Laughton Osborn.

The vision of Rubeta, an epic of the island of Manhattan. With illustrations, done on Stone .. online

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THE



VISION OF RUBETA,



AN EPIC STORY



OF THE ISLAND OF MANHATTAN.



WITH ILLUSTRATlOiVS, DONE ON STOJ\rE.



AUSUS- CELEBRARB DOMESTICA FACTA.




BOSTON:

WEEKS, JORDAN, AND COMPANY.

M DCCC XXXVIII.



LOAN STACIC



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1838, by

Weeks, Jordan, and Company,

in the Clerk's office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.



^55



THE AUTHOR'S PEEFACE.



I ADVISE nobody to attempt to find me
out. The endeavor can end only in dis-
appointment, after bringing perhaps upon
many innocent persons the annoyance of
temporary suspicion. There are but three
ways which can lead to any probability of
discovery, where an author is determined
to remain concealed : first, the carelessness
or treachery of confidants ; secondly, certain
circumstances, in the course of his labors,
that can with difficulty be made to apply
to more than one person ; thirdly, a known
style. The two first ways are effectually
closed, in the present case. As for the
third, I would observe that there is no au-
thor, in any era of literature, who stands

: . 741



VI THE AUTHORS PREFACE.

absolutely alone in his manner of composi-
tion : for, though he were the originator of
a style, yet would he, almost ere his book
were dry from the press, have imitators in
abundance. There is a degree of resem-
blance among all the writers of any partic-
ular epoch in letters. For example, take
those of the time of Anne, in England ;
they have all a certain family likeness in
their respective classes, which would ena-
ble you at once, after having seen any one
of them, to know where with probability
to place the date of the others' existence.
They are distinguishable from one another
only by the degrees of excellence, good,
better, best, — as are the writers of the pres-
ent day by their respective worthlessness,
bad, worse, worst, or their relative inferi-
ority, little, less, least. I might tell you a
story here, to prove that the judgment of an
author's personal identity by the features of
his style is about as hazardous as swear-
ing to the characters of his handwriting ;
but the author of the Pursuits of Liter-



THE AUTHOR S PREFACE. Vli

ature has saved me the trouble. Thus he
writes : —

" Julius Scaliger wrote and published aii oration, without his
name, against the celebrated tract, by Erasmus, called Cicero-
nianus. Erasmus, having perused it, immediately (and upon
conviction, as he thought,) fixed upon Hieronymus Aleander,
who was afterwards made an Archbishop by Leo the Tenth, and
a Cardinal by Pope Paul the Third, as the author of the whole,
or of the greatest part of it, by signs which he conceived to be
certain and infallible. These signs were strong indeed : his
phraseology, his manner of speaking, his peculiar diction, his
habits of life, and even the very intercourse which Erasmus
had daily with him. Nay, his genius and disposition were so
evident, that Aleander could not be more intimately known to
himself, than he was to Erasmus. Yet Erasmus was mis-
taken ENTIRELY. His judgment and sagacity will not be
questioned. But hear his own words ; for, on such an oc-
casion as the present, they are particularly remarkable. ' Ex
phrasi, ex ore, ex locutione, aliisque compluribus, mihi persuasi
HOC OPUS, maxima saltern ex parte, esse Hieronymi Aleandri.
Nam mihi genius illius ex domestico convictu adeo cognitus
perspectusque est, ut ipse sibi non possit esse notior ' ! !
(Erasmi Epist. 370. c. 1755. Op. Fol. Ed. opt. Lugd.) "*

I repeat. I myself defy discovery from
any circumstances in a poem, where I do
not once appear in my individual character :
its style, as I have said before, no man can

* Purs, of Lit. 9th ed. Lond. pp. 1,2. * *



Viil THE AUTHOR'S PREFACE.

pronounce upon with any degree of cer-
tainty : and, for my secret, there are but
two or three persons in the world that know
it, and I should not have intrusted it to them,
had I not had confidence in their honor and
discretion. But, while I make this declara-
tion, let it be noted distinctly, that it is no
motive of personal fear, which induces me
to wear a mask. They, who are so rash as
to assume the contrary, will one day find
their mistake. I could even now, with all
my heart, say with Icilius :

Tutto il periglio io-veggio :
Percio lo affronto : *

but it is not my cue. When the poem shall
have obtained that measure of success which
is thought necessary to promote its object,
I shall drop the veil ; and a hearty in-
dignation will keep warm till then. I
therefore advise all such persons to spare
their invectives till the proper season, as-
sured that no abuse, however noisy, nor any

* Alkieri. Virginia. Atto Vo. Sc. 1^. * *



THE AUTHORS PREFACE. IX

insinuations, however pointed, can rouse me
from my covert till it shall be my pleasure ;
while, to those who may derive amusement
from my labors, I add, with that reviver
of the foolery, without the wit, of Sterne,
Doctor DjxiEL Dove, that, if any of them
shall have my offspring laid at his door, I
hope he will take it up for pity, and in
silence, nor deny the parentage, as, in so
doing, while he cannot actually harm him-
self, he will help to thicken the mystery
which it is my present interest to gather
round me.

