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PRINCE JUMPED NERVOUSLY AND SHIED TO ONE SIDE.
The Outdoor Girls at Rainbow Lake. Frontispiece (Page 28)



The Outdoor Girls
at Rainbow Lake

OR

THE STIRRING CRUISE OF THE
MOTOR BOAT GEM



BY

LAURA LEE HOPE

AUTHOR OF " THE OUTDOOR GIRLS OF DEEPDALE," " THE

OUTDOOR GIRLS IN A MOTOR CAR," " THE BOBBSEY

TWINS," " THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT THE

SEASHORE," ETC.



ILLUSTRATED



NEW YORK

GROSSET & DUNLAP

PUBLISHERS



Made in the United States of America









4 n






BOOKS FOR GIRLS

BY LAURA LEE HOPE

I2mo. Cloth. Illustrated. Price per volume,

50 cents, postpaid.
THE OUTDOOR GIRLS SERIES

THE OUTDOOR GIRLS OF DEEPDALE
THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW

LAKE

THE OUTDOOR GIRLS IN A MOTOR CAR
THE OUTDOOR GIRLS IN A WINTER

CAMP
THE OUTDOOR GIRLS IN FLORIDA

THE BOBBSEY TWINS BOOKS

For Little Men and Women

THE BOBBSEY TWINS

THE BOBBSEY TWINS IN THE COUNTRY
THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT THE SEA-
SHORE

THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT SCHOOL
THE BOBBSEY TWINS AT SNOW LODGE

GROSSET & DUNLAP, PUBLISHERS, NEW YORK



COPYRIGHT, 1913, BY
GROSSET & DUNLAP.



THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE



CONTENTS

CHAPTER PAGE

I A GRAND SURPRISE I

II AFTER THE PAPERS II

III THE RUNAWAY 22

IV THE MISSING DOCUMENTS 31

V THE GEM 40

VI READY FOR A CRUISE 51

VII STOWAWAYS 60

VIII A HINT OF GHOSTS 72

IX OFF ON A TRIP 81

X ADRIFT 89

XI IN DANGER 99

XII AT RAINBOW LAKE 106

XIII CRACKERS AND OLIVES 115

XIV THE REGATTA 127

XV THE RACE 139

XVI FIGHTING FIRE 148

XVII ON ELM ISLAND 158

XVIII IN CAMP 166

XIX A QUEER DISTURBANCE 172

XX THE STORM 179



CONTENTS

CHAPTER

XXI THE GHOST 188

XXII WHAT MOLLIE FOUND 193

XXIII SETTING A TRAP 196

XXIV THE GHOST CAUGHT 204

XXV THE MISSING SADDLE 208






THE OUTDOOR GIRLS
AT RAINBOW LAKE

CHAPTER I

A GRAND SURPRISE

" GIRLS, I've got the grandest surprise for
you ! "

Betty Nelson crossed the velvety green lawn,
and crowded into the hammock, slung between
two apple trees, which were laden with green
fruit. First she had motioned for Grace Ford
to make room for her, and then sank beside her
chum with a sigh of relief.

"Oh, it was so warm walking over!' she
breathed. " And I did come too fast, I guess."
She fanned herself with a filmy handkerchief.

"But the surprise?' Mollie Billette reminded
Betty.

" I'm coming to it, my dear, but just let me
get my breath. I didn't know I hurried so.
Swing, Grace."

With a daintily shod foot a foot slender and
in keeping with her figure Grace gave rather a



2 THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE

languid push, and set the hammock to swaying in
wider arcs.

Amy Stonington, who had not joined in the
talk since the somewhat hurried arrival of Betty,
strolled over to the hammock and began peering
about in it that is, in as much of it as the fluffy
skirts of the two occupants would allow to be
seen.

" I don't see it," she said in gentle tones
everything Amy did was gentle, and her disposi-
tion was always spoken of as " sweet ' by her
chums, though why such an inapt word is gen-
erally selected to describe what might better be
designated as " natural ' is beyond comprehen-
sion. " I don't see it," murmured Amy.

