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^ U a i <, H ■








Count L. X. Tolstoi, i868.



THE WORKS



OF



LYOF N. TOLSTOI



War and Peace
I-II



NEW YORK

Thomas Y. Crowell (^ Company
publishers



WAR AND PEACE

VOL. I



Copyright, 1898,
By THOMAS Y. CROWELL & CO.



EDITOR'S PREFACE

Men occasionally appear who by the force of their
personality challenge the attention of mankind. Their
message may not be altogether welcome, but we listen
to it perforce. We may not accept it, but we become
conscious that it is affecting the thought of our time,
and unconsciously, perhaps, is changing our own lives.

Such a man is Count Lyof Nikolayevitch Tolstof.
Few have seen more widely contrasting phases of life,
have experienced a more inclusive experience of the
whole gamut of human life and passion. Born into
the higher circle of the Russian aristocracy, serving in
the army of the Caucasus and during the Crimean war,
received into the intimacy of the best writers of his
day, he has gradually worked his way up to the loftiest
plane of ethical Christianity, and now, repudiating the
form of his former literary activity, he preaches a doc-
trine of equal labor for all men, of non-resistance no
matter what the provocation may be, and of a literal
acceptation of the words of Christ regarding most of
the points of Christian profession and practice.

Striking out from the highway of Fame and Success,
he seems to be the personification of Russia's tradi-
tional peasant-hermit who lives in the forest and turns
the leaves of the golden book, and with infallible instinct
answers even the most difficult questions that are pro-
pounded to him.



vi EDITOR'S PREFACE

Count Tolstoi* himself in "What is Art" very dis-
tinctly states his own judgment of his works. Those
that he has written for his peasant readers he regards
as his best. Those that he wrote for Art's sake he
places in a lower category. But a man cannot put his
life-work out of sight, and the world has with wonderful
unanimity accepted his earlier stories as masterpieces,
which no one doubts will retain their place among the
masterpieces of universal literature. It is an interesting
and instructive task to trace the development of Count
Tolstoi's " Doctrine " from its first germs in his earliest
sketches through " War and Peace " even to his purely
religious works. It will be found that the fundamental
tendencies of his writings have ever been the same.
The dazzling and multifarious episodes of his romances,
drawn from every phase of life, have been like the
debris piled on the bottom granite of the religious
theory.

From either point of view it is remarkable; in the
books written for Art's sake, simply as novels, the ethi-
cal background is noticeable ; in the later stories, writ-
ten for the sake of the doctrine, the supreme art of the
story-teller is no less manifest. He can rid himself of
neither. In either case he holds his unique place as
one of the greatest writers of all time.

A new and uniform edition of Count Tolstoi's works
has been long a desideratum, and the present series of
volumes aims to present practically everything that has
proceeded from his pen. Not only have they been
translated from the original with the approval of the
author, but especial pains have been taken to give them
full and complete revision. Thus " My Religion," which
has hitherto existed only in a version made from the



EDITOR'S PREFACE



Vll



French, is now here translated directly from the origi-
nal. The editor has seized the opportunity of making
a new translation of "Anna Karenina." Miss Hapgood
has also carefully revised her versions of " Childhood,
Boyhood, and Youth," "Sevastopol," and "Life."

A number of Count Tolstoi's later works, stories, and
critical articles have been added, and it is believed that
these volumes in which this remarkable body of lit-
erature appears will find a warm welcome from the
thousands of Count Tolstoi's admirers in this country.

NATHAN HASKELL DOLE.
November i, 1898,



INTRODUCTION



/-"OUNT TOLSTOI in the early sixties began to
\^ write a novel, the characters of which were in-
tended to portray some of the surviving members
of the famous December conspiracy of 1825, return-
ing to the emancipated Russia of 1856. He wrote one
chapter of this novel, which was entitled the " De-
kabrists," but his mind was irresistibly drawn back to
the conspiracy itself, and finally to the first causes of
the conspiracy, which lay in the fateful epoch of the
first quarter of this century. Thus originated "War
and Peace."

