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ML

D36L3

1900








/5^^



Lbretto

THE ORIGINAL ITALIAN FRENCH
OR GERMAN LIBRETTO WITH A
CORRECT ENGLISH TRANSLATION

LAKME



PUBLISHED BY



CHARLES E. BURDEN

Steinway Hall

107-109 EAST 14th STREET, - NEW YORK



THE ONLY CORRECT AND AUTHORIZED EDITION



/f^




^ ' '.Ar 4 CO,

SAN FRANCISCO



L A K M E.



OPERA IN THREE ACTS.



MUSIC BY



LEO/DELIBES.




Published by CHARLES H. BURDEN

109 EAST 14th street

NEW YORK



ARGUMENT. i^oi



The action of "Lakme" progresses in India, and the opening incidents of
tlie opera occur near the abode of Nilakantha, a Brahmin, who, with his follow-
ers, still abhors the invading race. Gerald and Frederick, officers in the
British army, with Rose and Ellen, English ladies \ isiting the East, while
strolling in the environs, desecrate the sacred grounds by their presence. Be-
uig brought to a sense of their intrusion, they depart, but Gerald remains for
the purpose of sketchini^ the design of some jewels which have been forgotten in
the garden by Lakme, the Brahmin's daughter. Laic.mk now enters, and her
beauty at once wins Gerald's heart. Some love passages follow, but they are
rudely interrupted by the sudden return of Nilakantha. It is death for a for-
eigner to profane consecrated soil, and Lakme hastens her lover's departure. He
leaves unseen, but Nilakantha finds traces of his visit, and the curtain falls
upon the Indian's oath of vengeance. In the second act, the scene is shifted
to a neighboring city, where a great festival is in course of celebration. Nila-
kantha and Lakme, disguised as penitents, mingle with the throng, the Brahmin
intent upon tliscovering ttie author of the sacrilege. He commands Lakme to
sing, and the voice of the loved one makes Gerald reveal himself. His doom
is sealed. Night comes on, and when the crowd has scattered and the public
square is deserted, Nilakantha strikes Gerald down. Lakme, however, has
see;i the deed, aid with the aid of Hadji, a faithful attendant, she bears the
youiig man, who is not mortally woinided, away. This episode brings the sec-
ond act of the o,iera to a close. When the curtain rises upon the third, it dis-
closes a forest view, with Gerald, who has been restored to health and strength
through Lakme's care, slumbering at the maiden's side. The couple once more
exchange assurances of undying love. A chorus of voices is heard in the dis-
tance. It is sung by a procession of young people on their way to taste the
sacred waters which are said to make love perennial. Gerald and Lakme must
essay their powers, and the girl goes forth to fill a cup at the holy fount. While
she is absent, Frederick reappears to Gerald, who has long been missing, and
recalls him from romance to reality. The regiment is about to march away,
and Gerald must be at his post. He promises to answer the roll-call after hav-
ing bidd m farewell to Lakme. Frederick accepts his friend's word and leaves
him Lakme returns with the sacred water. As Gerald is about to put the cup
to his lips, however, the sound of drum and fife reaches his ears. He starts, and
Lakme, at a glance, understands everything. In quiet but o'ermastering despair,
-^he gathers some poisonous flowers and expresses their juice between her teeth.
Death follows in a few minutes, the heart-broken creature expiring in Gerald's
arms as Nilakan rHA and his followers enter and behold the sorrowful picture.




CHARACTERS.



Lakme. Mrs. Bentson. Governess.

Nilakantha, her father. Mallika.

Gerald, | ^,- ' Hadil

T^ f Officers of the British Army . ^ ^

Frederick, ) ^ A Fortune Teller.

Ellen, ) t\ , , , ., ,r. ^ A Chinese Merchant.



\ Daughters of the Vice-Roy.



A Sepoy.



Hindoos. English Officers and Ladies, Sailors, Bayaderes, Chinamen.
Musicians, Brahmins, etc.



The action progresses in our time, in one of England's possessions in India.

iw681182



LAKME



ACl^E PREMIER.