"What? 5 asked Grace, quickly.

" I guess she means that box of chocolates,"
murmured Mollie. " It's no use, Amy, for Grace
finished the last of them long before Betty blew
in on us or should I say drifted? Really, it's
too warm to do more than drift to-day."

" You finished the last of the candy yourself! '
exclaimed Grace, with spirit. If Grace had one
failing, or a weakness, it was for chocolates.

" I did not ! ' snapped Mollie. Her own fail-
ing was an occasional burst of temper. She had
French blood in her veins and not of French
lilac shade, either, as Betty used to say. It was



A GRAND SURPRISE 3

of no uncertain color was Mollie's temper at
times.

" Yes, you did! *' insisted Grace. " Don't you
remember? It was one with a cherry inside,
and we both wanted it, and "

"You got it!" declared Mollie. "If you say
I took it "

" That's right, Grace, you did have it," said
gentle Amy. " Don't you recall, you held it in
one hand behind your back and told Billy to
choose?' Billy was Mollie's "chummy" name.

"That's so," admitted Grace. "And Mollie
didn't guess right. I beg your pardon, Mollie.
It's so warm, and the prickly heat bothers me so
that I can hardly think of anything but that I'm
going in and get some talcum powder. I've got
some of the loveliest scent the Yamma-yamma
flower from Japan."

" It sounds nice," murmured Betty. " But,
girls "

" Excuse me," murmured Grace, making a
struggle to arise from the hammock never a
graceful feat for girl or woman.

"Don't! You'll spill me!" screamed Betty,
clutching at the yielding sides of the net.
"Grace! There!"

There would have been a " spill ' except that
Amy caught the swaying hammock and held it



4 THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE

until Grace managed, more or \& s " gracelessly,"
to get out.

" There's the empty box," she remarked, as it
was disclosed where it had lain hidden between
herself and Betty. " Not a crumb left, Amy,
my dear. But I fancy I have a fresh box in the
house, if Will hasn't found them. He's always
snooping, if you'll pardon my slang."

" I wasn't looking for candy," replied Amy.
"It's my handkerchief that new lace one; I
fancied I left it in the hammock."

" Wait, I'll get up," said Betty. " Don't you
dare let go, Amy. I don't see why I'm so foolish
as to wear this tight skirt. We didn't bother
with such style when we were off on our walking
tour."

" Oh, blessed tour ! " sighed Mollie. " I wisfi
we could go on another one to the North Pole,"
and she vigorously fanned herself with a maga-
zine cover.

Betty rose, and Amy found what she was look-
ing for. Grace walked slowly over the shaded
lawn toward her house, at which the three chums
had gathered this beautiful if too warm July
day. Betty, Amy, and Mollie made a simulta-
neous dive for the hammock, and managed, all
three, to squeeze into it, with Betty in the middle.

"Oh, dear!" she cried. "This is too much!



A GRAND SURPRISE 5

Let me out, and you girls can have it to your-
selves. Besides, I want to talk, and I can't do it
sitting down very well."

" You used to," observed Amy, smoothing out
her rather crumpled dress, and making dabs it
her warm face with the newly discov^^d hand-
kerchief.

" The kind of talking I'm going to do now calls
for action * business/ as the stage people call
it," explained Betty. " I want to walk around
and swing my arms. Besides, I can't properly
do justice to the subject sitting down. Oh, girls,
I've got the grandest surprise for you ! ' Her
eyes sparkled and her cheeks glowed; she seemed
electriftd with some piece of news.

"1 fiat's what you said when you first came,"
spoke Mollie, " but we seemed to get off the
track. Start over, Betty, that's a dear, and tell
us all about it. Take that willow chair," and
Billy pointed to an artistic green one that har-
monized delightfully with the grass, and the gray
bark of an apple tree against which it was drawn.

* No, I'm going to stand up," went on Betty.
" Anyhow, I don't want to start until Grace
comes back. I detest telling a thing over twice."

