



Regality.



Pages 159-312



4. The Protestant Church.



1st, The several Periods since the

Reformation.
I. Period, 1560—1572.

Superintendents.

Commissioners.

Assemblies.

Synods.

Presbyteries.

Sessions.
n. Period, 1572—1592.

Tulchan Bishops.

Presbyteries Erected.

III. Period, 1592— IGIO.
Presbyterian Government Es-
tablished.

Overturned.

IV. Period, 1610— 1G38.
Episcopacy re-established.

Condemned.

V. Period, 1638—1662.
Presbytery revived.

Overturned.

VI. Period, 1662—1690.
Prelacy restored.
Ministers ejected



Conduct of Bishops.
Prelacy a grievance.
VII. Period, 1690— to the pre-
sent time.
Presbytery established.
Remarks upon the several Change;
of Church Government
Threnodia.
2nd, The Protestant Bishops ot
Moray since the Refor-
mation.
The Cathedral.
Palace, Chapter, Jurisdiction.
Revenues.

Feu duties of the Bishopric.
3rd, The Ministers of Parishes
since the Reformation.
Presbytery of Strathbogie.
Mortlich Parish.
Bellie Parish.
Presbytery of Aberlour.
Dundurcos Parish.
Rothes Parish.
Knockando Parish.
Boharra Parish.



Vlll



CONTENTS.



Aberlaure Parish.

Inveravon Parish.
Presbytery of Abernethie

Kirkmichael Parish.

Cromdale Parish.

Abernethie Parish.

Duthel Parish.

Alvie Parish.

Kingusie and Insh
Presbytery of Elgin.

Dipple Parish.

Essil Parish.

Speymouth Parish.

Urquhart Parish.

Lanbribe Parish.

Birnie Parish.

Elgin Parish.

St. Andrews Parish.

Kenedar Parish.

Ugston Parish.

Duffus Parish.

New Speynie Parish.

Alves Parish.
Presbytery of Forres.

Kinloss Parish

Rafford Parish.

Dallas Parish.

Forres Parish.



Edinkylie Parish.

Moy and Dyke Parish.
Presbytery of Nairn.

Ardclach Parish.

Aldern Parish.

Nairn Parish.

Ardersier Parish.

Calder Parish.

Croy and Dalcross Parish.
Presbytery of Inverness.

Moj^ and Dalarassie Parish.

Daviot and Dunlichtie.

Pettie and Brachlie.

Inverness Parish.

Durris Parish.

Kirkhill Parish.

Kiltarlatie Parish
Presbytery of Abertar.

Urquhart and Glennioriston

Boleskin and Abertarf

Laggan Parish.
Number of Inhabitants in Moray.
4th. The State of Religion in the

Province from the Reforma-
tion.
State of Popery in Moray.
Society for Propagating Chris-
tian Knowledge.

Pages 318-378



Index,



Pages 473-471)



HISTORY OF THE

PROVINCE OF MORAY.

PART III.

THE NATUBAL HISTORY OF MORAY.

A LTHOUGH this Country is in a climate con-
•^^-^ siderably Northern, being in the 12th Chm-
ate, and from about 57 degrees to 51 — 40 North
latitude, the longest day being about 17 hours 46
minutes, and the shortest 6 hours 14 minutes ;
yet no Country in Europe can boast of a more
pure, temperate, and wholesome Air. No part of
it is either too hot and sultry in Summer, nor too
sharp and cold in Winter : and it is generally
(and I think justly) observed, that in the plains
of Moray they have 40 days of fair weather in
the year, more than in any other country in Scot-
land. The wholesomeness of the Air appears in
the long lives of its inhabitants. In the year
1747, William Catanach in Pluscardine died at
the age of 119 years ; in the 1755, Sir Patrick
Grant of Dalvey died 100 years old ; in 1756,

VOL, III. 1



2 LONGEVITY; WILL O' THE WISP; COLD.

Thomas Eraser of Gortuleg in Stratherick, died
aged 97. And generally 80 years are reckoned
no great age to the sober and temperate.

