Copyright
Liberal Publication Dept. (Great Britain).

Ten years of Tory government, 1895-1905, Home affairs. A handbook for the use of Liberals .. online

. (page 1 of 39)
Online LibraryLiberal Publication Dept. (Great Britain)Ten years of Tory government, 1895-1905, Home affairs. A handbook for the use of Liberals .. → online text (page 1 of 39)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


GOVERNMENT



LIBERALS




TEN YEARS

OF

TORY GOVERNMENT.

189S 19O5.

HOME AFFAIRS.



A HANDBOOK



FOR THE



USE OF LIBERALS.



"Promising is the very air o' the time. . . . To promise is most courtly and
fashionable : performance is a kind of will or testament which argues a great
sickness in his judgement that makes it. " TIMON OF ATHENS.



1905,



THE LIBERAL PUBLICATION DEPARTMENT,

(In connexion with the National Liberal Federation and
Liberal Central Association.)

41 & 42, PARLIAMENT STREET,
LONDON, S.W.



(>



LONDON :

PRINTED BY THE NATIONAL PRESS AGENCY LTD.,
WHITEFRIARS HOUSE, E.C.



PREFACE.



Two years ago, in writing a few prefatory words to
" Eight Years of Tory Government/' I said that no
Government since the days of Charles the Second had
so bad a record as the present Administration. That
was giving the dog a sufficiently bad name, but, even
so, the last thing the dog is willing to do is to hang
himself. Mr. Balfour still outstays at Downing Street
the welcome he never received, and will probably live
in history as the Prime Minister who has declared
his right to remain in office without the pretence
of the support of the Country.

This Handbook seeks to show what the domestic
record of the Tory Government has been since 1895.
There is much talk about negative and positive
policies, but it is clearly desirable that the electors
who, thanks to the Septennial Act, will before very
long be allowed to record their opinion in the ballot-
box, should realise how they have been governed
during the last ten years. If, with their eyes opened
to what Toryism means and costs, they wish for a
further dose, there will be nothing more to be said.
But I have more confidence in the good sense of my
fellow-countrymen, who are not likely to forget in a
hurry the trick that was played upon them in 1900.
Every by-election shows a payment on account, but
the full reckoning can only come at the General
Election.

Foreign Affairs are outside the scheme of the
Handbook, but a word may be said as to the ancient
shibboleth that the country is only safe so long as

425978



foreign policy and Imperial Defence are controlled
by Mr. Balfour's Cabinet. The mere statement of
the proposition is its own refutation. It does not
only not frighten, it hardly amuses, except indeed
when, as at Chichester, we are solemnly assured that
a Liberal Prime Minister in Downing Street would
mean Germans landing on the shores of Sussex.

To have included the Fiscal Question amongst the
subjects dealt with would have been inconsistent with
the plan of the Handbook. It is the more light-
heartedly omitted since it is so fully dealt with in
many publications in which the case for Free Trade
is set out. At the moment the Tory party seem to
regard Tariff Reform as an incubus rather than an
asset, but the average elector, so long as he sees Mr.
Chamberlain and Mr. Balfour linked together, will
very properly conclude that they are linked together
against Free Trade. When Mr. Balfour uses another
half-sheet of notepaper to disown Mr. Chamberlain
and all his works, it will be time enough to consider
whether he is the real saviour of Free Trade, as hard-
pressed Tory candidates in the constituencies would
have us believe.

" Ten Years of Tory Government " is, of course,
written from a Liberal point of view. But it gives
chapter and verse for what is stated in it, and in the
case of present Ministers no rhetoric can be so
deadly as the plain and unadorned record of their
deeds. It only remains for Liberals to make sure
that this record is known of all men or, at any rate,
of all electors.

AUGUSTINE BIRRELL.

October, 1905.



EDITORIAL NOTE.



This Handbook covers the record of the Tory
Government on domestic questions from 1895 up to
the end of the Session of 1905. The Chapter on
Scotland which has appeared in previous editions
of the Handbook is omitted, as Scottish affairs are
dealt with in detail in " CURRENT POLITICS," issued
by the Scottish Liberal Association.*

Every effort has been made to be accurate and
to verify the quotations. Whilst it is too much to
expect that with so many facts and figures there are
no errors, it is hoped and believed that they will
be found to be very few ; a note of any that are
discovered will be much appreciated by the
Editor, addressed to 42, Parliament Street, S.W.