(Un jardin ires omhrage oil croissent
et s'entremelent toiites des fleurs de
rinde. All fond, line maison pen
elevee^a demi cache e par Ics arbrcs.
L'image dii Lotus sur la porte d' en-
tree et plus loin iine statue de Ga-
nega, idole a tete d'clephant, dieu de
la sagesse, donnent a ceite myste-
riense habitation I'aspect d'tin sanc-
tuaire. Au fond, le commencement
d'nn petit cours d'eaii qui se perd
dans la verdure. — Le jardin est en~
toiire d'line frele cloture en bamboits.
— C'est le lever du jour.)

(Hajdi, Mallika. Nilakantha, puis
Hindous, hommes et femmes.)

(An lever du rideau, Hajdi et Mal-
lika I'ont ouvrir la porte du jardin d
des Hindous, hommes et femmes, qui
entrent avec reciieillement.)

Choeur.
A I'heure accoutumee,
Qiiand la plaine embaumee
Par I'aurore enflammee,
Fete le jour naissant,
Unissons nos prieres,
Pour calmer les coleres
De Brahma menagant.

Nilakantha, sortant de sa demeure.

Soyez trois fois benis, vons qui rendez

hommag'e
Au pretre abandonne qu'on raille et

qu'on outrage.
De nos vainqueurs odieux
Nous lasserons les coleres ;
lis ont pu cbasser nos dieux
De leurs 'temples seculaircs !
Mais, sur leurs tetes, Brahma
A suspendu sa vengeance,
Et, quand elle eclatera,
Ce sera la delivrance,
Dans ma retraite, auiourd'hui



La puissance de Dieu brille,
Je le vois, je monte a lui
Quand j'entends prier ma fille.

Lakme.

( A ce moment, on entend la voix de
Lakme, dans la demeure du brahmane,
Tons les Hindous se prosternent.)

Blanche Dourga,

Pale Siva!

Puissant Ganeqa !

O vous, que crea Brahma!

Apaisez-vous,

Protegez-nous !

{A la Un du chant sacrc, Lakme a
parii sur le seuil de la demeure du
brahmane et mcle sa priere a celles des
Hindous.)

Nir^KANTHA, aux Hindous.

Allez en paix, redite"B, en partant,
La priere au matin, allez, Dieu vous
entend !

(Toute le monde sort, a I' exception
du brahmane, de Lakme ct de scs deux
serviteurs.)

Nilakantha,

Lakme, c'est toi qui nous proteges,

Et si je puis braver les haines sacri-
leges

De I'ennemi triomphant^

C'est que Dieu prend pitie de ta can-
deur d'enfant.



Lakme.

Lorsque Brahma, dans sa cKm.ence,
En broyant une fleur, fit la terre et le

ciei,
II y laissa le micl,
Et ce fut I'esperance.



LAK ME



ACT L

A ".'cry shady garden, in which all
the floivers of India grow in pro-
fusion. At back a loiv-built house,
half hidden by the trees. A mould-
ing reprtsenting a lotus over the
entrance door, and farther on a stat-
ue of Ganesa — an idol zvith an ele-
phant's head, and the Goddess of
Wisdom — impart to the mysterious
duelling the appearance of a sanc-
tuary. At back, the commencement
of a stream that wanders away and
disappears amid tropical grozcths.
The garden is surrounded by a
.<;lighf fence of bamboo zvork. Day
is dazvning.



Hadji. Mallika, Nilakantha and Hin-
doos enter as the curtain rises.
Hadji and Mallika open the garden
gate to some Hindoos, male and fe-
male, that enter devoutly.

Chorus.
Lo. 'tis the hour appointed
When the plain, incense breathing,
With the dawn's fire anointed,
Now hails the rising sun.
May our pray'rs in communion.
Calm the wrath ever seething —
Lull the wrath of great Brahma.
Till his kindness be won !