The quantity of notes, towards the close
of the volume, may be thought excessive ;
but the characters of the poem are persons
of so respectable a standing, that it is a duty
I owe to myself, and to my fellow-citizens,
to justify the severity of the censure passed
upon them, which I am much deceived if
I shall not be found to have done in every
particular.

The long note,* on Mr. Wordsworth's

* Page 288, and Apptndit. * *
b



X THE AUTHORS PREFACE.

pretensions to distinction as a poet and a
critic, will need no apology with those who
may happen to be convinced by its argu-
ments, or who are, already, of a similar
opinion with the writer. Had Mr. Words-
worth remained where Byron laid him, I
should not have thought to write the epitaph
of his muse, which, in that case had been
impertinent, because superfluous ; but he has
had a resurrection, and is now so radiant in
the apotheosis of popularity, that men's eyes
are dazzled, and they deem it profanation to
consider whether the deificatioa be rational,
or have its origin in the grossest of delu-
sions. I share a satirist's prescriptive privi-
lege, and am troubled with no such scruples.



PREFACE OF THE EDITOR.



The singular circumstances, under which the Vision
of Rubeta came into the hands of its present proprie-
tor, cannot be now recounted ; for, though the recital
would not indeed endanger a secret which the Author
has not chosen to reveal, yet would it compromise the
security of the Editor, by exposing him to suspicions
with which he is too humble to desire to be honored.
It is sufficient to say, that, when the manuscript was
conveyed to him for publication, permission was ac-
corded to add, provided he effaced nothing, such com-
ments as he might deem proper. Of this indulgence,
it will be seen, he has liberally availed himself. His
principal efforts have been confined to giving to the
heroic characters of the Author's muse a reality, if they
be but shadowy creations of the brain, or the advantage
of a modern reflection, if (as he rather thinks) they
are the gigantic beings of a past epoch, and of per-



xii PREFACE OF THE EDITOR.

haps an extinct race of humanity ; for who ever heard
of a Ruheta ? and though indeed a Petronius and a
Margites have both been known, yet very different
were they (at least the former) from the Petronius
and Margites who give such relief to the brilliancy
of RuBETA, and with him form the grand effect of
this solemn poem. Not that the Editor by any means
vouches for it, that his conjectures will be found cor-
rect; but, in the absence of all certain information,
he presumes that his efforts to illustrate the char-
acters and actions of the poem, by parallels drawn
from real life and contemporary events, will be found
acceptable, and perhaps useful.

The parts he has contributed to the volume are in-
dicated by a couple of stars. .- * *



' AdUfisXti xtXa^'^irtj, rZv "E'T* —

Ql^v^iav Aoxo&iK ytviav aXiyeuv.
' E»3-a trv'yxaif/.cc^xs'', iyyva,iTo//,ix.i
AK fiiVf ii ^l/>7(rai, (pvyo-^svov (Tt^ktov,
JMjjS a.'Ttiipot.'ro)/ xaXcov,
'Ax^iffofov SI icai at^fiaruv, aifi^ic^d^cci, —

PixD. Olymp. xi. 13 — 19. Heyne. Lond. 1823.

Hoc ego opertuin,
Hoc ridere meum tarn nil, nulla tibi vendo
Iliade. Audaci quicunque afflate Cratino,
Iratum Eupolidem prsegrandi cum sene palles,
Aspice et haec, si forte aliquid decoctius audis.
Inde vaporata lector mihi ferveat aure,
Non hie, qui in crepidas Graiorum ludere gestit
Sordidus, et lusco qui possit dicere Lusce,
Seque aliquem credens, Italo quod honore supinus
Fregerit heminas Areto Eedilis iniquas ;
Nee qui abaco numeros, et secto in pulvere metas,
Sat risisse vafer, multum gaudere paratus
Si Cynico barbam petulans Nonaria vellat.
His mane edictum, post prandia Calliroen do.

