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Mackall
Scrambled Eggs



THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES




SCRAMBLED
EGGS

BY
L \\VTOX MACKALL

AND

FRANCIS R. BELLAMY




STEWART KIDD

MODERN PLAYS



EDITED BY
FRANK SHAY



Stewart Kidd Dramatic Anthologies

Fifty Contemporary One-Act Plays

Edited by
FRANK SHAY and PIERRE LOVING

- pHlS volume contains FIFTY REPRESENTATIVE ONE-ACT PLAYS

I of the MODERN THEATER, chosen from the dramatic works of con-

* temporary writers all over the world and is the second volume in the

Stewart Kidd Dramatic Anthologies, the first being European Theories of the

Drama, by Barrett H. Clark, which has been so enthusiastically received.

The editors have scrupulously sifted countless plays and have selected the
best available in English. One-half the plays have never before been pub
lished in book form; thirty-one are no longer available in any other edition.

The work satisfies a long-felt want for a handy collection of the choicest
plays produced by the art theaters all over the world. It is a complete reper
tory for a little theater, a volume for the study of the modem drama, a rep
resentative collection of the world s best short plays.

CONTENTS



AUSTRIA

Schnitzler (Arthur) Literature
BELGIUM

Maeterlinck (Maurice) The Intruder
BOLIVIA

More (Federico) Interlude
DENMARK

Wied (Gustave) Autumn Fire*
FRANCE

Ancey (George) M. Lamblin

Porto- Riche (Georges) Francoise s Luck
GERMANY

Ettinger (Karl) Altruism

von Hofmannsthal (Hugo) Madonna Di*-
nora

Wedekind (Frank) The Tenor
GREAT BRITAIN

Bennett (Arnold) A Good Woman

Calderon (George) The Little Stone Houae

Cannan (Gilbert) Mary s Wedding

Dowson (Ernest) The Pierrot of the Min
ute.

Ellis (Mrs. Havclock) The Subjection
of Kezia

Hankin (St. John) The Constant Lover
INDIA

Mukerji (Dhan Gopal) The Judgment of

Indra
IRELAND

Gregory (Lady) The Workhouse Ward
HOLLAND

Speenhoff (J- H.) Louise
HUNGARY

Biro (Lajos) The Grandmother
ITALY

Giocosa (Giuseppe) The Rights of the Soul
RUSSIA

Andreyev (Leonid) Love of One s Neigh
bor

Tchekoff (Anton) The Boor



SPAIN

Benavente (Jacinto) His Widow s Hus
band ,
Quintero (Serafin and Joaqnln Alvarez-)

A Sunny Morning
SWEDEN

Strindberg (August) The Creditor
UNITED STATES

Beach (Lewia) Brothers
Cowan (Sada) In the Morgue
Crocker (Bosworth) The Baby Carriage
Cronyn (George W.) A Death in Fever

Flat
Davies (Mary Carolyn) The Slave with

Two Faces

Day (Frederick L.) The Slump
Planner (Hildegard) Mansions
Glaspell (Susan) Trifles
Gerstenberg (Alice) The Pot Boiler
Helburn (Theresa) Enter the Hero
Hudson (Holland) The Shepherd in the

Distance

Kemp (Harry) Boccaccio s Untold Tale
Langner (Lawrence) Another Way Out
MacMillan (Mary) The Shadowed Star
Millay (Edna St. Vincent) Aria da Capo
Moeller (Philip) Helena s Husband
O Neill (Eugene) He
Stevens (Thomas Wood) The Nursery

Maid of Heaven
Stevens (Wallace) Three Travelers Watch

a Sunrise

Tompkins (Frank G.) Sham
Walker (Stuart) The Medicine Show
Wellman (Rita) For All Time
Wilde (Percival) The Finger of God
YIDDISH

Asch (Sholom) Night

Pinski (David) Forgotten Soul*



Large 8vo, $8$ pages. Net, $5.00



Send for Complete Dramatic Catalogue

STEWART KIDD COMPANY

PUBLISHERS, - CINCINNATI, U. S. A.