" If Grace can't find that box of chocolates
she'll most likely run down to the store for an-
other," said Amy.



6 THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE

' And that means we won't hear the surprise
for ever so long," said Mollie. " Go on, Bet, tell
us, and we'll retail it to Grace when she comes.
That will get rid of your objection," and Mollie
tucked back several locks of her pretty hair that
had strayed loose when the vigorous hammock-
action took place.

" No, I'd rather tell it to you all together,"
insisted Betty, with a shake of her head. " It
wouldn't be fair to Grace to tell it to you two
first. We'll wait."

" I'll go in and ask her to hurry," ventured
Amy. She was always willing to do what she
could to promote peace, harmony, and general
good feeling. If ever anyone wanted anything
done, Amy was generally the first to volun-
teer.

" There's no great hurry," said Betty, " though
from the way I rushed over here you might
think so. But really, it is the grandest thing!
Oh, girls, such a time as may be ahead of us
this summer! " and she pretended to hug herself
in delight.

" Betty Nelson, you've just got to tell us ! " in-
sisted Mollie. " Look out, Amy, I'm going to
get up."

Getting up from a hammock or doing any-
thing vigorous, for that matter was always a
serious business with quick Mollie. She gener-



A GRAND SURPRISE



ally warned her friends not to " stand too close."

" Never mind, here comes Grace," interrupted
Amy. "Do sit still, Mollie; it's too warm to
juggle or is it jiggle? around so."

" Make it wiggle," suggested Betty.

" Do hurry, Grace," called Mollie. " We can't
hear about the grand surprise until you get here,
and we're both just dying to know what it is."

" I couldn't find my chocolates," said Grace, as
she strolled gracefully up, making the most of her
slender figure. " I just know Will took them.
Isn't he horrid ! "

"Never mind, did you bring the talcum?'
asked Amy. " We can sprinkle it on green
apples and pretend it's fruit glace."

" Don't you dare suggest such a thing when my
little twins come along, as they're sure to do,
sooner or later," spoke Mollie, referring to her
brother and sister Paul and Dora or more
often " Dodo," aged four. They were " regular
tykes," whatever that is. Mollie said so, and
she ought to know. "If you gave them that
idea," she went on, " we'd have them both in the
hospital. However, they're not likely to come
to-day."

" Why not?" asked Betty, for the twins had
a habit of appearing most unexpectedly, and in
the most out-of-the-way places.

" They're over at Aunt Kittie's for the day, ,



8 THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE

and I told mamma I shouldn't mind if she kept
them a week."

"Oh, the dears !" murmured Amy.

You wouldn't say so if you saw how they
upset my room yesterday. I like a little peace
and quietness/' exclaimed Mollie. " I love Paul
and Dodo, but " and she shrugged her shoul-
ders effectively, as only the French can.

' Here's the talcum," spoke Grace. ' I'm sorry
about the chocolates. Wait until I see Will," and
she shook an imaginary brother.

" Never mind, dear, it's too hot for candies,
anyhow," consoled Betty. " Pass the talcum,"
and she reached for the box that Mollie was then
using. " It has the most delightful odor, Grace.
Where did you get it? '

" It's a new sample lot Harrison's pharmacy
got in. Mr. Harrison gave me a box to try, and
said "

' He wanted you to recommend it to your
friends, I've no doubt," remarked Mollie.

" He didn't say so, but I haven't any hesita-
tion in doing so. I just love it."

' It is nice," said Amy. " I'm going to get
some the next time I go down town."

The spicy scent of the perfumed talcum pow-
der mingled with the odor of the grass, the trees,
and the flowers, over which the bees were hum-
ming.



A GRAND SURPRISE, 9

" Come, come, Betty! " exclaimed Mollie, vig-
orously, when shining noses had been rendered
immune from the effects of the sun, ' when do
we hear that wonderful secret of yours?'

"Right away! Make yourselves comfortable.
I'm going to walk about, and get the proper ac-
tion to go with the words. Now, what did I do
with that letter?' and she looked in her
belt, up her sleeve, and in the folds of her
waist.

