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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES



3 3433 07736229 5



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THE HOSTESS OF TO-DAY



E NEW YOF



^STOR, LENOX AND
ILDEN FOUNDATIONS





THE HOSTESS
OF TO-DAY








. [DA HULL



ILLUSTRATIONS BY

- r COTLES CLARKZ





:cpiBNEP'S SONS

NEW YORK





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I4ii;;,5



T TOF?, LFNOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS

__ 1899.



Copyright, 1899, by
Charles Scribtier's Sons



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TROW DIRECTORY

PRINTING AND BOOKBINDING COMPANY
NEW YORK




THE purpose of this book is to assist the
house-keeper and hostess in selecting a
menu suitable for the most elaborate repast
or the simplest meal ; to enable her to esti-
mate the cost of either at average market
prices allowing for local differences ; to
know how to prepare and serve each dish
and to provide a quantity sufficient for six
persons.

It is not designed to instruct beginners
in minute details pertain ; ng to the proper
preparation of dishes in dailjr ; us<% 'of the"
entire duties of a waitress. ''Tb'.ese'Heyart-
ments have already been ably Seated by
other writers.

The author's intention is to }>u4',B?$>re
her readers a book which will enable them
to practise both economy and hospitality,
and to make it possible for the inexperi-




PREFACE

enced to calculate exactly the cost of a projected entertainment,
how to cook it and how to serve it. This may be accomplished
by learning thoroughly the resources and average prices of local
markets.

Many house-keepers with small incomes wish to gather their
friends around their tables, but hesitate to do so because of the
incalculable expense of both time and money ; this book has
been compiled to meet such a difficulty, and to show that
guests can be lunched or dined in a dainty and charming man-
ner at a very moderate cost and a small expenditure of time,
which is of much importance to the busy house -keeper of
to-day.

Ordinary dishes are supposed to be familiar to every house-
keeper, so that directions for many such are here omitted. Re-
cipes requiring elaborate preparation and much ornamentation
are either simplified or omitted altogether.

Effort has been made to give recipes a little out of the ordi-
nary, such as one may like to place before guests who recog-
nize and appreciate the finer effects of seasoning and serving.
Most beginners in house -keeping have been so engrossed with
school duties and the business of getting an education, that the
minor details of serving a meal have escaped their observation.
The few hints about serving contained in this little book will,
itJs.h'o'ped, meet this emergency. There is also an attempt to
assist the novice .i'n si v le,c ; .ing recipes which harmonize, where it
is thought h,tcc B ,sarj', to serve two or more dishes in the same
course,' /'; ^c ? " c f

The Ind ( ex gives the price as well as the name of each dish,
so that in planning 'an entertainment one can readily select a
menu within the sum apportioned.



VI




CILERY recipe in ibis book is sufficient for six per-
sons, all measurements are level, and one cupful
is half a pint.

A " Cover" is the place at table for each guest and should
consist of the plate, napkin, knives, forks, spoons, and glasses
necessary for the meal.

A " Service " plate is placed on the table before guests are
seated and is not removed until the first hot course after soup.

Table linen should b^ laundered without starch and ironed
while very damp. Table-cloths should be folded once in iron-
ing and rolled on a stick or laid in loose folds to avoid creases.
Napkins should be folded four times in ironing, then folded
once more with the hand to hold the bread or roll, and should
be placed at the left of the forks. If a service plate is not used,
put the napkin holding bread in its place directly in front of
each guest.

To saute means to cook in a very small amount of butter,
fat, or oil until brown, in a frying or saute pan.



VI 1



HINTS TO THE NOVICE

To fry means to plunge into deep, hot fat and cook until
brown. Always use a wire basket for this purpose, only cover
the bottom of the basket with articles to be fried and do not
have them touch each other.

To crumb and fry means to dip in crumbs, which must be
dry and powdered tine, then in slightly beaten egg mixed with
very little water and in crumbs again, then plunge 'into deep,
hot fat and cook until brown. Test fat by dropping in a small
1'iece of bread; it should brown in 1 minute for uncooked
mixtures and in 40 seconds for cooked mixtures.

To crumb means to cover with fine crumbs and bits of
butter and brown in the oven, or cover with crumbs which
have been sauted in butter until brown, and place in oven for a
moment. The proportion to use is }- 2 c. crumbs to 1 tbsp.
butter. The latter method is the most satisfactory if done
properly.