STEWART KIDD MODERN PLAYS
Edited by Frank Shay



SCRAMBLED EGGS



Stewart Kidd Modern Plays
Edited by FRANK SHAY

To meet the immensely increased demands of the play-reading public
and those interested in the modem drama, Stewart Kidd are issuing
under the general editorship of Frank Shay a series of plays from the pens
of the world s best contemporary writers. No effort is being spared to
secure the best work available, and the plays are issued in a form that is
at once attractive to readers and suited to the needs of the performer
and producer. Buff ah Express: "Each play is of merit. Each is unlike
the other. The group furnishes a striking example [of the realistic trend
of the modern drama."

From time to time special announcements will be printed giving com
plete lists of the plays.

SHAM, a Social Satire in One Act. By Frank G. Tompkins.
Originally produced by Sam Hume, at the Arts and Crafts Theatre,

Detroit.

San Francisco Bulletin : "The lines are new and many of them
are decidedly clever."
Providence Journal : "An ingenious and merry little one-act play."

THE SHEPHERD IN THE DISTANCE, a Pantomime in
One Act. By Holland Hudson.
Originally produced by the Washington Square" Players.
Oakland Tribune: "A pleasing pantomime of the Ancient East."

MANSIONS, a Play in One Act. By Hildegarde Planner.
Originally produced by the Indiana Little Theatre Society.
Three Arts Magazine : "This thoughtful and well-written play of
Characters and Ideals has become a favorite with Little Theatres
and is now available in print."

HEARTS TO MEND, a Fantasy in One Act.

By H. A. Over street.

Originally produced by the Fireside Players, White Plains, N. Y.
St. Louis Star : "It is a light whimsy and well carried out."
San Francisco Chronicle: "No one is likely to hear or read it
without real and legitimate pleasure."

SIX WHO PASS WHILE THE LENTILS BOIL.

By Stuart Walker.
Originally produced by the Portmanteau Players at Christodora

House, New York City.

Brooklyn Eagle : "Literary without being pedantic, and dramatic
without being noisy."

OTHERS TO FOLLOW. Bound in Art Paper. Each, net, .50



A Barnyard Fantasy



By
LAWTON MACKALL

and

FRANCIS R. BELLAMY




CINCINNATI

STEWART KIDD COMPANY
PUBLISHERS



COPYRIGHT. 1922

By LAWTON MACKALL




All Rights Reserved



The professional and amateur stage rights in this play are strictly
reserved. Application for permission to produce SCRAMBLED
EGGS should be made to Lawton Mackall, in care of the pub
lishers, Stewart Kidd Company. Cincinnati. Ohio



Printed in the United States of America
TH CAXTON PRESS






PERSONS OF THE PLAY

CLARENCE, a rooster
MARTHA, his wife
EUSTACE, a drake
GERTRUDE, his wife
PHYLLIS, a fair stranger duck
CHICKENS, TURKEYS, GANDERS,
PIGEONS AND OTHER INHABIT
ANTS OF THE BARNYARD

The costumes suggest, in an inexpensive
manner, comic ducks and chickens, rather
than literally feathered fowl.



1109224



SCRAMBLED EGGS



SCENE: A BARNYARD.

On the right can be seen a small chickencoop.
On the lefty almost hidden by huge burdock
leaves, is a duck s nest. The whole scene is
drawn to scale to represent the way a barnyard
would appear to a chicken. In the center is a
fairly good-sized gray rock. Water troughs, tin
cans, a cracker box, with large signpost and sign
complete the list of accessories. When the curtain
goes up the stage is empty. Then Eustace ap
pears, dressed in spectacles and silk hat and
carrying a huge book labeled "Reform" under his
wing, and dragging behind him a large sign,
which he solemnly affixes to the signpost, whereupon
it is seen to read, "Better Barnyards: Dr. Eustace,
Originator of the Purity for Poultry Movement,
Will Speak Here at Sunset" As he does so the
head of a chicken appears from the bars of the
chickencoop on the right (Martha} and stares at
him through a large pair of lorgnettes. Dr.
Eustace, unaware of this, takes out a large halo
from his pocket, affixes it to his silk hat, opens his
book and assumes the attitude of an orator.

EUSTACE

Fellow denizens

MARTHA

Eustace



SCRAMBLED EGGS



EUSTACE (not noticing her and settling his halo

more firmly)

Fellow denizens
MARTHA (letting down the curtain in front of her

coop and speaking sharply)

Eustace!
EUSTACE (pausing and hiding his halo under his

wing)

Ah! A neophyte, no doubt.

MARTHA

Your wife left a message for you.
EUSTACE (looking in the direction of his nest and
then at Martha)
What, has she gone?

