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Lewis Randolph Hamersly.

The records of living officers of the U. S. navy and Marine corps: with a history of naval operations during the rebellion of 1861-5, and a list of the ships and officers participating in the great battles online

. (page 28 of 42)
Online LibraryLewis Randolph HamerslyThe records of living officers of the U. S. navy and Marine corps: with a history of naval operations during the rebellion of 1861-5, and a list of the ships and officers participating in the great battles → online text (page 28 of 42)
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1866-9.



CAPTAIN HENRY A. BARTLETT. »

Born in Rhode Island. Appointed from Rhode Island ; commissioned as
Second Lieutenant, November 24th, 1861; headquarters, Washington, D. C,
1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861; iroo-clad frigate
New Ironsides, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-4 ; Lieutenant Bart-
lett participated in all the most important operations of the South Atlantic
Blockading Squadron ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1865 ; Marine
Barracks, Boston, Massachusetts, 1866; steam-sloop Sacramento, special cruise,
1867; commissioned as Captain, November 29th, 1867; steam-sloop Contoocook,
flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1868-9.



CAPTAIN CHARLES A. STILLMAN.

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut ; commissioned as Second
liieutenant, November 24th, 1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, November
25th, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H , 1862 ; steam-frigate Colorado,
West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1862-3 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New
York, 1864 ; sloop Cyane, Pacific Squadron, 1864-5 ; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-
sh.ip Pacific Squadron, 1866-7 ; commissioned as Captain, December 5th, 1867 ;
Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1867-9.



CAPTAIN WILLIAM R. MoKEAN.

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from New York ; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, November 27th, 1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, Novem-
ber 25th, 1861 ; Blarine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1862 ; Marine Bar-
racks, Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, 1863-5; steam-sloop Brooklyn,
Brazil Squadron, 1865-7; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1868-9; commis-
sioned as Captain, 1869.



CAPTAIN HORATIO B. LOWRY.

Born in Vermont. Appointed from South Carolina ; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, Novem-
ber 26th, 1861; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1861; steam-frigate
Wabash, flag-ship South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1862-3; brevetted
Captain for gallant and meritorious service, September 8th, 1863 ; Marine



250 MARINE CORPS.



Barracks, Boston, Massachusetts, 1864-5 ; store-ship New Hampshire, South
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; receiving-ship New Hampshire, Nor-
folk, Va., 1866 ; Marine Barracks, Boston, Massachusetts, 1867 ; receiving-ship
Vermont, New York, 1867-8 ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1868-9 ; at pre-
sent, attached to frigate Sabine, special cruise; commissioned as Captain, 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANTS.



FIRST LIEUTENANT FREDERICK H. CORRIE.

Born in New York. Appointed from Kentucky; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, Novem-
ber 26th, 1861 ; Marine Battalion, serving in South Atlantic Squadron, 1861-2;
Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1862 ; Marine Barracks, Mare Island,
California, 1862-4 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, North Atlantic Blockading Squad-
ron, 1864-5 ; battle of Fort Fisher, etc., brevetted Captain for gallant and
meritorious conduct; Marine Barracks, G-osport, Va., 1866-7 ; receiving-ship
New Hampshire, Norfolk, Va., 1868 ; receiving-ship Vermont, New York,
1868-9 ; at present, attached to steam-sloop Juniata, European Fleet.



FIRST LIEUTENANT PERCIVAL C. POPE. *

Born in Massachusetts. Appointed from New Hampshire ; commissioned as
Second Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant,
November 26th, 1861 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, South Atlantic Blockading
Squadron, 1861-4; brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious service, Sep-
tember 8th, 1863; Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Blassaohusetts, 1864-7;
steam-sloop Monongahela, North Atlantic Squadron, 1867 ; steam-sloop Susque-
hanna, flag-ship North Atlantic Squadron, 1867-8; Marine Barracks, Charles-
town, Massachusetts, 1868-9.



FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM R. BROWN.

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as
Second Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia,
1862; steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1802-4 ; commissioned
as First Lieutenant, August 18th, 1862 ; special duty, Philadelphia, 1864-9.



