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The book of the thousand
nights and a night



Richard Francis Burton, Leonard Cliarles
Smitliers, Albert Letcliford



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NOTICE.

H. S. Nichols & Co., respectfiilly beg to call
the attention of purchasers to the feci that all Books
issued by them are intended to be sold at the net
advertised prices without deduction, and that they
are supplied to Booksellers on terms which ynH not
allow of any discount being given by them to the
public.



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VOL. IV.



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THE LIBRARY EDITION



The Arabian Nights' Entertainments



VOLUME IV



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; ^ ji _,\j-ii^



" TO THE PURE ALL THINGS ARE PURE "
(Puris omnia pura).

— Arab Proverb.

Niuna corrotta mente intese mai sanamente parole."

— " Decameron " — conclusion.



" Erubuit, posuitque meum Lucretia librum

Sed coram Bruto. Brute! recede, leget."

—Martial.



*' Mieulx est de ris que de larmes escripre.

Pour ce que rire est le propre des hommes."

— Rabelais.



" The pleasure we derive from perusing the Thousand-and-One Stories
makes us regret that we possess only a comparatively small part of these
truly enchanting fictions."

— Crichton's '* History of Arabia."



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The Book of the

Thousand Nights and a Night



TRANSLATED FROM THE ARABIC BY

CAPTAIN SIR R. F. BURTON

K.C.M.G. F.R.G.S. &c. &c. &c.
REPRINTED FROM THE ORIGINAL EDITION AND EDITED BY

LEONARD C. SMITHERS



IN TWELVE VOLUMES— VOLUME TV



LONDON

H. S. NICHOLS & CO. 3 SOHO SQUARE W

MDCCCXCIIII

(All rights reserved)



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\^Q 9.^LI



JNIVER5ITY
LIBRARY



COPYRIGHT ENTERED
AT STATIONERS* HALL, 1894



PRINTED BY H. S. NICHOLS AND CO. AT 3, SOHO SQUARE, LONDON. W.



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CONTENTS OF THE FOURTH VOLUME.



PAGK

60. UNS AL-WUJUD AND THE WAZIR'S DAUGHTER ROSE-IN-

HOOD I

(Lane— VoL 11, Chapt. XVIII. Story of Uns el- Wujood atid El- Ward
fi-l-Akmam: p. S49'J

61. ABU NOWAS WITH THE THREE BOYS AND THE CALIPH

HARUN AL-RASHID 31

62. ABDULLAH BIN MA'AMAR WITH THE MAN OF BASSORAH

AND HIS SLAVE-GIRL 35

(Anecdote of a Man and his Slave-Girl: p, 578J

63. THE LOVERS OF THE BANU OZRAH 36

(Anecdote of Two Victims of Love : p. $79' )

64. THE WAZIR OF AL-YAMAN AND HIS YOUNG BROTHER . 38

65. THE LOVES OF THE BOY AND GIRL AT SCHOOL ... 39

(Love in a School: p. 580.^

66. AL-MUTALAMMIS AND HIS WIFE UMAYMAH .... 40

67. HARUN AL-RASHID AND ZUBAYDAH IN THE BATH . . 41

68. HARUN AL-RASHID AND THE THREE POETS .... 43

69. MUS'AB BIN AL-ZUBAYR AND AYISHAH HIS WIFE ... 44

70. ABU AL-ASWAD AND HIS SLAVEGIRL 45

71. HARUN AL-RASHID AND THE TWO SLAVE-GIRLS ... 46

72. HARUN AL-RASHID AND THE THREE SLAVE-GIRLS . 46

73. THE MILLER AND HIS WIFE 47

(Anecdote of a FaithUss Wife: p. 582. >

74. THE SIMPLETON AND THE SHARPER 48

(Anecdote of a Simpleton and a Sharper: p, 582.^

75. THE KAZI ABU YUSUF WITH HARUN AL-RASHID AND

QUEEN ZUBAYDAH 49

VOL. IV. h



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viii Alf Laylah wa Laylah,

76. THE CALIPH AL-HAKIM AND THE MERCHANT .

(Anecdote of El- Hakim bi-amri-llah and a Merchant of Cairo: /. 583.^

jj. KING KISKA ANUSHIRWAN AND THE VILLAGE DAMSEL
(Anecdote of Anooshirwdn : p. 384. )

