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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



I*



THE BERRY PAPERS



BY THE SAME AUTHOR

WILLIAM MAKEPEACE THACKERAY: A

BIOGRAPHY.

THE THACKERAY COUNTRY.
SOME ASPECTS OF THACKERAY.
THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF WILLIAM

BECKFORD.
THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF LAURENCE

STERNE.

VICTORIAN NOVELISTS.
THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF WILLIAM

COBBETT.

"THE FIRST GEORGE."
"FARMER GEORGE."

"THE FIRST GENTLEMAN OF EUROPE."
"AN INJURED QUEEN" (CAROLINE OF

BRUNSWICK).

THE BEAUX OF THE REGENCY.
SOME ECCENTRICS AND A WOMAN.
BATH UNDER BEAU NASH.
BRIGHTON : ITS HISTORY, ITS FOLLIES, AND

ITS FASHIONS.
SOCIETY AT TUNBRIDGE WELLS IN

THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.





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THE BERRY PAPERS

BEING THE CORRESPONDENCE
HITHERTO UNPUBLISHED OF

MARY AND AGNES BERRY

(1763-1852). BY LEWIS MELVILLE
WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRA-
TIONS, or *r *r *



LONDON : JOHN LANE, THE BODLEY HEAD
NEW YORK: JOHN LANE COMPANY
TORONTO : BELL fa? COCKBURN. MCMXIV



Printed by BALLANTYNE. HANSON b> Co.
at the Ballantyne Press, Edinburgh



Collegw
, Library



TO
MY WIFE




I



PREFACE

Misses Berry died in 1852, and thirteen
years later appeared Extracts from the Jour-
nals and Correspondence of Mary Berry,
which had been prepared for press by
Lady Theresa Lewis. As the title indicates, these
volumes included but a selection of the papers left by
Mary Berry, and the present work may be regarded as
supplementary to the " Extracts." The hitherto un-
published correspondence includes letters written by,
or addressed to, the two sisters, Professor John Playfair,
Maria Edgeworth, Richard Owen Cambridge, Elizabeth
Montagu, Lord Jeffery, John Whishaw, the sixth Duke
of Devonshire, the Carlisles, the Hardwickes, the second
Lord Palmerston, Thomas Brand, Lord Colchester, the
Countess of Albany, Lady Charlotte Lindsay, Richard
Westmacott, Lord Dudley, Lady Charlotte Campbell,
Sarah Austin, the Hon. Caroline Howe, Lord Dover,
Chevalier Jerningham, Dean Milman, &c. There is also
printed for the first time a long series of self-revealing
letters exchanged between Mary Berry and the Hon.
Mrs. Darner, concerning which the former wrote in
1842:

"These letters, selected from a hundred others, I
cannot bring myself to destroy. I cannot for my soul
obliterate all memory of the truest, the most faithful and

rii



viii BERRY PAPERS

most generous Friendship that ever animated two human
Beings.

" I am aware that when I am gone these letters can
interest nobody. I am aware that they are almost en-
tirely expressions of character and of affection. But I
cannot ask my own hands to destroy the flattering proofs
of having been the object of such affection, of such
constant, unwearied, unselfish Friendship. Would that
the conscious pride with which I look back to these
recollections was entirely unsullied by my not having
borne with sufficient patience in later years some weak-
nesses and peculiarities which I felt indignant at creep-
ing over such a character as Hers !

" Oh noble, elevated, and tender Spirit ! if, from some
higher state of existence, thou canst read my inmost Soul,
as thou ever didst in this Read then my self-reproaches.
Read the just punishment of such impatience, in the
entirely widowed Soul that has thus long survived Thee,
wandering through the world 'without a second and
without a judge.'" 1

Most interesting, too, is the correspondence, also
printed for the first time, between Mary Berry, Mrs.
Darner, and General Charles O'Hara, written when
Mary Berry was engaged to the soldier. " This parcel
of letters," Mary Berry wrote in October 1844, "relates
to the six happiest months of my long and insignificant
existence, although these six months were accompanied
by fatiguing and unavoidable uncertainty, and by the
absence of everything that could constitute present en-
joyment. But I looked forward to a future existence
which I felt, for the first time would have called out all

