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241 flDS



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS



BY THE SAME A UTHOR

SELECTED POEMS. Second Im-
pression

THE CHINESE LANTERN
Second Impression

PAINS AND PENALTIES: The
Defence of Queen Caroline

THE NEW CHILD'S GUIDE TO
KNOWLEDGE. Third Impres-
sion

THE WHEEL: A Dramatic Trilogy
SAINT FRANCIS POVERELLO



IN COLLABORATION WITH
GRANVILLE BARKER

PRUNELLA, or Love in a Dutch
Garden. Twelfth Impression.

SIDGWICK & JACKSON LTD.



THE

DEATH OF ORPHEUS



BY

LAURENCE HOUSMAN



LONDON
SIDGWIGK & JACKSON LTD.

MCMXXI



All rights reserved



DRAMATIS PERSONS



ORPHEUS.

DION (A Shepherd King).

LYCUS

PHILEMON

LEADER OF CHORUS.

MESSENGER.



r Sons).



EURYDICE (A Water-Nymph).

PH ALISSA (Daughter -in - law
to Dion).

FIRST BACCHANAL.

SECOND BACCHANAL.
SHEPHERD BOY.



Shepherds, Maidens, Bacchanals, Shades.



535241



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS
ACT I

SCENE. A deep glen, shaded by trees, with path leading to a
stream. The stream is fed by a fall of water from a
deeply-recessed rock. Behind the rock rises the mound of
a hill crowned by a circle of pine-trees. It is noon : the
bright light of day is tempered by the thick screen of leaves.
Upon the grass slopes, between which the stream runs,
SHEPHERDS are discovered resting.

DION. Deep-fountained Rock, where amid mur-
murous shade
Of sweet-voiced waters dwells the secret

Nymph,

Unseen of men ; and Thou, protecting Pan,
Who unto earth giv'st peace lover of herds
And all wild things, Father of fleece and fell
Shadow our noontide rest ! For now the

plains

And the bare hill burn in the eye of day ;
All life grows languid, and the parched herbs

faint.

Go, fetch me a draught of water from the
spring !

[LYCUS goes : fills a pitcher at the fountain,
and returns. PHILEMON plays softly
upon a small harp.
Under the heart of Earth,

7



$ I ; .tHE fiEATH OF ORPHEUS

In the faithful breast,

Surely abideth rest

For the sons of men :

For of her spring rivers to birth,

And the kindly yield

Of herb, and flower, and grass,

And hidden root, and the joy of the harvest

field.

The rains lie buried : they pass ;
They return again.

[He drinks and passes the pitcher on.
Take strength, O my sons, from these ;
And to Earth be praise,
Who bringeth to all things life.
So length of days
And peace in the fold shall be ours,

[PHILEMON'S harping stops.
And an end without strife.
PHILEMON. Ah ! Father, what hast thou said ?
Was peace in the fold when Linus, our lover,

lay dead ?
Linus, a keeper of sheep, and the son of a

king !
DION. Peace, and let be ! Shall an old grief

trouble thee still ?
PHILEMON. It is new ; it is new ! His voice is

gone from the hill :
I shall hear him never again !

[He resumes his harping.

MAIDENS enter , bearing pitchers; they move slowly
down to the spring, and stand to listen.

Linus is dead, is dead !



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS 9

IST SEMI-CHORUS. He sang a song that was loved

of men,

Merry it was as the song of a bird ;
And the feet danced then
For the heart that heard.
2ND SEMI- CHORUS. But the God was jealous

because of this

That he gave unto mortal man more bliss
Than ever befell by the will of Heaven.

[The harping ceases.
PHILEMON. And we saw the field with his blood

stained red.
Linus, our lover, is dead, is dead !

[The women stoop to draw water.
DION. Hearken, my son ; give ear to the voice

of age.
Blame not the Gods ; for with them from of

old

Dwells wisdom, and the eye of Heaven sees all.
Earth hath her seasons ; so, in its day, comes

joy,

Briefer than any flower. Then, for a while,
Man's heart is blest. But Time takes all

things fair,
And changing, cherisheth, making memory

sweet.

Enter PHALISSA, dressed in robes of red and purple,
and crowned with vine leaves. She carries
a cup and wine-skin. Unseen by the SHEP-
HERDS she comes to the stream, and stands
listening.