78. THE WATER-CARRIER AND THE GOLDSMITHS WIFE .

79. KHUSRAU AND SHIRIN AND THE FISHERMAN

(Anecdote of Khusrow and Shureen and a Fisherman : p. 585. )

8a YAHYA BIN KHALID AND THE POOR MAN

(Anecdote of Yahya el-Barmekee : p, 586.^

81. MOHAMMED AL-AMIN AND THE SLAVE-GIRL .

(Mohammad el-Emeen atid the Slave- Girl El-Bedr el-Kebeer : p. 587.^

82. THE SONS OF YAHYA BIN KHALID AND SA'ID BIN SALIM

(Anecdote of El-Fadl attdja'afar the Barmekee : p. 588 J

83. THE WOMAN'S TRICK AGAINST HER HUSBAND

(Anecdote of a Deceitful Wife: /. 589.;

84. THE DEVOUT WOMAN AND THE TWO WICKED ELDERS

85. JA'AFAR THE BARMECIDE AND THE OLD BADAWI .

86. OMAR BIN AL-KHATTAB AND THE YOUNG BADAWI

(Atiecdote of a Homicide: p, 589.^

87. AT^MAAMUN AND THE PYRAMIDS OF EGYPT .

88. THE THIEF AND THE MERCHANT

(Atucdote of an Impitdent Thief: p. 592.^

89. MASRUR THE EUNUCH AND IBN AL-KARIBI .

(Compact of Mesroor with Ibn el-Karibee : /. 594.^

90. THE DEVOTEE PRINCE

(Anecdote of a Devotee Son of Harun er-Rasheed : p. 595.^

91. THE SCHOOLMASTER WHO FELL IN LOVE BY REPORT

92. THE FOOLISH DOMINIE

93. THE ILLITERATE WHO SET UP FOR A SCHOOLMASTER

(Attecdote of an Illiterate Schoolmaster : p. 599.^

94. THE KING AND THE VIRTUOUS WIFE

95. ABD AL-RAHMAN THE MAGHRIBI'S STORY OF THE RUKH

(The Rukh: p. 600. J

96. ADI BIN ZAYD AND THE PRINCESS HIND .

97. DI'IBIL AL-KHUZA'I WITH THE LADY AND MUSLIM BIN

AL-WALID

98. ISAAC OF MOSUL AND THE MERCHANT .

99. THE THREE UNFORTUNATE LOVERS .



PAUK
50



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Contents, ix

PAGE

loa HOW ABU HASAN BRAKE WIND 95

loi. THE LOVERS OK THE BANU TAYY 97

( Result of Restraint upon 7 wo Lovers : p. 601.^

102. THE MAD LOVER 98

(Atucdole of a Distracted Lover : p, 602. J

103. THE PRIOR WHO BECAME A MOSLEM 100

fTAe Converted Prior : p. 603.^

104. THE LOVES OK ABU ISA AND KURRAT AL-AVN ... 104

(Adoo 'Esa and Kurrat el-'Myn : p. 606, J

105. AL-AMIN AND HIS UNCLE IBRAHIM BIN AL-MAHDI . .111

106. AL-KATH BIN KHAKAN AND AL-MUTAWAKKIL . . ' 112

107. THE MAN'S DISPUTE WITH THE LEARNED WOMAN CON-

CERNING THE RELATIVE EXCELLENCE OK MALE AND

KEMALE 113

108. ABU SUWAYD AND THE PRETTY OLD WOMAN ... 120

109. ALI BIN TAHIR AND THE GIRL MUUNIS 121

iia THE WOMAN WHO HAD A BOY AND THE OTHER WHO

HAD A MAN TO LOVER 121

111. ALI THE CAIRENE AND THE HAUNTED HOUSE IN BAGH-

DAD 122

(Ckapt. XIX. Story of Alee of Cairo : p. 609, J