MAEINE CORPS. 251

FIRST LIEUTENANT RICHARD 8. COLLUM. «

Born in Indiana. Appointed from Indiana; commissioned as Second Lieu-
tenant, November 25th, 1861; frigate St. Lawrence, East Gulf Blockading
Squadron, 1861-3; commissioned as First Lieutenant, December .30th, 1862;
Marine Barracks, Cairo, 111., 1864; iron-clad frigate New Ironsides, North At-
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; battle of Fort Fisher, etc.; Marine Bar-
racks, Washington, D. C, 1865-7; Marine Barracks, Naval Station, Blound
City, Itr, 1868; steam-sloop Richmond, European Fleet, 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT NORVAL L. NOKES.

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from District of Columbia ; com-
missioned as Second Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861; Marine Barracks,
Brooklyn, New York, 1862; sloop Vincennes, West Gulf Blockading Squadron,
1863; commissioned as First Lieutenant, June 30th, 1868; steam-sloop Pensa-
cola, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Washington,
D. 0., 1865-6 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Pacific Squadron, 1860-8 ; bead-
quarters, Washington, D. C, 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM B. RBMEY.

Born in Iowa. Appointed from Iowa; commissioned as Second Lieutenant,
November 25th, 1861 ; frigate Sabine, special service, 1862-3 ; Marine Bar-
racks, Gosport, Va., 1864; receiving-ship North Carolina, New York, 1865;
steamer Vanderbilt, North Pacific Squadron, 1865-7 ; receiving-ship New
Hampshire, Norfolk, Va., 1868; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1868-9; at
present, on special duty at Washington, D. C.



FIRST LIEUTENANT HENRY J. BISHOP.

Born in Connecticut. Appointed from Connecticut; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, November 25th, 1861 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York,
1862-3; store-ship Vermont, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1863-4:
commissioned as First Lieutenant, April 1st, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Ports-
mouth, N. H., 1865-6; steam-sloop Susquehanna, special cruise, 1866-7,
Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., 1867-8; Marine Barracks',
Naval Station, Pensacola, Fla., 1868-9.



FIRST LIEUTENANT ROBERT L. MEADE.

Born in District of Columbia. Appointed from Tennessee ; commissioned
as Second Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862 ; Marine Barracks, Gosport, Va., 1862 ;



252 MARINE CORPS.

Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1862-3 ; South Atlantic Blockading
Squadron, 1863 ; taken prisoner, September 7tli, 1863 ; in the night attack on
Fort Sumpter, brevetted First Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious services ;
commissioned as First Lieutenant, April 2d, 1864; Marine Barracks, Broiikiyn,
New York, 1864-5; steam-sloop Shenandoah, Asiatic Squadron, 1865-9; at
present, on duty at Philadelphia.



FIRST LIEUTENANT LYMAN P. FRENCH. .

Born in New York. Appointed from New York; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C, 1863;
Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1863; steam-frigate Niagara,
special service, 1863-4; commissioned as First Lieutenant, April 1st, 18G4;
iron-clad Roanoke, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; Marine Bar-
racks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1866-7; Marine Barracks, Washington,©. 0., 1868;
Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIABI WALLACE.

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland ; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862 ; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washington, J).
C, 1862-4; commissioned as First Lieutenant, June 10th, 186-4; stearn-sloop
Susquehanna, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 18G4-5 ; two attacks on
Fort Fisher and land assault on the same ; Lieutenant Wallace was wounded
and was brevetted Captain for gallantry ; steam-sloop Susquehanna, Brazil
Squadron, 1865-6 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1867 ; headquarters,
Washington, D. C, 1867; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1868; Marine
Barracks, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1868-9.



FIRST LIEUTENANT EDWARD C. SALTMARSH.