" Gracious, I hope I haven't lost it ! ' she ex-
claimed, glancing about, anxiously.

"Was it only a letter?' asked Mollie, some-
thing of disappointment manifesting itself in her
tones.

" Only a letter ! " repeated Betty, with proper
emphasis. " Well, I like the way you say that !
It isn't a common letter, by any means."

" Is it from that queer Mr. Blackford, whose
five hundred dollar bill we found when we were
on our walking trip? ' asked Amy, with strange
recollections of that queer occurrence.

" No, it was from my uncle, Amos Marlin, a
former sea captain," was the answer, " A most
quaint and delightful character, as you'll all say
when you meet him."

" Then we are going to meet him? " interjected
Grace, questioningly.

" Yes, he's coming to pay me a visit."



10 THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE

" Was that the grand surprise? " Amy wanted
to know.

"Indeed not. Oh, there's the letter," and
Betty caught up a piece of paper from under-
neath the hammock. " I'll read it to you. It's
quite funny, and in it he says he's going to give
me the grandest surprise that ever a girl had.
It "

"But what is the surprise itself?' inquired
Mollie.

" Oh, he didn't say exactly," spoke Betty,
smoothing out the letter. " But I know, from
the way he writes, that it will be quite wonder-
ful. Everything Uncle Amos does is wonderful.
He's quite rich, and "

" Hark ! " exclaimed Amy.

A voice was calling:

" Miss Ford ! Miss Ford ! "

"Yes, Nellie, what is it?" asked Grace, as
she saw a maid coming towards her, beckoning.

"Your brother wants you on the telephone,
Miss Ford," answered the maid, " he says it's
quite important, and he wants you to please
hurry."

" Excuse me," flung back Grace, as she hurried
off. " I'll be back in a minute. I hope he's
going to confess where he put those chocolates."



CHAPTER II

AFTER THE PAPERS



' HELLO, is this you, Will? 1
"Yes, this is Grace. What did you do with

my chocolates? The girls are here, and .

Never mind about the chocolates? The idea! I

like . What's that? You want to go to the

ball game? Will I do your errand for you?
Yes, I'm listening. Go on ! '

" It's this way, Sis," explained Will over the
wire from a down-town drug store. "This
morning dad told me to go over to grandmother's
and get those papers. You know; the ones in
that big property deal which has been hanging
fire so long. Grandmother has the papers in her
safe. The deal is to be closed to-day. I prom-
ised dad I'd go, but I forgot all about it, and
now the fellows want me to go to the ball game
with them.

"If you'll go over to grandmother's and get

the papers I'll buy you a two-pound box of the

ii



12 THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE

best chocolates honest, I will. And you can
get the papers as well as I can. Grandmother
expects one of the family over after them to-
day, and she has them all ready.

" You can go just as well as I can better, iri
fact, and dad won't care as long as he gets the
papers. You're to take them to his office. Will
you do it for me, Sis? Come on, now, be a
sport, and say yes."

" But it's so hot, and Betty, Amy, and Mollie
are here with me. I don't want to go all the way
over to grandmother's after some tiresome old
papers. Besides, it was your errand, anyhow."

" I know it, Sis, but I don't want to miss that
game. It's going to be a dandy! Come on, go
for me, that's a good fellow. I'll make it three
pounds."

" No, I'm not going. Besides, it looks like a
thunder storm."

" Say, Sis, will you go if I let you ride
Prince?"

"Your new horse?" asked Grace, eagerly.

"Yes, you may ride Prince," came over the
wire. Will was a good horseman, but for some
time had to be content with rather an ordinary
steed. Lately he had prevailed on his father to
get him a new one, and Prince, a pure white
animal, of great beauty, had been secured. It



AFTER THE PAPERS

was gentle, but spirited, and had great speed.
Grace rode well, but her mount did not suit her,
and Mr. Ford did not want to get another just
then. Will never allowed his sister to more
than try Prince around the yard, but she was
ager to go for a long canter with the noble
animal. Now was the chance she had waited
for so long.