Pers. I. 121 — 134. Casaubon. Lond. 1647.



Thus much it haa been judged requisite to lay before the world in relation
to [RUBETA] ; not with any view of exalting his character higher than it
deserves, which is quite needless ; but of making its real value more generally
known, and of rescuing it from the misrepresentations of a few misinformed
or malevolent men. To some, no doubt, the portrait here drawn of him will
appear a very flattering one ; but it will be much easier to call than to prove
it such. Nothing has been advanced but what is founded on the most au-
thentic evidence, nor has any circumstance been designedly strained beyond
the truth. And if his [Eminence] did really live and act in such a manner
that the most faithful delineation of his conduct must necessarily liave the air



XIV



of a panegyric, llie fault is not in the copy, but in the original. Rmeir of thr
Life and Cfiaracter of Jlrchhiskop Secker, by Dr. Porteus. (p. G7. N. York.
1773.)

Thine own mouth condemneth thee, and not I. Job xv. G.



— the gentlemen of the press, whose livelihood is lying. — Sir W. Scott's
Diary. Memoirs, by J. G. Lockhart, Esq. (Vol. IV. p. 24!), Galignani's
Edition.)

For daily bread the dirty trade they ply,
Coin their fresh tales, and live upon the lie.

Crabbe. The Newspaper.

They '11 sit by the fire, and presume to know

What 's done i' the Capitol ; who 's like to rise,

Who thrives, and who declines ; side factions, and give out

Conjectural marriages ; making parties strong,

And feebling such, as stand not in their liking,

Below their cobbled shoes. Coriolaims, A. I. So. 2.

You have neither feelings nor opinions of your own ; but, like a glass in a
tavern, bear about those of every blockhead who gives you his; and, because
you mean no harm, think yourselves excused, though broken- friendships, dis-
cords, and murders, are the consequences of your indiscretions. Belle's Strat-
agem, (Mrs. Inchbald's Stage-edition,) A. ii. Sc. 1.

Far be from me the uncharitable presumption, that these sanguine persons
are destitute of principle, or void of right intentions. Doubtless, in many in-
stances, they persevere in error for no reason, but because they believe it to be
truth. There is even much that is right in them ; but are they not too easily
satisfied with a low measure of that right, without examining accurately the
quality of the practice, merely because it is not disreputable .' Christian Mor-
als, by Hannah More, Chap, xviii. (p. 21G, 1st Amer. ed.)



BaccH. ^ieficai •roiriTev ^i^iou.
\Ji ftiv yct^ oUKir iKTiv 01 ovriSt xaxoi,

HeRC. Tj S' ; OVK lotpiuv Z,^ ;

Bacch. Tdura ya^ mi xa) fiovov
"Et Icr) \oivrov aya^av, i] xai redr' a^a,
0« y*'^ ffaf Old oud' avro rov^ oTois tx^''



XV



HeRC. Ovkouv trip 'iffr lyTavBu ftn^axuWia,
TpaysJhia; 'proiovvroc, 'yrXilv h fiu^ia,
Eupi-ri^cu leXiit »} ffraSiiu XaXifri^a ;

SACCn. 'E-rifuXXl^l; to-vt IctJ, koa ffrufiuXfjiaru.,
^'.Xihivwv fiouirua, XaSnrai Ti^vti;,
"A (p^ovta, BaTTOv, n" f^ovov ;^^o^oii XdSri,
"Atra^ 9r^»gev^<titv'ra, tS 'V^a.yuh'ia,
Tinfiov Ss wottiTriv av ou^ I'igci; 'in,
"LriTuv av, offTi; prif^ci yivvcilov Xaxai,

Akistoph. Ran. 7:2 — 77, S9 — 97. ed. Br. ^ro-. 1783.

[Exilibus racemnlis, succo carentibus, comparatos adolescentulos illos, qui,
nondum maturo ingenio, tragoedias componendae se pares esse rentur, ait Bac-
chus statira arescere, evanescere, si, accepto choro, semel tantum in Tragcedi-
am minxerint, etc. De Tragoedia, tanquam de meretrice, loquitur, quae ama-
toribus poetis copiam sui facit. Brunckii Jlnnotat.^

Je vols les Briguants, les Bourreaulx, les Adventuriers, les Palefreniers de
maintenant plus doctes que les Docteurset les Prescheurs de mon temps. Que
dirai-je ? Les femnaes et les filles ont aspire k ceste loijange et manne celeste
de bonne doctrine. Rabelais, Liv. ii. chap. 8. .Iinst. 1741. in-4to.

