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GENERAL BONAPARTE,



AFTERWARDS



THE EMPEROR OF THE FRENCH AND
KING OF ITALY.



1769— 1821.



Frontispiece.



THE



OF

Eaura, Bucfjess of ^brantes



(WIDOW OF GENERAL JUNOT)



Reminiscences of her Life in Corsica, Paris,
AND in Spain and Portugal




A NEW EDITION
IN FOUR VOLUMES, WITH PORTRAITS

VOLUME THE SECOND



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1Ricbar& aBentlei^ an& ^ow

JJublishcrs in QDvbin.uj) to ^jcr <il^ajcstii the (Qucciv
1893



ISAAC FOOT
LIBRARY .



THE



^)omt anil (Eourt ^ife

OF

CJje Cmptror ^apoleon



AND HIS FAMILY



Pictures of the most Distinguished
Persons of the Time



MADAME JUNOT (n£e PERMON)
DUCHESSE D'ABRANT:fes




A NEW EDITION
IN FOUR VOLUMES, IVITH PORTRAITS

VOLUME THE SECOND
<£ « b n

1Ricbar5 Bentle\> anb %o\\

publishers in (L">rbinvui) to ^jcv ^bijcstjj the (Uucen






LIBRARY

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

SANTA BARBARA



CONTENTS
OF THE SECOND VOLUME



Chapter I.
1—6.

Chapter II.
7—14.

Chapter III.
15—27-

Chapter IV.
28-34.

Chapter V.

35—45-

Chapter VI.

46—50.

Chapter VII.
51—59-

Chapter VIII.
60 — 64.

Chapter IX.

65—77-



Chapter X.
78-8S.



( Presentation at Court — Conversation with the First
( Consul — Hortense de Beauharnais.

j Preparations for Madame Permon's ball — A family
I visit to the Tuileries.

(■The ball at Madame Permon's — Important guests
•I — The Minuet de la Cour — Conversation with
i Napoleon — Jerome Bonaparte.

f Political career of Lucien Bonaparte — Kind act of
( his towards the Fl^chelle family.

[The customs of the New Court — The First Consul's
•j reviews — The drummer of Zurich — The Diplo-
[ matic Corps.

(Anecdote of David — Gerard — General Moreau's
V pistols.

f Pauline Foures — Napoleon's liaison with her in
I Egypt — She becomes Madame Ramchouppe.

j General Junot's work in Paris — Chevalier's con-
t spiracy — The Chouans.

I Gaiety of Madame Permon — Explosion of the in-
I fernal machine — Alarm at the Opera — Effects of
j the explosion in the Rue Saint Nicaise— Police
[ investigation.

.(Visits to the Tuileries — Caroline Murat — M. Por-
( talis.



CONTENTS OF VOL. II.



Chapter XI.
86—92.



(^ Breakfast with Madame Bonaparte — Visit to the
\ lions — Napoleon and the Psylle — The snake
( found.



i Madame Junot's receptions — Cambaceres — The
catastrophe attending M. de Souza — A second
attempt upon his wig — General Mortier — Cesar
Berthier.



Chapter XIII.
108 — 122.



The First Consul on parade — M. de Latude —
Visit from the terrible Santerre — General Char-
bonnier — His incompetence — The fiery Van-
damme.



Chapter XIV.
123 — 128.



( M. Charles and his friendship for the Empress
t Jc



Josephine.



Chapter XV.
129—134.



' A tribute from General Kl^ber — The affairs of
^ Egypt — General Damas.



Chapter XVI.
135—141-



•■M. Geouffre's mission to General Menou foiled —
The painter Goubaud and his tricolour un-
I welcome.



Chapter XVII,
142-147.



f Description of Malmaison — Insincerity of the Em-
1 press Josephine.



Chapter XVIII.
148—153.



( Private theatricals at Malmaison — Arrival of two
I old soldiers — Alarm in the night.



Chapter XIX.
154—179-



(-Scene between the First Consul and Madame
I Bonaparte — Her jealousy of Madame Junot —
Interviews with the First Consul at unofficial
I hours — Arrival of Junot — A hunting scene —
'^ Madame Junot's return to Paris.