MARTHA

Since early morning. She said you were to be
sure to sit on the eggs until she comes .back.
EUSTACE (with ruffled dignity)
I? I?

MARTHA

Well, of course, you aren t my husband. My
Clarence believes the female s place is on the
nest. But that s what your wife said.
EUSTACE (sadly folding his book and putting his
halo in his pocket)
Alas! No reformer should have a family.

(He starts for his nest and has just drawn aside
the burdock leaf which leads to it, when enters
Clarence gallantly following a young chicken.
A look of horror overspreads Eustace s face as he
sees the chicken drop a feather and Clarence pick
it up and rush forward to give it to her.)



SCRAMBLED EGGS



EUSTACE (coughing)
Ahem!

(The chicken, startled, goes out, while Clarence
comes forward sulkily.}

EUSTACE (turning away sadly from the burdock leaf]
Clarence, there are some things which I fear
you and I will never regard in the same light.
Aside from the fact that you are married, think
of your position in the community, your obliga
tion to set a good example to young peepers.
How can you forget such things, and carry on
with other chickens under Martha s very beak?

CLARENCE (sulkily)

Been sitting on your eggs?
EUSTACE (angrily)
Certainly not, sir!

CLARENCE

Just hesitating on them, I suppose.
EUSTACE (loftily)

Clarence, Gertrude and I have the modern
view. The single standard of morality and
equal division of responsibility.

(Enter second chicken, carelessly from right,
giving Clarence inviting glances.)

CLARENCE (aside)

What elegantly slender drumsticks!

EUSTACE

My wife has her responsibilities and I have mine.
CLARENCE (again aside)

What irresistible pin feathers!
9



SCRAMBLED EGGS



EUSTACE

Gertrude is Chairman of the Committee on
Free Puddles for the Public. She is raising a
fund for the Laying-in Hospital. She is leader
of the movement for Sex Education for Duck
lings on a platform of More Rain.

CLARENCE

What a walk!

EUSTACE

When I am speaking for better barnyards then
she is warming our eggs.

CLARENCE

Where is she now, then ?
EUSTACE (stammering)
Why, I I-

(Clarence, unable to stand it longer, follows
second chicken, who is now about to go off left.}

EUSTACE (discovering that Clarence is no longer

beside him, and that he is following second

chicken, horrified)

Clarence !
CLARENCE (turning and seeing third chicken, come-

lier still, entering right)

You re right!

(He picks up the third chicken and goes off in the
opposite direction as first chicken enters wildly
from left, looks around and seeing no one but
Eustace makes for him. Whereupon Eustace
rushes to the sign and clasps it to his bosom.
She pecks at him but he clasps the sign tighter,
and she shrugs her wings and goes off.)
10



SCRAMBLED EGGS



MARTHA (her head appearing again from coop}

Has anybody here seen Clarence?
EUSTACE (aside}

This is terrible. (To Martha] Madam, you

have my profoundest sympathy.
MARTHA (firing up)

What impertinence!
EUSTACE

Ah, madam! If only it were! I respect your

endeavors to shield your husband.

MARTHA

Shield him! The best husband in the barn
yard, so loving to me every time I see him.
With all your guile, you hawk in dove s clothing,
YOU will never be able to alienate my affections
from him.

(She shuts the shutter with a slam as Clarence re-
enters from right, picking colored feathers from
his wings and blowing them gaily in the air.)

EUSTACE
How can you, Clarence?

CLARENCE

It s the easiest thing in the world, my boy.

EUSTACE

And to think that before I began my labors,
you were the leader of the barnyard You!
(He swells visibly with indignation.) You, you
pullet hound. You leering libertine!

CLARENCE (strutting with pride)
You said it.

ii



SCRAMBLED EGGS



EUSTACE

And you have no shame. You glory in it.
Four years old and what have you done for the
barnyard?

CLARENCE

You have no delicacy, Eustace.

EUSTACE

I state the ugly fact.
CLARENCE (complacently)

Well, old topknot, what s your egg record?
EUSTACE (terribly]

Egg record!

CLARENCE

Well, pardon my strutting, but a fowl who
learns from his wife only this morning that six
eggs five of them unprecedentedly large
grace his nest, may be excused a slight crow!

EUSTACE (incredulously)
Six eggs?