1 Add. MSS. 37727, f. i.



PREFACE ix

the powers of my mind and all the warmest feelings of
my heart, and should have been supported by one who
but for the cruel absence which separated us, would
never have for a moment doubted that we should have
materially contributed to each other's happiness. These
prospects served even to pass cheerfully a long winter
of delays and uncertainty, by keeping my mind firmly
riveted on their accomplishment. A concatenation
of unfortunate circumstances the political state of
Europe making absence a necessity, and even frequent
communication impossible ; letters lost and delayed, all
certainty of meeting more difficult, questions unanswered,
doubts unsatisfied, all these circumstances combined in
the most unlucky manner, crushed the fair fabric of my
happiness, not at one fell swoop, but by the slow mining
misery of loss of confidence, of unmerited complaints,
of finding by degrees misunderstandings, and the firm
rock of mutual confidence crumbling under my feet,
while my bosom for long could not banish a hope that
all might yet be set right. And so it would, had we ever
met for twenty-four hours. But he remained at his
government at Gibraltar till his death, in 1802. And I,
forty-two years afterwards, on opening these papers
which had been sealed up ever since, receive the convic-
tion that some feelings in some minds are indelible."

An introductory chapter tells the story of the life
of the Misses Berry from their birth until 1790, when
the hitherto unpublished correspondence begins, and
it contains some particulars of their family history,
their early years, their first visits to the Continent, and
their acquaintance with Horace Walpole. From that
date the letters have been allowed, so far as possible,
to carry on the narrative.



x BERRY PAPERS

The sisters lived, respectively, to the great ages of
eighty-eight and eighty-nine, and thus were the last
links between the early years of the reign of George III
and the mid- Victorian era. "A very few years since,"
Thackeray said in one of his lectures on "The Four
Georges," " I knew familiarly a lady, who had been
asked in marriage by Horace Walpole, who had been
patted on the head by George III. This lady had knocked
at Johnson's door ; had been intimate with Fox, the
beautiful Georgina of Devonshire, and that brilliant
Whig society of the reign of George III ; had known
the Duchess of Queensberry, the patroness of Gay and
Prior, the admired young beauty of the Court of Queen
Anne. I often thought as I took my kind old friend's
hand, how with it I held on to the old society of wits
and men of the world. I could travel back for seven
score years of time have glimpses of Brummel, Selwyn,
Chesterfield, and the men of pleasure ; of Walpole and
Conway ; of Johnson, Reynolds, Goldsmith ; of North,
Chatham, Newcastle ; of the fair maids of honour of
George II's Court ; of the German retainers of George
I's ; where Addison was Secretary of State ; where Dick
Steele held a place ; whither the great Maryborough
came with his fiery spouse ; when Pope, and Swift,
and Bolingbroke yet lived and wrote." The Berrys
went everywhere and knew everyone ; and their salon,
held first at No. 26 North Audley Street, and later
at No. 8 Curzon Street, was one of the features of
London society. There night after night were as-
sembled all the wit and beauty of that time. Miss
Kate Perry wrote in her privately-printed Remini-
scences of a London Drawing-room, "There was a
charm about these gatherings of friends, that hereafter



PREFACE xi

we may say : ' There is no salon now to compare with
that of the Miss Berrys.' "

Besides the Journals and Correspondence now in
the British Museum, the principal authorities for the
life of Mary and Agnes Berry are the Diary of Lord
Colchester ; Thomas Moore's Journals ; Letters to Ivy from
the -first Earl of Dudley ; Harriet Martineau's Biographical
Portraits; Lord Houghton's Monographs; Horace Wai-
pole's Letters; and Warburton's Memoir of Horace Walpole
and his Contemporaries ; Letters of Harriet, Countess Gran-
ville; Cobbett's Memorials of Twickenham; Clayden's
Samuel Rogers and his Contemporaries; Mrs. Brookfield
and her Circle ; Horace Walpole' s Twin-Wives (Temple Bar,
March 1891); and Captain Hamilton's Cyril Thornton.

I am much indebted to Mrs. Charles H. E. Brook-
field for the loan of a copy of Miss Kate Perry's
privately-printed and exceedingly rare Reminiscences of
a London Drawing-room, which contains much interesting
information concerning the Berrys ; and to Mr. A. M.
Broadley, who has most generously permitted me to
insert letters hitherto unpublished from the Countess
of Albany, Maria Edgeworth, and Lord Jeffery, to Mary
Berry ; and from Mary Berry to Lady Hardwicke, Eliza-
beth Montagu, Mrs. Lamb, and Kate Perry, the originals
of which are in his library. To the Rev. Henry W.
Clark, the author of the admirable History of English
Nonconformity, I owe many thanks for assistance ren-
dered during the preparation of this work.