Use pastry flour for pastry and all baking-powder mixtures ;
for everything else use bread flour.

Croutons for soup: Cut buttered bread into j^-inch cubes
and brown in the oven.

To lard meat, poultry, or sweetbreads : Draw strips of pork
through meat with larding needle, which may be bought for
the purpose, or it may be done at the market by an experienced
butcher.

Serving from the side means from the butler's pantry or
from a table behind a screen.

To marinate means to mix with an oil or vinegar dressing, in
which the article is left for a certain time.

Everything pertaining or belonging to one course should be
removed before the next course is served, except the wine-
glasses. These should remain on the table from the beginning



Vlll



HINTS TO THE NOVICE

to the end, the only exception being the glasses for cordials and
liqueurs, which are served after the coffee, which is sometimes
served in the drawing-room.

In removing a course take large dishes or platters first, then
the plates and silver from each " cover." The carving knife
and fork should be side by side on the platter. *

Every dish should be passed to the left with the handle of
the serving spoon or fo;k on the side toward the guest and
within 4 or 5 inches of the table, so that guests may help them-
selves without reaching. Plates containing individual portions
should be placed from the right and removed from the right.

The foundation of all dinners should be soup, meat, and
vegetables, salad and dessert. Of luncheons, soup in cups, meat
or fish entree, salad, and a sweet. All other courses may be
added at discretion.

Bread, butter, rolls, bread -sticks, and water should never
be asked for. A careful waitress will see that these are well
supplied.

The hand-tray should be covered with a doily, clean ones
being at hand to replace soiled ones. This is to avoid the noise
and clatter of dishes.

In preparing for an entertainment the hostess would save
time and avoid confusion by making two copies of the menu,
one for the butler's pantry, containing directions for serving, and
the other for the kitchen, giving details and recipes for cooking
and the time each course should be ready for serving.

Attention is called to the special mention of dishes which
may be prepared several hours before serving or final cooking,
thereby enabling the hostess to give the artistic touch which
would be lost if obliged to crowd them in with the necessary
things which always seem to multiply at the last moment.

ix




PLEASE READ CAREFULLY.

THESE recipes are divided into sections containing ingredi-
ents required, under the headings A, B, C, etc., followed
by method or rule for combining, cooking, and serving. In
many cases the method is given at the beginning of sections
containing a number of recipes so similar that it would be
needless to repeat them, as the general directions are sufficient.
The abbreviations are :



c. for cupful or
qt. for quart.
pt. for pint.
doz. for dozen.



pint.



tbsp. for tablespoonful.
tsp. for teaspoonful.
Ib. for pound.
m. for minute.



Wherever possible recipes are represented by measurements.



XI





r nt






PAOE

TIlNTS TO THE NOVICE vii

EXPLANATION OF METHOD .... xi

DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS:

THE FORMAL DINNER . . 1

THE INFORMAL DINNER . . 11

THE FORMAL LUNCHEON ... 1:5

THE INFORMAL LUNCHEON . 11

SOME BEGINNINGS 1 7

SOUPS 24

FISH . 11'

Shell Fish . . . 53

SAUCES FOR FISH 62

ENTREES OF MEATS AND POULTRY . f>7

Hot Entrees . . . (18

Cold Entrees ... . . 83

Garnishings for Entrees . . . S7

SAUCES FOR MEATS AND VEGETAHI.KS '.MI

Hot Sauces . M

Cold Sauces . !>8

Fruit Relishes . M

PIECE DE RESISTANCE

Meats . 105

Poultry 11-



\d,\




CONTENTS

DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS Continued : PAGE

ENTREES OF VEGETABLES 117

SHERBETS 136

GAME HO

SALADS 131

EGGS AND CHEESE .... HI"

DESSERTS 174

Cold Desserts ... 175

Pastry 1^5

Hot Desserts 189

PUDDING SAUCES .... . . 197

FROZEN CREAMS, ICES, AND FRAPPES 202

CAKES 212

Cake, in Loaves 212

Cake, in Layers .... 216

Small Cakes 217

Afternoon Tea Cakes 210

Cake Fillings .224

Frostings 227

COFFEE AND CORDIALS 22!)