112. THE PILGRIM MAN AND THE OLD WOMAN .... 141

(Anecdote of a Townsman and a Bedaweeyeh : p. 635.^

113. ABU AL-HUSN AND HIS SLAVE-GIRL TAWADDUD ... 144

114. THE ANGEL OK DEATH WITH THE PROUD KING AND THE

DEVOUT MAN 197

115. THE ANGEL OK DEATH AND THE RICH KING ... 199

116. THE ANGEL OK DEATH AND THE KING OK THE CHILDREN

OK ISRAEL 201

(A Tyrannical Kingaftd the Angel oj DecUh : p. 636.^

117. ISKANDAR ZU AL-KARNAYN AND A CERTAIN TRIBE OK

POOR KOLK 203

n8. THE RIGHTEOUSNESS OK KING ANUSHIRWAN ... 205

119. THE JEWISH KAZI AND HIS PIOUS WIKE 206

120. THE SHIPWRECKED WOMAN AND HER CHILD ... 209

121. THE PIOUS BLACK SLAVE 212

122. THE DEVOUT TRAY-MAKER AND HIS WIKE .... 215

(Advantages of Piety and Industry : p. 637.^



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X Alf Laylah wa Layiah,

PAGE

123. AL-HAJJAJ BIN YUSUF AND THE PIOUS MAN .... 219

124. THE BLACKSMITH WHO COULD HANDLE FIRE WITHOUT

HURT 220

125. THE DEVOTEE TO WHOM ALLAH GAVE A CLOUD FOR

SERVICE AND THE DEVOUT KING 223

126. THE MOSLEM CHAMPION AND THE CHRISTIAN DAMSEL . 226

( Anecdote of a Moslem IVarrwranda Christian Maiden : p. 639.^

127. THE CHRISTIAN KING'S DAUGHTER AND THE MOSLEM . 231

128. THE PROPHET AND THE JUSTICE OF PROVIDENCE . 234

(The Justice of Providence : /. 642. )

129. THE FERRYMAN OF THE NILE AND THE HERMIT . . 236

130. THE ISLAND KING AND THE PIOUS ISRAELITE ... 238

131. ABU AL-HASAN AND ABU JA'AFAR THE LEPER . . . 242

132. THE QUEEN OF THE SERPENTS 245

a. The Adventures of Bulukiya 251

d. The Story of Janshah 274

Conclusion of the Story of the Queen of the Serpents . 328

133. SINDBAD THE SEAMAN AND SINDBAD THE LANDSMAN . 343

(Lane— Vol, III. Chap, XXII. Story of Es Sindbad of the Sea and
Es Sindbad of the Land: pp. I— 78.^

a. The First Voyage of Sindbad the Seaman . . . .346

b. The Second Voyage of Sindbad the Seaman . . .355

c. The Third Voyage of Sindbad the Seaman . . .363

d. The Fourth Voyage of Sindbad the Seaman . . . 374

e. The Fifth Voyage of Sindbad the Seaman . . .387
/. The Sixth Voyage of Sindbad the Seaman ... 396
^. The Seventh Voyage of Sindbad the Seaman ... 407
The Seventh Voyage of Sindbad the Seaman (according to the

versiott of the Calcutta Edition) 416



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Uns al- Wujud and the Wazii's Daughter.



UNS AL- WUJUD AND THE WAZIR'S
DAUGHTER AL-WARD FI'L-AKMAM
OR ROSE - IN - HOOD.'