LEWIS MELVILLE.
LONDON, July 1913.



SECTION I

THE EARLY LIFE OF MARY AND AGNES BERRY
(1763-1789)

PAGE

Mary Berry's Notes of Early Life Her silence concerning her father's
forebears Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe states that her maternal
grandfather was a tailor Her great-uncle Ferguson's career His
childless marriage His sister's sons, Robert and William, his natural
heirs Robert Berry's early life His marriage with Miss Seton
alienates his uncle The birth of Mary and Agnes Berry The
death of Mrs. Robert Berry Ferguson wishes Robert Berry to
marry again His refusal brings about a breach between them
William Berry is informed that he, not Robert, will be his uncle's
heir Mary Berry's life-long bitterness at the loss of fortune Robert
Berry's weakness of character The girls live with their grandmother
in Yorkshire Robert Berry rents College House, Chiswick His
daughters' education Sir George and Lady Cayley Mary Berry's
first suitor The death of Ferguson Robert Berry's legacy Mary
Berry's dissatisfaction a tour in the west of England A visit to
Weymouth With the Craufords at Rotterdam A Dutch tour
Switzerland and Italy An autobiographical passage Florence
Sir Horace Mann Turin Rome Naples Montpellier Paris
Return to England The Berrys after their return from abroad
Their meeting with Horace Walpole Their acquaintance with
him ripens into intimacy Walpole's account of them His affection
for the sisters He laughs at the discrepancy in age between him
and them Mary his favourite He writes his Reminiscences of the
Courts of George I and George II for their entertainment He
dedicates to them his Catalogue of Strawberry Hill He introduces
them to the Conways Caroline, Lady Aylesbury Anne Seymour
Conway Her artistic instincts Ceraccni's statue of her as the
Muse of Sculpture Her marriage with the Hon. John Damer
Darner's extravagance He commits suicide Lady Sarah Lennox
on the ill-fated marriage Lord Milton's brutal behaviour to his
daughter-in-law, Mrs. Damer Mrs. Damer goes to her father's
house She goes abroad She rents a house in Sackville Street
Lady Sarah Lennox's pen-portrait of her Mrs. Darner's later life . 3

SECTION II
THE BERRYS ABROAD (October 1790 to November 1791)

Mary Berry's Memoranda for 1790-1 The sisters correspond regularly
with Horace Walpole His letters His affection for them His
longing for their company He refuses their offer to return His
jealousy of their friends Unpublished correspondence of Mrs.



xiv BERRY PAPERS

PAGE

Darner and Mary Berry The Berrys depart for Italy Mrs. Darner's
devotion to Mary Berry Dr. George Fordyce M. and Mme. de
Boufflers Edward Jerningham, "the charming man" Lady
Melbourne Mrs. Darner winters abroad Lady Elizabeth Foster
Mrs. Cholmeley General Charles O'Hara The Duke and
Duchess of Richmond Lady Bristol Giardini Richard Cosway
The Countess of Albany, wife of " The Young Pretender " An
accident to Mary Berry Her ill-health The rivalry between the
French and English captains of passenger- vessels at Calais
Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France Horace Walpole's
jealousy Mrs. Elizabeth Hervey Mrs. Buller Cicero's Letters
Lucan Lady Aylesbury Mrs. Darner's studio She falls from the
scaffold Protestations of friendship Lady Duncannon Mrs.
Damer slandered in the Newspapers William Combe expresses his
desire to apologise for his statements Lady Mount Edgcumbe
Mrs. Darner's statue of George III The fate of the French Royal
family Lady Mary Churchill Walpole's indignation that the
Countess of Albany does not recognise the Berrys' name The
Countess of Albany and Alfieri Lady Frederick Campbell Lady
Craven Walpole suffers from rheumatism Foolish paragraphs
in the World Edward Topham Mrs. Damer at Felpham
Horace Walpole desires the Berrys to live at Cliveden after their
return to England The Countess of Albany proposes to visit
Scotland Lord Frederick Campbell Mrs. Damer and her mother
Madame de Cambis Walpole's anxiety about the Berrys return-
ing via France His appeal to them to alter their projected route
Field-Marshal Conway German inns The Berrys' carriage breaks
down near Bologna 23