HOT BEVERAGES AND COLD DRINKS . . 233

SOME ACCESSORIES

SANDWICHES 242

Savory Sandwiches 242

Sweet Sandwiches 247

Flavored Butters 248

FIVE O'CLOCK FUNCTIONS . 252

EVENING COLLATIONS . . . 255

CHAFING DISH CREATIONS. .259

INDEX , . . . ... 281

xiv



DINNERS AND
LUNCHEONS



FIVE O'CLOCK
FUNCTIONS



EVENING
COLLATIONS



CHAFING-DISH
CREATIONS




TH.E-N
PI1RI TC




' With a few friends, and a few dishes dine,
And much of mirth and moderate wine."

COWLEY.



THE FORMAL DINNER

A DINNER of twelve or more covers, to which formal
invitations have been sent, should consist of eight to
twelve courses, rather less than more. Careful atten-
tion should be given to the selection of each course
that it will so harmoniously blend with the others
that the result may be a gastronomic symphony.

Although violent contrasts must be offered to pique
the appetite, the dinner should rise from a mild be-
gi lining, gradually increasing in force until the piece
ili ri- Distance, or roast, is reached, then should dain-
tily descend to the dessert ; and with the coffee and
cordials will come the satisfaction to tlie diner that
he has been gloriously entertained, but riot repletcd.

The fastidious individuality of the hostes
always be en evidence, and one with many servants



THE HOSTESS OF TO-DAY

may, with propriety, make this a most elaborate
affair ; but with a little forethought in selecting a
menu containing dishes which may be prepared in
advance, some even the day before, the inexperienced
house-keeper will be able to offer her guests a dainty
repast, pleasing to the eye as well as to the palate,
with a small number of assistants one to cook, one
or two to serve, and one to lend a hand will be all
that are necessary. The experienced house-keeper,
however, will be equal to the occasion with even less
assistance if she will give her attention to a few well-
selected courses cooked to perfection and daintily
served. Avoid ostentation ; remember that simplicity
is the ruling spirit of the day. There have been so
many excellent books written giving directions for
the care of the dining-room and its accessories that
many details will not be mentioned here. . The writer's
intention is only to suggest to the young house-keeper
the best and simplest methods of arranging a table
and of serving and removing each course.

The cover and arrangement of the table are of the
utmost importance, as the slightest departure from
mathematical regularity and immaculate cleanliness
is slovenly and must not be tolerated by our hostess
of to-day.

A round, square, or oblong table covered with a
thick cotton-flannel cloth or pad under a fine linen
damask without crease or wrinkle, and the best you
can afford, is the first requisite. On rare occasions
this cloth may be of satin damask or of handsome

lace over satin, but if this is attempted, all of

2



DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS

the table appointments must bu equally smart,"
and the dinner itself must be an epicure's dream.
Whether this cloth be simple or sumptuous, it must
hang over at least a quarter of a yard on ev-ry
side.

The place for each guest and the necessary plate,
knives, forks, glasses, etc., constitute the cover.




The Cover.



The next consideration is this cover or place for
each guest. Allow at least twenty inches for every
person, and more, for elbow room, if you can spare it.
At each cover place the best ten-inch plate you have ;
this is called the service-plate and should be placed
on the table before dinner is announced, to be left on
until the fish or first hot course after the soup is
served. It is now considered good form always

3



THE HOSTESS OF TO-DAY

have a plate in front of each guest until dessert, but
this is an unimportant detail and depends somewhat
upon the number of servants ; the hostess should suit
her own convenience. The service-plate should be
placed exactly in the middle of the space allotted to
each person, and about an inch from the edge of the
table. Place at the right of the service-plate as many
knives as will be required before the dessert, each one
with the sharp edge turned toward the plate and in
the order in which they will be needed, beginning at
the extreme right. At the right of the knives place
the spoon for soup, which should be a table-spoon or
soup-spoon, with the inside of the bowl turned up ;
then the oyster-fork or small fork for canapes. At
the left place as many forks as will be needed before
the dessert, unless you are to have many courses, when
too much small silver w^ould look like display. Place
forks in the order in which they are to be used, the
fish-fork at the extreme left and the entree fork next ;
then the fork for the roast, which, of course, should
be the largest ; then the fork for game or salad, all
with the tines turned up, the last fork close to the
plate. If sherbet is served it is a temptation, if you
have choice spoons, to place them on the table from
the beginning, but it is in better taste to have them
on the plates with the sherbet. If on the table they
should be outside of the oyster-fork, or for a luncheon
in front of the service-plate, as there are not so many
glasses to take the room. If more knives or forks are
required, they may be quietly placed at the covers

just before the course needing them is served. If

4



DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS

there are not many courses, the dessert fork and spoon
may be on the table from the beginning. Place the
fork ii'-xt to the plate with the other forks, and the
spoon in front of the plate beneath the sherbet-spoon
if it be us'-d.

