Copyright
Land & Thompson.

Historical and descriptive review of the industries of Dallas. 1884-5. Trade, commerce and manufactures .. online

. (page 1 of 18)
Online LibraryLand & ThompsonHistorical and descriptive review of the industries of Dallas. 1884-5. Trade, commerce and manufactures .. → online text (page 1 of 18)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


omp/imenfs of



See Page



kW^



"EXAB.



X
AV\^ lBBe *V*xJ
,,AuroV /GaiAA-aketo,. */\O<J^







THE ONLY LINE RUNNING THROUGH THE CENTRAL AND BEST PORTIONS OF THE

STATE OF TEXAS.



Passenger Express Trains i Daily Fast Freight Lines



OVER THE ENTIRE ROAD.



ELEGANT * PULLMAN * PARLOR * CARS,



THE ONLY ONES IN THE STATE, on all Day Trains between HOUSTON AND DENISON.



PULLMAN PALACE SLEEPING CARS,

Each Way, Daily, Without Change, Between
NEW ORLEANS and ST. LOUIS, via HOUSTON, DALLAS and DENISON,

GALVESTON and AUSTIN, via HOUSTON,



Ty C O|| AOTCQT Between Texas, Kansas City, Hannibal and all points Xorth
InCOnUni tO I and West, and Favorable Eoutes via Denison and Missouri
T- i i^- ^3 Pacific B'y to Kansas City, Hannibal or St. Louis, or via the

G. H. & S. A. System All-Rail Through Line

VIA

^HOUSTON * AND * NRW *

To all Points in the United States and Canada.

Via the last named Rout

TRAL KAILWAY ma]

ORLEANS an<



Through Tickets from or
IIorsTON & TEXAS CE*
<; ic U.MAN LLOYD, WHITJ
Lines, on sale at importa

QALVB8TON,
SAN ANTONIO,
WEIMAR,
FLATONIA,
BOUND ROCK,




NE.W BRAUNFELS,



ROCKDALE.



i|g"For information as to rates of passage and freight, routes, etc., apply in person
or by letter to

DANL. EIPLBT, A. FATTLE1TER, J. "WALDOj

G' F. A., G. P. A., Vice President and Traffic Manager,

HOUSTON, TEXAS.



HISTORICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE REVIEW



OF THE



INDUSTRIES OF DALLAS.



J.S84 - 6.:



MANUFACTURING ADVANTAGES, BUSINESS AND TRANSPOR-
TATION FACILITIES,

TOGETHER WITH

SKETCHES OF THE PRINCIPAL BUSINESS HOUSES



AND



MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS



IN THE CITY.



c



DALLAS, TEXAS,

PUBLISHED BY THE AUTHORS.

1885.



.Date

PUBLISHERS' NOTICE.



It is clearly evident from the wonderful development of the United States'
resources, and the rapid increase of consumers in the country since the close of
the civil war, that commerce and manufactures cannot longer be controlled in the
interest of the few cities which have hitherto constituted the great centers and
distributing points. The law of progression forbids the continuance of such mo-
nopolistic features, and the vastness of our territory, the immensity of our
resources and their broadcast distribution, the remarkable enterprise of our people
and the general development of the country at large, must naturally bring about
the surrender of such unlimited power and the establishment of centers in every
section having the facilities to sustain them. In no part of the country is there
exhibited a more determined effort to develop the strength of local advantages and
thus secure the early fruits of the equitable disposition of trade and manufacture,
than in the Southern States, and in Texas this progressive spirit is particularly
prominent. No State in the Union is possessed of more valuable resources and in
more unlimited quantities. Recognizing their importance, commercial and manu-
facturing industries are rapidly establishing centers in the midst of this boundless
wealth. Of the several points thus selected none possess more favorable advan-
tages than Dallas the Queen City and none are striving more energetically to
establish itself upon a scale commensurate with its magnificent wealth of resources;
and it is for the purpose of disseminating more thoroughly the knowledge of the
wonderful opportunities which here await new business capital, and also its rapid
development as a great commercial and manufacturing center, that the compilation
of this volume has been undertaken. If our labors succeed, even to a limited ex-
tent, in advancing the material interests of the public at large, and of this beauti-
ful and well deserving city in particular, we will feel that our work has not been
in vain.

We desire to return our grateful and heartfelt thanks to T. . McEnnis,
President Merchants' Exchange; C. A.. King, Sec'y Merchants' Exchange; W. L.
Cabell, Mayor, for valuable assistance rendered, and to those business men who
have so liberally patronized our work.

Respectfully,

THE PUBLISHERS.



Bcroft Library



GENERAL INDEX.