SECTION III

THE BERRYS AT LITTLE STRAWBERRY HILL
(1792-1794)

The Berrys return to England Horace Walpole desires them to live at
Little Strawberry Hill Kitty Clive Walpole's lines to her A
newspaper attack on the Berrys Mary Berry thereupon decides not
to live at Little Strawberry Hill Walpole eventually persuades her
to do so Walpole succeeds to the earldom of Orford His distress
thereat A false rumour that he proposed marriage to Mary Berry
A proposal of marriage to Anne Seymour Damer William
Augustus Fawkener Correspondence between Mary Berry and
Mrs. Damer concerning the proposed marriage The Berrys at Sir
George Cayley's Lord Orford unwell Lady Aylesbury The
Berrys at Scarborough Lord Hartington Field- Marshal Conway
Jerningham's play, The Siege of Berwick "Pretty Mrs. Stanhope"
Captain Nugent Lord Moira and the expedition to Brittany
Admiral Lord Howe Mrs. Darner's bust of Miss Berry William
Combe The Berrys in Yorkshire They return to Little Straw-
berry Hill Agnes Berry at Cheltenham Mary and Mr. Berry at
Park Place The Berrys at Prospect House, Isle of Thanet The
Greatheads Mrs. Damer at Goodwood Her new town house
Professor Playfair Miss Berry's play 88



CONTENTS xv

SECTION IV
THE LOVE-STORY OF MARY BERRY (1795-1796)

FACE

Mary Berry in love at sixteen Her one serious love-affair General
Charles O'Hara His early career He first meets Mary Berry
His further career At Gibraltar and Toulon Imprisoned in the
Luxembourg On his return proposes to Mary Berry She accepts
him The engagement kept a secret from all but Mrs. Damer
The death of Field-Marshal the Hon. H. S. Conway Correspond-
ence, mainly concerning O'Hara, between Mrs. Damer and Mary
Berry Agnes Berry's love-affair The departure of O'Hara to
take up the Governorship of Gibraltar a pen-portrait of O'Hara
at Gibraltar Mary Berry's reasons for not marrying him before
his departure The breaking off of the engagement Mary Berry's
regrets after forty years 134

SECTION V

THE BERRYS AT HOME AND ON THE CONTINENT
(1797-1803)

The death of Mrs. Darner's half-sister, the Duchess of Richmond
Horace Walpole's illness and death Mary Berry's account of his
last days His will Mary Berry edits his collected works The
Berrys and Mrs. Damer in 1798-9 The Hon. Caroline Howe She
is mentioned in Walpole's Letters An appreciation of her by Mary
Berry At Strawberry Hill Mrs. Damer s private theatricals The
production by amateurs of Mary Berry's comedy, Fashionable
Friends The cast Joanna Baillie The play well received The
author determines to secure a public representation The second
Viscount Palmerston The Peace of Amiens Mary Berry and Mrs.
Damer visit Paris Berthier, Cambace"res, Macdonald, Fouche,
Massena, Mme. Recamier, Mme. de Stael, &c. Presented to
Madame Buonaparte Napoleon Buonaparte Fashionable Friends
produced at Drury Lane The Berrys go abroad in October 1802
At Nice The death of Caroline, Lady Aylesbury Mme. de
Staremberg Amateur theatricals at The Priory Correspondence
with Lord Hartington and Mrs. Damer The propects of a new
war Death of the Duke of Bridgewater His will Reported death
of "Old Q." Sir William Hamilton's estate Bridgewater House . 196

SECTION VI
MARY AND AGNES BERRY IN SOCIETY (1804-1816)

Agnes Berry's engagement to her cousin It is broken off Agnes Berry's
illness Miss Kate Perry's appreciation of her The salon in Curzon
Street Some frequenters Mary Berry and Sam Rogers " The
Dead Dandy " The Berrys receive everybody and go everywhere
Parties at Tunbridge Wells Paul Amsinck, Master of the Cere-
monies A game of whist Mary Berry presented to the Princess