Is there a boy, at the present day, who fancies himself in love with his
nurse, or has been kissed by the ladies that visit his mama, but straightway
writes Sonnets to Hope, Odes to Despair, and Lines to Blank .'' etc.

***** — is not this the age of brass .■' Does not that most dictatorial of lit-
erary dictators, etc. : does not that most republican of papers, which would have

all poets Byrons, and all novelists Sir Walter Scotts : does not the L y

G e tell us, that indiscriminate praise (or puffing) is, and shall be, the

order of the day .' Alas for the days that are gone ! when genius was

as sure to produce critics, as a hot sun to breed maggots ; when, etc. etc. Sixty
Years of the Life of Jeremy Levis, Vol. L p. 213.

Oh, parbleu ! interrompit le chevalier de Saint-Jacques, nous ne sommea
pas si timides que vous. Nous n'attendons point, pour decider, qu'une piece
soit imprim6e : des la premiere representation nous en connaissons lout le prix.
II n'est pas meme besoin que nous I'ecoutions fort attentivement ; il suffit que
nous sacliions que c'est une production de don Gabriel pour ctre persuades
qu'elle est sans dcfaut. Gil Bias, Liv. x. Chap. 5.

Pravi favore labi moitales solent,
Et, pro judicio dum stant errores sui,
Ad poenitendum rebus manifestis agi.

Ph-«dr. f'al). Lib. V. 5. Durman. Jlmslcl. 16'J8.



XVI

Etcnim tam varia sunt palata mortaliuni, tam morosa quorundam ingenia,
tarn ingrati aniini, tam absurda judicia, ut cum his baud paulo felicius agi
videatur, qui, jucundi atque hilares, genio indulgent suo, quam qui semetma-
cerant curis, ut edant aiiquid, quod aliis, aut faotidientibus aut ingratis, vel
utilitati possil esse, vel voluplati. Plurimi Uterus iiesciunt, multi conterniiunt.
Barbaras ut durum rejecit, quicquid non est plane barbaruni. Scioli aspernan-
tur ut triviale, quicquid obsoletis verbis non scatet. Quibusdam solum placent
Vetera, plerisque tantum sua. Hie tam tetricus est, ut non admittat jocos : hie
tam insulsus, ut not ferat sales. Tam simi quidam sunt, ut nasum oinnem,
velut aquam ab rabido morsus cane, reformident : adeo mobiles alii sunt, ut
aliud sedentes probent, aliud stantes. Hi scdent in tabernis, et inter pocula de
scriptorum judicant ingeniis, magnaque cum autoritate condemnant utcunque
lubitum est, suis quenque scriptis, veluti capillicio vellicantes, ipsi interim tuti,
et, quod dici solet, 'i^a SiXus, quippe tam leves et abrasi undique, ut ne pilum
quidem haboant boni viri, quo possint apprehendi. Sunt pra^tcrea quidam tam
ingrati, ut quum imponse delectentur opere, nihilo tamen magis anient auto-
rem : non absimiles inhumanis hospitibus, qui, quum opiparo convivio prolixe
sint excepti, saturi demum discedunt domum, nullis habitis gratiis ei, a quo
sunt invitati. 1 nunc, et hominibus tam delicati palati, tam varii gustils, ani-
mi prajterea tam memoris et grati, tuis impensis epulum instrue. Thom^
Mori ad Pctr, JEg. cpist. p. vii. ex libelli dc Utopiana rcpuh. edit. Glasg.
12rao. 1750.

Mais le fait est que la multitude de livres inlisibles degoiite. II n'y a plus
inoyen de rien appreiidre, parce qu'il y a trop de choses ii apprendre. Je suis
occupe d'un problcme de geometric; vient un roman de Clarisse, en six vol-
umes, que des anglomanes me vantent comme le seul roman digne d'etre lu
d'un homme sage : je suis assez fou pour le lire ; je perds mon temps et le fil
de mcs etudes. Puis, lorsqu'il nic fallut lire di.x gros volumes du president
de Thou, et dix autres de Daniel, et quinze de Rapin Thoyras, et autant de
Mariana, arrive encore un Martinclli, qui veut que je le suive en enfer, en
purgatoire, et en paradis, et qui me dit des injures parce que je ne veux pas y
aller ! Cela dusespere. La vue d'une biblothcque me fait tomber en syncope.