This panoramic novel was published between 1864
and 1869. In the original it has upwards of 2000 pages,
and contains not far from 650,000 words. Yet in spite
of its multiplicity of characters there is no confusion in
the delineation of types. Count Tolstoi's brother-in-
law, Professor C. A. Behrs, says : " There is no doubt
that in ' War and Peace ' Prince Nikolai Andreyevitch
Bolkonsky and Count Ilya Andreyevitch Rostof are
intended to represent the Count's grandfathers, Prince
Volkonsky and Count Tolstoi." He also thinks that
his mother, the Princess Mariya Volkonskaya is the pro-
totype of Prince Andrei's saintly sister; his father.
Count Nikolai Ilyitch, that of young Lieutenant Rostof,
though the story of his capture by the French is trans-
ferred to Pierre's experiences. G. H. Perris says : " One
feels that the writer must have split his own soul in
twain to make those two chief iigures of Prince Andrei
Bolkonsky and Count Pierre Bezukhoi — the proud and
elegant gentleman, cold, skeptical, even as to the power
of reason, yet visited with spasms of spiritual anxiety
especially after the death of his wife, whom he has de-



X INTRODUCTION

spised ; and then the more typical Slav — gentle, emo-
tional, weak of will, but full of humane desires." And
he adds, " Every character is, indeed, in a sense which
can hardly be used of any other modern artist, the over-
flowing of some side of his own opulent and varied
character."

In this novel, which is an implicit protest against
war, we have a kaleidoscopic succession of life-views.
One follows the other without confusion, naturally, with
entrancing interest. "The court and camp, town and
country, nobles and peasants, — all are sketched in with
the same broad and sure outline. We pass at a leap
from a soiree to a battle-field, from a mud hovel to a
palace, from an idyl to a saturnalia. As we summon
our recollections of the prodigal outpouring of a care-
less genius, a troop of characters as lifelike as any in
Scott or in Shakespeare defile before our mental eye.
Tolstoi" finds endless opportunities of inculcating his fa-
vorite themes : the mastery of circumstance over will
and desire, the weakness of man in the front of things,
and the necessity for resignation."

But, not alone as a novel is " War and Peace " re-
markable. It is the basis and illustration of a theory
of Fate. Count Tolstoi' shows that the great man is as
much a puppet as the merest soldier ; Napoleon or Ku-
tuzof or Bagration, seeming to direct great movements,
were, in reality, no more the efficient cause of them
than the striking of the clock is the cause of a sunset.

In support of this theory, Count Tolstoi introduces
the great men of those famous Napoleonic days, and
shows how they, as well as men unknown, were led,
often with eyes wide open, into courses where destruc-
tion infallibly awaited them. His arguments on this
subject, scattered here and there through the book,
were extracted without change and published in France
in a separate volume entitled " Napoleon and the Rus-
sian Campaign." The epilogue has also been published
by itself under the title " Power and Liberty."



CONTENTS



PART I (1805)

CHAPTER I. Page i

Soiree at Mile. Scherer's. Discussion with Prince Vasili about politics.
Mile. Scherer's proposal that Anatol Kuragin marry the Princess Mariya.

CHAPTER H. P. 7

Mile. Scherer's drawing-room. The old aunt. The Princess Bolkon-
skaya. Pierre. Anna Pavlovna as mistress of ceremonies.

CHAPTER in. P. II

The various groups. The Viscount Montemart. Discussion of the
murder of the Due d'Enghien. Ellen the beautiful. The story of the
duke meeting Napoleon at Mile. George's.

CHAPTER IV. P. 18

The Princess Drubetskaya urges Prince Vasili to forward the interests of
her son Boris. The value of influence. Discussion of the coronation of
Bonaparte at Milan. The viscount's views of matters in France. Pierre's
eulogy of Napoleon. Pierre's smile. Prince Ippolit's story.