Chapter XX.
180 — 190.



r The Theatres — The Opera — A masked Ball.



{Private theatre at Malmaison — Actors and their
critics — The bootless dragoon — Anecdote of
Isabey — Leapfrog with the First Consul — Punch
of the Republic.



Chapter XXII.
203—215.



f Gaieties in Paris — Career of General Brune — His
( murder — Junot's incomplete report.



Chapter XXIII.
216 — 222.



j Count Louis von Cobentzel — Amusing scene with
( a special courier from Vienna.



Chapter XXIV.
223 — 230.



\ La ComMie Franfaise— General Sprengporten-
( Madame R^camier.



CONTENTS OF VOL. II.



C Uneasiness of General Rapp — Junot's interview
\ with the First Consul — Order of the day regard-
[ ing the Battle of Nazareth.

Chapter XXVI. ( Hoax upon the Princesse Dolgorouki — M. De
239 — 248. ^ Lac^p^de — Perilous position of M. Robert.

M. Brunetiere — Visit to Mademoiselle Clairon —
The Queen of Babylon without bread — Generosity
of her friends — Her opinion of Mademoiselle
Mars — The mysterious shot.



Chapter XXV.
231—238.



Chapter XXVH.
249—257-



(Admiral Linois's engagement — The flotilla at
Boulogne — Scandalous pamphlets — The First
Consul reproaches General Junot — General
Junot's wound at Milan.



Chapter XXIX.
279 — 287.

Chapter XXX.
288 — 300.



Chapter XXXI.
301—312.



Chapter XXXII.
313—328.



( General Lannes's freedom — An appeal for an
1 audience — Certificate of examination.

(Illness of Madame Permon — Madame Junot's
confinement — A merry dinner-party — Poor
Andoche — An impromptu visit to the Tuileries
— Birth of Junot's eldest daughter.

(M. d'Offreville a terrible bore — Talma— Comic
•j scene at the Thiatre Montansier — The runaway
( cabriolet.

/ The King of Etruria — M. de Talleyrand — A Tuscan
I Fete — CEdipics at the Comidie Franfaise — Reg-
-! nault de Saint Jean d'Angely — Proposed creation
I of the Legion of Honour — Cardinal Consalvi —
"^ " Te Deum " at Notre Dame.



Chapter XXXIII.
329—342.



f Death of Madame Permon — Departure of Madame
Leclerc for St. Domingo — Her fondness for
i dress— Toussaint — Death of General Leclerc.



Chapter XXXIV.
343—355-



Chapter XXXV.

356—365.



r Peace of Amiens — Mr. Fox in Paris— Anecdote of
\ Fox— His debts— The First Consul's coat— His
i well-shaped legs — Story of a Marseilles banker.

(Arrival of foreigners in Paris — The Duchess of
Courland — Lady Conyngham — Lord Whitworth
— " The Marquis of Steyne " — Count Philip von
Cobentzel — Madame Demidoff.



Chapter XXXVI.
■ 366—382.



The painter David — The Gobelin tapestries — The
Museum of Painting and Sculpture at the
Louvre — Cabinet of Medals — Story of M. de
Sartine — Intolerance of the clergy — The cur6 of
St. Roche and Mademoiselle Chameroi — Napo-
leon's ditrnified rebuke.



CONTENTS OF VOL. II.



/Cardinal Caprera — Baptism of Junot's eldest

VVVT7TT daughter — A little devil — Disappearance of Car-

HAPTERjiAAVii. | dinal Caprera's biretta-The First Consul's god-

3°3 394- child — General and the Countess Verdier —

' Madame Marmont.

(The First Consulship for life — Breakfast given by
General Junot— Present from the First Consul —
Little Josephine Junot — Illness of Junot — Unex-
pected visit from Napoleon.

List of the Principal Honours conferred by the Emperor
Napoleon.

Contemporary Rulers.
Cambac^res.