xvi BERRY PAPERS

of Wales Her Royal Highness at Strawberry Hill An intimacy
springs up between the Princess and Mary Berry The Battle of
Vimiera The Hon. Caroline Howe Lady Charlotte Campbell
Mary Berry's edition of the letters of Madame du Deffand The
Rev. Sydney Smith The Rev. G. O. Cambridge Lord Carlisle-
Lord Dudley The Hon. Mrs. Darner Mary Berry at Wimpole,
Christmas 1811 Agnes Berry to Mary Berry Lady Charlotte
Campbell's letters The assassination of Spencer Percival The
grief of the Princess of Wales The Battle of Salamanca The
Princess of Wales visits the Berrys at Tunbridge Wells, August 1812
Little Strawberry Hill leased to Alderman Wood The Berrys in
London, 1812-1815 Mary Berry goes to Paris in i8i6to stay
with the Hardwickes Sir Charles and Lady Stuart Her corres-
pondence with her sister John William Ward Lord Rosebery
The Greffulhes Sir Robert Wilson's trial Admiral Linois and
General Boyer Mdlle. George Talma The Duke of Wellington
Mdlle. Duchenois The Due de Richelieu Pozzo di Borgo
Talleyrand Mdlle. Mars French society Henry Luttrell A
letter from Maria Edgeworth Letters from Mary to Agnes Berry .



SECTION VII
THE LATER LIFE OF THE BERRYS (1817-1852)

The Berrys at Genoa Society in that town The Duke of Devonshire
Lord John Russell The letters of Lady Russell The death of
Lady Glenbervie The death of Robert Berry Mrs. Darner's
tribute to him The death of Madame de Stael Lucca Baths
Professor Playfair Lady Carlisle The death of Princess Charlotte
Lady Charlotte Campbell's second marriage John Whishaw
The publication of The Life and Letters of Rachel, Lady Russell
The Countess of Albany Lady Hardwicke Lord Colchester The
Berrys' movements, 1822-5 They move to Curzon Street Mary
Berry begins to prepare her edition of the correspondence of Horace
Wai pole Lady Charlotte Lindsay The Comparative View of
Social Life in France and England The death of Mrs. Damer
Lord Dover The Reform Bill "The quiet of gunpowder"
Macaulay Richard Westmacott, R.A. English art in 1834
Charades The Berrys at Paris in 1834 Harriet, Lady Granville
William Beckford's Italy ; with Sketches of Spain and Portugal
Buckingham Palace The Duke of Sutherland The resignation
of Sir Robert Peel, 1835 Lord Melbourne again becomes Prime
Minister Lord Jeffrey Lord Carlisle on Jesse's George Selwyn
and his Contemporaries Sarah Austin Madame Re"camier The
Duchesse de Praslin Chateaubriand Stratford Canning The
state of Europe in 1848 Kate Perry Dean Milman Ruskin
Last years Death of Agnes Berry Death of Mary Berry
Epitaph 382



ILLUSTRATIONS



FACING
PAGE

MARY BERRY AND AGNES BERRY. From miniatures by George
Englcheart in the Pierpont Morgan Collection. From a photograph
lent by Dr. Williamson Frontispiece

JOHN WILLIAM WARD, FIRST EARL OF DUDLEY. From a con-
temporary sketch by E. Berens 10

HORACE WALPOLE. From an engraving by T. Evans after Lawrence 14
THE HONBLE. MRS. DAMER. From an engraving by Hop-wood after a

tainting by G. C. 20

LADY SARAH LENNOX. From a painting by Sir Joshua Reynolds . 22

EDWARD JERNINGHAM. From an engraving by F. Thomson after

Shee. From the Collection of John Lane 26

LADY DUNCANNON. From an engraving by Mackenzie after Walker

in the Collection of A. M. Broadley, Esq. 42

LADY CHARLOTTE CAMPBELL. From an engraving by G. Wilkin

after Hoppner 50

MRS. CLIVE'S HOUSE AT TWICKENHAM. (CLIVEDEN OR LITTLE
STRAWBERRY HILL.) From an engraving in the Collection of A.
M. Broadley, Esq., by H. S. Storer, from the original drawing by
the same artist. 88

ORIGINAL DRAWING FOR MRS. DAMEK'S BOOKPLATE BY AGNES

BERRY. Reproduced by kind permission of Mr. Tregaskis . . 104

JOHN PLAYFAIR, F.R.S. From an engraving by R. Cooper after

Raebum. From the Collection offohn Lane 132

MARY BERRY. From the Collection of A. M. Broadley, Esq. . . 196
MADAME DE STAEL 206

THE SIXTH DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE. From an engraving by Edward