CHAPTER V. P. 27

Description of Pierre. Pierre and Prince Andrei arguing about war and
Napoleon.

CHAPTER VI. P. 32
The princess joins the gentlemen. Almost a family quarrel.



xii CONTENTS

CHAPTER VII. P. 35

Prince Andrei's advice to Pierre never to marry, and his reasons. Pierre
promises to give up taking part in Anatol's dissipations.

CHAPTER VIII. P. 39

Pierre breaks his promise and goes once more. The scene at the
Horseguard barracks. The wager between Stevens and Dolokhof.
Character of Dolokhof. Dolokhof drains the bottle, and wins the fifty
rubles. Pierre's frolic with the bear.

CHAPTER IX. P. 46

Boris Drubetskoi attached to the Semyonovsky regiment of the Guards.
The Princess Drubetskaya visits the Rostofs at Moscow. The Countess
Rostova. Her dignity. The countess's name-day reception. Talk about
the old Count Bezukhoi and his illegitimate son. Account of Pierre's frolic
with Anatol. PossibiUty of Pierre inheriting a name and fortune,

CHAPTER X. P. 51

Irruption of the children. Natasha Rostova at thirteen, Nikolai Ros-
tof. Characteristics of Boris Drubetskoi.

CHAPTER XL P. 54

Sonya the niece; compared to a kitten. Her jealousy. The Countess
Rostova and Mme. Karagina discuss children's education. Appearance of
the Countess Viera.

CHAPTER XII. P. 59

Nikolai comforts Sonya in the conservatory. Natasha's mischievous
kiss. Her engagement to Boris.

CHAPTER XIII. P. 61

Viera shows her character to her brothers and sister. The countess and
Anna Mikhailovna have a confidential talk. The princess acknowledges
her want of money. Determines to call upon Count Bezukhoi.

CHAPTER XIV. P. 66

Boris and his mother drive to Kirill Vladimirovitch's. Anna Mikhal-
lovna's interview with Prince Vasili. Prince Vasili's opinion of Count
Rostof. Boris sent to Pierre.



CONTENTS xiii



CHAPTER XV. P. 71

Pierre's visit at his father's house. The count's three nieces receive him
like " a ghost or a leper." Pierre left severely to himself. Pierre and
Boris. Pierre's confusion. Anna Mikhailovna's zeal for the old Count
Bezukhoi's salvation.

CHAPTER XVI. P. 77

Count Rostof 's manner of raising seven hundred rubles. The countess
presents the money to Anna Mikhailovna.

CHAPTER XVII. P. 80

Marya Dmitrievna Akhrosimova. Shinshin and Berg. Berg's defense
of his ambition. His egotism. Arrival of Pierre. Description of Marya
Dmitrievna. Her semi-humorous attack upon Pierre. The count's dinner-
party. Girls in love.

CHAPTER XVIII. P. 87

Animated conversation. Colonel Schubert's defense of the emperor's
manifesto. Nikolai's interest in the war. His enthusiastic speech. Nata-
sha's mischievous remark about the ices.

CHAPTER XIX. P. 91

Sonya's sorrow. Natasha's sympathy. Sonya offers to sacrifice herself.
The four young people sing "The Fountain." Natasha dances with
Pierre. Count Rostof dances " Daniel Cooper " with Marya Dmitrievna.

CHAPTER XX. P. 97

Count Bezukhoi receives his sixth stroke of apoplexy. Scenes at the
mansion. Prince Vasili's interview with the Princess Katish. Discussion
of Pierre's chances of the inheritance. Prince Vasili's scheme for prevent-
ing it.

CHAPTER XXI. P. 106

Anna Mikhailovna takes Pierre to his dying father. She promises to
look out for his interests. They discover Prince Vasili and the Princess
Katish in consultation. Scene in the anteroom.



xiv CONTENTS



CHAPTER XXII. P. I XI

Glimpse of Count Kirill Bezukhoi. Description of the bedroom. The
ceremony of extreme unction. Prince Vasili's strange action. Pierre
kisses his father's hand. The count's last look.



