Louis Stopford Darling.

Tournament casting and the proper equipment online

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TIMANTHES:



TRAGEDY.



[Price One Shilling and Sixpence- J



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TIMANTHES: n



TRAGEDY.

As it is performed at tbo
THEATRE ROYAL

IN

COVEN T-G A R DE N.

. B Y

JOHN HOO L E.
THE THIRD EDITION



LONDON:

Printed for T. Becket and Co. in the Strand.
M.DCC.L3TXI.



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THI HB*r YORK
UBRAF

989



IF^UBRARY!



AfTfR, LENOX AND
TUJDUi FOUNDATIONS
R W6 U|



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PROLOGUE.



Spoken by Mr. BENS LEY.

WHEN firft our bard advent'rous left the lhore,
To tempt the drama's depth, untry'd before £
With beating heart his trembling fail he rearM,
While critic fands and envious rocks he fear'd.
But your indulgence fwelFd the profp'rous wind*
And fafe convey'd him to the port defign'd.
The track, yourfelves approv'd, be now purfues,
And for a fecond trip his care renews.

Oft, in the fdeht hours of teeming thought,
As flatt'ring profpe&s in his bofom wrought,
Hope imag'd to his fight your ftarting tear,
And brought the welcome plaudit to his ear !
But while he now revolves that mutual fame
Should join the poet's and the a&or's name,
O 1 let him here one tender tribute pay,
To early worth, untimely fnatch'd away !
To him, who once, alas ! his fcene infpir'd,
Whofe foftnefs melted, and whofe fpirit fir'd !
While to the friend this grateful debt he pays,
Each gen'rous breaft will fure confirm the praife ;
With you, his honeft zeal muftibnd approved, * ,
Which makes this ofPring to thtr mart he Wd l :






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Dramatis Perfbnae.



DEMOPHOON, Mr. BENSLEY.

TIMANTHES, Mr. S M I T H.

CHERINTHUS, Mr. WROUGHTON.

MATHUSIUS, Mr. CLARKE.

ADRASTUS, Mr. GARDNER.

O R C A N E S, Mr. D A V I S.

O LINT H US, a Child.

ISMENA, Mrs. YATES.

CEP HIS A, Mrs. BULK LEY.



Officer, Guards, Attendants j
Chorus, of Priests and Virgins.

SCENE, Thrace



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TIMANTHES:

A

T R A G E D Y.

ACT L

S C EN E, The pdha.
Enur Adhastus and Orcanis.



nr>



OR CANES*

ilMANTHES is arriv'd.

■ ADRAST US.

■*" The fetting fun

Gilds his returning enfigns.— Great Demophoort
Prepares to welcome home his conquering Ton,
And meet him with a father's love*

or can ES.

• And yet
Amidft this hour of triumph, forrow clouds
The fplendor of a vigor's arpis : this ev*
Fore- runs a day of fad fojemiyty.

ADRASTUS,
Orcanes, yes— that fun, whofe chearful light
Smiles on the iianfclif* % ^ that pip t ii?g< leads

J B His



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2 TIMANTHES:

His flock to fold, muft, ere to-morrow's noon,

Behold his altar ftain'd with guiltlefs blood. '

Thou know'ft long fince the oracle required

A virgin's life in annual facrifice ;

And every yea^ on this returning day,

In folemn gtesour weejping Thjpce^giyes up ^

The melancholy victim.

ORC AN E S.

Have the priefts
Receiv'd jjie virgins yet, whofy names muft ftarfd *
To-morrow's dreadful chance ?

A D R A STXTS.

Not yet — ,and thence
I fear new evils may arife : 'tis whifper'd,
I know not what, of fomething that portends
Gonteft and tumult to the ftate : Mathufius,
The hoary chief, beneath whofe faltering care
Our young Timanthes learn'd the trade of war,
Grown old in toils, an alien to the court,
Now lives fequefter'd, fince the Jring dtfpleas'd* „ ,
RecalFd him from command, and in his ftead
Left his }>rave fon to guide the Thracian files :
Retir'd he dwells, where on the city's fkirts
The fea in tempefts breaks ; or where, in calms,
Its glafly waves reflect the trembling towers j
With him refides his daughter fair lfrrieria. '

OR q A>N E S.