At the upper right hand of the plate, near the cen-
tre, place a _-<>blet for water; then place the wine-
glasses in the order in which they are to be used,
beginning n^ar the points of the knives, reaching to
th>- Lj.iblet in a semi-circle. If many wines are served,
a double semi-circle may be formed, beginning with
the sherry -glass and ending with the goblet. (See
diagram -T.)

'\'\{>' napkin- should be large and of fine quality.
They should be folded in ironing four times ; then
when ready to use fold them once with the hand,
slipping between the folds, but in sight, a dinner-roll,
l'i' -ad-stick, or piece of bread cut two inches long by
one and a half thick. Place the napkins at the left
of the forks if there is space, otherwise place them
on the service-plate.

If dinner-cards are used, and they usually are for
convenience in seating the guests, they should be
placed upon the napkin. These cards may be plain
and small, with only the name of the guest written
upon them, or they may have also in the upper left-
hand corner or centre the monogram or initials of
the hostess, or a dainty hand painting ; any of these
ar>- correct and in good taste.

An allowable exception to the general rule of ' no
furbelows" is the name of the guest in silver or gilt

5



THE HOSTESS OF TO-DAY

lettering on the end of a ribbon. This ribbon may be
narrow and tied around a bunch of flowers, or it may
be broad and laid flat between the covers, the other
end connected with a basket or bunch of flowers,
these bunches or baskets forming the centre-piece,
which, of course, is demolished when the repast is
over. Let it be thoroughly understood, however, that
these favors are only for ladies.

Menu-cards are seldom used at small dinners, un-
less there is an artistic or amusing feature to be illus-
trated ; men and women are expected to be sufficient-
ly entertaining to require no literary or childish aids
to conversation. The practical object of the menu-
card is to give guests an opportunity to save capacity
for specially delectable courses, but this will not be
necessary in the dainty dinners which our hostess
will give.

Much attention should be given to the selection of
guests and placing of name-cards at the covers to
insure a successful and harmonious entertainment.
There should be good listeners as well as fine talkers,
and here the tact of the hostess is called into play
to avoid anything like a contretemps. The hostess
should either tell each gentleman, as he is received,
the name of the particular lady he is to take out to
dinner, or the name should be written on a small card
and placed in an envelope addressed to the gentleman
and put in a conspicuous place in the dressing-room ;
R. or L. in corner of card designating the side of table
on entering room. When dinner is announced, the
host offers his arm to the lady for whom the dinner is



G



DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS

given, or the one who is to be seated at his right, fol-
lowed by the guests, the hostess closing the procession
with the gent Ionian to be honored or the one whom she
intends seating at her right hand.

A few hints regarding the decoration of the table
must be given here, though the fashion of to-day may
be out of date to-morrow. Perhaps one feels inclined
to be in touch with the latest whim, especially if it has
a r a I son d'etre. Extreme simplicity, and a desire for
artistic effect combined with the practical, is the order
of the day. The appearance of millinery must be
avoided, consequently lace and ribbon furbelows are
not used for the adornment of the table. A centre-piece
of fine linen, or the flowers in the pattern of the table-
cloth, exquisitely and delicately embroidered or ah' ne
linen, with insertion and border of heavy altar-lace,
and glass or silver bowls and vases filled with an ar-
tistic arrangement of flowers and vines are a sufficient
embellishment for the most elaborate feast, although
small bunches of flowers, or single flowers placed at
each cover, are a delicate attention much appreciated
by the ladies, and in perfectly good taste. Let the
hand of madame be manifest, and beware of the wiles
of the florist. Small silver or glass dishes, containing
relishes, bonbons, and salted nuts, are usually placed
on the table, though fashion decrees now that their
place is on the side-table ; but with the possession of
antique silver and Venetian glass one may dare to be
a little less up to date. The same may be said of
choice decanters and coasters one can hardly be ex-
pected to put them out of sight. It is scarcely neces-



THE HOSTESS OF TO-DAY

sary to say that butter-plates should not be placed on
the table at a formal repast. It is supposed that care
has been taken to supply each course with all require-
ments in the way of seasoning and sauces, and condi-
ments are served as they are needed.