'Tis observed in this, as in all Northern Coun-
tries, that, in the beginning of the year, the
Daylight increases with remarkable celerity, and
decreases in a like proportion, at the approach of
winter, which is owing to the inclination of the
Earth towards the Poles. And in the Winter
nights, the Aurora Borealis (from its desultory
motion, called Merry-dancers and Streamers)
affords no small light. Whether this proceeds
from nitrous vapours in the lower region of the
air, or from a reflection of the rays of the sun,
I shall not enquire. It is certain that the Ignis
Fatims or Ignis Lambens that shineth in the
night is owing to a thick and hazy atmosphere,
and a clammy and unctuous dew ; for in riding,
the horse's mane, and the hair of the rider's head
or wig, shine, and by gently rubbing them, the
light disappears, and an oily vapour is found on
the hand.

The Cold in this Country is never found too
sharp and severe. In the winters of 1739 and
1740, the frost was not by much so strong in
Moray, as it was at Edinburgh and London, and
during the continuance of it the water-mills at
Elgin were kept going. The warm exhalations
and vapours from the sea dissolve the icy parti-
cles in the air, and the dry sandy soil doth not



heat; rains; snow; winds prevalent, 3

soon freeze, or retain these particles : and if,
among the mountains, the Cold is more intense,
it is an advantage to the inhabitants ; for, by
contracting the pores of the body, the vital heat
is kept from dissipating, and is repelled towards
the inner parts, keeping a necessary warmth in
the whole body.

The Heat is pretty strong in Moray; for in
summer, the Sun's absence under the horizon is
so short, that neither the atmosphere, or heated
soil has little time to cool. And often, the heat
is greater in the glens and valleys, than in the
champaign ground, for the rays of the Sun are
pent in and confined, and reverberated from
the rocks.

Eains in this Country are seldom hurtful, or
occasion inundations. Usually we have the
Lambmass Flood in the beginning of August,
and sometimes a Michaelmas storm ; but the
Soil is generally so sandy and dry, that Drought
is more hurtful than Bain.

Snow seldom lieth a long time, even in the
glens and valleys ; and when it continueth, the
benefit of it is considerable, especially if it is
attended with Frost; for it mellows and manures
the ground, and renders it more fertile, impreg-
nating it with nitre and other principles of vege-
tation, which improve both corn and grass.

The winds that prevail here, are the South-
west, the North and North-east. From January



4 MOUNTAINS AND DESERTS IN MORAYSHIRE.

to June they generally blow between North-west
and North-east, and from June to November
between South-west and North-west. In winter
they are more various and inconstant. By these
periodical changes, the barley seed-time in April
and May is cool, and the Harvest is fair and dry.
Hurricanes are seldom known in this Country.

The Mountains and Deserts in the Highlands
of Moray, are incomparably more extensive than
the arable ground. A chain of the Grampian
Mountains runneth on the South side of Spey,
and another chain, though lower than the former,
stretcheth on the North side, from the mouth to
the head of the river. And the straths of the
other rivers. Erne, Nairn, Ness, and Farar, are,
in like manner, enclosed by ranges of hills. Al-
though, to the taste of some travellers, these
may seem to disfigure the Country ; to others,
their diversifying figures form the most agreeable
landskip. And certainly, the benefit of these
Mountains is very great; they collect and dis-
solve the clouds into rain, and from the reser-
voirs in their bowels, form the rivers and brooks
that water the valleys and plains. The Mountain-
water being impregnated by the earth, tlnrough
which it is filtrated, has a vegetable power, which
appears in the fertility of the grounds at the foot
of Mountains. Their surface affords rich and
wholesome pasture, necessary for the inhabitants,
whose property consists [mainly in cattle. Let



MOUNTAINS HEALTHY NATURAL FENCES. 5

me add, that these Mountains, as natural fences
inclosing the valleys, make a fresh stream of air
fan them, and drive away all noxious vapours :
and hence the inhabitants are so sound, vigorous
and wholesome, as to know few diseases, except
such as are contracted by intemperance, or com-
municated from other countries.