There was once, in days of yore and in ages and times long
gone before, a King of great power and lord of glory and
dominion galore; who had a Wazir Ibrahim hight, and this
Wazir*s daughter was a damsel of extraordinary beauty and
loveliness, gifted with passing brilliancy and the perfection of
grace, possessed of abundant wit, and in all good breeding
complete. But she loved wassail and wine and the human
face divine, and choice verses and rare stories ; and the delicacy
of her inner gifts invited all hearts to love, even as saith the
poet describing her : —

Like moon she shines amid the starry sky, • Robing in tresses blackest

ink outvie.
The morning-breezes give her boughs fair drink, • And like a branch

she sways with supple ply :
She smiles in passing us. O thou that art • Fairest in yellow robed,

or cramoisie,
Thou playest with my wit in love, as though • Sparrow in hand of

playful boy were I.'

Her name was Rose-in -Hood and she was so named for her young
and tender beauty and the freshness of her brilliancy ; and the
King loved her in his cups because of her accomplishments and
fine manners. Now it was the King's custom yearly to gather
together all the nobles of his realm and play with the ball.' So
when the day came round whereon the folk assembled for ball-
play, the Minister's daughter seated herself at her lattice, to
divert herself by looking on at the game ; and, as they were at
play, her glance fell upon a youth among the guards than whom
never was seen a comelier face or a goodlier form ; for he was
bright of favour, showing white teeth when he smiled, tall-

1 Lit. •• The rose in the sleeves or calyces." I take my English equivalent
from Jeremy Taylor, " So I have seen a rose newly springing from the clefts
of its hood," etc.

2 These lines are from the Bresl. Edit. (v. 35). The four couplets in the
Mac. Edit, are too irrelevant.

3 Polo, which Lane calls " Goff."

VOL. IV. A



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2 Alf Laylah wa Laylah,

statured and broad-shouldered. She looked at him again and
again and could not take her fill of gazing ; and presently said to
her nurse, ** What is the name of yonder handsome young man
among the troops ? " Replied the nurse, " O my daughter, the
dear fellows are all handsome. Which of them dost thou mean ? "
Said Rose-in-Hood, •* Wait till he come past and I will point
him out to thee." So she took an apple and as he rode by
dropped it on him, whereupon he raised his head, to see who did
this, and espied the Wazir's daughter at the window, as she were
the moon of fullest light in the darkness of the night ; nor did he
withdraw his eyes till his heart was utterly lost to her, and he
recited these lines : —

Was*t archer shot me, or was't thine eyes • Ruined lover's heart that

thy charms espies ?
Was the notched shaft ^ from a host outshot, • Or from latticed window

in sudden guise ?

When the game was at an end, and all had left the ground, she
asked her nurse, " What is the name of that youth I showed
thee ? " and the good woman answered, ** His name is Uns al-
Wujud"; whereat Rose-in-Hood shook her head and lay down
on her couch, with thoughts a-fire for love. Then, sighing
deeply, she improvised these couplets: —

He missed not who dubbed thee, " World's delight," • A world's love

conjoining to bounty's light • :
O thou, whose favour the full moon favours, • Whose charms make

life and the living bright I
Thou hast none equal amongst mankind; • Sultan of Beauty, and

proof I'll cite :
Thine eye-brows are likest a well-formed N6n,' • And thine eyes a

S^d,^ by His hand indite ;
Thy shape is the soft, green bough that gives • When asked to all

with all gracious sprite :
Thou excellest knights of the world in stowre, • With delight and

beauty and bounty dight.



1 Arab. *' Muffawak"=: well-notched, as its vqlue depends upon the notch.
At the end of the third hemistich Lane's Shaykh very properly reads
"baghtatan " (suddenly) for " burhatan "=:: during a long time.

2 "Uns" (which the vulgar pronounce Anas) "al-Wujud " = Delight of
existing things, of being, of the world. Uns wa jud is the normal pun— love-
intimacy and liberality ; and the paranomasia (which cannot well jse render^
in English) re-appears again and again. The story is throughout one of love ;
hence the quantity of verse.