CLARENCE (complacently)
An even half-dozen.

EUSTACE
Incredible. All laid this morning?

CLARENCE

All this morning.

EUSTACE

I never heard of such a thing.

CLARENCE

There are lots of things you never heard of.
EUSTACE

What a responsibility! Six innocent, unhatched
chicks. Does not the mere thought stir you to
emulate my noble ideals?
12



SCRAMBLED EGGS



CLARENCE

Your noble ideals? Why, I wouldn t trust you
with a wooden decoy. (As fourth chicken enters
from right.) Ahem!

EUSTACE (horrified)
And yet another!

CLARENCE (consoling him)

Yes, it s hard. I d rail too if I were in your fix.
Forty-nine chickens in the barnyard and only
one duckess. I don t blame you for your single
standard stuff. Necessity makes a beautiful
virtue.

EUSTACE

Necessity! Necessity! Sir, if there were a
thousand bewitching waddlers in the barn
yard, I should still support that standard there.

CLARENCE (as he starts to follow the fourth chicken)
Yes you would not!

MARTHA (as Clarence and fourth chicken get to edge
of stage)
Oh, Clarence!

CLARENCE (stopping and thinking an instant)
An important business engagement, Martha.
I shall be back later. (He goes out.)

EUSTACE (looking worriedly at the standard)
A virtue of necessity! Sinister thought.

MARTHA (proudly)

There s ambition for you. You tortuous worm.

EUSTACE (clasping his forehead)
Worm. Ah, a dirty stroke.

MARTHA (as she turns away from Eustace, sees
Clarence re-entering^ still stalking the fourth
chicken. Horrified)

13



SCRAMBLED EGGS



Ah ! {As they leave she rushes out of her coop and
stands flapping her wings after them.) Oh, the
speckled hussy ! My Clarence! My dishonored
eggs! (Weeping) Oh, I beg your pardon,
Eustace! Forgive me my harsh, unhenly
words. The things you told me, alas, they are
only too true. If you ever were a friend of
mine support me now. (She faints on his bosom.)

(Enter Gertrude from left.)

GERTRUDE

Eustace, a hen upon your wishbone ! Martha,
unwing him at once.
EUSTACE
Quick, bring some garlic, some smelling roots.

GERTRUDE

Not a root until you explain.
EUSTACE (holding Martha with melancholy gaze)

Only the long expected, my dear Clarence
MARTHA (wailing)

Oh, I saw him ! The speckled hen ! I saw him

myself! My Clarence!

(She bursts into sobs and they calm her.)

GERTRUDE (striding up and down energetically)

She must get a divorce at once.
MARTHA (coming to)

But I couldn t live without Clarence, the only

rooster in the barnyard. What I want is to

have him all to myself!

(Gertrude flaps her wings in disgust and turns
away.)

14



SCRAMBLED EGGS



EUSTACE

Then you must make him respect you, Martha.
Make him feel the need of your companionship.
Share all his interests. {At this instant Clarence
comes in with fourth chicken but goes hastily out.)
Go where he goes, do what he does.
MARTHA (wiping her eyes)

But what will become of my eggs ?

GERTRUDE

You must share them fifty-fifty, as Eustace
and I do.

MARTHA

Well, I shall try to be that kind of wife. It will
be hard at first, but perhaps I shall get used
to it. For Clarence s sake I shall try. (She
goes toward her coop sadly , repeating in lower
tones) I shall try. (As she closes the coop and
goes in her voice is a whisper) I shall try.

GERTRUDE (a s Martha closes the coop)

And without my husband s assistance. (Turn
ing to Eustace.) Well, and how long have you
been off the eggs ?

EUSTACE (confused)
Why, I I-

GERTRUDE

Don t duck, Eustace. I shall take their temper
ature.

(She takes out a large thermometer, pulls aside
the burdock leaf that leads to the nest at left,
stares an instant, and then gives a blood-curdling
scream?)

EUSTACE
Great seaweed! What has happened?

15



SCRAMBLED EGGS



GERTRUDE (wildly)

Gone! They are gone! Gone! Gone! (Turning
to Eustace.) What have you done with our
poor, unhatched children ?
EUSTACE
Gone?

GERTRUDE

Vanished, flown, disappeared ! (Angrily) While
you quack empty theories before their neglected
nest.

EUSTACE (firing up)

You mean while you agitate Free Puddles for
the Public.