CHAPTER XXIII. P. 117

The midnight scene in the petit salon. Altercation between Anna
INIikhailovna and Katish. Anna Mikhailovna rescues the mosaic portfolio.
The struggle for the same. Death of the count. Effect of the count's
death on Prince Vasili. Anna Mikhailovna's account of the count's death.
Her hopes from Pierre.

CHAPTER XXIV. P. 122

Prince Nikolai Andreyevitch Bolkonsky at home. His character and
notions. The prince at his lathe. His lesson to his daughter. His praise
of mathematics. Julie Karagina's letter to the Princess Mariya. Julie's
description of Nikolai Rostof. The Princess Mariya's reply. Conflicting
ideas of Pierre.

CHAPTER XXV. P. 132

Arrival of Prince Andrei and his wife. Meeting of Liza and Mariya.
Prince Andrei's annoyance. Prince Andrei and his father. The old
prince dressing.

CHAPTER XXVI. P. 138

In the prince's dining-room. The ancestral tree. Meeting of the old
prince and Liza. Discussion of politics at table.

CHAPTER XXVII. P. 144

Prince Andrei's preparations for departure. Serious thoughts. Fare-
well interview between Mariya and Andrei. Mariya persuades Andrei to
wear the blessed medallion. Mariya's criticisms on her father's religious
views. Coquettish Mile. Bourienne. Liza's flighty talk. Andrei's fare-
well to his father. The prince's memoirs. Farewell to Liza.



CONTENTS XV



PART II (1805)

CHAPTER I. Page 155

The Russian army and Kutuzof near Braunau. Preparation for inspec-
tion. Condition of the regiments. The regimental commander. A
change of orders. Dolokhof cashiered. The blue capote. Captain
Timokhin of Company Three.

CHAPTER H. P. 161

Arrival of Kutuzof. The review. Prince Andre! and Nesvitsky.
Zherkof. The hussar mimic. Prince Andrei reminds Kutuzof of Dolo-
khof. Timokhin's account of Dolokhof Regimental comments on Ku-
tuzof. " Singers to the front ! " Zherkhof tries to make friends with
Dolokhof.

CHAPTER in. P. 170

Kutuzof and the member of the Hofskriegsrath. Kutuzof 's excuses
for not taking an active part in offensive operations. Change in Prince
Andrei. Kutuzof 's report of him to his father. How regarded by the
staff. Arrival of the defeated General Mack. Le malhetireux Mack.
Preparations for the campaign. Zherkhof insults General Strauch. Prince
Andrei's resentment.

CHAPTER IV. P. 178

Nikolai Rostof as yunker. Nikolai and his horse. His conversation
with his German host. Description of Denisof. Lieutenant Telyanin.
Disappearance of the purse. Nikolai forces Telyanin to refund.

CHAPTER V. P. 188

Nikolai refuses to apologize to the regimental commander. Discussion
of the matter. Nikolai's pride. End of inaction.

CHAPTER VI. P. 192

Kutuzof in retreat. The army crossing the Enns. The scene. View
from the hill. Firing from the battery.



xvi CONTENTS

CHAPTER VII. P. 195

The Russians crossing the bridge. Nesvitsky on the bridge. Scraps of
soldier talk. The German household. Denisof on the bridge. Military
repartees. ^

CHAPTER VIII. P. 201

Appearance of the French. The Cossack patrol. The solemn gap
between the two belligerents. The Unknown. Under fire. Passage of
the hussars. Nikolai Rostof. Ordered to burn the bridge. Misunder-
standing. Grape. The beauty of the scene. Contrast with death and
the destruction of battle. Rostof 's prayer. Under fire for the first time.

CHAPTER IX. P. 211

The retreat of the Russians. November 9, 1805. Condition of the
army. Prince Andrei wounded. Sent with a special courier to the Aus-
trian court at Brunn. Driving through the night. Weird sensations
Prince Andrei at the palace. Invited to meet the war minister. Cool
reception. Thoughts suggested by officialdom.