A

PAGE

Abraras, W. EL, Land Commissioner of the Texas Pacific Ey. Co 53

Aldrich & Worthington, Implements, Wagons, Buggies, Etc 80

Alston, A. S., Livery, Feed and Sale Stable Ill

Andrews, B. E., & Co., Dallas City Lumber Yard 102

Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association, L. Beidenstein, General Agent 110

Armstrong Bros., Wholesale Groceries and Provisions 115

Austin, F., Diamonds, Watches, Clocks and Jewelry 130

B

Bartram, Robinson & Co. , Agricultural Implements 108

Billington, T., Furniture 98

Bird, Anderson & Co., Rough and Dressed Lumber, Etc 112

Black Bros., Palace Shoe Store 110

Blankenship & Blake, Wholesale Dry Goods, Notions, Etc. 60

Bond, B. M., & Bro., Groceries and Cigars 119

Bouche, A. E., Staple and Fancy Groceries, Etc 136

Bristol & Clark, Architects 77

Bryant, W. S. , Texas Loan Office 57

Burnett, Mrs. J. E., Pumps, Gas and Steam Fitting 99

C

Cain, A., Livery, Feed and Sale Stables , 93

Caldwell, J. F., & Co., Grocers 74

Camuse, E. F., Wagon and Carriage Maker 105

Carter & Gibson Printing Co., Job Printers, Stationers, Etc. , 114

Carter, Mrs. M. A., Dressmaker .' 96

Cheaney, P., D.D. S., Dallas Dental Parlors 119

Childs, E. G., Coal and Coke 64

Clancey, C. H., Shirts and Underwear 92

Clark & Clark, Proprs. Railroad Planing Mill 75

Cockrell, S. H. & Co., Proprietors Todd Mills 88

Cole & White, Land and Collecting Agents 90

Coreth, R., Agent Oliver Chilled Plow Works, at South Bend, Ind 66

Craddock, L., Wholesale and Retail Wines, Liquors and Cigars 62

Crutcher & Crowdus, Real Estate and Collecting Agents 7<>

Cutter & Co. , Agents Missouri Steam Washer. . 134



iv INDEX.

D

PAGE

Dallas Iron Works, Phelan & Co., Props ............................................... 91

Dallas Paint and Color Works .......................................................... 86

Dallas Paper and Bag Warehouse, H. Elsas & Co ...................................... 99

Dallas Steam Coffee and Spice Mills, Babcock, Foot & Brown, Props .................. 69

Dallas Wire Works, H. Holdersback ................................................... 54

De Stephano Bros., Foreign and Domestic Fruits and Produce ........................ 79

Drs. Davis & Sons, Homoeopathic Physicians .......................................... 65

Douglas Bros., Merchant Tailors ....................................................... 59

Douglas & Danover, Eeal Estate Agents ............................................. 132

Dougherty, J. S , General Land Agent ...................................... ........... 70

Downs, J. S., Staple and Fancy Groceries ........................ ..................... 83

Doyle, Geo. L., Corn, Oats, Hay, Barley, Etc .......................................... 70

Ducourt, E., Upholsterer .......................................................... 122

E.

Eckford, Chas. G., Carpets, Oil Cloths, Etc ............................................ 89

Eclipse Lumber Yard, R. M. Page, Prop ........................... , ................... 106

Edwards, C. H., Pianos, Organs, Etc ................................................... 103

Elliott & Clark, Phoenix Planing Mill ................................ ' .................. 71

Emerson, Talcott & Co., Agricultural Implements, Kockford, 111., J. M. Wendellken,

Manager for Texas ................................................................. 97

Erb, Paul F., Bookseller and Stationer ................................................. 128

Exchange Bank ........................................................................ Ill



Flanders, J. E., Architect ..... ' ......................................................... 131

Fox, A. W. , Manufacturer of Candy ........................ .......................... 134

Frees & Son, Pianos, Organs and Musical Merchandise ................................ 109



Garlington, M. D., Commission Merchant. Grain, Fruit, Etc .......................... 58

Gluck, Jos., Cigars, Tobacco, Etc ...................................................... 132

Goldsmith Bros., Jobbers in General Merchandise ..................................... 56

Goslin, D., China Hall ................................................................. 73

Griffiths & Cowser, Lumber ............................................................ 67



Hamilton & Young, Wall Paper, Glass, Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Etc .................. 57

Hancock, W. T., Staple and Fancy Groceries .......................................... 125

Hanway, S. B., Dealer in Marble ...................................................... 129

Harry Brothers, Wholesale and Retail Stoves, Tinware, Etc ........................... 85

Hawes, J. K. , Furniture, Crockery, Glassware, Stoves, Etc ........................... 128

Henry & Guber, Props. Trinity Cigar Factory ........................................ 94

Hewett, Dr. O. B., Dentist ............................................................. 131

Hinckley & Son, Stoves, Tinware, Etc ................................................. 83

House, J. M. , Druggist and Pharmacist ............................................... 107

Howell, W. H., & Bro., Wholesale and Retail Druggists ............................... 106

Huey & Philp, Hardware, Iron, Stoves, Etc ........................................... 95

Hughes Brothers & Co., Baking Powder, Cider, Ginger Ale, Etc ...................... 104



INDEX.