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Blassachusetts ; commissioned as
Second Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Washin"'-
ton, D. 0., 1862-3 ; Marine Barracks, Naval Station, Pensacola, Fla., 1863 ;
commissioned as First Lieutenant, June 10th, LJ64; frigate Sabine, special
service, 1864-5; Marine Barracks, Boston, Mas.iiichusetts, 1865-7; Slarine
Barracks, Go.sport, Va., 1868; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT CHARLES F. WILLIAMS.

BOEN in Connecticut. Appointed from District of Columbia; commissioned
as Second Lieutenant, June 14th, 18G2 ; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C.



MARINE CORPS. 253

1862 ; steam-frigate Minnesota, flag-ship North Atlantic Blockading Squadron,
1862-C ; Brazil Squadron, 1868-4; commissioned as First Lieutenant, June
10th, 1864 ; steam-sloop Ticonderoga, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron,
1864-5 ; battle of Fort Fisher, etc. ; brevetted Captain for gallant and meritor-
ious service; Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C., 1865-8; steam-sloop Ply-
mouth, European Squadron, 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT EDWARD P. MEEKER.

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey ; commissioned as
Second Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862 ; headquarters^ Washington, D. C, 1862 ;
Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1863-4; commissioned as First Lieu-
tenant, September 17th, 1864; steam-frigate Colorado, North Atlantic Blocka-
ding Squadron, 1864-5; battle of Fort Fisher, etc.; brevetted Captain, for gal-
lant and meritorious conduct ; steam-frigate, Colorado, flag-ship European Squad-
ron, 186(>-7 ; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, New York, 1868; Naval Station, Nor-
folk, Ya, 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT LOUIS E. FAGAN.

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, June 14th, 1862; headquarters, 1862; Marine Barracks, Phila-
delphia, 1363 ; steam-frigate Wabash, flag-ship South Atlaatic Blockading Squad^-
ron, 1863-4 ; brevetted First Lieutenant for gallantry in action ; North Atlan-
tic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; bombardment of Fort Fisher, and land as-
sault on the same ; brevetted Captain for bravery in battle ; commissioned as
First Lieutenant, December 8th, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Gosport, Va., 1865—6 ;
special duty. New York, 1866-7 ; Marine Barracks, Navy Yard, Philadelphia,
1867 ; steam-sloop Ossipee, North Pacific Blockading Squadron, 1868-9.



FIRST LIEUTENANT CHARLES L. SHERMAN.

Born in Michigan. Appointed from Michigan ; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, July 12th, 1862 ; headquarters, 1862 ; Marine Barracks, Charles-
town, Massachusetts, 1863; steam-sloop Hartford, flag-ship West G ulf Blocka-
ding Squadron, 1863-4 ; battle of Mobile Bay ; brevetted First Lieutenant for
gallantry ; steam-sloop Richmond, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ;
commissioned as First Lieutenant, December 8th, 1864 ; Marine Barracks,
Brooklyn, New York, 1865-7 ; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1868-9.



FIRST LIEUTENANT GEORGE M. WELLES.

Born in New York. Appointed from New York ; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, July 12th, 1862; headquarters, 1862; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn,



254 MARINE CORPS.

New York, 1863; Naval Station, Norfolk, Va., 1864-5; commissioned as First
Lieutenant, January 11th, 1865; Marine Barracks, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1865-7;
Marine Barracks, Mare Island, California, 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT HENRY C. COCHRANE.

Born in Pennsylvania. Appointed from Pennsylvania; commissioned as
Second Lieutenant, March 10th, 1863 ; headquarters, 1863 ; Mississippi Squad-
ron, 1864-5; commissioned as First Lieutenant, August 20th, 1865; head-
quarters, 1855-6; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1866; receiving-ship Con-
stellation, Philadelphia, 1867 ; sloop Jamestown, North Pacific Squadron, 1868 ;
steam-sloop Saranae, Pacific Fleet, 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT GEORGE B. HAYCOCK.

Born in Maine. Appointed from California ; commissioned as Second Lieu-
tenant, March 18th, 1863; Marine Barracks, Philadelphia, 1864-5; steam-sloop
Canandaigua, European Squadron, 1865-9 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant,
June 20th, 1866 ; at present, on duty at Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Mass.



FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM S. MUSE.

Born in Maryland. Appointed from Maryland ; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, March 18th, 1864; sloop St. Marys, Pacific Squadron, 18G4-6;
commissioned as First Lieutenant, April 27th, 1867 ; Marine Barracks, Wash-
ington, D. C, 1867-9.



FIRST LIEUTENANT ISRAEL H. WASHBURN.

BoEN in Maine. Appointed from JIaine ; commissioned as Second Lieuten-
ant, March 18th, 1864; Marine Barracks, Portsmouth, N. H., 1864-5 ; steamer
Rhode Island, flag-ship Atlantic Squadron, 1865-6 ; Marine Barracks, Ports-
mouth, N. H., 1867 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, August 29th, 1867 ;
Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Massachusetts, 1868 ; Marine Barracks, Ports-
mouth, N. H., 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT ALBERT B. YOUNG.

Born in District of Colurnbia. Appointed from Massachusetts ; commissioned
3 Second Lieutenant, March 18th, 1864; iron-clad frigate New Ironsides, North



MARINE CORPS. 255

Atlantic Blockading Squadron, 1864-5 ; steam-sloop Powhatan, flag-ship South
Pacific Squadron, 1865-7 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, November 29th,
1867 ] headquarters, 1867 ; Marine Barracks, Mare Island, California, 18Q.8-9.



FIKST LIEUTENANT FRANK D. WEBSTER.

Born in New Hampshire. Appointed from New Hampshire ; commissioned
as Second Lieutenant, March 18th, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Charlestown, Mass.,
1864 j steam-sloop Lancaster, flag-ship Pacific Squadron, 1864-7 ; Marine Bar-
racks, Boston, Massachusetts, 1867-8 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant,
December 5th, 1867 j Naval Station, Pensacola, Florida, 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT JAMES D. B. BEBESE.

Born in Illinois. Appointed from Illinois ; commissioned as Second Lieu-
tenant, March 18th, 1864 ; headquarters, 1864 ; South Atlantic Blockading
Squadron, 1864-5; receiving-ship Vermont, New York, 1866; Marine Bar-
racks, Brooklyn, New York, 1866-9; commissioned as First Lieutenant, May
1st, 1868.



FIRST LIEUTENANT A. S. TAYLOR.

Born in New Jersey. Appointed from New Jersey ; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, July 2d, 1864 ; headquarters, 1864; Marine Barracks, Mare Island,
California, 1864r-8 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, July 30th, 1868 ; steam-
sloop Tuscarora, Pacific Fleet, 1868-9.



FIRST LIEUTENANT JAMES M. T. YOUNG.

Born in New York, Appointed from Maryland; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, July 2d, 1864; headquarters, 1864-5 ; Marine Barracks, Pensa-
cola, 1865-6; headquarters, 1866-7; steam-sloop Pawnee, South Atlantic Squad-
ron, 1867-9 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, August 9th, 1868.



FIRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM B. MURRAY.

Born in Iowa. Appointed from Iowa; commissioned as Second Lieutenant
July 2d, 1864; headquarters, 1864; Marine Barracks, Mound City, Illinois,^



256 MAKINE CORPS.

1865-6 ; steam-sloop Lackawanna, North Pacific Squadron, 1866-9 ; commis-
sioned as First Lieutenant, 1869 ; at present, on duty at Marine Barracks, Mare
Island, California.



FIRST LIEUTENANT GEORGE C. REID.

Born in Ohio. Appointed from Ohio ; commissioned as Second Lieutenant
July 2d, 1864 ; headquarters, 1864-6 ; steam-sloop Monongahela, North At-
lantic Squadron, 1867 ; appointed Aid-de-camp to Commandant, 1867 ; head-
quarters, 1867-9; commissioned as First Lieutenant, 1869.



FIRST LIEUTENANT ERASTUS R. ROBINSON.