The coldnefs 'twixt Demophoon and Mathufius
Has reach'd the public notice j born to fhine V

Jn camps alone, Mathufius has not learnt
The foft addrefs to rife in c#uft$» *

A D R A S T V S.

'Tistrue,.
And DJ26d with him,. Timanthes hat tmbib'd

Hk

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( A TRAGEDY, i

His temper's warmth, which oft, by youth inflam'd,
Flies to extremes — Cherinthus, his young brother,
Is form'd of fofter mould ; yet both poflefs
Demophoon's heart ; and born of different queens,
He in Timanthes feems to prize the gifts
Of manly fortitude, while in Cherinthus
He loves the milder virtues that revive
His queen Serena's memory.

O R c a N E s.

Cherinthus
Is now expe&ed from the Phrygian land,
Sent by Demophoon on fome embaify
Of high concern -*• but fee the king approaches.

Enter Demophoon attended.

Demophoon.
'Tis well — Mathufius* abfence on the eve
Of this important day, when he fliould meet
My conquering fon, the pupil of his arms,
Argues a ftubbornnefs and difregard
A fovereign ill can brook : we own his deeds,
His years of fervice for the ftate ; — but tell
The all-prefuming man, that merit, felf
O'er-rated, cancels its reward — Adraftus,
Ought hears't thou of Cherinthus ?

A D R A S'rUS,

No, my liege;
But to the cThracian port, the favouring winds
Muft bring his veflel, ere the clofe of eve.
Forgive a fubje&'s freedom, but you feem
Opprefs'd with fecret care.

DEMOPHOON.

The time, Adraftus,
Now cilta for meditation, and how few * '

' • * B 2 Arc



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4 TIMANTHES:

Are a king's hours of peace, whofe cv*ry day
Teems with fome counfel for the public weal,

ADRASTUS.

Yet thi6 aufpicious day my king muft own
Sets not with common luftre, when your fon,
The brave Timanthes, from the Scythian land.
Adds to his father's brow new wreaths of fame,
And to his people gives the palms of peace.
No, facred fir, the hardy fons of Thrace
Did never ^celebrate with greater joy
A conquering chief's return.

DEMOPHOON.

Well pleased I hear
My faithful people's Ihouts afcend the fky;
And fympathize in thofe exulting founds,
That to the much-lov'd name of my Timanthes,
Join every wifli — but hark ! the vi&or comes.

Enter Timanthes attended*

TIMANTHES.
Royal fir !

To whom Tirpanthes 0wns fa double tie
Of fon and fubjeft i fee him now return'd
From Scythia's kingdom with fucceCs and conqueft
To grace a father's throne—

P8MOPHOON.

Timanthes, rife:
The king and father give thee double welcome,
And treble praife to Mars the armipotent,
That gives Pcmopboon in his dadiftg fon
His kingdom's beft defender,

T I M A N T » E 8.

Thanks to heaven,
Whoft faiil^ hawgrae'd my uwxpcrteac'4 **m$!

• I may,



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A TRAGEDY. 5

X may, without a blufh, coofefs my doeds :
Yes, we have conquer'd ; never view'd the fun
A more extenfive flaughtcr : 'midft the tumult
Of fear and rage, were blended undiftinguifli'd
The bnpe, the bafe, the vidor and the vanquilh'd.
The day at length was ours ; if you demand
A proof of this, behold yon' captive bands,
Behold yon' fhattcrM arms and ftreaming cnfigns.

DEMO'PHOON.
'Tis not alone o'er the ftern Scythian foe
Thou fpread'ft thy trophies j by fubduing him,
Thou triumph'ft in D^mophoon's brcaft — mean-time
In this embrace receive my pledge of love :
Thy father welcomes thee ~ proceed, my fon,
Urge on thy courfe to honour's furtheft goal,
Till verging on the extreme of age, Demophoon
Beholds thy fame eclipfe his own — but toils
Demand refreshment, and the weary'd arm
Of valour gains new vigour •from repofe.
But I have that requires thy private ear ;
X*et all, except Timanthes, leave the prefence.

[Exeunt attendants.

Manent Demophoon and Timanthes.

DEMOPHOON.
Come near, my fon — thou little think'ft how much
Thy happinefs employs my careful breaft.
While in the diftant fields of fame Timanthes ,
Encounter'd dangers for his father's honour,
Demophoon's thoughts were all employed at home,
To blefs his glad return with halcyon days.