PHILEMON. Linus is dead !



10 THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS

DION. Aye, dead. So has this land

Become his resting-place. When shepherds

pipe
And maidens dance, his sound is in the

hills;

Swift at his call to fold the flocks return ;
So in men's hearts his melodies abide,
Vocal for ever. Thus from life's furrowed

field
The sown goes reaped, and treasured loss

brings gain.
When thou art old thou shalt look back and

see

Across the years as over a sunset land
Of low -lit peaks touched by the downward

day
Those shining joys once thine, distant, and

few,

And far between ; and all the rest a shade
Of darker hours, round which no memory

clings,
Down-deepening to the night which covers

all.
PHILEMON. Ah, me ! Would so that I stood far

away

On that dim slope of time !
DION. Then shalt thou see

How shine and shade together are but one :
Unto which end grief, which companions joy,
Makes the bright less seem more. Thus do

the Gods
Round man's brief gladness shed the beams of

heaven.



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS 11

PHILEMON. Thy words I shall find true when I

am old :

But not true now. Linus, our joy, is dead !
I to the echoes cry his name ; but ever
Lonely a voice returns not his, but mine.
LYCUS. Cry him no more ! Amid those echoes

now
A sweeter voice hath homed. Hither come

late,

For Linus we have Orpheus.
PHALISSA. What of him ?

[Her voice startles the SHEPHERDS, and the

sight of her causes disquiet.
LYCUS. I, too, loved Linus. But when Orpheus

sings,

Dead Linus lives again : twin brothers they,
Though parted from their birth. When Linus

died

PHILEMON. Not died was slain ! By the sweet

singing throat
Dogs took and tore him. So God smote him

dumb !
LYCUS. Then, as we mourned him, came that

newer strain
Mightier than his. When Orpheus sang, the

earth

Woke out of sleep ; with upward rush of leaf
Spring came again, and all the clamorous

woods

In trembling chorus cried : ' Orpheus is come ! '
Straightway yon stream a seven years'

vanishment
(So long thereof had drought bereft our fields)



12 THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS

Out of its rock, reviving, gushed again.
So in our midst dwells peace unto this day.
[PHALISSA, with metallic noise of bells at
her girdle, crosses the stream, and offers to
DION the wine cup wreathed in ivy.
DION. Daughter, why this ? Know'st thou not

from of old
We shepherds drink no wine ? In field and

fold,

Pastured like herds, earth satisfies our need.
PHALISSA. And fed like herds, are of the herd-
like breed.

Therefore take other counsel, for that is well !
DION. Strange words ! What now ?
PHALISSA. I have strange news to tell.

DION. Yes, and strange raiment also ! Round

thy head

What binds yon fillet of leaves ?
PHALISSA. A serpent : dead,

Till the God give it life.

DION. The God, thou sayest ?

PHALISSA. Aye ! No meek God like those to

whom thou prayest
Pan of the herds, Demeter, bed of earth !
Unto this God no water-nymph gave birth
But she, in whose veins ran such fierce desire
To clasp her lord, that, answering fire for fire,
So died she his. And from those nuptials

sprung
This new, this wondrous God, whom now

man's tongue

Praises in many a land. Soon shall ye hear
The Bacchic chant, and see the rout draw near



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS 13

Of dance and minstrelsy. Look ! how they

come

With clash of brazen cup, and beat of drum,
And tangled tresses flying from vine-crowned

head,
And wine-stained bosoms bare, and raiment

red,
And wonder, and great rejoicing. So shall

ye see
New earth in the making, and man henceforth

free!
DION. Well, thou hast told thy story. But

when comes

This mighty God of thine, with noise of drums
And rout of revellers, let him discern
How simple a folk we be, and lightly turn
Some better way ; and passing, come no more
To trouble us !
PHALISSA. He will not pass before

Ye pay him tribute.

DION. Tribute ? We owe him none.

PHALISSA. For having given to all beneath the

sun

This cup of joy, to him deep debt ye owe,
And worship.

DION. Which we render to him so !

[He takes the cup and reverses it, spilling

the contents.