An important feature of the entertainment is the il-
lumination, and it requires more serious consideration
than is usually given it. Unless the hostess is in the
first flush of youth, and her guests are all equally for-
tunate, she should eschew all abominations in the way
of glaring, unshaded ceiling lights, whether of gas or
electricity. The most effective and artistic illumina-
tion is a soft light from candles or lamps, not higher
than the head of the tallest guest, and if this is not
sufficient, it should come from the sides of the room,
or from a low, shaded centre chandelier, and never from
near the ceiling, high over the heads of the guests.
Such a light, which always throws sad shadows upon
the faces of beautiful women, makes mournful the
most joyous occasion.

There are two ways of serving a formal dinner, both
equally "good form," and the one chosen should de-
pend upon the convenience and taste of the hostess.
The most formal way, and perhaps the most conven-
ient, if there is the helping hand in the butler's pan-
try, is to serve each course from the pantry neatly
arranged on individual plates, the butler or waitress
having the tray in the left hand, putting the plate con-
taining the portion upon it, taking it to the right side
of each guest, and with the right hand placing it upon
the service plate until after the soup or bouillon course



DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS

which is removed with tlie service plate, then setting
it in front of the guest and close to the edge of the
table. Then, if anything is to be served with the
course, it should be placed on the tray and passed to
the left side of each guest, being held low enough to
enable the guest to help himself with his right hand.

If it is desired to follow the fashionable method of
always having a plate before each guest until dessert,
then the tray should be dispensed with in placing the
course. Remove from the right with the left hand and
place the following course or empty plate with the right
hand also from the right. Guests should be served in
rotation, beginning alternately at the right and left of
the host and hostess, going in opposite direction for
each successive course.

The other and more simple way of serving is to have
the course artistically arranged and cut in small pieces
on a large dish or platter, accompanied by the neces-
sary serving-spoon, knife, or fork, and put on a tray,
or. if too large, held in the hands carefully and offered
to the left of each guest of course, after plates, knives,
or forks for the course have been placed. To remove
ai'li course, wait until everyone has finished, then
take tin' tray in the left hand and with the right hand
remove the plate from the right, placing it on the tray.
If the knife or fork is accidentally left on the table
l>y a thoughtless guest, it should be taken up quietly
and put on the plate on the tray. Do not remove more
than one plate at a time, or all belonging to the course
at each cover. It is very bad form to pile one plate on
top of another when clearing the table. If it is not

9



THE HOSTESS OF TO-DAY

convenient to take so much time, dispense with the
tray and take one plate in each hand, thus removing
two at a time. Remember this is the formal dinner,
and there is supposed to be plenty of time and numer-
ous servants.

Wine should be poured into the glasses from the
right, and should follow the serving of each course.

Black coffee in small cups, followed by cordials in
tiny glasses, is the last course, and should precede the
finger-bowls, unless the fashionable method is ob-
served of serving coffee and cordials to the ladies in
the drawing-room, while the gentlemen are left at the
table to become anecdotal over their cigars and their
liqueurs ; then the finger-bowls should be placed be-
fore the ladies leave the table.

It is considered quite " smart " in some social circles
to serve cocktails just before dinner is announced or im-
mediately after the guests are seated at table, and this
appetizer is a twin to the fashion of cigarette-smok-
ing during the dinner and after by the ladies ; but our
hostess of to-day will lose no friends by excluding this
pair of bohemians from her dinners and luncheons.

There are two things to remember that guests are
invited for social intercourse, and that the machinery of
serving should run so smoothly and quietly that there
will be no interruption to the conversation. The most
successful entertainment is the one that is so simply
and quietly served as to be beyond criticism. The nat-
ural desire to exhibit rare possessions of silver and glass
should be the only excuse for departing from the fash-
ion of the hour, which, let me repeat, is simplicity.



10



DINNERS AND LUNCHEONS



THE INFORMAL DINNER

THE informal dinner, or the family dinner with the
addition of two or more guests, should be served almost
like the formal dinner by the hostess having several
servants. The few exceptions are that the soup may
be served by the hostess from a tureen on the table,


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Online LibraryLinda Hull LarnedThe hostess of to-day → online text (page 1 of 18)