LIST OF PORTRAITS

CONTAINED IN THE SECOND VOLUME



GENERAL BONAPARTE, AFTERWARDS THE EMPEROR OF THE
FRENCH AND KING OF ITALY - - frontispiece

JEROME BONAPARTE, KING OF WESTPHALIA, COUNT
MONTFORT (COUNT HARTZ), MARSHAL OF FRANCE IN

1850 - - - - to face page 26

JEAN VICTOR MOREAU, GENERAL, CONQUEROR AT HOHEN-
LINDEN, AND AFTERWARDS SHOT FIGHTING AGAINST

HIS COUNTRY AT DRESDEN - to face page 50

ELIZA MARIE ANNE BONAPARTE, GRAND - DUCHESS OF
TUSCANY, PRINCESS OF LUCCA AND PIOMBINO (cOUNTESS

OF CAMPiGNANo) - - to face page 194

MARIE CAROLINE LOUISE ANNONCIADE BONAPARTE, GRAND-
DUCHESS OF BERG AND CLEVES, AFTERWARDS QUEEN
OF NAPLES (countess OF LI PON A, DUCHESS OF

tarentum) - - - tfl jacc page 326

LUCIEN BONAPARTE, DUKE OF MUSIONANO AND PRINCE

OF CANiNO - - - to face page 330



MEMOIRS OF MADAME JUNOT

DUCHESS OF ABRANTES



CHAPTER I.

My Presentation to the First Consul and Madame Bonaparte — Diiroc
and Rapp on the Steps — Eleven o'clock — Politeness of Eugene
de Beauharnais — Gracious Reception by Madame Bonaparte —
Amiability of Hortense — Conversation with the First Consul —
Bonaparte's Opinion of Mirabeau — The Rogue and the Tribunes —
M. de Cobentzel and Singular Reserve of Bonaparte — Bonaparte
upon the Society of the Faubourg Saint Germain — Portrait of
Mademoiselle de Beauharnais.

My presentation to the First Consul and Madame Bona-
parte was a great affair for my mother ; she occupied her-
self upon my toilet with more minute care than I imagine
she had ever bestowed upon her own in the highest tide of
her vanity. One thing disturbed her much, no ceremonial.
"Nevertheless, he acts the King," said my mother. The
truth was that at this time the interior of the First Consul's
family was like that of a very rich man, with no more
etiquette ; Madame Bonaparte had not even yet ladies in
waiting.

We went to the Tuileries after the Opera, leaving the
ballet of Psyche in the middle that we might not be too
late, and arrived at ten o'clock. My heart beat as we

VOL. 11. 27



2 MEMOIRS OF THE DUCHESS OF A BRANT ES

alighted at the Pavihon of Flora, at the door which pre-
cedes that in the angle so long called the entrance of the
Empress. As we ascended the five or six steps before the
door on the left, leading to the apartments on the ground-
floor, we met Duroc and Rapp. " How late you are !"
said Duroc. "It is near eleven o'clock." "Ah!" added
the brave Alsatian, " Madame Junot is a worker of marvels ;
she is about to make an infidel of our good Junot." And
he burst into a loud laugh.

I was desirous of turning back ; but Junot replied,
" Madame Bonaparte desired me to come here after the
Opera." " Oh !" said Duroc ; " it is quite a different thing
if Madame Bonaparte has appointed the hour."

At this moment the folding door of Madame Bonaparte's
apartment opened, and Eugene de Beauharnais ran down.
He was sent by his mother, because, having heard the
wheels of a carriage within the Court, and finding that no
one came up, she began to fear lest by mistake, arising
from the lateness of the hour, I might be told that she
could not receive me.

I was sensible of this attention, and the more so as the
messenger was himself very fit to dispel apprehensions of a
doubtful reception. M. de Beauharnais gave me his arm,
and we entered the large salon together. This fine apart-
ment was so obscure that at first entering I saw no one in
it ; for it was lighted only by two chandeliers placed on the
mantelpiece, and surrounded with gauze to soften the glare.
I was very nervous on entering ; but an observation from
Eugene de Beauharnais contributed wonderfully to restore
my composure.