The Editor desires to express ['his sincere
acknowledgments to the many friends who have
assisted him in this compilation.

October, 1905.



* Price Is., post free Is. 4d., from the Liberal Publication Departmen
42, Parliament Street S.W.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

PAGE

FINANCE i

1. The Yearly Balance Sheets 1

How the Money has been Raised... ... ... ... ... 2

How the Money has been Spent ... ... ... ... ... 4

Total Expenditure 6

Sir Henry Fowler's Return 6

The Cost of the South African War 10

Amount Raised in Taxation, 1891-1905 11

Taxation Imposed and Remitted, 1895-1905 12

The Increased National Expenditure ... ... ... ... 13

The Sinking Fund 14

The Raid of 1899 14

The Re-settlement of 1903 14

The Re-settlement of 1905 15

The National Indebtedness ... ... ... ... ... 15

The Position in 1905 15

National Indebtedness for the last 18 years ... ... 17

Tory Taxation 19

The Sugar Duty, 1901 20

The Coal Tax, 1901 20

The Corn Tax, 1902 22

The Tobacco Tax, 1904 23

The Extra Twopence on Tea, 1904 25

The Tories and Sir W. Harcourt's Finance 26

The Brussels Sugar Convention 27

The Results of the Convention 29

Tory Prophecy 29

Fact 30

Tory Explanations 33

Mr. Kearley's Amendment to the Address ... ... 35

Mr. Chamberlain and the Sugar Question 36

2. The "Doles' 38

The " Doles " at a Glance 38

The 1896 "Dole "to English and Scotch Landowners ... 38

The 1897 " Dole "to Denominational Schools 39

The 1898 "Dole" to Irish "Agriculture" 39

The 1899 " Dole "to Clerical Tithe-payers 40

The 1900 " Dole "to Irish Tithe-payers 42

The 1901 Renewal of the Agricultural and Clerical " Doles " 43

The 1905 Renewal of the Agricultural and Clerical " Doles " 43



CHAPTER II.

AGRICULTURE 46

1. The Tory Promise 46

2. What the Tories Have Done 47

The Rating Act (England and Wales) of 1896 48

What the Rating Act Does 48

Concrete Instances ... ... ... ... ... 50

Liberal Attempts to Improve the Act 51

Points About the Act 52

The Local Taxation Commission and the Rating Act 54

The Agricultural Commission Report and the Agricultural

Depression 57

The Animals Diseases Act, 1896 59

The Effect of the Act 60

The Sale of Food and Drugs Act, 1899 61

Agricultural Holdings ... ... ... ... ... ... 62

The Agricultural Holdings Act, 1900 63

Insufficient and Complicated... ... ... 63

Rejected Amendments 64

Mr. Lambert's Bill, 1901 66

Small Holdings and Allotments 67

The Budget of 1894 and Agricultural Land 68

3. Points and Figures , 69

Mr. Chamberlain on " a Fair Rent " 69

The " Farmers' Friends " ! 69



CHAPTER III.

EDUCATION 70

1. The Tory Record, 1895 19O1 70

A. 18951900 , 70

The Education Bill, 1896 71

The Voluntary Schools Act, 1897 ... ,,. ... 72

The Necessitous School Boards Act, 1897 73

The 1899 Code and Pupil Teachers 74

The Board of Education Act, 1899 75

The Secondary Education Bill, 1900 75

B. 19001901 75

The Education (No. 1) Bill of 1901 76

The Education Act, 1901 77

2. The Education Act of 19O2 77

The Inclusion of Elementary Education ... 77

The Provisions of the Act 78

The Act Criticised 87

3.jThe Tory Record, 19O3 19O5 90

The Education Acts at Work 90

Ministers and the Acts 90

The Welsh Coercion Act, 1904 91

The Committee Stage 92

Mr. Balf our on Coercing Local Authorities 93

The Bishop of St. Asaph's Bill, 1904 94

4. Educational Administration, 1895 19O5 ... 95



CHAPTER IV.