TIMANTHES.
Have I not felt your goodneft ? fince the time
Of early childhood to the ripening age
-: Of



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6 TIMANTHES:

Of manly life, a father has prevented
My every wifh.—

DEMOPHOON.

Thou know'ft Argea dy'd
Ere twice fix moons had taught thy tongue to lifp
A mother's name — two years elaps'd, once more
I try'd the nuptial band : Cherinthus crown'd
This fccond union — but his birth, alas !
Was fatal to Serena ; and with her,
In me the hufband dy'd ; and now the father
Engrofles all my foul.

TIMANTHES.

Still may Timanthes
With filial duty footh your days in peace,
And oft as war {hall call your banners forth
Return with conqueft home.

DEMOPHOON.

Thou canft not tell
How dear I hold thee — to the toil of arms
Love gives its foft relief, and beauty beft
Smooths the rough front of war : tho* now my years
Roll forward, and the fummer of my life
Yields to declining autumn, well I know
What youth has been, and what befits the age
When jocund fpring leads up the laughing hours.

T I M A N T H E S.
Alas ? my lord, let not your goodnefs tafk
Timanthes' gratitude, I afk no more
To crown my labours than Demophoon's fmiles.
What blifs is wanting to that chief, whofe arms
Defend his fovereign's throne and guard his pebple ?

DEMOPHOON.
Yes, my lov'd fon, Cephifa's virgin charms,
Cephifa, daughter to the Phrygian king,
Shall be thy valour's great reward.

XI-



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A TRAGEDY. j

T1MANTHES.
Cephifa !

DEMOPHOON.

What mean'ft thou? Wherefore hangs this fudden gloom
O'er thy diang'd features ? Can Cephifa's beauties,
Whom fighing kings *— nay more-— '

TIMANTHE5.

Yet hear me, fir,
Be not difpleas'd with your Timanthes — Heav'n's
My witnefs, .gladly would I yield my Hfe,
If fuch a facrifice could aught avaH
To infure Demophoon's peace — Jwit I xonfefs
Repugnance hercrT*

demopeoon;

x ; , ^ t Timanthes ! —

TI MAK THE*.' ;!
■ ;" . . -Tho' I own,
(What fine has loudly fpoken) every virtue
That decks the royal virgin, yet if aught •■
My deeds have merited -r . . „ ,

DEMOPHOON.
' , i Where- can we find
Anodier. partner for Timanthes' bed,
Unlefs a fubje£ born ? t- Think not, my ion, >
The (hades.. of our great auceftors (hall bluflx
To fee. their line difgrae'd — from them we hold
The ftatutc, that condemns to death the fubjeft
Who weds with royal blood j and whilft I live
I'm guardian of the laws, and will enforce thorn *
Even with fevcreft rigour,

TIM AN TH E S.
Sacred, fir ~

ErJzr

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S T f M ANT HE S^

£^r Orcanej.

OR'CANES,

The Phrygian fhipv »y lord, ar ^ now defcry'd
Full fleering to the port, their fpreading fail*
Swell in the winds that waft them to the fhore.

DEM OP BOON.
*Tis well — go thpu, my fo»,. to meet thy brother,
And bid the princefe welcome to the land :
Myfelf would with thee, but the priefta demand
My prefence at ths temple, to confult
To-morrow's mournful rites.

TIMANTM18.

[qfide.'] Doubts rife on doubt* f :
This dreadful facrifiee — yet ftay, my father —

DEMOPHOON.
What would'ft thou ?-*-fpeak — *

TIMANTHES.

• Aiasriknawnot^wfat^
Fain would I uttei-* But - .



DEMOPHOON.

Ko more* F cannot
Prolong the pcecioue time in vam debate:
The terms are fettled, prmee — tfcen fummon dl v
Thy virtud to *efl>e& a parent's wSJ, "

And drefs thy look© in fmiks to mffc^Cephifc.

[Exeunt t>emophoon andibrcttxeb,*

Timanthe^ *lmu
Ha ! dreamy looks in finiles to me*t Qepfrf* !
What have I heard !— O ! where's. Jfaen* iw*,; „ t .
That once could footh my c&res ! whofe beauty bell
Smooth'd the rough talk of war — Methinks even noi*
She chides the lingering hours— then let me fly,

P ~ Steal



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A tragedy; 9

Steal unperceiv'd upon the beauteous mourner,
And with Timanthes' love relieve her forrows !