CHAPTER X. P. 217

Prince Andrei entertained by the witty Bilibin. His character and
career. Diplomatic subtleties. Occupation of Vienna. Buonaparte or
Bonaparte? Illusions.

CHAPTER XI. P. 224

Prince Andrei meets the fashionable set - " les notresV Prince Ippolit
Kuragin and the others at Bilibin's. Prince Ippolit, the butt, entangled.

CHAPTER XII. P. 227

Prince Andrei at the levee. Received by the Emperor Franz. Over-
whelmed with invitations. Invested with the order of Maria Theresa of
the third degree. Hasty departure of the court. Bilibin relates the story
of the capture of the Thabor Bridge.

CHAPTER XIII. P. 233

Prince Andrei returns to the army. The confusion of the Russian army
The doctor's wife. The drunken officer. Prince Andrei finds Nesvitsky.



1



CONTENTS xvii

Kutuzof with Prince Bagration and Weirother. The dispositions.
Description of Bagration. Kutuzof gives Bagration his blessing. Descrip-
tion of Kutuzof. Prince Andrei begs to join Bagration.

CHAPTER XIV. P. 240

Kutuzof decides to retreat from Krems to Znaim and Olmiitz. Bagra-
tion sent across the mountains. " The impossible possible." A trick that
failed. The armistice. Bonaparte's indignation at the delay. His letter
to Murat. Bagration's four thousand.

CHAPTER XV. P. 245

Prince Andrei reports to Bagration. Cordially received. Reconnoiters
the position. The sutler's tent. Captain Tushin with his boots off. The
soldiers at the front. Punishment of the thief. Gossip with the French.
Sidorof. Dolokhof spokesman. Sidorof 's gibberish French.

CHAPTER XVI. P. 251

The scene from the hill. The lay of the land. Prince Andrei's compre-
hension of the position. Discussion of death. The cannon-shot. Cap-
tain Tushin again.

CHAPTER XVII. P. 254

The beginning of the action. Influence of the fact. The auditor.
" French pancakes." The Cossack killed. Tushin's battery. Setting
Schongraben on fire. Tushin's covering forces withdrawn. Tushin for-
gotten. Importance of the general's presence in spite of the fortuitousness
of events.

CHAPTER XVIII. P. 260

Battle-scenes. At the front. Effect of the battle on Bagration. The
enemy's charge. " Left ! left ! left ! " Charge of the Sixth Jagers. The
enemy yield.

CHAPTER XIX. P. 265

The Pavlograd hussars attacked by Lannes and defeated. Ordered to
retreat. Quarrel between the two officers. The challenge. The test.
Rostof 's squadron facing the enemy. The charge. Nikolai's sensations.
Nikolai falls. The hook-nosed Frenchman. Nikolai runs. Escapes. A
benumbed arm.



xviii CONTENTS



CHAPTER XX. P. 272

Demoralization in the ranks. Timokhin's firmness. Dolokhof s gal-
lantry. Tushin still at work. Death in the battery, Tushin's gallantry.
His imagination. Matushka Matveyevna. Prince Andrei sent to recall
Tushin. Sights on the battery.

CHAPTER XXI. P. 279

Nikolai given a ride on the gun-carriage of the Matveyevna. Bivouac.
The living river. The night scene. After the battle. Rostof 's sensations.
Scraps of talk. Tushin summoned to the general. Bagration at the cot-
tage. The captured standard. The regimental commander's story. True
because he believes it true. Praise for the blameworthy. Blame for the
praiseworthy. Tushin called to account. Prince Andrei defends Tushin.
A splendid tribute. Nikolai's illusion. The conjunction of forces
effected.



PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS IN "WAR AND
PEACE"

Count Kirill Vladimirovitch Bezukhoi {^Graf Kir-'iS. Vlah-(\e.G-meer-o-vi(ch
Be-zoo-ho-ee'\. A wealthy old grandee of the Empress Catherine's
time. At his death his illegitimate son Pierre inherits his title and
estates.