Let him take back the gift, and waste his wine
No more on us, Daughter.
PHALISSA. Daughter of thine

I am not ! In my blood a nobler strain,
Than ever thou didst breed on this dull plain,



14 THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS

For freedom pines. Oh, in what heifer's

stead

Am I pent here, wasted for having wed
Thy son, that died, leaving this uneared womb
A barren field ? What must it be my doom
Still mateless to remain while season runs
To season, bringing age ? Hast thou not sons
Enough, as churls to labour for thy need ?
Give me another mate, and let me breed
Strength to thy race ! Else shall my vows

be given

Unto that God be he of earth or heaven
Who, from thy bondage brings my soul re-
lease !
DION. Thou proud, unquiet woman, hold thy

peace !
Thy words have taught me nothing. I know

well
How sorely many a day thou hast grudged to

dwell

Beneath my roof, and that no fathering care
Could reconcile thee to the unsullied air
Of this still world of ours. Yet wast thou free
To go or come. My door stands wide for thee :
Whichever way thou wilt, thou canst pass

through,
The choice is open.

[He goes, accompanied by one of the SHEP-
HERDS. PHALISSA stands still for a
while and looks after him.

PHALISSA. Yea, and for others, too,

The choice is open. There remains more wine
Than thou hast spilt. [She re-fills the cup.



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS 15

God I how thine eyes do shine,
Ruddier than rubies ! O shepherds, hearken

now !

Unto this God, released, I make my vow :
Take, Lord, for here I give myself to Thee !
Bacchus, thou art the God ! [She drinks.
LYCUS. O brothers, see

What light shines from her eyes !

[She sways ; ecstasy takes hold of her ;

she begins dancing.

PHALISSA. Hither to me !

Hither to me ! Hither to me !
And I will show thee the ways of light ;
Till thy mouth be a song
For the heart made strong,
And thou shalt win glory in all men's sight.
Hither to me ! Hither to me !
Drink of this, and thy soul shall have wings !
Yea, thou shalt see, and thine ears shall hear
Great, and many, and marvellous things :
For the heavens shall open, the Gods shall

appear.

Hither to me ! Hither to me !
A new God cometh by land and sea,
Hither to me !
PHILEMON. Why comes he hither ? His very

name sounds strange.
PHALISSA. Light of the dawn to many a land

brings change.
PHILEMON. Then, in man's waking, field and

herd have part.

PHALISSA. That lies without ; this rises from
the heart :



16 THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS

For thereunto with speed he enters in

And makes his dwelling-place. Then are

ye kin

With God himself.

PHILEMON. Great bliss, were it but true !

PHALISSA. The proof awaits thee. Little thereof

I knew,
Till with first tasting : then my soul grew

wise.
PHILEMON. What profits he having how great

a prize ?
PHALISSA. Even as a fisherman beside some

strand

Sees the float dip, and draws his net to land
Rich with a myriad scales.
PHILEMON. For such reward

I would drink deep.

PHALISSA. Therefore I hailed him Lord,

Having so drained his cup. Why dost thou

stand
Doubtful ? Of what ? Nay, come, reach

out thy hand !
For this is life.
PHILEMON. Life ? And therein what part

For better reward have I ?
PHALISSA. He from thy heart

Shall banish grief.
PHILEMON. All grief ?

PHALISSA. Yea, have no fear 1

The dead arise. Thou shalt find Linus here.
PHILEMON. Of that, oh, were I sure ! If it were

true
Him would I worship !



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS 17

PHALISSA. Thou say'st well. So do N l

[As PHILEMON is about to take the cup,

music sounds in the near distance.
LYCUS. Hark ! It is Orpheus.
PHALISSA. O Shepherds, pay no heed

To that dull strain ! Sweeter than ever reed
Breathed o'er by Pan, or touch of silver

string,

This newer strain which to man's soul I bring.
Hearken to me, to me !

[The music draws nearer.

PHILEMON. Ah ! softly there !

Orpheus that bringeth peace. Him, him I

hear :
O sweetest minstrel ! Hail !

[Ignoring the proffered cup, he stands rapt.

Enter ORPHEUS, harping as he comes.

ORPHEUS. Peace from of old

Be in your dwellings, brothers, and round the
fold!