Born in New York. Appointed from New York; commissioned as Second
Lieutenant, July 2d, 1864 ; headquarters, 1864 ; Marine Barracks, Mare Island,
California, 1865; steam-sloop Saranac, Pacific Squadron, 1866-7; Marine Bar-
racks, Brooklyn, New York, 1868; steam-sloop Seminole, North Atlantic Squad-
ron, 1869 ; commissioned as First Lieutenant, 1869.



A BRIEF HISTORY

OP

Naval Operations during the Rebellion.



The war of the rebellion opened upon a people but ill-prepared for such a con-
test, and in nothing was this want of preparation more manifest than in the con-
dition of the navy. The limited number of ships and men at command, when
the proclamation announcing the blockade of the Southern ports was issued, de-
volved upon the Navy Department the necessity of calling into service, not only
the entire available naval force, but also vessels from the commercial marine. Or-
ders were issued to at once prepare for service all the public vessels which were
lying dismantled at the various yards ; vessels of every kind that could be in any
way rendered serviceable were purchased or chartered, and the force thus hurriedly
collected was divided into two squadrons, and placed along the coast. One of
these two, denominated the Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under command of
Flag-Officer Charles Stringham, had for its field of operations the entire coast,
from the eastern line of Virginia to Cape Florida. The other, the G-ulf Squad-
ron, under Flag-Officer Wm. Mervine, operated from Cape Florida westward to
the Rio Grande.

The task of blockading the coast, an unattractive one enough, and one re-
quiring unceasing vigilance, was carried out as effectually as the nature of the coast
and the circumstances of the case would permit. The ports of North Carolina,
situated within the shallow waters of the sounds, afforded peculiar facilities for
the evasion of the blockade, as well as for annoying piratical enterprises, and
accordingly an expedition was undertaken having for its object the occupation of
the defences at Hatteras Inlet. Flag-Officer Stringham commanded in person
the naval forces, and Major-General Butler the small military force, consisting
of about 800 men, which was to co-operate with the navy on this occasion.

The expedition left Hampton Roads on the 26th of August, 1861 ; it con-
sisted of the flag-ship Minnesota, with four other U. S. steamers, and three
chartered vessels, and two transport towing schooners with surf-boats.

On the 27th, the fleet rounded Cape Hatteras, and anchored to the southward,
and on the following morning the troops were landed without mishap, through
a heavily rolling surf. The inlet was defended by two heavy batteries. Forts
Hatteras and Clark, and against the latter of these the fire of the fleet was first
directed — the Wabash and Cumberland opening at ten o'clock — and with the
other vessels passing and repassing until shortly after noon, the flag on the fort
was down and the rebels were seen running towards Fort Hatteras. The troops
thereupon moved up the beach, and at two o'clock the American flag was flying over
Fort Clark. Captain Gillis, of the Monticello, was ordered to feel his way into
the inlet and take possession, but he had not advanced far when fire was opened
on him from Fort Hatteras, whereupon a general engagement ensued, continu-
ing until dark. Early the following morning, the fire was renewed and oon-
17 C257~>



258 NAVAL OPERATIONS DURING THE REBELLION.

tinued with such effect that before noon a white flag was displayed from the
fort, and the troops marched up; the crews of the squadron, spontaneously, though
as if by a preconcerted signal, giving three hearty cheers.

General Butler immediately went intb the inlet with his tug to take posses-
sion, and shortly after returned to the flag-ship with the three senior officers of
the Confederate army and navy, between whom and the commanders of the
joint expedition terms of capitulation were drawn up.

The loss in killed and wounded in the forts had been large, but although
they had returned the fire of the squadron throughout the engagement, they
had done so without effect, the shot for the most part falling short, and thus
this important victory was achieved without a single casualty to any one upon
the vessels or among the troops. Unfortunately the military force was insufficient
to follow up the advantage thus gained by occupying a position on the main
land, and important as was the occupation of the defences of Hatti-ras inlet, it
was not until some time after that any very strong hold was obtained upon the
coast of North Carolina.