"You have nothing to fear," said he; "my mother and
sister are so kind !" These words made me start ; no
doubt I might experience that emotion which a young
woman is so liable to feel at a first presentation to strangers,



JOSEPHINE AND HORTENSE



especially when she has some reason to imagine that she may
not be very cordially received ; but my spirits recovered
surprisingly.

Madame Bonaparte was in the same place which she then
occupied as mistress of the house, and where afterwards she
was seated as sovereign of the world ; I found her before a
tapestry frame prosecuting a work, three-fourths of which
was performed by Mademoiselle Dubuquoy, whose ingenious
hint that Marie Antoinette was fond of such employments
had inspired Josephine's inclination for them. At the other
side of the chimney sat Mademoiselle Hortense de Beau-
harnais, an amiable, mild, agreeable girl, with the figure
of a nymph and beautiful light hair. Her gracious manners
and gentle words were irresistibly pleasing.

The First Consul was standing before the chimney with
his hands behind him, fidgeting as he had already the habit
of doing ; his eyes were fixed upon me, and as soon as I
recovered my self-possession I found that he was closely
examining me ; but from that moment I determined not to
be abashed, as to allow myself to be overcome by fantastic
fears with such a man would be ruin.

Madame Bonaparte stood up, came forward, took my two
hands and embraced me, saying that I might depend upon
her friendship. "I have been too long Junot's friend," she
continued, " not to entertain the same sentiments for his
wife, particularly for the one he has chosen." "Oh, oh!
Josephine," said the First Consul, " that is running on very
fast ! How do you know that this little pickle is worth loving ?
Well, Mademoiselle Loulou (you see I do not forget the
names of my old friends), have you not a word for me ?"

He had taken my hand, and, drawing me towards him,
looked at me with a scrutiny which for a moment made me
cast down my eyes, but I recollected myself immediately.
"General," I replied, smiling, "it is not for me to speak



4 MEMOIRS OF THE DUCHESS OF A BR ANTES

first." The slight contraction of his brow would have been
imperceptible to any other person, but I knew his counte-
nance well : he smiled almost instantly, and said, " Very
well parried. Oh, the mother's spirit. Apropos, how is
Madame Permon ?" " She suffers much ; for two years past
her health has altered so seriously as to cause us great
uneasiness." " Indeed ! so bad as that ; I am sorry to hear
it, very sorry ; make my regards to her. It is a wrong head
— a devil of a spirit ;* but she has a generous heart and a
noble soul."

I withdrew my hand, which he had held during this short
colloquy, and took my seat near Madame Bonaparte. The
conversation became general and very agreeable. Duroc
came in, and took part in it. Madame Bonaparte said little
on subjects she did not understand, and thereby avoided
exposing her ignorance. Her daughter, without saying
more than is becoming in a young girl, had the talent of
sustaining the conversation on agreeable topics.

M. de Cobentzel was expected at Paris, and his arrival
was spoken of. Madame Bonaparte said that she had
heard someone observe upon the astonishing resemblance
between Count Louis de Cobentzel and Mirabeau. " Who
said that?" asked the First Consul hastily. "I do not
exactly recollect. Barras, I think." " And where had
Barras seen M. de Cobentzel ? Mirabeau ! he was ugly ;
M. de Cobentzel is ugly— there is all the resemblance. £A,
pardieu ! you know him, Junot ; you were with him at our
famous treaty, and Duroc, too. But you never saw Mira-
beau. He was a rogue, but a clever rogue ! he himself did
more mischief to the former masters of this house than the
States-General altogether. But he was a rogue." Here he

* I have already said that I shall preserve the turn of Napoleon's
phrases and his manner of speaking ; it was original, and at once
Oriental and bourgeoise.