J

PAGE
Jones, F. T., Commission Merchant and Dealer in Grain 87



Kanady, C. D., Tinware, General Hardware and Builders' Supplies ................... 125

Kuehlthau, C. E., City Steam Laundry ................................................ 117

L.

Land & Thompson, Real Estate and Land Agency ................................... 137

Lammers, H. T., & Co., Manufacturers' Agents and Commission Merchants .......... 56

Larmour & McCombs, Architects and Civil Engineers ................................. 124

Lawrence's Commercial College ................. ................................... .... 98

Leeper Brothers, Livery, Feed and Sale Stables ....................................... 123

Lehman Bottling Co., Mineral Waters, Ciders and Champagnes ....................... 129

Linskie, P. W. , Funeral Director ....................................................... 107

Live Oak Grocery, T. F. Loughlin, Prop ............................................... 72

Loeb, H., Grocer, Cotton Factor, Grain, Etc ........................................... 93

Louden, G. W., Second-hand Goods .................................................... 81

M

Marsalis, T. L. , & Co. , Wholesale Grocers .............................................. 113

Matthews, H. S., Lumber Dealer ....................................................... 116

Mayer's Establishment, Restaurant and Saloon ........................................ 121

McCullough & Coff man, Livery Stable ................................................. 127

McEnnis & Co., Flour and Woolen Mill Agents, Etc .................................. 123

McKeand, Jas., Hay, Corn, Oats, Barley, Bran, Etc .................................. 133

McWhirk, A., Plumbing, Steam and Gas Fitting ..................................... 59

Meisterhaus, C., Beer and Ice .......................................................... 86

Metzler, A., Commission Merchant, Dealer in Grain and Produce ..................... 96

Meyer, Chas. A., Staple and Fancy Groceries .......................................... 136

Miller, A. C. D., Artistic Photographer ................................................ 72

Moflett & Lack's Steam Dye Works .................................................... 65

Momand, C. E., &Bro., Grocers ....................................................... 53

Moore, S. G., Doors, Sash, Blinds, Mouldings, Etc .................................... 118

Murphy & Bolanz, Real Estate and Collecting Agents ................................. 55

N

Newman, Dr. S. , Dentist ............................... ............................... 71

/ Noland & McRosky Hardware Co ...................................................... 120

Novelty Iron and Boiler Works ....................................................... 94

O

Oliver Brothers, Shirt Makers .......................................................... 121



Patterson & Co., Fruits, Nuts and Candies ............................................. 115

Payne & Sheets, Manufacturers of Carriages and Wagons ............................. 62

Ploeger & Hoppe, Staple and Fancy Groceries ......................................... 122

Powell, E. M., Dealer in Texas Lands and Ranches .................................... 76

Prather, Ardrey & Ewing, Fire and Marine Insurance Agency ........................ 90



Vi INDEX.



PAGE
Rainwater & Stearns, Grain ....................... .................................... 84

Rick, Geo., Furniture .................................................................. 135

Robinson & Hart, Emporium of Art, Needlework ...................................... 105

S

Sanger Bros., Wholesale and Retail Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, Millinery, Etc ..... 67

Seixas, H. D., Stoves, House Furnishing Goods, Tinware, Etc ......................... 82

Shields, K., Window Glass, Paints, Oils, Etc .......................................... 77

Simon, F., Second-hand Goods of All Kinds ............................................ 104

Sinker, Davis & Co., Engines, Boilers, Steam Pumps, Saw Mills, Etc .................. 120

Smith, Ed. C., Undertaker ............................................................. 58

Southwestern Stoneware and Pipe Co . ................................................. 109

T

Texas Mut. Aid and Endowment Association. Allen M. Hall, Sec'y ................... 92

Texas Newspaper Union, H. C. Jones, Prop ........................................... 79

The Bradstreet Mercantile Agency, Sidney Tabor, Sup't ............................. 100

The Dallas Rubber Stamp and Stencil Works and Texas Almanac Job Printing House 130

The Grand Windsor Hotel, W. C. Howard, Prop ...................................... 64