THE TORY SOCIAL PROGRAMME ... 104

1. The Tory Promise 104

2. What the Tories Have Done ... 105

Mr. Chamberlain's Programme 106

Mr. Balfour's 1895 Election Card 107

CHAPTER V.

OLD AGE PENSIONS ios

1. The Tory Promise 108

A. 1895 108

B. 1900 109

2. What the Tories Have Done 110

The " Expert " Commission 110

The Select Committee of the House of Commons Ill

Who Are to Have the Pensions ? ... ... ... 112

The Machinery of the Scheme... ... 113

The Cost 113

The Departmental Committee ., 114

Mr. Chamberlain's Old Age Pension Record 115

In Opposition and in Office 117

Aged Pensioners Bill, 1902 118

Pensions by Preferential Tariffs, 1903 119

Select Committee, Aged Pensioners Bill, 1903 121

Old Age Pensions Bill, 1904 122

Mr. Chamberlain and the " Unknown Scribbler " (1905) ... 122

3. Points and Figures 123

The Two Mr. Chamberlains 123

Passing it on 123

" Consult the Liberal Unionist Agent"... ... ... ... 124

Mr. Chamberlain and the Friendly Societies ... ... ... 124

I." Under Another Chancellor of the Exchequer " 124

II." A Subject for Party Controversy" 125

Mr. Balfour on Old Age Pensions 126

The Morning Post on Mr. Chamberlain and Old Age Pensions 127
The Saturday Review on Mr. Chamberlain and Old Age

Pensions 127

CHAPTER VI.

THE COMPENSATION ACT 128

1. The Tory Promise 128

A. 1895 128

B. 1900-1905 129

2. What the Tories Have Done 131

The Compensation Act in Parliament ... ... ... ... 132

The Excluded Workers. The Agricultural Labourer 134

The Agricultural Labourers Act of 1900 135

Tory Misstatements about the Act ... ... ... ... 136

The Departmental Committee's Recommendations ... ... 138

The Amending Bill of 1905 142

3. Judges on the Working of the Act 146



4. Points and Figures 149

Promise v. Performance ... ... ... ... ... ... 149

The Act and " Casual " Labourers 149

The Act and Tariff Reform ... 150

CHAPTER VII.

THE TEMPERANCE QUESTION 151

1. The Tory Promise 151

2. What the Tories Did, 1895 19O3 152

The Vagaries of 1901 154

The Children's Liquor Act, 1901 156

The Licensing Act, 1902 156

Ministers and " the Trade " in 1903 158

3. The Licensing Act, 1904 160

Summary of Provisions of the Act 162

The Bill in the Commons 165

The Time Limit 167

Mr. Balfour and " EternalJustice " 169

4. The Licensing Commission Report 170

CHAPTER VIII.

THE HOUSING OF THE WORKING

CLASSES 174

1. The Tory Promise 174

A. 1895 174

B. 1900 175

2. What the Tories Have Done 175

The Small Houses Act, 1899 175

Better Housing ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 176

The Act of 1900 176

1900-1903 177

The Act of 1903 178

CHAPTEE IX.

THE EXCLUSION OF ALIENS 179

1. The Tory Promise 179

2. What the Tories Did, 1895 19O4 180

The Tory Record, 1895-1902 180

The Royal Commission Report, 1903 181

Recommendations 182

Minority Reports 183

The Aliens Bill, 1904 184

The Second Reading 185

The Reference to a Grand Committee 186

The Fate of the Bill 186

3. The Aliens Act, 19O5 187

The Bill as Introduced 187

The Second Reading 189

Later Stages 191

Points from the Debates ... ... ... ... ... ... 192

The Act as Introduced and as Amended... 195



CHAPTER X.

SHORTER HOURS IN SHOPS 197

1. The Tory Promise 197

2. What the Tories Have Done 197

The Shop Hours Act, 1904 199

CHAPTER XI.