A FAMILY PARTY



took a pinch of snuff, repeating, " He was a bad man, and
too vicious to be tribune of the people ; not but in my
tribunate there were some no better than he, and without
half his talent. As for Count Louis de Cobentzel— — "

He took another pinch of snuff, and was about to resume
his observations, but stopped as if struck by a sudden reflec-
tion. He thought, perhaps, that the first magistrate of the
Republic should not so lightly give his opinion upon a man
just named by a great Power to treat with him. He stopped
then with a sentence half uttered, and, turning to me, said :

"I hope that we shall often see you, Madame Junot.
My intention is to draw round me a numerous family, con-
sisting of my generals and their young wives. They will be
friends of my wife and of Hortense, as their husbands are
mine. Does that suit you ? I warn you that you will be
disappointed if you expect to find here your fine acquaint-
ances of the Faubourg Saint Germain. I do not like them.
They are my enemies, and prove it by defaming me. Tell
them from me, as your mother lives amongst them — tell
them that I am not afraid of them."

This sentence, spoken with harshness, gave me uneasiness
from two causes : it was disobliging both to Junot and to
me ; it seemed to reproach him for taking a wife from a
hostile society, and to hint that I came into his own with
unfriendly dispositions. I could not forbear answering,
perhaps hastily :

" General, excuse me if I cannot consent to do what is
not in the province of a woman, and particularly in that of
General Junot's wife ; and permit me to carry from you
to my friends only messages of peace and union ; I know
that they desire no others."

I would not interrupt the relation of this interesting inter-
view to describe the person and manners of Mademoiselle
de Beauharnais, but I think it would be an injustice both to



6 MEMOIRS OF THE DUCHESS OF A BR ANTES

her and my readers to omit to describe her as she appeared
at my first introduction to her. Hortense de Beauharnais
was at this time seventeen years old ; she was fresh as a rose,
and though her fair complexion was not relieved by much
colour, she had enough to produce that freshness and bloom
which was her chief beauty ; a profusion of light hair played
in silky locks round her soft and penetrating blue eyes.
The delicate roundness of her figure, slender as a palm-tree,
was set off by the elegant carriage of her head ; her feet
were small and pretty ; her hands very white, with pink
well-rounded nails.

But what formed the chief attraction of Hortense was the
grace and suavity of her manners, which united the Creole
languor with the vivacity of France. She was gay, gentle,
and amiable ; she had wit, which, without the smallest ill-
temper, had just malice enough to be amusing. A careful
education had improved her natural talents ; she drew
excellently, sang harmoniously, and performed admirably in
comedy. In 1800 she was a charming young girl ; she after-
wards became one of the most amiable princesses of Europe.
I have seen many, both in their own courts and in Paris, but
I never knew one who had any pretensions to equal talent.

She was beloved by every one, though, of all who sur-
rounded her, her mother seemed to be the least conscious
of her attractions. I do not mean to say that she did not
love her, but certainly she did not express that degree of
maternal affection which Hortense de Beauharnais merited.
Her brother loved her tenderly : the First Consul looked
upon her as his child ; and it was only in that country so
fertile in the inventions of scandal that so foolish an accusa-
tion could have been imagined, as that any feeling less pure
than paternal affection actuated his conduct towards her.
The vile calumny met with the contempt it merited, and is
now only remembered to be confuted.



[ 7 ]



CHAPTER II.

The Wedding-ball — List of Guests — Swearing — Invitation to the First
Consul — His Visiting-cards — Diplomatic Breakfast — Visit to the
Tuileries, and Invitation to Madame Bonaparte — The Mojiaco and
Les Deux Coqs — The First Consul's Closet — Charm of his Physi-
ognomy — The First Consul accepts an Invitation to the Ball — The
First Anniversary of the i8th of Brumaire, and the Ball deferred —
M. de Caulaincourt's Indiscretion.

My mother had determined to give a ball on the fifteenth
day after my marriage ; it was an ancient custom, and though
not now the fashion, she would by no means forego it. One
evening when we had dined with her, she required our
assistance in arranging her plans : " For this ball," said she,
" must be one of the prettiest that has been given this long
time past ; my house, it is true, is very small, but it must
be turned into an enchanted parterre of flowers. Come,
take your place at the desk, Madame Laurette, and make
out our list of invitations, for all your husband's friends
must be of the party." Junot thanked her, and kissed her
hand.