3 The allusion to a " written N " suggests the elongated not the rounded
form of the letter.

4 The fourteenth Arabic letter in its medial form resembling an eye.



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Uns al' Wujud and the Wazir's Daughter, 3

When she had finished her verses, she wrote them on a sheet
of paper, which she folded in a piece of gold-embroidered silk
and placed under her pillow. Now one of her nurses had
seen her ; so she came up to her and held her in talk till
she slept, when she stole the scroll from under her pillow;
and, after reading it, knew that she had fallen in love to
Uns al- Wujud. Then she returned the scroll to its place
and when her mistress awoke, she said to her, ** O my lady,
indeed I am to thee a true counsellor and am tenderly anxious
on thy account. Know that love is a tyrant and the hiding
it melteth iron and entaileth sickness and unease ; nor for whoso
confesseth it is there aught of reproach." Rejoined Rose-
in-Hood, "And what is the medicine of passion, O nurse
mine? " Answered the nurse, **The medicine of passion is enjoy-
ment. Quoth she, ** And how may one come by enjoyment ? "
Quoth the other, ** By letters and messages, my lady ; by
whispered words of compliment and by greetings before the
world ^; all this bringeth lovers together and makes hard
matters easy. So if thou have aught at heart, mistress mine,
I am the fittest to keep thy secret and do thy desires and carry
thy letters." Now when the damsel heard this, her reason
flew and fled for joy; but she restrained herself from speech
till she should see the issue of the matter, saying within her-
self, " None knoweth this thing of me, nor will I trust this
one with my secret till I have tried her." Then said the
woman, *• O my lady, I saw in my sleep as though a man
came to me and said : — Thy mistress and Uns al- Wujud
love each other; so do thou serve their case by carrying their
messages and doing their desires and keeping their secrets ; and
much good shall befall thee. So now I have told thee my vision
and 'tis thine to decide." Quoth Rose-in-Hood, after she heard

of the dream, And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day and

ceased to say her permitted say.

i^tt tt^m it )Da0 t5e (E^ixtt |)itn)irelr anlr ftmentp^neconlr Bx^t^

She said. It hath reached me, O auspicious King, that Rose-in-
Hood asked her nurse after hearing of the dream, "Tell me,

I This is done by the man passing his fingers over the brow, as if to wipe
off perspiration ; the woman acknowledges it by adjusting her head- veil with
both hands. As a rule in the Moslem East women make the first advances ;
and it is truly absurd to see a great bearded fellow blushing at being ogled.
During the Crimean war the fair sex of Constantinople began by these allure-
ments but found them so readily accepted by the Giaours that they were
obliged to desist.

A2



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4 Alf Laylah wa Laylah,

canst thou keep a secret, O my nurse ? " Whereto she answered,
** And how should I not keep secrecy, I that am of the flower of
the free^ ?" Then the maiden pulled out the scroll, whereon she
had written the verses and said, "Carry me this my letter to
Uns al-Wujud and bring me his reply." The nurse took the
letter, and repairing to Uns al-Wujud kissed his hands and
greeted him right courteously, then gave him the paper ; and he
read it, and comprehending the contents wrote on the back these
couplets : —

I soothe my heart and my love repel, • But my state interprets my

love too well :
When tears flow I tell them mine eyes are ill, • Lest the censor see

and my case foretell,
I was fancy-free and unknew I Love ; • But I fell in love and in

madness fell.
I show you my case and complain of pain, ♦ Pine and ecstasy that

your ruth compel :
I write you with tears of eyes, so belike • They explain the love come

my heart to quell;
Allah guard a face that is veiled with charms, • Whose thrall is Moon

and the stars as well ;
In her beauty I never beheld the like ; • From her sway the branches

learn sway and swell :
I beg you, an 'tis not too much of pains, * To call* ; 'twere boon with-
out parallel.
I give you a soul you will haply take, • To which Union is Heaven,

Dis-union Hell.