Scriven after G. Hayter 258

MARY BERRY. From a contemporary engraving in the " Town and

Country Magazine" in the Collection of A. M. Broadley, Esq. . 286

SAMUEL ROGERS. From an engraving by C. W. Sherbom after

Hoppner in the Collection of A. M. Broadley, Esq 288

xvii



xviii BERRY PAPERS

PACING
PAGE

THE DOWAGER MARCHIONESS OF DONEGAL. From an engraving by

Mackenzie after Craig in the Collection of A. M. Broadley, Esq. . 290

PHILIP, EARL OF HARDWICKE. From an engraving in the Collection

of A. M. Broadley, Esq 310

MLLE. MARS. From the Collection of A. M. Broadley, Esq. . . 322

MLLE. GEORGKS IN THE PART OF PHEDRE. From an engraving by

Lcroy after Libourd in the Collection of A. M. Broadley, Esq. . 324

TALLEYRAND 330

LORD JEFFREY. From an engraving after IV. H. Lizars. From the

Collection of John Lane \ 410

RICHARD WESTMACOTT. From an engraving by Thomson after J.

Derby. From the Collection of John Lane 414

MRS. SARAH AUSTIN. From a drawing on stone by Weld Taylor after

H. P. Briggs, R.A 428

LETTER FROM MARY BERRY TO CHARLES DRUMMOND. From tht

Original in the Collection of A. M. Broadley, Esq 436

MARY BERRY AT THE AGE OF 86. From the Collection of A. M.

Broadley, Esq. 438

PETERSHAM CHURCH. From a contemporary water-colour drawing in

the Collection of A. M. Broadley, Esq 440



THE BERRY PAPERS



THE BERRY PAPERS



SECTION I

THE EARLY LIFE OF MARY AND AGNES BERRY
(1763-1789)

Mary Berry's Notes of Early Life Her silence concerning her father's fore-
bears Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe states that her maternal grandfather
was a tailor Her great-uncle Ferguson's career His childless marriage
His sister's sons, Robert and William, his natural heirs Robert Berry's
early life His marriage with Miss Seton alienates his uncle The birth
of Mary and Agnes Berry The death of Mrs. Robert Berry Ferguson
wishes Robert Berry to marry again His refusal brings about a breach
between them William Berry is informed that he, not Robert, will
be his uncle's heir Mary Berry's life-long bitterness at the loss of fortune
Robert Berry's weakness of character The girls live with their grand-
mother in Yorkshire Robert Berry rents College House, Chiswick His
daughters' education Sir George and Lady Cayley Mary Berry's first
suitor The death of Ferguson Robert Berry's legacy Mary Berry's
dissatisfaction a tour in the west of England A visit to Weymouth
With the Craufords at Rotterdam A Dutch tour Switzerland and Italy
An autobiographical passage Florence Sir Horace Mann Turin
Rome Naples Montpellier Paris Return to England The Berrys
after their return from abroad Their meeting with Horace Walpole
Their acquaintance with him ripens into intimacy Walpole's account of
them His affection for the sisters He laughs at the discrepancy in age
between him and them Mary his favourite He writes his Reminiscences
of the Courts of George I and George II for their entertainment He
dedicates to them his Catalogue of Strawberry Hill He introduces them
to the Conways Caroline, Lady Aylesbury Anne Seymour Conway
Her artistic instincts Ceracchi's statue of her as the Muse of Sculpture
Her marriage with the Hon. John Darner Darner's extravagance He
commits suicide Lady Sarah Lennox on the ill-fated marriage Lord
Milton's brutal behaviour to his daughter in-law, Mrs. Darner Mrs,

3



4 BERRY PAPERS

Darner goes to her father's house She goes abroad She rents a house
in Sackville Street Lady Sarah Lennox's pen-portrait of her Mrs.
Damer's later life.

IN Mary Berry's Notes of Early Life, which were
found among her papers after her death, there
are, strangely enough, no particulars of her fore-
bears, not even a passing reference to her grand-
fathers. " My father was the maternal nephew of an old
Scotch merchant of the name of Ferguson," she says,
and no word more. The family history was thus de-
liberately wrapped in mystery, and nothing was generally



Online LibraryLewis MelvilleThe Berry papers; being the correspondence hitherto unpublished of Mary and Agnes Berry (1763-1852) → online text (page 1 of 38)