THE ARMY AND NAVY 201

The Increase in Cost ... ... ... ... ... ... 201

The Army Corps Scheme 202

The Remounts Scandal 204

The Meat Contracts 206

The War Commission Report 207

The Intelligence Department's Warnings ... 207

Disregarded Warnings 208

Lord Lansdowne's Ignorance ... ... ... 208

The Utter Lack of Co-ordination 209

Lord Roberts's Comments ... ... ... ... 209^

The Responsibility of the Cabinet ... ... 210

The Lesson not Learnt 210

Home Unpreparedness 211

Responsibility of Lord Lansdowne 212

The War Report in the Commons 212

The War Office Committee Report

The Abandoned Army Corps Scheme 213

The Government and the Report of the Committee of

Three 214

Mr. Arnold-Forster's Army Scheme... ... ... ... 214

Mr. Arnold-Forster's Scheme in 1905 21

" Arrested Progress " The Militia and the

Volunteers 220

The Scheme and Economy - 224

The Militia and Volunteer Royal Commission Report, 1904.

Conscription 227

The Government and Conscription 229

The Army Stores Scandal 230

The Royal Commission 233

The Vote of Censure ... 234

Points and Figures 235

Liberals and Imperial Defence 235

Liberals and Army Reform 236

Lord Roberts on the Army 236

Armaments Expenditure on Peace Footing 237

Five Years' Naval Construction 237

CHAPTER XII.

LONDON 238

The Government and the Metropolitan Water Companies 238

The Attack upon the London County Council 240

The Education Act, 1903 242

London Tramways 243

The Port of London 243

The Tory "Doles " and their effect in London 245



CHAPTER XIII.

IRELAND 247

1. Questions dealt with 247

(1) Irish Local Government 247

What the Irish Local Government Act of 1898

does 248

The Act and the Credit for it 249

The Working of the Act 249

(2) The Irish Land Question 250

The Act of 1903 in Outline 250

The Second Reading 252

The Working of the Act 254

2. Questions not dealt with 255

(1) Home Rule 255

Home Rule in Parliament, 1895-1905 256

(2) The Financial Relations between Great Britain and

Ireland 259

(3) An Irish Roman Catholic University 261

A. Mr. Balfour's Manifesto, 1899 261

B. The Royal Commission of 1901 262

(4) Irish Representation 265

3. The MacDonnell Incident 267

The New Departure 267

Sir A. MacDonnell Appointed 267

The Terms of Sir A. MacDonnell's Appointment ... 267

The First Fruits of the New Departure 269

The Beginning of the Devolution Scheme 269

Lord Dunraven's Manifesto 269

The Reform Association Scheme 271

Mr. Wyndham's Disclaimer 273

Sir E. Carson's Criticism 274

The Government's Censure of Sir A. MacDonnell ... 275

Mr. Wyndham's Resignation 276

Mr. Wyndham's Personal Explanation 276

Sir H. Campbell-Bannerman's Vote of Censure ... 278

The Morals of the Incident 279



CHAPTER XIV.

WALES 280

Religious Equality 280

Education 281

Temperance Reform 281

The Land Question 281

Private Bill Legislation 282

The Berriew Act, 1897 282



CHAPTEE XV.

HOUSE OF LORDS 233

The House of Lords as Standing Committee

of the Tory Party 285

The Lords' Record during the Tory Govern

ments, 1895=1905 288

(1) The Irish Land Act of 1896 289

(2) The Workmen's Compensation Act of 1897 289

(3) The Irish Local Government Act of 1898 290

(4) The Vaccination Act of 1898 290

(5) The Seats for Shop Assistants Act of 1899 291

(6) The " Wear and Tear " Clause of the Education Act

of 1902 292

(7) London Trams, 1905 ... 293

Welsh School Schemes 294



CHAPTER XVI.

OTHER QUESTIONS 295

(1.) Local Taxation Commission Report 295

The Commission Report ... ... ... ... ... 296

I. Local Subventions ... .. ... ... 296

II. The Rating of Agricultural Land 297

III. The Rating of Site Values 299

(2.) The Taxation of Land Values 302

(3.) The Rights of Workmen 304

Mr. Beaumont's Motion, 1902 ... 305

The Bills of 1903, 1904, and 1905 305

Mr. Shackleton's Bill, 1903 307

Mr. Paulton's Bill, 1904 i 307

Mr. Whittaker's Bill, 1905 308

The Royal Commission 310

(4.) The Penrhyn Quarry Dispute 311

(5.) Railway Servants Accidents and Hours of

Labour 312

The 1895 Parliament 312

Captain Norton's Motion, 1902 313

Mr. Caldwell's Motion, 1903 314

(6.) Government Contracts for Foreign-Made

Goods 315

(7.) The Exclusion of Prison -Made Goods .. 316



APPENDIX.