And thou, sweet Nymph, that in yon mur-
murous bed

Of rock-bound springs hidest thy secret head,

Peace to thy ways and waters without end !
PHALISSA [meaningly]. Unto thee also may she
prove a friend,

When thou art lonely and none else is near.
ORPHEUS. Thou sayest well ; for solitude is dear

In places loved of Pan.
PHALISSA. Far from his kind

Hither comes one that with a secret mind

Hath tasted of strange things.



18 THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS

ORPHEUS. The light of day

Is on my goings. When have I sought the

way
Of darkness ever ? Nay, what reproach is

this?
PHALISSA. Surely I hold thee blameless ; for the

kiss

Thou gavest was like water, not like wine.
ORPHEUS. O bitter woman, what means this

word of thine ?
PHALISSA. Wisdom. Drink, Orpheus !

[She offers him the cup.

ORPHEUS. Nay, I thirst not yet.

PHALISSA. Noon is now passed ; but ere yon

sun be set
Thirst shall lie heavy upon thee; and like

fire

A God shall stand 'twixt thee and thy desire.
ORPHEUS. What say'st thou ?
PHALISSA. Naught. It was the God that spake.
O Orpheus, thou sweet singer, that wouldst

make

This world anew, hereafter shall be told
Thy tale but how the ways of the Gods are

old

Beyond man's understanding. Yet, in truth,
My heart hath pity upon thee for thy youth
And comeliness ; so would I be thy friend.
ORPHEUS. Better if thou be swift, and make an

end.
PHALISSA. What I would say shall others stand

to hear,
And thou be shamed ?



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS 19

ORPHEUS. Speak ! Make thy meaning clear.
If unto any man I have done shame,
Let it be told. But if not, of what blame
Do I stand charged ?

PHALISSA. Of dark and hidden ends.

ORPHEUS. No secrets have I from the eyes of

friends.

PHALISSA. Only of foes, forsooth ?
ORPHEUS. Why, who be they ?

PHALISSA. Not all the world consents to go thy

way.
ORPHEUS. Let each choose freely : none would

I compel.
PHALISSA. Yet by false magic wouldst thou

weave a spell
To bind all things on earth. Yea, herb and

tree

Amazed do tremble at thy minstrelsy ;
And snake and savage beast, all brought to

shame,

Stricken in spirit, at thy touch grow tame,
To slothful sleep betrayed. Beneath thy

hand

A plague of peace hath fallen upon this land !
What ! Wilt thou teach the lion to chew

the cud ?

Rather would I see rivers turned to blood,
Than blood so emptied of its ancient fire !
Hearken, O God, and grant me my desire !
I know, I know why he doth haunt this spot
From morn till eve. And I would that this

stream were not !
So come, thou God,



20 THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS

Vine-crowned, and clad like the pard,

And smite with thy rod this rock,

And the cleft of her hiding-place !

Is the way so rugged and hard

For thy feet to tread ?

Shall she laugh ? shall she mock ?

Shall she stand in the way of thy might ?

Come, then, and deep in its bed

This fountain of waters smite,

Till the flow of its streams runs red,

Till it sink, and be lost in night !

[The SHEPHERDS are startled. ORPHEUS

remains unmoved.
ORPHEUS. What God is he, whose hand shall do

this thing ?
PHALISSA. He of the Vine, and the Cup, and the

fangs that sting !
ORPHEUS. To other and older Gods our hearts

belong.
PHALISSA. But swift of foot he comes, and his

hands are strong.
The grape he hath crushed, and the vat with

his wine runs red.
ORPHEUS. Let him drink thereof and be glad ;

let him crown his head
With leaf and cluster ; let Satyrs dance in his

train ;
Let him pass through this land in peace, and

return not again.
PHALISSA. Art thou so set ? Dost thou deny

this God ?

ORPHEUS. I know him mighty and strong, and
like fire to the clod.



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS 21

PHALISSA. Therefore receive in thy heart the

gift of his hand.
ORPHEUS. The vine hath her portion in earth

but not in this land :
Our ways are the ways of peace.
PHALISSA. Now surely, I deem,

In speech have I tarried too long to prepare

a path.
I offered thee kindness ; but soon, when he

cometh in wrath,

Thy flock shall be scattered, and thou for-
saken, alone
For spitting, and scorn, and reproach, shalt

hereafter be known.
With the trample of dancing feet he shall

stain thy stream,

And the triumph and shout of our chorus shall

shatter thy dream. [Exit PHALISSA.