Mais, me dit M. Gervais, pensez-vous qu'on se mette plus en peine dans ce
pays-ci de vos Chinois et de vos Indiens, que vous ne vous souciez des prefaces
du signor Martinelli.' Eh bien ! ftl. Gervais, n'imprimez pas mes Chinois et
mes Indiens.

M. Gervais les imprima.

Voltaire. Leltres Chinoises, &c. xii.



LIST



OF SUCH LIVING PERSONS

AS ARE PARTICULARLY MENTIONED IN THE COURSE OF THIS VOLUME.*



Mr. John Quincy Adams.
American Ambassador to the court

of .

Prof. Henry J. Anderson.
Prof. Charles Anthon.
Rev. Mr. Henry Anthok.
Autlior of " Jeremy Levis."

B.

H. L. B.

Mr. Wm. Thompson Bacon.

Mr. John Bailey.

Miss Joanna Baillie.

Mr. Banim.

Mr. Park Benjamin.

Dr. Bird.

Mrs. Bird.

Mr. Bleecker.

Lady Blessington.

Miss Caroline Bowles.

Loraina Brackett.

Dr. Amariah Brigham.

Dr. Brownell.

Rev. Dr. Wm. C. Brownlee,

Bruno.

Mr. Wm. Collen Bryant,

Mr. Buchanan, (Sen. U. S.)

Mr. Edward Lytton Bulwer.

Mr. Thomas Campbell, v

Camus.

Dr. Capron.

Mr. Thomas Carlyle.

Caudex.

Rev, Dr. Ciianning,

Mrs. Child.



Civis.

Mr, Macdonald Clarke.

Mr, Clay, (Sen. U. S.)

Common Council of Manhattan.

Mr. Connor.

Contributors to the " Knickerbocker

Magazine."
Contributors to the " New- York

Mirror."
Contributors to the " New- York

Review."
Mr. James Fennimore Cooper.

Mr. George Dearborn.
Mr. Charles Dickens,
Thomas Downing,
Mr. Wm. Duer.
Mr. Dwight.

Rev. Dr. Manton Eastburn.
Miss Maria Edgeworth.
Mrs. E, F. Ellet.
Mr, Ewing, of Ohio, (Sen. U. S.)

Flaccus.

Mr. David Hale.
Messrs. Harper & Brothers.
Rev. Dr. Francis L, Hawks.
Mr. Nathaniel Hawthorne.
Mr, Henry W. Herbert.
Historical Society of New York.
Mr. Charles F. Hoffman.
Lord Holland.
Mr. Ball Hughes.
Mr. Leigh Hunt.



* The names in Italic type are fictitious designations, in some cases assumed by the
persons themselves to whom they relate, in others assigned to ihem by the Author. * *



XVI 11



A LIST OF TERSONS.



Mr. WAsriiNfiTON Ikving.
Mr. Benjamin D'Ishaeli.



Mr. Preston, (Sen. U. S,)
Mr. Joseph Price.



General Jackson,
Mens. J. Janon, (the critic of tiic
Journal ilea Dibats.)

Mrs. Frances-Kemble Butler.
Mr. Charles King.

Miss L. E. Landon.

Mr. Leavitt.

Mr. J. G. Lockhart.

Mr. Richard Adams Locke.

Mr. Long.

M.
M.mGlTES.

Mattbias.

Miss .

Mr. Mitchell, (the translotor of

Aristophanes.)
Molcus.
Maria Monk.
Mr. Clement C. Moore.
Mr. Nathaniel F. Moore.
Mr. Thomas Moore.

Mr. M. M. Noah.

Mr. Daniel O'Connel.
Mr. Lacghton Osborn.
Mr. Robert Owen.

Mr. John Howard Payne.

Frances Partridge.

Mr. James K. Pavlding.

PETROmUS.

Mr. Tyrone Power.

Mr. William II. Prescott.



Dr. David M. Reese.
Father Richards.
Mr. Leitch Ritchie.
Mr. RoscoE.
Signer Rossini.
RUBETA.
Signer Rubini.

F. W. S.

Parson S .

Mr. Daniel Seymour.
Dr. John Augustine Smith.
Mr. Robert Southey.
Mr. William L. Stone.
Old Suffolk.

Mr. Thomas Noon Talfourd.

Signer TamburiiNI.

Mr. Arthur Tappan.

Tartar.

Mrs. Trollope.

Mr. W .

Mr. Adam Waldie.

Mr. Ward.