In distant ages, and in times of tumults and
war, much of the corn land was on the tops and
sides of the lower hills. The ridges and furrows,
are as yet discernible in many places, and the
great heaps of stone gathered out of the corn-
fields still remain. Their safety from the incur-
sions of enemies, made them choose these high
places to dwell in ; and at that time, the valleys
were all covered with woods, and haunted by
wolves ; and by burning the woods many glens
and valleys are become swamps, marshes, and
mosses, by the water stagnating in them. When
more peaceable times encouraged agriculture and
trade, men found the produce of corn in the hilly
ground turn to small account. They destroyed
the woods in the valleys (of which many roots,
and trunks of oak and fir are daily digged up),
drained swamps and marshes cultivated the rich
ground, and removed their houses and habita-
tions into more convenient situations, and more
fertile land in the valleys.

The Plains of Moray below the hills, extend
the whole length of the Country, from Spey to



b THE PLAINS OF MORAY ; SOIL OF THE COUNTRY.

Farrar ; but of an unequal breadth, not above 6
miles where broadest. And although the Coun-
try is champaign and level, it is so cultivated,
that there is no stagnating water or fens, to ren-
der it unwholesome by exhalations and vapours.

The Soil of this Country is generally, either a
light Sand or a deep Clay. The Sandy Soil in
the plains, is called "Moray Coast," two or three
feet deep of a light sandy earth, below which is
a stratum of free-stone, or of hard compacted
gravel. This composition makes it very warm,
and the strong reaction of the sunbeams so heats
the Soil, that, without frequent showers in Sum-
mer, the produce of it is burnt up. The Clay
Soil is strong and deep, and when well manured
with hot dung or sea ware or weeds, it yieldeth
a rich increase ; but it requireth moderate rain,
as much as the Sandy Soil doth, for heat and
drought bind the Clay, and the circulation of the
sap and moisture from the root is stopt : hence
the common observation is, A misty May and a
dropping June, brings the honny land of Moray
ahoon.

The Soil in the Highlands is better watered,
and by the sides of rivulets and brooks is deep
and fertile, and needeth not much rain ; and the
valleys running from North-east to South-west,
the South side is always most fertile, because it
is better watered, and less dried up by the heat
of the sun.



WHEAT, OATS, BEANS, AND PEASE ; FLAX AND HEMP. 7

The Corn grain produced by this Soil, is,
Wheat, Barley, Oats, Rye, Beans, and Pease.
The low lands are so plentiful in these sorts of
grain, that they not only have enough for home
consumpt, and supplying some parts of the High-
lands, but they export annually good quantities
into other kingdoms. And if some parts of the
Highlands have not plenty of grain for their con-
sumpt, it is not that the Soil is less fertile, or
worse manured ; but the Barley and Oats are of
a smaller body, and a thicker hool. Providence
wisely so ordering, to guard the tender grain,
which in cold valleys is apt to be chilled and
blasted by clammy mill-dews, and sometimes by
hoar frost : and though their grain doth not yield
so much meal as in the low lands, it yields more
and better straw, which to them is no less useful.
But the principal cause why they fall short in
Corn, is, that the inhabitants are too many for
the small extent of land, in so much, that I have
often seen ten persons on a poor farm of twenty
pounds Scots. And what is wanting in Corn, is
abundantly made up in Cattle, which are their
main property.

Of late Flax and Hemp are propagated, the
former especially in great plenty, which is manu-
factured both for home consumpt and for export-
ation ; and no Soil in the kingdom is more proper
for Flax, than a part of the low lands of Moray. ■
And it is no less proper, both in the low landa



8 GAEDEN productions; WILD FRUITS AND HERBS,

and Highlands for Hemp ; but the want of ship-
ping discourages the propagation of it.