[The SHEPHERDS stand to watch as she goes.

ORPHEUS sits musing. PHILEMON strikes

a sad note upon his lyre.

IST SEMI-CHORUS. In Phrygia springeth a river ;
Red, red it runneth like blood,
And sweet in men's ears it singeth
Its burden of earth and the rains ;
And the fields rejoice as it floweth in flood
With life from a dead man's veins.
2ND SEMI-CHORUS. For lo, it comes from the

place of death,
From the cave of the playing, where flute to

breath

Rang sharp ; and the air became loud with cries,
As the God looked on with pitiless eyes,



22 THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS

When the doom of Heaven was brought to pass,
And mute fell the pipings of Marsyas.

[ORPHEUS touches his lyre: the note changes];

it becomes peaceful and rises to joy.
ORPHEUS. On the brink of the spring which saw

him bleed,

When all the fauns and dryads had fled,
The broken flute hath become a reed ;
Green it grows by the river's bed.
There, in the eddies that creep and cling,
With low, soft murmur, a voice doth sing
How the wells of winter awake out of sleep,
And fountains of rivers arise in spring.



ACT II

The same scene ; it is near sunset. ORPHEUS it seated beside
the spring. SHEPHERDS and MAIDENS are gathered round
him. As the scene opens, the concluding notes of his harp
are heard.

ORPHEUS. Here, then, because your hearts in-
cline thereto,
Peace hath her dwelling. Surely of old she

knew
That the Gods' ways who dwell on earth are

kind ;
For, of like form and substance with man's

mind,
That which fills Nature, and to field gives

grass,
And fruit to tree, through them was brought

to pass

In that dim-memoried world of ancient days,
Ere walls stood built, or temples decked for

praise.

Patiently and unrecognised they wrought
To fashion life, and to wild natures taught
The natural law casting thereon no spell,
Nor worship claimed by sign or miracle.
This was that Golden Age which bards have

sung.

23



24 THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS

Then from high heaven was heard the

angry tongue

Of Gods with Gods at war. That conflict dire
Creation's doom foretold : then fierce desire,
Anger, and emulation, hate, and scorn
Infection bred ; so in man's heart was born
Fierce pride and lust for power, that he might

be

Mighty as Gods in wrath and enmity.
Thus in God's image man created man
To his undoing. The Iron Age began,
And ends not yet.

[He strikes a note upon his harp.
But ye that love green earth,
Be faithful unto Pan, and to his worth
Offer yourselves, seeing that ye are of kind.
For mortal knows not the celestial mind,
Nor scales the star-built mansions of the sky.
Above his lowliness the heavens stand high ;
Their laughter is immortal, and his grief
Troubles them not.

LYCUS. Oh, to what strange belief

Wouldst thou compel us ? Where, then, shall

the soul
Of man find comfort ?

ORPHEUS. He that would see life whole

Must measure good with ill.

DION. Thou sayest well ;

For that breeds patience.

ORPHEUS. This day, ye heard tell,

H|A new God cometh yea, a God of might.

DION. Naught unto us.

ORPHEUS. To many he gives delight,



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS 25

And many a travelled land hath owned him

lord ;

Yet in his train he bears no spear or sword :
But peaceful seems, bidding men's hearts

rejoice.
DION. Why should we shepherds hear him, when

thy voice

Sounds sweeter to our ears ?
ORPHEUS. If with glad hearts

Ye hold as ye have heard, the God departs,
And to your dwelling-place comes not again.
DION. Belated at locked doors he drums in vain.
PHILEMON. Yet some went forth as the loud

rumour grew.
DION. Phalissa ?

PHILEMON. Aye ; with her went others too.

DION. Well, well, so be it ! Young blood must

live and learn.
Give her God -speed ! Soon shall the rest

return,
Sheep from the shearers.

Enter MESSENGER, running.

MESSENGER. Help ! Ho ! Where are the men ?
A wolf is in the fold ! Out of their den
In the dark forest come the reveller bands
With timbrels, dancing : and with lawless

hands

Ten yeanlings of the herd and oxen twain
Hence have they haled and on wood -altars

slain ;

And every victim to the slaughter led
With wreaths of sacrifice go garlanded.