Mr. Walsh.

Dr. John Ware.

Dr. John C. Warren.

John JFaters.

Prof. Wayland.

Mr. James Watson Webb.

Mr. Daniel Webster.

Mr. Noah Webster.

Mr. Robert W. Weir.

Mr. N. P. Willis.

Mr. Secretary Woodbury.

Mr. William Wordsworth.



The reader will oblige himself, as well as the Editor, by making the
following corrections before entering on the Poem.



Pas.



29,


line


17,


for


152-157,


read


177-182.


47,


It


9,


II


260-261, of Canto iii.,


It


216 on page 158.


«


it


— J


"


715,


"


714.


G8,


II


20,


II


35,


It


34.


95,


II


a4,


II


Vol. 1,


II


Vol.2.


108,


II


28,


It


246th verse of Canto iii.,


"


246th verse on page 158.


134,


II


24,


It


756, Canto iv.,


"


757, Canto iii.


149,


II


41,


after


■ Vidffi Poet.,


It


i. 177.


162,


It


32,


for


258,


It


258 on page 157.


164,


II


6,


II


Fretille's caution,


It


Fretille's emotion.


165,


CI


18,


II


635,


II


631,


ti


II


30,


"


543 -&i9,


It


643, 549.


179,


II


25,

27,


"


498,
498,


It
It


493.
493.


184,


II


29,


II


708,


"


720.


191,


II


41,


II


472,


It


478.


209,


II


14,


annex **




.


214,


II


21,


after man.


insert


when he saw the beggar.


241,


11


19,


for


713,


read


714.


267,


II


45,


"


707,


11


714.


271,


II


2,


after thus,


put a


; comma.


281,


11


20,


for


246 of Canto iii.


read


246 on page 158.


11


"


37,


"


246 of the preceding Canto, "


246 on page 158.



There are, doubtless, many other errors in the course of the volume 5 but they are
such as will occur in the first edition of ahnost any work of equal size, and, as they
must be detected at a glance, they need no enumeration. Such, for examples, are
the word " craven," p. 62, line 20, — for cavern ; " Fauxbourg," p. 136, line 32, — for
Faubourg; and " Vergine," p. 180, lines 14, 21, 26, — for Virgine. * *



CANTO FIRST.



THE CONVENTION



ARGUMENT.

The subject proposed. The invocation. The scene of the
action of the poem. The members of the solemn convention
in a state of great despondency, caused by the want of coals
and the absence of their chief Dulness, concerned lest her
darling should arrive too late for the great business of the
night, makes a bargain with Caution, whereby the latter
engages to relieve the hero from the difficulty into which
E.NVY and Vanity have plunged him. Awful entrance of the
rescued monarch. He is hoisted (not without mischance)
to a temporary throne, amid the acclamations of his subjects.
He begins to recount the perils from which he has escaped ;
and by a necessary digression hurries off his hearers with him
to Montreal, to the prime source of his recent troubles.
RuBETA relates his arrival at the convent of the Hotel-Dieu ;
his reception by the sisters ; his interview and parley with the
abbess and the green father ; and how the abbess told her
dream. * *



THE



VISION OF RUBETA.



CANTO FIRST.

I SING RuBETA, who in vision dread
Saw tipp'd like Midas' own his solemn head,
When met, with other rogues, in grave debate,
To prop the throne of Follj's ancient state.
By virtue rais'd he rul'd it, and still rules, 5

High-Priest of Hypocrites and King of Fools.

Say, goddess ! thou who chalk'st th' unsettled score
On the blurr'd slate at Memory's hostel-door.
How, flogg'd by Fate, the newsman at full trot
Jokes left behind, and broken wind forgot, lo

Ver. 6. High-Pnest of Hypocrites and King of Fools.] The titles con-
ferred upon him by the united divinities in the last Canto. So the 3d
and 4th lines allude to the actions and events of the five first Cantos;
and the first division of the 5th line to the 7th Canto. The 1st and
2d lines indicate the general subject and grand event of the poem.
7-12. Say, goddess ! etc.] **

Musa, mihi caussas memora, quo numine laeso,
Quidve dolens, regina deum tot volvere casus
Insignem pietate virum, tot adire labores,
Impulerit : tantsene animis coelestibus irae ?

ViRG. .Eji. i. 8-11. (Hunter, 1799.)
10. Jokes left behind — ] Nothing but very superior jockeyism could
have forced the hero to this sacrifice ; for "gentle Dul.ness ever loves



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