Nilakantha (coming from his dwell-
ing).
Thrice be their joys increas'd, whose

homage here is given
To the forsaken priest, outraged,
jeered at and driven!
We shall the fury assuage
Of those that hate us, our victors ;
They have cast our gods in rage
From their sacred temples olden.
Yet Brahma over each head
f^is vengeance holds as the thunder,



And when it bursts forth so dread

Shall our bonds be rent asunder.

In my blest retreat, to-day,

Is the light of heaven straying,

And I feel I own its sway,

When I hear my daughter praying.

Lakme.
(Enter Lakme. Before she appears
her voice is heard in the Brahmin's
dwelling. All the Hindoos prostrate
themselves.)

Thou Dourga bright!
Thou Siva pale!
Mighty Ganesa!
Ye, from Brahma's life,
We hail !
{As the sacred chant finishes Lakme
appears on the treshold of the house
and mingles her prayer with that of
the throng.)

Nilakantha (to Hindoos).

Go ye in peace, the homeward path

now wend.
Morning's pray'r repealing. Away !

On all God's love descend !

(Exeunt all except Lakme, Nilakantha
and Lakme s tzvo attendants.)

Nilakantha.

Lakme, 'tis thou that still doth aid
us!
And if I can defy
The foe that doth o'ershade us.
With his foul triumph and hate,
Tis that Heaven in thee
But innocence doth see.

Lakme.

When Brahma high, in mercy ten-
der,

Crushed a flower to make earth, left
he honey therein,

For mortals at their birth ;

This was Hope's golden splendor.



L A K M £.



NiLAKANTHA.

II faut que je te quitte a Tinstant.



Lakme.



Ouoi <l*ia?



NiLAKANTHA.

Sois sans crainte!

Dans la pagode sainte,

Qui reste encor debout a la ville on

m'attend,
La fete de demain m'appelle.

(.-^w.r serviteurs.)
Restez prez de Lakme!

Hadji.
Nous veillerons snr elle!

AIallika.
Nous veillerons tous deux!



NiLAKANTHA.

Je serai de retour
Avant la fin du jour!



Lakme, Hadji, Mallika.

Que le ciel te protege,
Te guide par la main,
Chasse tout sacrilege
Au loin de ton chemin!

NiLAKANTHA.

Que le ciel me protege,
Me guide par la main,
Chasse le sacrilege
Au loin de mon chemin!

(Nilakantha s'eldgne accompagne
jusqu'a la porte par Lakme et ses deux
serviteurs. Hadji ventre dans la mai-
son.)

Lakme.

{aprh ^etre deharrassee de quelques

bijoux qu'elle a poses sur une

table en pierre.)

Viens, Mallika, les lianes en fleurs

Jettent deja leur ombre

Sur le ruisseau sacre qui coule, calme

et sombre,
Eveille par le chant des oiseaux ta-

pageurs.



Mallika.

Oh, maitresse, c'est I'lieure ou je te

vois sourire,
L'heure benie on je puis lire,
Dans le coeur toujours ferme
De Lakme!

Lakme.

Sous le dome epais ou le blanc jasmin
A la rose s'assemble,
Sur la rive en fleurs, riant au matin,
Viens, descendons ensemble.
Lentement glissons, sur le flot char-

mant,
Et d'une main nonchalante
Ridons doucement
L'onde fremissante ;
Viens, gagnons le bord
Oil la source dort,
Ou I'oiseau chante!

Mallika.

Sous le dome epais oia le blanc jasmin
A la rose s'assemble,
Sur la rive en fleurs, riant au matin,
Viens, descendons ensemble.
Lentement glissons, sur le flot char-

mant,
Et d'une main nonchalante
Ridons doucement
L'onde fremissante;
Viens, gagnons le bord
Oil la source dort,
Ou Toiseau chante!

Lakme.

Mais je ne sais quelle crainte subite

S'empare de moi,

Quand mon pere va seul a leur '•iPe

maudite,
Je tremble d'eflfroi!

Mallika.

Pour que le dieu Gane^a le protege,
Jusqu'a I'etang ou s'ebattent joyeiix
Les cygnes aux ailes de neige,
Allons cueillir les lotus bleus!

Ensemble.
Sous le dome epais ou le blanc jasmin,
etc.