The Potatoe, ahnost unknown in this Country
eighty years ago, is now everywhere planted with
great success, and thereby the poor are supplied,
and much barren ground is cultivated, to the no
small advantage of the proprietors.

Mustard is likewise propagated in the fields,
and might be made a profitable article, in its
quality not inferior to any in the Kingdom.

There are no Garden Fruits or Herbs in any
part of Britain, but can be brought to as great
perfection in the low lands of Moray, by the same
or less culture. Gentlemen's Gardens yield, in
plenty. Nectarines, Peaches, Apricots, Apples,
Pears, Plums, Geens, Cherries, Strawberries,
Easps, Gooseberries, Currants, &c., all of the
best kinds. And the kitchen garden affords the
greatest plenty of kitchen Herbs and Eoots.

Nor are the Wild Fruits and Herbs less various
and plentiful, especially in the Highlands, in
woods and heaths, such as Hazel-nuts, Service-
berries, Sloes, Easps, Bramble-berries, Hip-ber-
ries, Bug-berries, Blae-berries, Averans, or Wild
Strawberries. Wild Herbs of the Medicinal
kind abound everywhere : as Valerian, Penny-
royal, Maiden-hair, Scurvy-grass, Sorrel, Gen-
tian, Brook-lime, Water-trefoil, Mercury, Ger-
mander, Wormwood, Liver-wort, Sage, Centaury,
Buglos, Mallows, Tormentil, Scordium, &c.



CiESAR'S CHARA AND OUR CARMILE. 9

I cannot here omit the Root and Herb Carmile,
which abounds much in heaths and birch woods.
Dio in Severo, speaking of the ancient Caledonian,
says, " Certum cibi genus parant ad omnia, quern
si ceperunt quantum est unius fabse magnitudo,
minime esurire aut sitire solent."'" Dr. Sibbald
observes, from Caes. de. Bel. Civ. lib. 3, That
Valerius's soldiers had found a kind of Eoot
called Char a, '' quod admistum lacte multum
inopiam laevabat, id ad similitudinem panis effecie-
bant, ejus erat magna copia."f Theophrastus
calls it Badix Scythica, and says, That the
Scythes could live on it and Mare's Milk for
many days. To me it is probable, that Caesar's
CJiara, and our Carynile (i.e. the Sweet-root, for
it tastes like Liquorish) are the same, and are
Die's Cihi Genus. It grows in small knots on
the surface of the groimd, and bears a green
stalk four or five inches long, and a small red
flower. I have often seen it gathered, dried and
used on journeys, especially on hills, to appease
hunger; and being pounded and infused in water,
it makes a pleasant wholesome balsamic drink,
and is used sometimes in the Highlands.

If we view the Forests, we shall not find
them, as in England, large woods enclosed for

*" They provide a certain kind of food, of which if they
take the bigness of a Bean, they use not to hunger or thirst."

t "Which, mixed with Milk, greatly relieves hunger. They
prepared it like Bread, and had great plenty of it."



10 EXTENSIVE FORESTS IN THE PROVINCE OF MORAY.

holding the King's game. Such woods, but not
enclosed, there seem to have been in this country,
as the Forests of Eothemurchus, Tarnua, Inver-
culan, &c. And now Forests are such parts of
the Mountains and Glens, as are appropriated to
the pasturing of Deer and other game. The
King is properly the Superior and Master of all
Forests, and Gentlemen in whose lands they
lie are but the hereditary keepers of them. The
Duke of Gordon has large Forests in Glenavon,
and in Badenoch, in which I have seen 300
Deer in one flock or herd. Lovat, Grant, Eothe-
murchus, Macintosh, Glengary, have fine For-
ests ; but they are now everywhere laid open
for pasturing Cattle ; and few Deer (which love a
clean pastm'e) are to be found in them, but have
removed into the Forest of Athole which is
carefully kept.