THE MANDATE THEORY sis

I. No Express Mandate 320

II. No Implied Mandate 321

Possible Justifications for Lack of Mandate 324

Summary 324



CHAPTER I.



FINANCE.



Before we proceed to set out the financial story of the present
Government it will be convenient to summarise very shortly its salient
features :

(1) Thanks to good times and trade (for which on their own ad-
mission the Government has not been responsible) the revenue has
risen by leaps and bounds, but even up to the time of the war there
was practically no remission of taxation. (See pages 2 and 12.)

(2) The realised surpluses of the years before the war were nearly
all diverted from their natural destination the reduction of the
National Debt. (See page 4.)

(3) In order, in 1899, to escape the odium of imposing fresh
taxation in a time of great revenue, the annual amount set aside for
the service of the National Debt was reduced in time of peace from 25
to 23 millions. (See page 14.)

(4) The largest of Sir Michael Hicks-Beach's surpluses was smaller
than the increased yield to the revenue due to Sir William Harcourt's
equalisation and graduation of the Death Duties in 1894. (See
page 27.)

(5) The soundness of Sir William Harcourt's finance is attested by
the fact that no attempt has been made to upset it. (See page 26.)

(6) As the result of the enormous increase in the normal expendit-
ure, over two-thirds of the war taxation has to be retained now that
the war is over. (See page 19.)

(7) The South African War, estimated to cost 10 millions, cost
226 millions, of which 125 millions is added to the National Debt.
(See page 10.)

(8) Owing to the amount of Capital Expenditure no debt has been
paid off since the war, nor is there any prospect of doing so at least
until 1908. (See page 15.)

(9) The Tory Government is now spending 48 millions a year
more than the Liberal Government did in 1895 in other words
Toryism costs every man, woman, and child in the United Kingdom
<! 2s. 6d. every year or nearly a penny for every working day in the
whole year. Whilst the population has grown by one-tenth, the
National Expenditure has, under Tory Rule, grown by over one-half.

I. THE YEARLY BALANCE-SHEETS.

We give on the next four pages two sets of tables showing :

(A) How the money has been raised.

(B) How the money has been spent.

The first includes only the amount raised for Imperial purposes. We
add in the second the amount raised Imperially which is handed over
to local authorities in grants in aid.



TEN 'STEAKS ' Of TORY GOVERNMENT.



tn 3

! O

< I"



SI



CO

< 8

a I
>]



~ 2

. s-.i



,!






ooooooo o ooooo

o o o o o o o o o o o o o

of o" o" *o" 10" o" o" CM" o" o" o" o" co"

CO O GO CM 10 CM CM CO OlOOCO^

(M i i Oi 00 t t- O5 >O 00 -* K7> CO CM

co" co" CM" t>T r r co" cjT co" co" CM"

CM CO rH CM O rH

ooooooo o gooog

ooooooo o ooooo

" o" o" o" o" o" o" o" o" o" o" **" co"

O CM O Oi t iO CO O IO IO CO ir

GO rH O iO ~ CO I CO CO CO ^H 00 CM

co" CM" "*" oo" i-Too" of co"co" CM"

CM CO r-H rH : O5 rH

I

ooooooo o ooooo

^D ^^ O> <^ <^> C^ *^^ ^^ CD 1 <O" O^ ^^ ^O

o o^ ooooo o ooooo

o" o" o" o" o" o" o" o" o" o" o" co" co"

lOOOcOt-OO IO rHiOCOioo

OOCM^COt^COO "* t^rH-H^lt^OO

o"os -"i>^ rH oo" cs CM"CO" i T

CM CM rH r-l 00 rH

ooooooo , o ooooo

ooooooo o ooooo

GO" o" o" o" o" o" o" co" o"o~io"^t-T

,_r oo" r-T t-T iTi>r oo" CM"CO" iT

CM CM rH rH j GO rH

ooooooo o ooooo

o o o o o o o o o o o o

ooooo c^ o^ ooooo

^H <^> <^) c^j t^) (~*> CO "^^ ^D <Q) IO OO CO

lOCOCOiOCMrHlO t- CO rH i I O OO

cM'HHoocoaiio^o "^ ooas-^t-o

CM CM rH I" GO rH

ooooooo o ooooo

Soooooo o ooooo

oooooo o ooooo

10" o" of T jo" 10" o" -o" o" o" o" co" co"

