Leonard Withington.

Solomon's song: translated and explained, in three parts online

. (page 20 of 20)
Online LibraryLeonard WithingtonSolomon's song: translated and explained, in three parts → online text (page 20 of 20)
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Theology, pp. 108, 109.) This assumption is well an-
swered by Plato ; he traces knowledge to the one and
the many, — that is, the all-inclusive one and the all-



328 THE SUPPLEMENT.

included many, — in other words, the archetypal world,
all whose ideas are perfect, clear, and fixed. But this
philosophy postulates omniscience ; for everything is
related to all things, and it cannot be understood in
its relations until all things are known.

Take your choice, ^en. You need infallible teach-
ing ; you need certainty; that is, you need faith. Men
seek it somewhere. They find it either in an infalli-
ble book, or an infallible pontiff, or their own infallible
minds. The worst idolatry we can be guilty of is to
set up our own partial knowledge as a substitute for
omniscience.

Let us then restore this holy book to the supremacy
it once held, and which it must hold when religion
lives in the earth. Religion rests on authority ; our
ignorance of lower causes drives us to the first ; we
depend on the Bible, not only for the instruction it
imparts, but for the veneration, the quickening power
it gives to the soul. The Bible has not only words,
but charmed words ; and approaches our natures with
the boundless variety which different ages and disposi-
tions require.

If the book here translated does not meet the
wants of any particular reader, he needs not pro-
nounce it superfluous. Divine truth has many other
forms. Let us decide the question whether we have
a Divine authority to walk by or not. Let us have
no half-rule ; let us think what a thrill of attention



THE SUPPLEMENT. 329

and fear would pass through the soul, what a charm
would attend the reading of the Divine Word, what
a glory would gild the sacred page, if we could re-
store the sacred impression felt when the glad mes-
sage was first brought from Heaven to man ! Our
faith would then be operative, because it would have
something to rest on ; and " the Word of God would
be quick and powerful, and sharper than a two-edged
sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul
and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and would
prove a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the
heart." (Hebrews iv. 12.)



THE END.



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Online LibraryLeonard WithingtonSolomon's song: translated and explained, in three parts → online text (page 20 of 20)