Notwithstanding the visible destruction of
"Woods in this Province, by burning, felling,
clearing of Valleys and Glens, no Country in
Scotland is more plentifully served than this is.
In the parish of Duthel, Sir James Grant has a
Fir Wood several miles in circuit. And in the
parishes of Abernethie, Kinchardine, Eothemur-
chus, and Alvie, the Duke of Gordon, Grant,
Macintosh, and Eothemurchus, have an almost
continued Fir Wood, 14 miles in length, and in
some places more than 3 miles in breadth. In
Glenmoriston there is a good Fir Wood, and in



BURNING OF THE WOOD OF ABERNETHIE. 11

Strathglas a very large one. Parts of these
Woods are often burnt by accidental fire ; and in
the year 1746, the Wood of Abernethie suffered
some miles in circuit, by which some millions of
trees, young and old, were destroyed. Here I
cannot but observe, as peculiar to Fir Woods,
that they grow and spread always to the East, or
between the North and the South-east, but never
to the West or South-west. The cause of this
seemeth to be, that in the months of July and
August, the great heat opens the Fir apples then
ripe, and the winds at that season, blowing from
South-west to W.S.W., drive the seed out of the
open husks to the East and the neighbouring
Earths. Almost all the Glens and Valleys abound
in Birch, Hazel, AUer, Aspine, Saugh or Sallow,
Holly, Willows, Haws, Service-tree, &c. And in
the Plains, are the Forest of Tarnuay, and the
woods of Inshoch, Kilravock, and Calder ; and in
this last, and in Inveravon, Alvie, and Urquhart,
are large Oaks. I incline to think, that these
Woods are the remains of the Sylva Caledonia,
which Ptolemy extends '' A Lelalonio Lacu ad
^stuariiun Yararis," from Loch Lomond to the
Moray Firth.

With this abundance of Wood, there are Mate-
rials for Building found in great plenty. Through-
out the Plains of Moray, there are rich quarries
of Freestone, easy to hew and dress, and yet
durable. And in the Highlands, there is the



12 FREESTONE AND LIMESTONE; MINES OF IRON ORE.

greatest plenty of Limestone, besides some quar-
ries of it near Elgin, in Duffus, at Tarnua, &c.
Slatestones are found both in the Highlands and
Lowlands ; and good Clay almost in every parish
within the Province.

There are no mines of Coal as yet discovered
in this Country ; yet I doubt not but such there
are, and in a few generations the exigencies
of the people will require their digging for them.
In the Highlands, there is an inexhaustible store
of Turf and Peats ; and the Lowlands (except
the parishes on the coast, from Spey to Find-
horn) are as yet well served in these, and in
Broom, Heather, and Furze. I have not observed
any Furze or Whins in Strathspey or Badenoch ;
and only in the low Country : but the Moss
ground is much exhausted, and will soon become
very scarce.

No Gold, Silver, Copper, Brass, or Tin, has as
yet been discovered in this Country. But there
are rich Mines of Iron ore in several parts ; and
at Coulnakyle in Abernethie parish, a Forge was
set up lately, which made very good Iron, but
through the extravagance arid luxury of the
Managers was given up. At Achluncart, in the
parish of Boharm, there is a quarry of fine Whet-
stone ; and in Glenlivat, and other places, there
is great plenty of rich Marie for Manure.

Let me add, that there is in this Country,
several materials for Dyeing, which the people



MATERIALS FOR DYEING; THE MORAY FIRTH. IS

use with success. With the top of Heather they
make a Yellow colour ; with a red moss growing
on stones, and called Korkir, they dye Eed ; with
the bark of the Alder or Aller tree, they dye
Black ; and a Gentleman in the parish of Kirk-
michael had several hands employed in gathering,
in the hills. Materials for dyeing Blue, Ingrain,
Purple, &c. I have seen some of the Indigo he
has made, and it proves very rich and good.
This invention, if successful, may be a great



Online LibraryLachlan ShawThe history of the province of Moray. Comprising the counties of Elgin and Nairn, the greater part of the county of Inverness and a portion of the county of Banff,--all called the province of Moray before there was a division into counties (Volume 3) → online text (page 1 of 37)