" You must want to see that ball game awfully
bad, to lend me Prince," said Grace.

" I do," answered Will. " But be careful of
him Don't let him have his head too much or
he'll bolt. But there's not a mean streak in him."

" Oh, I know that I can manage."



: Then you'll get those papers from grand-
mother for me, and take them to dad?'

" Yes, I guess so, though I don't like leaving
the girls."

"Oh, you can explain it to them. An'd you
an 'phone down for the chocolates and have
them sent up. Charge them to me. The girls
can chew on them until you come back. It won't
take you long on Prince. And say, listen, Sis ! '

" Yes, go on."

"Those papers are pretty valuable, dad said.
There are other parties interested in this deal, and
if they got hold' of the documents it might make
a lot of trouble."



I 4 THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE

"Trouble?"

" Yes. But there's not much chance of that.
They don't even know where the papers are."

" All right, I'll get them. Have a good time
at the game, Billy boy."

'I will, and look out for Prince. So long!'
and Will hung up the receiver, while Grace over
the private wire, telephoned to the groom to sad-
dle Prince. Then she went out to tell her friends
of her little trip.

And while she is doing this, I will interject
a few words of explanation so that those who did
not read the first volume of this series may have
a better understanding of the characters and loca-
tion of this story.

The first book was called " The Outdoor Girls
of Deepdale; Or, Camping and Tramping for
Fun and Health." In that is given an account of
how the four chums set off to walk about two
hundred miles in two weeks, stopping nights at
the homes of various friends and relatives on the
route. At the very outset they stumbled on the
mystery of a five hundred dollar bill, and it was
not until the end that the strange affair was
cleared up most unexpectedly.

The four girls were Betty Nelson, a born
leader, bright, vigorous and with more than her
share of common sense. She was the daughter



AFTER THE PAPERS 15

of Charles Nelson, a wealthy carpet manufac-
turer. Grace Ford, tall, willowly, and exceed-
ingly pretty, was blessed with well-to-do parents.
Mr. Ford being a lawyer of note, who handled
many big cases. Mollie Billette, was just the op-
posite type from Grace. Mollie was almost al-
ways in action, Grace in repose. Mollie was
dark, Grace fair. Mollie was quick-tempered
Grace very slow to arouse. Perhaps it was the
French blood in Mollie blood that showed even
more plainly in her mother, a wealthy widow
that accounted for this. Or perhaps it was the
mischievous twins Dodo and Paul whose an-
tics so often annoyed their older sister, that
caused Mollie to " flare up " at times.

Amy Stonington was concerned in a mystery
that she hoped would some day be unraveled.
For years she had believed that John and Sarah
Stonington were her father and mother, but in
the first book I related how she was given to un-
derstand differently.

It appears that, when she was a baby, ~Amy
lived in a Western city. There came a flood,
and she was picked up on some wreckage.
There was a note pinned to her baby dress or,
rather an envelope that had contained a note,
and this was addressed to Mrs. Stonington.
5i\my's mother was Mrs. Stonington's aunt,



16 THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE

though the two had not seen eacn other in many
years.

Whether Amy's parents perished in the flood,
as seemed likely, or what became of them, was
never known, nor was it known whether there
were any other children. But Mr. Stonington,
after the flood, was telegraphed for, and came
to get Amy. He and his wife had kept her
ever since, and shortly before this story opens
they had told her of the mystery surrounding her.
Of course it was a great shock to poor Amy,
but she bore it bravely. She called Mr. and
Mrs. Stonington " uncle " and " aunt " after that.

I described Deepdale and its surroundings in
the previous book, so I will make no more than
a passing reference to it here. Sufficient to say
that the town nestled in a bend of the Argono
River, a few miles above where that stream wid-
ened out into beautiful and picturesque Rainbow
Lake. Then the river continued on its way
again, increasing into quite> a large body of water.
On the river and lake plied many pleasure craft,
and some built for trade, in which they competed
with a railroad that connected with the main line
to New York. In Rainbow Lake were a number
of islands, the largest Triangle obviously so
called, being quite a summer resort.