Monsieur Pierre, afterwards Count Piotr Kirillovitch Bezukhoi' \_Pee-6-tr
Ki-x\\-o-vitch, shortened into Kiriltcli\. The old count's illegitimate
son, educated abroad, and easily led both into dissipation and into
idealistic theories of life, " gentle, emotional, weak of will, but full of
human desires." He marries first the Princess Ellen, and afterwards
the Countess Natasha Rostova.

Prince Nikolai Andreyevitch BoLKONSKY \^Kiiiat (K-nee-az) Nee-ko-\2L\\.-ee
An-dtQ-ye-vikh (or An-dte-yiU/i) BoZ-kon-siee], A harsh martinet,
full of old-time prejudices, living a bitter, lonely life at his estate of
Luisiya Gorui (Lwee-see-ya Gor-^^), or Bald Hills: father of Prince
Andre! and the Princess Mariya.

Prince Andre! Nikolayevitch (Nikolaitch) BOLKONSKY [A'wzrts An-dre-ee
Nee-ko-\ik\-ye-'o'itch ; (^Ni-ko-\i!n-iicli) . Also called Andre and Andre-
yusha (^An-dre-^oo-sha)^. Adjutant or aide to General Kutuzof;
wounded at Austerlitz; proprietor of Bogucharovo \Bo-goo-\.(^z!a-ra-
va\ ; engaged to Countess Natasha Rostova.

Prince Nikola! Andreyevitch (Andreyitch) Bolkonsky \_Kniaz JVee-ko-\a.h-ee
Afi-dxh-ye-viick (or Aii-dx&-iUh)']. Called by the pet names Niko-
lusha, Nikolenka \_Nee-ko-\o6-%ha., Nee-\.6-len-ka'], Prince Andre!'s
baby son.

Princess Yelizavieta Karlovna Bolkonskaya («tV Meinen) {^K'-nee-a-^tt-
nya Yel-ee-zahv-y€i-a Ka.r\-ov-iia Boi-li6n-sia-ya^. Known as Liza
or Lise ; Prince Andre! Nikolayevitch's wife, who dies in giving birth
to the little Nikolusha.

Princess Mariya Nikolayevna Bolkonskaya [^-iiee-az/t-na. Mah-x&t-ya Nee-
ko-\2i}n.-yev-na\. Known as Marie, Masha, Mashenka \yi\i.-shen-ka\;
afterwards the Countess Rostova [ 6'ra-feen-^a Ros-Zo-tyz].

Prince Vasili Sergeyevitch (or Sergeyitch) Kuragin {^Kniaz Va-%te-lee Sier-
ge-e.-ye-vitch (or Sier-gee-h-itcli) Koo-xi}n-gheen'\. Vasili is Basil.

Prince Ippolit Vasilyevitch Kuragin \_Kniaz /p-o-\ee\. Va-%Qe\-ye-7'itc/i].
In the diplomatic service, but dissipated and foolish. " Le Charmant
Hippolyte."

Prince Anatol Vasilyevitch Kuragin \^K'>iiaz An-a-t6\ Va-setX-ye-vitc/i].
A spendthrift who aspires to the Princess Mariya Nikolayevna's hand,
but proves himself unworthy.

Princess Yelena Vasilyevna Kuragina \^Kniazhna Yel-h-na Va-seel-yev-
na Koo-xii\\-gee-mi\. Also known as Ellen, Helene, Elena, Lyolya
[Z-yo-Z-jrt], afterwards the unfaithful wife of Pierre Bezukho!.

Count Ilya Andreyevitch (or Andreyitch) Rostof [Graf Il-yk An-dxe-ye-
vitch R6s-/c7/]. A wealthy but extravagant proprietor or pomyeshchik
\J>om-yh'=,-lchik~\, whose affairs go from bad to worse.