26 THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS

Then each slain carcase limb from limb they

tear,
And in loud triumph as bloody trophies

bear.

These now, a mingled mob, people and priest,
In drunken revelry rejoice and feast :
Hearken, and ye shall hear !

[Sounds of distant revelry and shouting are

heard.

DION [rising]. Soon shall they know

The price thereof ! Our shepherd crooks will

show

These rogues how honest folk a reckoning take.
Up, all of you I

[The SHEPHERDS, staves in hand, leap to

their feet.

ORPHEUS. So doing, shall ye make

Your slaughtered sheep and oxen live again ?

DION. Let them bleat loud enough, and lightly

then

Our wrath shall be appeased.
ORPHEUS. To hear men's throats

Filled with the bleating of slain sheep and

goats
What profit is it ? When strangers in this

land
Make sojourn, have ye not ever, with free

hand,

Bestowed of your abundance for their need,
Both food and shelter ?
DION. But these men by greed

Have robbed us, using force.
ORPHEUS. Not having guessed



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS 27

Thy will to succour them. Were it not best
To leave it so ? Let them depart in peace.
DION. What 1 go unpunished ! and thenceforth

never cease

Boasting them of the evil they have done ?
ORPHEUS. Old shepherd of the herds, doth not

the sun

Shine on the evil and on the good alike ?
Is God's hand alway lifted swift to strike
Each evil-doer according to his deed ?
Is not the' good thou so west on earth like

seed ?

Here let it fall or there, on smooth or rough,
The field prepared for it shall yield enough
To give it increase. If thy way be kind,
Is it unprofitable when some are blind ?
DION. Orpheus, an I had never heard thee sing,
Foolish, I ween, had seemed such counselling
Unto mine ears. But what thou art I know :
A man of peace. Ne'er hast thou found a foe,
To whatsoever land thy feet have come.
For I have seen how savage beasts grow

dumb

And meek to thy sweet music. By what law
Of reconciliation dost thou draw
And join all kinds together, whole and part ?
ORPHEUS. No blood hath stained these hands,

nor in my heart
Hath wrath been kindled : therefore I have

no fear.

DION. Well, be it so ! Thy counsel I will hear.
Let them depart in peace.

[He re-seats himself.



28 THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS

ORPHEUS [speaking to music]. Under the heart of

Earth,

Deep in the faithful breast,
Peace abideth, and rest,
Rest for the sons of men.
For of her spring rivers to birth ;
Then cometh the kindly yield
Of herb, and flower, and grass,
And the joy of the harvest field.
The fruits thereof though they pass,
Take root and return again.
DION. 'Tis my own word in blessing come back

to me !
Sons, Brothers, are ye content ?

[The SHEPHERDS sign agreement.
So let it be !
Orpheus, play on !
ORPHEUS. Now as I know

Compassion is in your hearts, come, I will show
Unto your eyes a mystery most dear,
Which here hath dwelling ; and ye shall have

no fear

Because of it. Oh, hearken all of ye,
And with pure hearts explore. Hither to me !
[He rises and stands before the fountain.
And Thou, O Holy Mother of mute Earth,
That to all flesh gives life, accept the worth
Of these thy servants !

[He strikes his harp. The SHEPHERDS

gaze in wonder and astonishment.
ORPHEUS. Hither to me ! Hither to me,
O Fount of the sacred spring !
Why art thou ever content to fling,



THE DEATH OF ORPHEUS 29

Like a veil of dreams,
These shifting gleams,
These falling waters, these silver streams,
Over the face of thy loveliness ?
LYCUS. Oh, look, how it leaps with redoubled

shock !
PHILEMON. The fountain gushes from rock to

rock !
DION. What marvel is this that mine eyes

behold ?

ORPHEUS. Dost thou not live ?
Art thou not strong ?
Forward to give,
Faithful to bless ?

Does not this land to thy love belong ?
Are not its fields for thy feet to press ?
And the wealth of its flocks and herds is thine,
And thy streams to its drouth much better
than wine,

For the grape is less green than the water-
cress.


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