{Pendant les dernihes measures du
chant, Mallika a detache une petite
Jarquc qui etait amarree dans les ro-



L A K M £.



NiLAKANTHA.

But now I leave thee here for a
time.

i^AKME.

Leave me now ?

NiLAKANTHA.

Fear not, thon !
In yon pagoda sacred,
Which hands have not defiled, they
await me, my child,

To-morrow's holiday doth summon.

{To attendants.)

13 V Lakme here abide.

Hadji.
Our watch we'll keep unceasing.

Mallika.

To £^uard her is our pride.

NiLAKANTHA.

I'll in peace go my way,
E'er twilight dims the day!

Lakme, Hadji and Mallika.
Heaven shield and protect thee,
And guide thy steps aiway!
And where thy feet may go.
Let never foeman stray !

NiLAKANTHA.

Heaven guide and protect me!
And guide my steps alway,
And where my feet may go,
Let never foeman stray.

1 \ilakantha departs, accompanied for
a fezv paces by Lakme and her
attendants. Exit Hadji in house.)

1 \KME {after having removed some
jcivels and placed them on a stone

table).
See, Mallika, the vines all aflower
In shadow now are hiding,
The calm and sacred stream, so soft-
ly, darkly gliding,

Tho' awaken'd by warbling of birds
in the bowers.

Mallika.

O, fair mistress ! this hour when
smiles of thine beholding!

This hour so blest, thy heart un-
folding,

Tho' oft closed ! I read its secret,

Lakme !



Lakme.
'Xeath yon dome,
Where jasmines with the roses are

blending,
To mossy banks so bright,
Let us twain now be wending.
On the tide, side by side.
While with playful hands
We touch the waters shining.
Joyfully there reclining.
Come! seek the crest,
Where the birds softly singing, glad

are winging.
To yon dome fair and bright.
Let us twain now be wending.

Mallika.
'Neath yon shady dome,
Where the jasmines white
With the roses are blending,
To the mossy banks.
Fair with dawning light,
Let us twain now be wending.
On the gentle tide,
Ling'ring side by side,
While with light and playful hands,
We touch the waters shining,
Joyfully there reclining,
Come ! seek we the crest.
Where the spring doth rest,
Birds singing, glad are winging,
To yon shady dome,

'Neath the jasmines white.
Let us twain now be wending.

Lakme.

But nameless dread all my being is
swaying.

When father so dear

All alone in their city accurs'd is stay-
ing.

I shudder, I tremble in fear!

Mallika.
May the God Ganesa him still watch

over.
Haste ! to yon waters our course we'll

pursue,
U'here swans white, with downy

wings, hover ;
There we will cull the lotus blue.

Together.

'Xccith the dome, where jasmines,
eic.

{During the iinal bars of this number
Mallika has loosened the rope of a
small boat zvhich is fastened among



8



L A Iv J\I fi.



seatix; Lakme y monte, suivic de Mal-
lika qui a pris I'aviron; la barque s'e-
loigne et leiirs vo\x s'eteignent dans le
loin tain.

(Gerald, Frederic, Ellen, Rose, Mis-
tress Bent son.)

{On entend des eclats de rire en de-
hors de la cloture du jar din.)

Rose.
Que voyez-vous?

Frederic.
Je vois un jardin.

Ellen.
Et vous, Gerald?

Gerald.
Je vois de tres beaux arbres.

Ellen.
II n'y a ])ersonne?



Gerald.



Je ne sa:s pas.



Regardez bien.



Rose.



Frederic.
Ce n'est pas commode, a travers une
pareille cloture.

Ellen.
Essayez d'ecarter les bambous!

Mistress Bentson.
Mesdemoiselles, mesdemoiselles, soyez
prudentes.

Gerald.
Tiens, je vois la statue de Ganega, le
dieu de la sagesse.

Frederic.
Je vois une feuille de lotus dessinee
sur la porte. C'est la demeure
d'un brahmane.

Rose et Ellen.
D'un brahmane!

Frederic.
Allons-nous-en !

Rose et Ellen. -
Pourquoi ?