[Exit.

SCENE, A Garden.

Enter Mat h-u s itfs and Ism en a.

I 8 M B N A,
Yet hear me, fir, nor chide your lov'd Ifinena, j

If fhe prefume, with unexperienc'd counfel,
To guide a father's thoughts — Alas ! I fear
The fond impatience of paternal tendernefe
But makes that evil fttre, which fortune elfe
May otherwife difpofe. — Has not Demophoon
Difpatch'd fome delegates to Delpbos* {hrine,
Once more- to feek a period to the fcourge
That hangs each year on our devoted Thrace ? j

MATHUSIUS.
From thence no comfort fprings — This very morn
Arriv'd, thqy from the facred tripos brought
Their doubtful anfwer, that the land muft groan
Beneath the wrath of heaven, till to himfelf
Th' offender (hall be known, who, guiltlefs, now,
Ufurps a prince's right.

IS MEN A.
Myfterious aH ?
MATHUSIUS.
Mean-time deftru&ion with remorfelefs fury
Hangs o'er my child, the darting of my age !
- And ftfall I then content —

I S M E N A.

Yet recollect
Your wonted fortitude—why fhould you hope
That, 'niidftthfc weeping maidsr of Thrace, Ifmeria

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,o TIM ANT HE Si

Should ftand exempted from the fatal urn ? **
Yqu plead the king perhaps —

MATHUSItTS.

And jufl; the plea :
Am I, becaufe afubjedt, lefs a father'?
Apollo wills fome virgin, nobly born, a ;

Should ftain his altar every year with blood.
Let him recall his daughter, kept at diftance
With artful policy — let him expofe
Her name in yonder urn, and kt him prove
What pangs diftraft a wretched parent's breaft
When his heart trembles, as the priefi-draws ntear
The facred vafe, while with a folemn mien
His lips prepare to fpeak the vi&im's . name.

I S M E N A.
Alas ! my lord, caft round your eyes, behold
The Thracian court, and mark her proudeft nobles
Whofe hearts have (hudder'd on this awful day
For a chad's threaten'd life —/lis true Arfene,
The firft-born off-fpring of his queen Argea,
Refides at diftance from Demophoon's palace :
But yet refleft, that, fingly to refufe
Ifmemi's name, will but incenfe the king :
Let not my danger urge you to expofe ■ • .
Your age to further woe— too much already
He views you with an unpropitious eye.
I dread to think, if now too far provok'd,
What mifchief may enfue !

MATHTJSIU8.

In vain thou tell'ft me
Of wrath or hatred in his breaft, while reafon
Aflerts my caufe, and heaven infpires my thoughts.
Was it for this I taught his arms to conquer,
Afld bjed his fon to greatnefe ? Yes, by me

The



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A TRAGEDY. n

The Scythian foe is vanquifh'd ; and by me
This eve Timanthes comes in triumph home.

I S M E N A.
Timanthes, O! my heart! [aftde.] What fays my lather,
Is then the prince return'd I

MATHUSIUSv

He is, Ifmena,
And comes in happy hour : his generous foul
Difdains not to remember that Mathufius
Taught his young fword to reap in glory's field :
To him Twill appeal — he will, with pity,
Behold a parent's fufferings.

I S ME N A.

Yet, my father,
Should the brave prince, with fympathizing heart,
Plead vainly with Demophoon, O ! forbear
To urge the conteft further : hope, the genius
That ftill has watch'd your years of danger paft, ,
Will guard your age from anguifh.

MATHUSIUS.

Ceafe, Ifmena,
To oppofe, with fruitlefs words, my fix'd refolve :
No, if I ftill muft be condemn'd to feel
This anguifh of the foul, yon haughty monarch
Shall fliare with me thofe fears a father knows,
Nor ftand excluded from Mathufius' pangs !

[Exit.
I s m E N A alone.

The tempeft thickens round ! my little bark ^
That, till this hour has ftemm'd life's boifterous wave,
At length, I fear, muft fink — Timanthes comes,
He comes with conqueft crown'd, but where are now
Ifmena's finifcs*to meet him ! Is it -thus,

C 2 With



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t% TI M AN T H E S;

With tears Ul-omen'd, with foreboding fcgtis,
I give him welcome he/e ! . k

Enter Timan*hes.