The G. W. Borland Publishing Co. , J . K. Churchill, Manager ......................... 95

The Howe Machine Co. , L. A. Wilson, State Agent .................................... 78

The Hunstable Boot and Shoe Co., Wholesale Boots and Shoes ....................... 118

The J. B. Watkins Land Mortgage Co .................................................. 81

The Mercantile Agency of R. G. Dun & Co., Geo. Osmond, Manager .................. 89

The New Home Sewing Machine Co., W. D. Knowles, Manager ....................... 101

The Texas Land and Mortgage Co. (Limited), of London, England, C. E, Wellesley,

General Manager ....................... . ........................................... 80

V

Vering, S. H., Alden Compressed Yeast .............................................. 60



Webster, Geo. A., Sewing Machines ................................................... 85

Weir Plow Company, Agricultural Implements, Buggies, Wagons, Engines, Etc. ..... 63

Williams, J. L., & Co., Druggists, Dealers in Photographic Stock. . ............... ____ 132

Wilson & Tozer , Architects ........................................................... 73

Witwer, John S., Wagons, Carriages, Buggies, Plows, Etc ............................. 100

Wolf, F., Saddles, Harness, Bridles, Etc ......................................... '.,.... 84

Worden, A. E., Guns, Rifles, Revolvers, Etc .............................. . 82



Peoria, Decatur & Evansville



SHORT LINE



QUICKEST in TIME



ro ACL. POINTS-



JIOBTH, WEST

AM)

HOBTHTOST.




WHHMronMB



ONLY LINE

RUNNING

SOLID THAIHS



EYAHSYILLE,

MATTOON,

Decatur and Peoria



At Evansville connection for both Passenger and Freight with this line is made, and
thus taps the whole Northern Railroad System, giving it

THROUGH CONNECTIONS AND FACILITIES



-TO-



PEORIA,

ROCK ISLAND,

ST. PAUL MINNEAPOLIS, CHICAGO



ALL POINTS NORTH AND NORTHWEST,

As well as all points in Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Dakota and Montana.
The road is thoroughly equipped with the latest improved and best rolling stock, the
track laid with STEEL, HAILS.

Safety appliances on Passenger Trains, and courteous and attentive train officials.
Take a trip over this line and you will be convinced of it.



GEO. L. BRADBURY,



H. C. PARKER,



S. M. MILLER,



Vice Prei. ui Sen. Mn;. Traffic Manager. Den. Pass, and Tkt. Agt.

OFFICES, FKOFIIA, ILL.



LAND & THOMPSON,

REAL ESTATE DEALERS AND

GENERAL LAND AGENCY OFFICE,



WILL Attend to the Sale, Purchase, Exchange, and Lease of Lands; Locating of
Lands; Paying of Taxes, and Protection of Lands ; Redemption of Lands from
Tax Sales; Inspection of Lands and Perfecting of Titles; Make Investments for
Capitalists, and Make Loans on Lands, and all other matters in any way connected
with the General Land Office Business, in a Prompt, Reliable and Satisfactory
manner.

Farm Lands! Stock Lands!

MINERAL LANDS i j

Buying and Selling of Farms, Ranches and Stock. ,

OVER ONE MILLION ACRES



OF THE FINEST

GRAZING AND FARMING LANDS IN TEXAS

For Sale at LOW RATES TO ACTUAL SETTLERS.



Buy and Sell City Property; Rent and Collect Rents; Place Fire Insurance, Pay Taxes
and Keep Up Improvements and Conduct a General Real Estate Business in all Branches.
Being personally acquainted with the Prominent Land Operators and Real Estate Men
of St. Louis, Chicago, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Baltimore and other Principal Cities,
and possessing all other necessary facilities, we are enabled to place Property
entrusted to us with a rare Promptness and upon such Advantageous
Terms as but few Land Agents in Texas can Duplicate.

Our Terms are Liberal, as the New Era of Low Prices Demand
they Should Be.

^Correspondence Solicited, and References furnished on application.

See Page 137.



DALLAS:

HER TRADE, COMMERCE AND INDUSTRIES.



INTRODUCTORY.

The growth of the " Lone Star State" has been the wonder and admiration of
the whole civilized world. While we stand in ecstacy and gaze upon her fine
prairies and upon her broad rivers and lakes and the numerous cities, towns and
villages that stud the State from border to border, we pause to take one long and
lingering glance at Dallas, and with our feeble pen paint the picture of her birth,
life and being; of her wonderful trade and commerce, her religious and social in-
stitutions; to examine into the cause and effect, and, if possible, discover and
show to the world what has tended to make Dallas the second city in commercial
importance in this great State; to demonstrate to the people residing here that
their work has only just begun and that the future of this city is brighter than
pen can picture or artist portray.