Frederic.

Parce qu'il ne faut pas plaisanter avec
ces gens-la.

Ellen, ccartant les bambous.

Oh! moi, je veux absolument voir le
jardin d'un brahmane.

Mistress Bentson,
Miss Ellen, soyez prudente!

Ellen.
Oh! il est trop tard!

{Les bambous out cede, elle est en-
tree dans le jardin.)

Mistress Bentson.
Oh! Miss Ellen!

Rose,
La breche est faite, on pent passer.

Mistress Bentson, eperdue.
Miss Rose, vous aussi !

Gerald.

Nous ne pouvons plus reculer, vene-
rable mistress Bentson.

Mistress Bentson,
entrant en faisant la grimace.
Mais je ne sais pas chez qui nous
sommes.

Frederic.
Moi, je le sais tres bien. Je ne con-
nais pas le proprietaire de ce petit
temple, mais j'ai beaucoup enten-
du parler de lui.

Gerald.

Tres positivement, nous n avons pas
6t6 present6s,

Frederic.
Nous nous livrons la a une plaisanterie
extremement dangereuse.

Rose, vivement.
N'eftrayez pas, mistress Bentson.

Ellen.
Oh! non, ne I'efFrayez pas!



L A K M E.



the rushes; Lakiiie steps into it, fol-
lowed by Mallika, who takes the
oar; the boat moves off and the
voices die away in the distance.)

(Enter Gerald, Frederick, Ellen, Rose,
Mrs. Bentson.)

(Laughter heard outside the inclos-
ure.)

Rose.
What see you ?

Frederick.
A garden I behold.

Ellen,
And Gerald, yon?

Gerald.
Trees b'eautiful and grand I see.

Ellen.
And no one near?



Ger.^ld.



I know not.



Rose.

Your eyes use well.

Frederick.
Xo easy matter, so high and close
this fence.

Ellen.

A peephole through the bamboos
make.

Mrs. Bentson.
Girls, girls, be cautious, please.

Gerald.

See, Ganesa's statute, wisdom's god-
dess.

Frederick.
And at the door a lotus leaf. A
Brahmin dwells within.

Rose and Ellen.
A Brahmin. 'Tis ?

Frederick.
Go on ! Go on !



Rose and Ellen.
And why this haste?

Frederick.
A wide path give such folk. No
jesting here.

Ellen (forcing aside the bamboos).
But I a Brahmin's place must see.

Mrs. Bentson.
Be prudent, do.

Ellen.
Too late! (tlic bamboos have given
way; she is in the garden).

]\Irs. Bentson.
Miss Ellen!

Rose.

Made is the breech ; the entrance
free.

Mrs. Bentson.
You too! Miss Rose!

Gerald.
No drawing back, fair dame.

Mrs. Bentson (follozcing after, mak-
ing a face).
But in whose place are we?

Frederick,

Well do I know. But not this
temple's owner. Him have I heard
them noise abroad.

Gerald.

'Tis so; no introduction have we
had.

Frederick.

Refrain from jesting here. Tis
dangerous.

Rose (lively).
No need of fear, dame Bentson,
dear.

Ellen.
No fear! No fear!



lO



L A K M fi.



AllSTKtSS BeNTSON.

PennetteZjines demoiselles, je suis
votre gouvernante, la prudence est un
devoir pour moi.

Rose.
La prudence, oui ; mais la peur?

MiSTPESS Bentson.

La peur aussi. Quand M. le gouv-
erneur a diagne me confier sa fllle et
sa niece, il m'a recommande d'avoir
peur. Je me suis engagee a avoir peur.
J'ai peur!

Ellen^ c^aiemcnt, a Rose.
V'ois comme c'est joli.

Rose.
Quel adorable fouillis de feuilles et
de fleurs !

Frederic.
Prenez garde aux serpents, sous les
fleurs, miss Rose !

Ellen.
Comme elle est cociuette, cette riv-
iere, toute bordee de verdure

Rose.
Elle a I'air de s'allonger dans une
courbe gracieuse pour arriver jus-
qu'ici.