,__ ( IO rH CM rH CO O iO CO OO i i rH CO

rHOi^t^-O^^O CO A^JO^-^GO

o" co" GO" 10" r-T r-T 10 GO" o CM" r-T

CM (M rH t-^ rH

:::::: ce : : : : :

E- 1

.2 1 g

- ^:-:o w :::::

, 3 . . . O >

Q fl H

rH 02 2

r t^ ., w ^5



M I j '4? . fi 1 1

^ililljl s

. o W W m \A M rH

M M



e

^ 1






S .

-rt



FINANCE.



^


OOOOO
o o o o o

0000


O O O O

o o o o o o

O 00000


o
o




>o s

ll

I_I


<* 888

O^O^ t- 0^

V o" co" oo" <rf r-^

co co i co


o o o o ^ o

iO O O t^ CO IO
O5 iO O ^ O ^

oo~ <o * r-T ^-T


*&


^
c^f
*#

I-H




ooooooo

0000000


8S8

O O


8




oj ON


c* gggggg

t~- t~- CO t- t- O CM


O O O O ^f O
CO O CO t^ -< CM

10 I-H oo ^ o ^


o
J^

CO


CO

a


>o o CM r*- CM I-H

CO CO rH CO


O <O CO i i I-H
CM -i


co"
^


i

<j

S


000000
o o o o o o
ooooooo


SO O O
o o o o o

O O


o

8


i 5


. O O 10
^ O O O O CM CM O

GO-O O IO t- Oi QO


gO O O CM CO
O O O 00 O
CO "* t^ ^ O5 CO


*0

^
to


Q

H


co ^ co i^- ' O

co co i i co


C5 iO CO r-i

I-H 1 1

1 1


^

I-H


02

<


000000
o o o o o o
ooooooo


O O O
00000
O


o





. H CO

* &


CO O O O iO iO O

5+^ CO 10 <M (M
^ i QO C-l t^ 00 OD


CO O O O 00 CO
CO IO CO IO IO <M
OS t- CO ^ Oi 00


of

IO
10




-* <M CO 00 i i GO
CO CO i i CO


O5 ^r CO . i
<M i i

i-H


o




ooooooo
ooooooo


O O O O O

g88


1


1


x CO O iO O
<W OiOOOCMi^O

C5 OO CM GO t^ t- QO


CO O O iO O

O> O C5 O t^ O5

00 CO ^ ^ 00 O5


of

Oi

as




O i i -* t- i i ^

CO CO i i CO


^H ^ CO 1 1

CM I-H


CM

^

-H




















: : : : : : : g/








:. . : :: ?
::|: :I


H






I ? i5

g :^ : x ^

' ;^^-^

3 If 11 II

. oWH^^Wf^

H


>

M

tf 33

S'i-MlJ

l o: 3

O -4-3 flj !> N O

KT 03 .Ji; o <U *

5 . (Igl^l

M
H





TEN YEARS OF TORY GOVERNMENT.



a



000 O O O

00000
^0^0^ O^ 0_ O^

co"co"o" o" co -*

If) 1C t CM O CO

^ ^ MH O CM O GO



oo
o o

o o



COCO
CO O



(M (M



(M







OS CO

r-H O







co co

GO O



00 o o o o o i o o
ooooooo oo
^> <^> (^ < ^> O^ ^^ < ^ > ' *^> C^

o"o"o~ 10" of o" cTr-T I io"t^

OOO r-H -HH O GO CO I O <
D O O CM O GO. -^ CO IO CM



CO O CO
CM CM CM



10 <M co



O co

r-H CM







CM CM

CM GO

I- GO

co" co"