Another region which early taxed the energies of the navy was that of the
lower Potomac, where it was necessary to place a flotilla. The duties of this
flotilla were extremely embarassing, and it was evident that without the active
co-operation of the army it would be impossible to prevent the obstruction of
navigation by hostile batteries. For several months, however, the navy suc-
ceeded in keeping the river open and restricting to a great extent communica-
tion between the shores, until the close of October, 1861, when the rebels suc-
ceeded in erecting batteries at various points on the Virginia shore, thus render-
ing passage of the river dangerous. It was in the heroic discbarge of the
annoying duties of his post that the first commander of the flotilla, Commander
J. H. Ward, lost his life; the first officer of the navy killed in action during the
rebellion. He was shot by a musket ball while sighting a gun, in an attempt
to effect a landing at Matthias Point, where a formidable battery was afterwards
erected.

In spite of the continued increase of the squadrons, the labor of enforcing
the blockade increased quite as rapidly, since the needs of the blockaded States
called forth the most desperate efforts for their relief. The duties so imposed
upon the flag-officers thus became more arduous and extensive than could well
be performed by a single commander, and rendered a division of the squadrons
necessary. Shortly after the capture of Hatteras Inlet, Flag-Officer Stringham
relinquished his command, and the Atlantic Squadron was divided into two.
Captain Louis M. Groldsborough was appointed to the command of the North
Atlantic Blockading Squadron, to guard the coast of Virginia and North Caro-
lina, and raised his flag on the Minnesota, September 23d, 1861. The remain-
der of the coast, from the northern boundary of South Carolina to Cape Florida,
was entrusted to the squadron of the South Atlantic, under Captain Samuel F.
Du Pont. At the same time, Captain William W. McKean relieved Flag-Officer
Mervine from the command of the Gulf Squadron, the division of which was
postponed until a larger force could be sent around the peninsula. This was
consummated on the 21st of February, 1862, Flag-Officer McKean retaining
command of the Eastern Gulf Squadron, whose limits embraced the Florida coast^
from Cape Canaveral to Pensacola. The Western Gulf Squadron guarded the
coast from and including Pensacola, to the Rio Grande, including numerous im-
portant harbors and the outlet of the great valley of the Mississippi. This most
important command, which included the preparation of a great expedition for
the capture of New Orleans, was entrusted to Captain D. G. Farragut.



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON. 259

In addition to the five large squadrons thus constituted upon the maritime
frontier, it early became necessary to have an organized naval force on the Mis-
sissippi and its tributaries; and on the 16th of May, 1861, Commander John
Eodgers was directed to report to the War Department for the purpose of or-
ganizing an armed flotilla on the western waters. He immediately proceeded
to the West, purchased steamers, which were fitted and armed as gunboats, and
commenced the organization of the Mississippi flotilla, which soon after made
itself known by a succession of brilliant achievements.



NORTH ATLANTIC SQUADRON.

We have already spoken of the annoyance experienced at the commencement
of the blockade, from vessels of light draught which made egress and ingress
through the many sounds on the coast of North Carolina. The occupation of
one of the most important inlets was not sufficient to exercise much control over
these operations, and it early became necessary to gain possession of the im-
portant points within the sounds. Flag-Officer Louis M. Groldsborough had, as
has been stated, assumed command of the North Atlantic Squadron, in Sep-
tember, 1861, and early in the following January a joint expedition of the navy
and army, for operations in the waters of North Carolina, moved from Hampton
Roads, under command of that officer and Brigadier-General A. E. Burnside,
respectively.

The naval force, consisting of seventeen light-draught. vessels, with an arma-
ment of 48 guns, most of them of heavy calibre, arrived at Hatteras Inlet on
the 13th, and in two days succeeded, with great difficulty, in passing over the
bulkhead and through the narrow and tortuous channel. It was not, however,
until some weeks later that the transports were able to surmount the obstacles
and to be prepared for active co-operation, which period of delay was employed



Online LibraryLewis Randolph HamerslyThe records of living officers of the U. S. navy and Marine corps: with a history of naval operations during the rebellion of 1861-5, and a list of the ships and officers participating in the great battles → online text (page 28 of 42)