" Oh ! surely," she replied, " your friends are my friends
now, only they swear rather too much ; and you, I have
been told, can do so, too, when you are angry. You must
leave off that ugly habit ; it does not become a gentleman."
Junot laughed, and held up his finger to me. " What,



8 MEMOIRS OF THE DUCHESS OF A BR ANTES

because she tells me that you swear?" said my mother.
" No, I hope she will never cease to pour all her confidence
into my maternal ear ; besides, remember, she has not yet
made acquaintance enough with your ear for it to supplant
mine ; but come, to work."

Junot took the pen, and wrote down all the names of the
ladies, beginning with Madame Bonaparte and Mademoiselle
de Beauharnais. He then waited for the name with which
my mother would commence the list of gentlemen.

" The First Consul of the French RepubUc, One and
Indivisible ; is not that the style ?" said my mother. " The
First Consul !" we exclaimed together. " Yes, the First
Consul ; is there anything astonishing in that ? I am tired

of being on bad terms with anyone, and besides "

" And besides," said Junot, laughing, " you think that
perhaps you were more in the wrong than he."

" No, no," said my mother; "that is quite another affair.
He was in the wrong altogether ; but I considered that, as
Laurette might be daily in his society, these sort of quarrels
might produce disagreeable effects for her, and I wished to
prevent that — was I not right ?" We embraced her. "But
the invitation," she added, "is not all. Do you think he
will accept it ? do you think he will come ?" " I am sure
of it ; only name the hour that will suit you best, and I will
come to fetch you," said Junot, enchanted at this prospect
of reconciliation between his mother-in-law and his beloved
General.

My mother looked at him with an air of astonishment
perfectly laughable. " Fetch me ! to go where ?" " Where !"
returned Junot, as much surprised in his turn ; " to the
Tuileries, to tender your invitation to the First Consul and
Madame Bonaparte." " My dear Junot," said my mother,
with the utmost seriousness and sang-froid, " you are quite,
nay, perfectly mad." " It seems to me that what I say is,



THE FIRST CONSUL MUST LEAVE A CARD 9

nevertheless, very sensible ; that nothing, in fact, can be
more reasonable," replied Junot, somewhat disconcerted by
the apostrophe. "And I tell you, you are mad. Would
you have me go to request General Bonaparte to come
again to my house, after having forbidden his appearance
there ?"

" How, then, do you propose to invite him ?" asked Junot,
with an accent impossible to describe. " Truly, how should
I invite him ? Precisely in the same manner as I do every-
one else, except that the card shall be all in writing, and I
will write it all in my own neat hand, which he knows per-
fecriy well."

Junot strode up and down the room, exclaiming, " But
that cannot be ! You had better not invite him at all ! He
will think that you intend him a disrespect." " He would
be much mistaken, then. But he would think no such
thing ; and you will see that, after having received my note
of invitation, he will do as all well-bred men would ; he will
call on me before the ball, or at least he will have a card
left at the door." " Do you think, then," said Junot, in the
utmost surprise, " that he keeps visiting cards ?" " And
why not ? My dear child, because Bonaparte gains battles,
is that any reason that he should not visit ?"

For a long time my inclination to laugh had been sup-
pressed with the utmost difficulty ; Albert, throwing himself
back in his arm-chair, had given way to his from the first ;
and this last observation, together with the stupefied
astonishment of Junot, who, with his mouth half open,
could not find words to answer, was altogether too much for
my gravity, and I burst into one of those fits of wild mirth
which one only enjoys at sixteen. My mother and Junot
were still no less serious, my mother at intervals murmuring,
" I do not see why he should not visit, and certainly I shall
not go first."



lo MEMOIRS OF THE DUCHESS OF ABRANTES

My brother and I became by degrees more reasonable,
seeing that she was perfectly in earnest, and certainly in-
tended that the First Consul should come first to her.
Now, it is true that not even a thought of royalty was yet
attached to his name, but already for twelve months he had
exercised the supreme authority of the State ; and this
power had placed him on an elevation which appeared quite
natural and becoming to him ; he was there because it was
his proper place.

Albert knew my mother's character, and that by further
opposition we should irritate without persuading her ; he
therefore sat down to the desk, and requested her to dictate



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