GERTRUDE

Better than holding strange hens on your
wishbone.

EUSTACE (contemptuously)

Or investigating the Rabbit Warren Under
world.

GERTRUDE

Rabbit Warrens, never! Only today I drafted
final plans for the communal incubator, and
appointed nineteen committees to O. K. them.
EUSTACE (derisively)

Communal incubator, hah! When the single
standard is yet to be settled ? (He laughs.)

GERTRUDE

Laugh if you will, but you cannot prevent the
onward march of progress. Perhaps that is
where your eggs have gone, at this minute!
Perhaps the communal incubator is a fact
already !

EUSTACE (startled)
What makes you think that?
16



SCRAMBLED EGGS



GERTRUDE

Intuition, you stupid. How else would you
expect me to know it? Ah, it just had to come!
I have been predicting it all along.
EUSTACE

But why should they experiment on your eggs?

GERTRUDE

Nonsense! Think what it will mean to them!
They will be hatched scientifically, eugenically,
their personalities allowed to expand, and when
they are grown up they will be free females.
They will enjoy the happiness of motherhood
without its drudgery.
EUSTACE
If there is a communal incubator.

GERTRUDE

If there is! Come, we shall find it now.

(A s they go out at left, Gertrude catches sight of
Clarence coming in at right, and whispers to
Martha in the coop.)

GERTRUDE

Now, Martha, here s your chance.

CLARENCE

Oh, gosh, what a blonde pullet she was! Oh

gosh ! And how blonde ! (As Martha looks out)

Why hello, wifie dear!
MARTHA (with forced pleasantness)

Why, how-do-you-do, Clarence? I want to

have a talk with you.
CLARENCE (lifting one foot in surprise)

Huh?



SCRAMBLED EGGS



MARTHA

I have been thinking things over very seriously,
and from now on I intend to be a very different
kind of wife to you. In the past I have not
shared your interests as I should have. But
in future I shall make myself your companion
in everything.

CLARENCE (leaning on the coop)
Well, I ll be plucked!

MARTHA

I shall be always at your side. Where you go,

will I go!
CLARENCE (angrily aside)

This is Eustace s work. (To his intense surprise ,

a duckling comes from under his coop.) What,

a duckling from my coop! (He staggers back

in astonishment.)
MARTHA (as he does so)

Wait, Clarence, I feel them hatching. The

happy moment has arrived.
CLARENCE (as another duckling and then another

appears from the coop y in a savage tone)

Happy moment!

MARTHA

They are all hatching, Clarence.
CLARENCE (terribly)

Five ducklings! That is what is hatching!
MARTHA (looking out for the first time and seeing

them)

Dear me!

CLARENCE

Dear me! Is that all you have to say, faithless
wife? Is that all in the face of five ducks?
Go, leave my coop forever! Never let me see
18



SCRAMBLED EGGS



your beak again, and take your web-footed
brats with you.
MARTHA (coming out of the coop)

Oh, but I am innocent. I swear to you, Clarence.
I really don t know how it happened.

CLARENCE

Ha! do you expect me to believe that, you
sparrow ?

MARTHA

Revile me, peck me, stop loving me if you will,
but oh, do not drive me away from my nest.

CLARENCE

Go! You are not fit to grace the nest of an
honorable rooster. (He flaps his wings and
drives her out.) Go! (She takes a step and
stops.) Go! (This is repeated until she leaves,
followed by the five ducklings. Then Clarence
takes a flint out of his pocket and sharpens his
spurs.) And now for that villain of a drake !

(Enter Eustace right.)

EUSTACE (anxiously)

Can you tell me where the communal incu
bator is?

CLARENCE

Are you referring to my wife?
EUSTACE (not hearing and peering around among
the burdock leaves)
We ve searched for it everywhere.

CLARENCE

Come out of those burdock leaves, you waddling
hypocrite. You sleek betrayer! You whited
sepulchre!



SCRAMBLED EGGS



EUSTACE

Why, why, what do you mean ?
CLARENCE (brandishing his claws)

Leering libertine, eh! You single-standard

seducer!
EUSTACE (who has given a little jump of surprise,

then horror, and finally anger, as the different

epithets are hurled at him)

Shut your bill, you liar!

(He throws of his silk hat and rushes at Clarence,
just as Gertrude from the right, rushes up in back
of Clarence and honks in his ear, so that he
swings completely around in his surprise.)