Ellen.
^'^is done ces belles fleurs.

Frederic.
N'y touchez pas, miss Ellen! ce sont
des daturas, des daturas stramonium,
tres inoffensifs en Angleterre, mais,
sous ce beau ciel indien, il suffirait
d'en mettre une feuille sous vos jolies
dents...

Mistress Bentson.
Pour etre cmpoisonnee?

Gerald.
Pour etre empoisonnee.

Frederic.
Parfaitement, mistress Bentson.

Mistress Bentson.
C'est un pays abominable.



Frederic.

Si vous me permettiez de vous par-
ler raison...

Rose.
Nous ne voulons pas !

Ellen.
Non, non, nous ne voulons pas !

Frederic.
V'oyons, Gerald, toi qui as des droits
ou du moins un semblant de droits,
puisque tu auras le bonheur d'epouser
miss Ellen dans quelques semaines...

Gerald.
Je n'userai jamais de mes droits
pour contrarier ma femme.

Ellen, lui tcndant la main.
A la bonne heure, voila une bonne
parole !

Frederic.

Oh! ces amoureux! {A Gerald.)
L'aventure, d'ailleurs, ne te deplait
pas. {A miss Ellen.) Vous ne le con-
naissez pas bien, miss Ellen ; il aime
le danger, il y met de la poesie ! c'est
un reveur de I'impossible, un enthou-
siaste de Tinconnu ; il se perd avec
amour dans les nuages bleus...

Ellen, vivement.
Je ne le lui reproche pas.

Frederic, gaienient.
Au contraire, n'est-ce pas? C'est
moi qui suis prosaique. Je vous jure
pourtant que si j'etais seul...

Rose.

Quoi? Nous ne nous exposons ]:as
beaucoup, puisque nous ne rencontrons
personne. On dirait cette demeure in-
Iiabitee.

Frederic.
Je vous r^pete qu'elle est parfaite-
ment habitee par un brahmane fana-
tique qui se nomme Nilakantba. II des-
servait une pagode que la conc[uete a
ruinee, ce qu'il nous pardonnc difficile
ment.

Mistress Bentson.
Mais j'en vols encore partout des
pagodes !



L A K M i:



11



Mrs. Bentson.

Yonr g'ovcrness T, young' ladies.
Prudence \r.v dntv here.



Rose.
Prudence, yes; not fear.

Mrs. Bentsox.

I->ar too. The governor, when to
me he gave in trust his daughter and
his niece, counselled — fear. For fear
I then engaged, and fear I have.

Ellen (to Rose, gaily).
I low fine it is !

Rose.

These buds and flowers, how sweet
they are !

Frederick.

Take care. Miss Rose, the serpents
lurk beneath the flowers.

Ellen.

A lovely river, all banked with
green.

Rose.

A distant cirv-" it makes, then here
returns so gracefully.

Ellen.
These flowers sec. how really swcc: !

Frederick.

Their beauty do not trust.

For these flowers, now so lovely sceui-

i^aturas they are called.
They are dazzlingly fair.
While poison containing.

Mrs. Bentson.

This is a land of terror.

Frederick.
iut with your leave Pll say....

Rose.

No, no! We will not herr.



Ellen.
We will not hear.

Frederick.

Gerald, 'tis you who have at least
some seeming rights, the honor \< ur>
of wedding sweet Miss Ellen here.

Gerald.

Xo rights ril ever claim to contra-
dict my wife.

Ellen (extending her hand to him).
Well said, indeed !

Frederick.

Ah, these lovesick ones. (To Ger-
ald). The venture pleases you.
(To Ellen.) You know him not so
well. Miss Ellen. Loves he danger
so he mixes poetry with it. A dreamer
seeking the impossible ; a rash en-
thusiast of what he knows but noth-
ing. Lost with Cupid in the ether
blue.

Ellen (gaily).
I reproach l:iiu not.

Frederick.

Ah, yes, 'tis T who close adhere to
prose. And yet were I alone I swear...

Rosk.

What! Xo risks we run, the place
deserted quite.