Then he folded the letter, and kissing it, gave it to the go-between
and said to her, ** O nurse, incline thy lady*s heart to me." ** To
hear is to obey," answered she, and carried the script to her
mistress, who kissed it and laid it on her head, then she opened
it and read it and understood it, and wrote at the foot of it these
couplets : —

O whose heart by our beauty is captive ta'en, • Have patience and all

thou shalt haply gain I
When we knew that thy love was a true affect, • And what pained our

heart to thy heart gave pain,
We had granted thee wished -for call and more ; • But hindered so

doing the chamberlain.
When the night grows dark, through our love's excess • Fire bums our

vitals with might and main :



t The greatest of all explorers and discoverers of the world will be he
who finds a woman confessing inability to keep a secret.
2 The original is intensely prosaic — and so am I.



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Uns al'Wujud and the Wazit^s Daughter, 5

And sleep from our beds is driven afar, • And our bodies are tortured

by passion -bane.
*' Hide Love 1 " in Love's code is the first command ; • And from

raising his veil thy hand restrain :
I fell love-fulfilled by yon gazelle: • Would he never wander from

where I dwell !

Then she folded the letter and gave it to the nurse, who took it
and went out from her mistress to seek the young man; but, as
she would fare forth, the chamberlain met her and said to her,
" Whither away ? " ** To the bath," answered she; but in her fear
and confusion she dropped the letter without knowing it, and went
off unrecking what she had done, when one of the eunuchs,
seeing it lying in the way, picked it up. When the nurse came
without the door, she sought for it but found it not, so turned back
to her mistress and told her of this and what had befallen her.
Meanwhile the Wazir came out of the Harim and seated himself
on his couch ; whereupon behold, the eunuch, who had picked up
the letter, came in to him, bending it in hand and said, ** O my
lord, I found this paper lying upon the floor and picked it up." So
the Minister took it from his hand, folded as it was, and opening
it, read the verses as above set down. Then, after mastering the
meaning, he examined the writing and knew it for his daughter's
hand ; whereupon he went to her mother, weeping so abundant
tears that his beard was wetted. His wife asked him, ** What
maketh thee weep, O my lord ? " And he answered, ** Take this
letter and see what is therein." So she took it and found it to be
a love-letter from her daughter Rose-in- Hood to Uns al-Wujud :
whereupon the ready drops sprang to her eyes ; but she composed
her mind, and gulping down her tears, said to her husband, ** O
my lord, there is no profit in weeping : the right course is to cast
about for a means of keeping thine honour and concealing the
affair of thy daughter." And she went on to comfort him and
lighten his trouble ; but he said," I am fearful for my daughter by
reason of this new passion. Knowest thou not that the Sultan
loveth Uns al-Wujud with exceeding love ? And my fear hath
two causes. The first concerneth myself ; it is, that she is my
daughter : the second is on account of the King ; for that Uns
al-Wujud is a favourite with the Sultan and peradventure great
troubles shall come out of this affair. What deemest thou should

be done ? " And Shahrazad perceived the dawn of day and

ceased saying her permitted say.



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Alf Laylah wa Laylah,



Bote tolim It \a9A 4e tS^xzt |)ttnlrrelr anlr ftebentp4|btrlr Biflit,

She said, it hath reached me, O auspicious King, that the Wazir,
after recounting the affair of his daughter, asked his wife, ** What
deemest thou should be done ? " And she answered, ** Have
patience whilst I pray the prayer for right direction." So she
prayed a two-bow prayer according to the prophetic* ordinance
for seeking divine guidance ; after which she said to her husband,
" In the midst pf the Sea of Treasures' standeth a mountain named
the Mount of the Bereaved Mother (the cause of which being so
called shall presently follow in its place, Inshallah !) ; and thither
can none have access, save with pains and difficulty and distress ;
do thou make that same her abiding-place.*' Accordingly the
Minister and his wife agreed to build on that mountain a virgin
castle and lodge their daughter therein with the necessary pro-
vision to be renewed year by year and attendants to cheer and to
serve her. Accordingly he collected carpenters, builders and
architects, and despatched them to the mountain where they
builded her an impregnable castle, never saw eyes the like thereof.
Then he made ready vivers and carriage for the journey and



Online LibraryLeonard Charles Smithers Sir Richard Francis BurtonThe book of the thousand nights & a night → online text (page 1 of 45)