XX PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS

Count Nikolai Ilyitch Rostof {^Graf Nee-ko.\k\^.ee //-yi'tchl. Known as

Nikolenka {_Nik-Q-le7i-ka'], Nikolushka, Kolya, Koko. Open-hearted

gallant, generous; serving in the cavalry; at first engaged to his

cousin Sonya, afterwards married to the Princess Mariya Bolkonskava

Count Piotr Ilyitch Rostof ^Graf Pee-6-ir //-yitch]. Known as Petva

[Pet-i'«], Petrdshka, Petenka. '

Countess Natalya Rostova {^nee Shinshina) {^Grafinya Na-ik\-ya ^d%-tov-a •
S/iin-s/nn-k~\. '

CountessViera liyitchna Rostova [Cr^/Z^jfa Vee-e-ra Il-yitch-na Ros-io-vcil
Known also as Vierushka [Vee-c-roosh-ka'], Vierotchka [Vee-Q-roich-
ka]. Afterwards married to Alphonse Karlitch Berg.
Countess Natalya Ilyitchna Rostova IGrafinya Na-\.s\-ya' li-yiich-na Rds-
(o-va'\. Also known as Natali, Natasha iiVa-ik-ska^. Engaged to
Prince Andrei Bolkonsky, but after his death married to Count Pierre
Bezukhol.
Sofya Aleksandrovna Shinshina (?) [S6f-j« Al-ex-iin-drov-nal. Known
as Sophie, Sonya [So-n-ya], Sonyushka [So-n-yoosk-ka^. The niece
of the Rostofs; engaged at first to Count Nikolai Rostof; "a sterile
flower."
Alphonse Karlovitch (or Karluitch) Berg. A conceited young officer, who

"gets on," and marries the Countess Viera Rostova.
Prince Boris Drubetskoi IKjiiaz Ba-xis Droo-bel-sko-ee']. A relation of the
Rostofs ; he is cold, calculating, and selfish, and through influence is
rapidly advanced. Known also as Borenka [^o-ren-k(i\.
Princess Anna Mikhailovna Drubetskaya IKniagina Anna Mi-hah-ee-lov-

na Droo-bct-%\k-ya\. Poor but intriguing ; the mother of Boris.
Juhe Karagina lKa-x2.-ghee-na\. Afterwards marries Boris.
Princess Yekaterina Semyonovna Mamontova ]
{JCniazhiia Ye-kai-er-tQ-na Seni-yon-ov-
na M.2^-inon-to-va'\. Known as Catherine,
Katish [A'rt-teesh], Catiche.
Princess Sofya Semyonovna Mamontova.
Princess Olga Semyonovna Mamontova. j

Vasili Feodorovitch Denisof \ya-%^&-lee Fee-o-do-ro-vitch De-ntt-sof].

Gallant soldier and poet, in love with Natasha. Known as Vaska.
Feodor Ivanovitch Dolokhof IFee-od-or Ee-vkn-o-vitch HoVo-hon. A
gambler and roue, who off"ers himself to Sonya, but is rejected ; brave
but bad.
Marya Ivanovna Dolokhova [Mar-^a Ee-vin-ov-na Dol-o-ko-val. The
fond mother of Feodor.

Marya Dmitrievna Akhrasimova [Mix-ya Dmee-iree-ev-na Ah-khra-%[m-

o-va'].
Piotr Nikolayevitch Shinshi'n [6'^m-sheen].

Prokhor Ignatyevitch Timokhin [Pro-hor /^-x\?it-ve-viich Tim-o-kht].
Osip (or losiph) Alekseyevitch Bazdeyef {6-sip A-lex-e-yc-viUh Baz-

dt-yefl. The Freemason, Pierre's " Benefactor."
Marya Ignatyevna Peronskaya [Mar-^'a /g.x\ii-vm-na Pe-x6n-ska-ya\
Platon Karatayef [Pla-ton Ka-ra-iiih-ve/}. The philosophical peasant ;



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