Frederick.

And yet, believe me, here he dwei!>^,
the Brahmin fanatic who styles him-
self Nilakantha. His pagoda here he
built. 'Tis nov.' in ruins ; the victor's
hands have touched it, and for that he
hates us all.



Mrs, Bentson.

And yet on e-^er}- hand T see these
pagodas.



12



L A K M £.



Frederic,
Dans les villes, oui ; nous aurons
meme demain nne des plus grandes
fetes indoues. Tous les brahmanes
^des environs vont se reunir a la grande
pagode, mais dans les campagnes, le
culte disparait peu a peu. Nilakan-
t!'a s'est retire sur ce coin de terre
qu'il a consacre a Brahma, de sa pro-
pre autorite, et il vit des modestes of-
frandes de quelques Hiridous qui lui
sont restes fideles. II a une fille.

Ellen,
Une fille?

Mistress Bentson.
C'est gens-la ont des filles?

Frederic.
EUe se nomme Lakme,

Ellen.
Oh ! le joli nom : Lakme !

Rose,
Je voudrais bien la voir.

Frederic.

II ne manquerait plus que cela, Mais
Tous ne savez done pas, Europeenne
que vous etes, que cette petite per-
sonne nee dans une pagode, vouee a
quelque Dieu ou a quelque deesse du
ciel indien, se croit elle-meme d'es-
sence divine. Elle meprise tout ce qui
se passe en dehors de cette enceinte et
elle ne se montre pas,

Ellen,
Et vous croyez qu'elle est belle?

Frederic.
Ravissante, dit-on.



^ Ellen.

'Ouand une femme est si joHe
Elle a bien tort de se cacher.

Frederic.
Dans ce pays tout est folie
Et j'achnets tout, moi, sans broncher.

Gerald.
Une idole qu'on divinise!



Rose.
Que Ton enferme avec ferveur!

Gerald.
Et qui jamais ne s'humanise !

Mistress Bentson.
Je la crois laide a faire peur!

Ellen.
Une femme est toujours sensible
Au juste hommage qu'on lui rend.

Frederic.
En Europe, c'est bien possible,
Mais ici, c'est tout different !



Gerald, Rose, Ellen, Mistress
Bentson.
Beaux faiseurs de systemes,
Amoureux du changement.

Laissez la vos poemes
Et raisonnons froidement ;
Les femmes sont partout les memes,
Fort heureusement.

Frederic.
Je hais tous les systemes,
J'observe tout simplement

Sans faire de poemes.
Les femmes changent vraiment
Et ne sont point partout les memes,
Fort heureusement!

Ellen.
Si nous cherchions un peu sa trace
Dans cet enclos mysterieux?

Frederic.
On ! non — ce serait d'une audace
A faire bondir tous leurs dieux.

Rose, raillense.
A-t-elle une grace divine ?

Frederic, avec bonhomie.
Mon Dieu ! moi, je me I'imagine.

Gerald, raillant.
Fraudrait-il vivre a ses genoux ?

Mistress Bentson, (ironique).
Dites done qu'elle est n-.ieux que nous!



L A K M fi.



n



Frederick.

In cities, ves. To-morrow's their
great feast day ; around the chief pa-
goda the Brahmins g^ather all. But,
without the towns, their worship
rlwindles o^raduplh-. Nilakantha here
unto his sacred spot retires and here
'le worships Bramah, the modest offer-
ing's of the faithful his sole support.
One daughter has hf.

Ellen.
A daughter!

Mrs. Bentson.
What! have they daughters then?

Frederick.
Her name, Lakme.

Ellen.
A pretty name Lakme.

Rose.
How glad]}- would I see her.

Frederick.

A charmer, she — a goddess most
high, hidden to eyes profane.

Ellen.
And think you she is beautiful?

Frederick.
T^Iost beautiful, 'tis said.

Ellen.
\\hen woman's bright, pretty and jol-

he is wrong to hide herself. •

Frederick.

But, in this land, everything's follv.
Arguments I lay on the shelf !

Gerald.
She's an idol men worship ever!


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