GERTRUDE

Stop, you big boob!
CLARENCE (stopping dead)
Boob?

GERTRUDE

Certainly. Martha never laid those eggs. She
only hatched them.
CLARENCE (staggered)
Hatched them?

GERTRUDE

She only sat on them. She would sit on any
thing. She was only their hot nurse. Stand
back, Eustace. Here comes Martha now!
I ll prove it. I ll make her sit on that stone
there.

(Enter Martha weeping, followed by the five
toddling ducklings in single file.)

CLARENCE

Shameless creature with her trail of guilt.

20



SCRAMBLED EGGS



GERTRUDE (as Martha passes the rock, pleasantly)
Pardon me, Martha, but you just dropped an

egg-

MARTHA (wiping her eyes, flustered but grateful}
Oh, did I? Thank you for telling me. I am
so bewildered that I hardly know what I am
doing. Ah, the poor little thing is all cold.

GERTRUDE (triumphantly)
You see?

CLARENCE

Well, I ll be fricasseed!

(At this moment all the inhabitants of the barn
yard begin to enter in little couples, ignoring
Clarence and bowing to Eustace, who has gone
after his silk hat, and is polishing his halo,
preparatory to putting it on.)

FIRST GUEST

Are we a little early?

SECOND GUEST

I understood it was to be at sunset.
(They peer at the sign.)

CLARENCE

Get up off that stone, Martha. Don t make
yourself any more ridiculous than you are
already.

MARTHA

Stone ? (She looks at the stone in intense surprise.)

CLARENCE

Rock!

MARTHA

But what shall I do? Where shall I go?
21



SCRAMBLED EGGS



CLARENCE

Go? Go any place out of sight, into your coop.
MARTHA (blissfully)

Oh, may I ? (She goes into her coop.}

(More guests are arriving now for the meeting
of the Better Barnyard Association.)

THIRD GUEST

Such a lovely bird.

FOURTH GUEST

I love to hear him quack.

CLARENCE (who has finally succeeded in sweeping
all the five ducklings out of sight , aside)
Foiled, but not defeated. I ll get that damned
drake yet. (He goes out.)

OLD GANDER

Let s go over here out of this gang of hen folks.

TURKEY

Have a chew of spearweed.

GANDER

Thanks. Say, I heard a good one the other day
There was a young pullet and she had never
laid an egg

(The rest is lost in the shuffle of the crowd as they
settle in their places. Four pigeons bring in an
old feed box for a rostrum for Eustace and place a
battered tin pail which he drinks from and polishes
his glasses. Two chickens fight with each other
over a long rubber, pulling it until it snaps in the
face of one, and until Gertrude finally silences
everyone in their places. Evening is falling.)

EUSTACE (taking a drink from the pail, clearing his
throat, settling his halo, and throwing out his
chest)

22



SCRAMBLED EGGS



Denizens of the barnyard, members of the
Purity for Poultry movement, now that we
have abolished capital punishment for obesity,
we come to the matter of the single standard.
Ah, my fellow denizens! Ah, my dear fellow
denizens! Only today a most lamentable case

TREMENDOUS VOICE OFF STAGE

Here chick, chick, chick, chick, chick! Here,
chick, chick, chick!

(There is a great stir in the assemblage. One or
two hens leave. Everyone looks nervous.)

OLD GANDER (fitting on an ear trumpet}

What s the disturbance? What are they going
for?

YOUNG CHICK

Didn t you hear it, Uncle? Supper call.

OLD GANDER

Bless my soul ! (He rushes of faster than anyone
else.)

EUSTACE (louder than before)
Fellow denizens

TREMENDOUS VOICE OFF STAGE

Here, chick, etc.

(Whole assemblage rushes out, overturning water-
trough and rostrum.)

EUSTACE (sadly)

Thinking only of their craws! Their crops in
the dust!

GERTRUDE

Well, aren t you coming?

EUSTACE

I, with my mission? Never!
23



SCRAMBLED EGGS



(Gertrude goes out in disgust. Eustace, alone
on the stage y after looking around to see if he is
observed, moves the box and suddenly seizes the
head of a long red worm, which he pulls from the
ground until it is nine or ten feet long, whereupon
it snaps from his mouth back into its hole again,
and although he rushes to the spot it has vanished.)


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