Our four girls lived near each other in fine



AFTER THE PAPERS 17

residences, that of Mollie's mother being on the
bank of the river. Deepdale was a thriving com-
munity, in the midst of a fertile farming section.

The summer sun glinted in alternate shadows
and brilliant patches on Grace Ford as she hurried
out to her friends on the lawn, after receiving
the message from her brother Will.

"What happened?' asked Mollie, for it was
evident from the expression on the face of the
approaching girl that something out of the or-
dinary had been the import of the message.

" Oh, it was Will. He "

" Did he ' fess up ' about the chocolates? ' in-
quired Mollie.

" No, but he's going to treat us to a three-
pound box. I 'phoned do\vn for them. They'll
be here soon, and you girls can enjoy them while
I'm gone."

"Gone!" echoed Betty, blankly. "Where
are you going, pray tell ? '

" Oh, Will forgot to do something father told
him to, and he wants me to do it for him. Get
some rather important papers from Grandmother
Ford. I'm going to ride Prince. I wish you all
could come. Will you be angry if I run away for
a little while? I shan't be more than an hour."

"Angry? Of course not," said Akiy, gently.
"Besides, it's important; isn't it?'



18 THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT. RAINBOW LAKE,

" I imagine so, from what Will said. But He;
has the baseball fever, and there's no cure for it.
So if you don't mind I'll just slip into my habit,
and canter over. Oh, I just love Prince! He's
the finest horse I '

" I'm afraid of horses," confessed Amy.

" I'm not ! " declared Betty, who was fond of
all sports, and who had fully earned her title
of " Little Captain," which she was often called.
" Some day I'm going to prevail on daddy to
get me one."

" I should think you'd rather have an auto,"
spoke Mollie.

" I may, some day," murmured Betty. ' But
hurry along, Grace. It looks as though it might
storm. We'll save some of the candy for you."

" You'd better ! "

The chocolates came before Grace was ready
to start after the papers, for she discovered a
rent in her skirt and it had to be mended. Then,
too, Prince proved a little more restive than had
been anticipated, from not having been out in
two days, and the groom suggested that he take
the animal up and down the road on a sharp
gallop to give the excess spirit a chance to be
worked off. So Grace saw to it that she had at
least part of her share of chocolates before she
left.



AFTER THE PAPERS 19

"And I have just time to hear the rest about
the grand surprise," she said to Betty, who had
been turning and creasing in her hand the letter
her uncle had written.

" I'm afraid I can't go as much into detail as
I thought I could/' confessed Betty. " But I'll
read you the letter my old sea-captain uncle sent
me. It begins : ' In port; longitude whatever yotj
like, and latitude an ice cream soda.' Then he
goes on :

" ' Dear messmate. Years ago, when you first
signed papers to voyage through life, when you
weren't rated as an A. B., you used to have
me spin sea-yarns for you. And you always
said you were going to be a sailor, shiver my
timbers, or something like that, real sailor-like,
so it sounded.

" ' I never forgot this, and I always counted
on taking you on a voyage with me. But your
captain that is to say your father never would
let me, and often the barometer went away down
between him and me.

" ' Howsomever, I haven't forgotton how you
liked the water, nor how much you wanted a big
ship of your own. You used to make me promise
that if ever I could tow the Flying Dutchman
into port that you could have it for a toy. And
I promised.



20 THE OUTDOOR GIRLS AT RAINBOW LAKE

" l Well, now I have the chance to get the
Flying Dutchman for you, and I'm bringing it
home, with sails furled so it won't get away. I'm
going to give you a grand surprise soon, and you
can pass it on to your friends. So if you let me
luff along for a few more cable lengths I think I'll
make port soon, and then we'll see what sort of a
sailor you'll make. You may expect the surprise
shortly.'

"That's all there is to it," concluded Betty,


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