Forty-four years ago Mr. John Neely Bryan occupied a cabin on the spot
where now stands the city of Dallas. Standing in his cabin door, as far as the eye
could reach, no human habitation was visible and the stillness of the night un-
broken, save by the hooting of the owl or the savage bay of the prowling wolf, or
the rippling of the waters on the fair bosom of the beautiful Trinity, which in its
onward course to the Gulf seemed to linger and laugh as it passed by the spot,
where in after years was to be built a great metropolis.

Now we stand upon the same spot in the center of a populous city, surrounded
by all the refinements of wealth and cultivation, a city numbering with its suburbs
nearly 35,000 souls, and embracing a vast amount of the industry, the energy and
the excitement of business. Situated in the midst of a great agricultural region,
with natural avenues and artificial roads tending to it in every direction, it is un-
surpassed for the markets of husbandry. A writer speaking of Dallas has this to
say : " There is no poetry in the history of Dallas. She did not awake one morn-
ing to find herself a city; she grew not in a night, or in a day or year. Hers has
been a long and continued struggle for supremacy, which, having gained, her
people may well be proud of, and for which they deserve praise and admiration.
Other cities in the State have sprung into existence in an incredibly short period
of time, heralded their greatness and glory for a time to the world, and then, hav-
ing over-reached the mark or builded beyond the requirements of the times,
country and surroundings, fell backward to wait for progress; while Dallas, inch



10 DALLAS HER



by inch, and year by year, slowly and surely grew, grew with a solidity that can
never be impaired, until to-day she stands the most prosperous and one of the
largest of Texan cities."

If we are successful in showing that the prosperity of Dallas has resulted from
the enterprise of individuals, it will be readily seen that we owe it chiefly to the
commercial classes. Not that we would claim for them the sole honor, or deny the
merits of others, for this would be as unreasonable as the fabulous dispute between
the body and the limbs. We only place them in the foremost rank of an active,
hardy, adventurous population, because, by controlling the wealth, the business
and the resources of the country, they have been the chief agents in its rapid
aggrandizement.

The reader will bear with us a moment and excuse a pen prone to wander,
while we touch for a moment upon a very important point as connected with this
discussion. It is one of paramount importance, and should receive a much more
attentive consideration than we can give it incidentally at this time. We refer to

COMMERCIAL CHARACTER.

What should be the character of those who act so important a part in the
business of the country, who control its resources, direct its energies, and in a great
degree form the moral standard which regulates the transactions of the whole
people ? The mercantile mind of our country is sufficiently keen. The pursuit
of wealth, attracting as it does intellects of every grade, includes among its
votaries many of the most aspiring and most capable minds, and gives to them
that constant and healthy exercise, which is calculated to sharpen the faculties,
and, if united with reading and reflection, produces a high degree of refinement.
The merchant should cultivate his mind and acquire knowledge, as an element of
power. Dealing in the products of various climes, and of all the arts, and engaged
in an intercourse, personally or by correspondence, which extends to all the marts of
traffic throughout the world, he should be well acquainted with the geography of
the globe, and with the productions, resources, habits, financial systems and com-
mercial usages of all nations. He should know thoroughly the composition and
history, the mode of production, cost, and all other incidents connected with every
article with which he deals, and should be versed especially in the moneys and
measures, the exchanges, the commercial laws and regulations of the various places
to which his business relations extend. This much we insist upon, as actually
necessary to the respectability of the mercantile character, and to enable the mer-
chant to wield his capital to advantage. But the intelligent merchant should
aspire to more than this. His position in society demands that he should place
himself upon an equality with the most cultivated of his fellow-citizens. As a
class, the merchants are the most wealthy men of our country. In social inter-
course they mingle with the most refined, with those who are the highest in intel-
lectual standing and official position. There is no place in society, no post in the
government, from which the merchant is excluded. On the contrary his command
of money, and the facilities afforded- by his relations of business, place him in a
prominent position, give him the control of the various commercial and moneyed



TRADE, COMMERCE AND INDUSTRIES. 11

institutions and render him the fit and active director and agent in the whole circle
of public charities, and in the numberless endowments for literary and liberal
purposes. Having thus opened to him a wide sphere of usefulness, he should
enter upon it with a consciousness of its dignity and importance, and qualify him-
self for the discharge of its duties by an assiduous and liberal cultivation of his


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Online LibraryLand & ThompsonHistorical and descriptive review of the industries of Dallas. 1884-5. Trade, commerce and manufactures .. → online text (page 1 of 18)