CO i-H

"~* I



8-



OO O O O OO'O

o o o o

o^o o^ o^ o^ o_ o^

O"o"oo" iO" ^H" co" O"i>^

O O CO r I lO r-H CO CO

O O O^ CM GO GO O '

CM CM CM (M O



sg

,-ll



OOO O OO



O CO GO CM CM 1^ 1C

icTof o" co" CM" i>^

CM r- 1 CM CM



>w



\al



0000000
o o o o o o o



O ! I r-H t r-H lO GO

O CM i i O "^ i.^ CO

o" oo" CM" T r-T CM"

CM r-H CM CM



CO



"i <

I
hg>



OOO O O O OO

00 o o o o o

o o o o o o o

CO (O *^ ^^ t^ CO Oi r^

O O "^ lO O "^ CO O

icTj>T|>r o" CM"

(M T i T i (M



o 1



to i ~o
to ve



CO



5

J5 ui







rr






.^ s

o

, I -43

>*

00



"0

*tf



I

X

H



I-T



1-1

I ert

13



'C 'C X

o -^ a! c3

^HM^ I

i H



M 0) oo * G

'S S'g g O

i ^ s



FINANCE.



>



0000000
o o o o o o o
o o o o o^o^o^o^
O co os 10 Oi I-H I-H ^

if) O- 'CO^Ht^COCMlO
OCOCOCMr-Hi IJ>.1O



CO OS CO
CM CM CO



i " CO O O

CO I-H



OOOOOOOO

0000000
O



O

o



O CM 00 CM O O I-H CO

t^~ of co" o' co" o" io~

CM CM CO CO r I ,-H



CM

CO
O

of





o, o^

"*" CM"

CO (M

O Tf

<M"



O : O


^^

co" o~

O ! -H

<M

of



o




oooooooo



(^ c^>

oo



CM O IO CO O 00 ^ CO IO

CO t^- ^H CO GO O i i I-H ^

O i < -rh CM -^ O l>- CO iT IO

i-^ "10" of co"of 10" i o

CM CO CO CM i -rf<



o o

^H" 10"







OOOOOOOO

0000000
o o o o o o o^

co o' o" o" 10" -^" o" o" co"

-HH t^ l-H CM ~-f CO CO

Tt* r-H CM OS O CO OS

CO O i < !> CO OS ^f

CM CM CO CM



8



IO CO

CO I-H

of icT

CM O







CM

oo co



^ CM

00 CO



IO



8 8

O O
oT CM"



oo

of



co 10

10 IT-

~ Of



O

of



I



oooooooo

of <M" o" o" <M" iff o" CM"

co co o CM



GO OS I-H CO

I-H -M CO CM



OS^CM t-

"of-*"







(M CM

10^ 10^

iS CM"

os o

1-1 !



co ^

OS r-H

OS i^






eg

I



03





' ft





a

w

1



lr-3 :

* r

'o d t- tf

.l.sJB'.s

c3 -t-3 4->
V. _- c

s^ O s^i

lHI

H



S



O



6 TEN YEARS OF TORY GOVERNMENT.

TOTAL EXPENDITURE.

The whole story, however, is not told in the above, since the
figures include neither capital expenditure nor what is paid to the
Local Taxation Account. Here is the complete set of figures :



Exchequer
Issues.
War.


Year.


Exchequer
Issues.
Normal.


Capital
Account.


Local
Taxation
Account.


Total.





















1894-5


93,918,000


810,000 7,014,000


101,742,000


23,217,000


/1899- 1
I 1900 /


110,505,000


4,847,000


9,965,000


125,317,000


68,620,000


1900-1


114,972,009


4,915,000


9,740,000


129,627,000


73,197,000


1901-2


122,325,000


7,548,000


9,714,000


139,587,000


55,132,000


1902-3


129,352,000


6,876,000


9,767,000


145,995,000


5,545,000


1903-4


141,416,000


7,305,000


9,795,000


158,516,000




1904-5


141,056,000


8,069,000



Online LibraryLiberal Publication Dept. (Great Britain)Ten years of Tory government, 1895-1905, Home affairs. A handbook for the use of Liberals .. → online text (page 1 of 39)