My life ! my lord ?
Com'ft thou again, preferv'd from danger's field,
To thefe fond arms !

TIMANTHES. . .

Yes, 'midft the fterner deeds
Which glory claim'd, thy image, prefent ftill,
Sooth'd every toil — And art thou then the fame
As when I left thee at the call of honour ?

ISMENA.
Canft thou then doubt me ! If thy heart, Timanthe
In the rough (hock of war, and clang of arms,
Forgot not fofter hours of peace and love,
Think'ftthou, Ifmena, 'midft thefe (hades, that oft
Have witnefs'd to our mutual vows, would ever
Caft off remembrance that (he once was happy ?

TIMANTHES.
Forgive the fondnefs of o'erfiowing love
That wiflies ftill to hear thofc gentle lips
Breathe their foft vows — How fares my boy Olinthus i
The precious fruit of our connubial joys, ' '
That heaven beftowed while, diftant with thy father,
Four fprings renewing fince the Thracian grove,
Timanthes march'd againft his country V foes ?

ISMENA..
Some God, that watches o ? er this pledge of love,
Sure crowns his tender age with growing beauty,
Or the fond mother with imagin'd grace .
Has deck'd his infancy j his looks already
Aflume thy manly fteronefs i when b$ ftailea,

He's



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A TRAGEDY. 13

He's all thyfelf ; and oft as I can fteal

A wifh'd-for look, I gaze with rapture on him,

And think I view Timanthes, till deceiv'd

With the dear thought, I ftrain him to my breaft,

And in the fon embrace the abfent father.

TIMANTHES.
What place contains our infant hope ! O ! kid,
Lead me, Umena, where thefe longing eyes
May in his features read a father's iikenefs,
Or fee them blooming with his mother's charms.

I S M E N A.
Alas ! my lord, awhile fupprefs thefe warm
Paternal feelings — ibme few miles remote,
Sequefter'd from the city, on the edge
Of the rude foreft, Areas and Ianthe,
A ruftic pair, unconfeious of their charge,
Rear his young life — Atnidft the obferving eyes
That watch a prince's deeds, you muft beware,
And but with caution fee him — Heaven allows
To us with fcanty hand the parent's joys,
In the foft moments of o'erflowing^ nature,
To clafp him in our fond endearing arms,
And blefs the prattler with the tongue of tranfport.

TIMANTHES.
By heav'n it (hall not be —I'll burft at once
From dark diifimulation's veil — 'tis now
The crifis of our fate !

ISMENA.

It is indeed :
To-morrow's fun lights up the fblemn day
Of annual facrifice : ftmeoa's name
Muft ftanJ enroll'd amongft th' ele&ed tmu
That wait the dreadful chance. #

TI-



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H TIMANTHES:

TIMANTHES.

Ifmena's name f

I S M E N A.
'Tis fo decreed, — « yet think not that I fear
To die for Thrace — no, for her country's fake,
Ifmena gladly would embrace her doom.
But Phoebus* words demand a virgin's blood 5
Shall I, a wife and mother, dare approach
His facred altar, an unhallow'd victim ?
Thus, if I fpeak or not, I ftill am guilty, '
My filence heaven offends* my fpeech the king, v

TIMANTHES.

The king muft know the fecret of our nuptials :

All, all demands is now — for, O Ifmena,

This very hour perhaps Cherinthus brings

A rival to thy love — Cephifa comes j

But now Demophoon urg'd me to receive

The Phrygian princefs — but, be witnefs heaven !

Not all the cruel policy of courts,

Not the ftern mandates of a king and father,

Shall e'er diflblve thofe tender ties which love

Has form'd, and virtue fandifies.

I S M E N A.
Alas!
What can it all avail ! our union .publifh'd,
Thou know'ft the fentence of the law impends
On my devoted head.

TIMANTHES.

A monarch made,
A monarch can* revoke- the ftern decree :
Deijophoon, tho' fevere, is ftill a parent,



His



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A TRAGEDY. 15

His kind indulgence {hall avert the flxoke
That threats Ifmena.

I S M E N A.

Rather let it come :
Too long, Timanthes, haft thou facrificM
Thy glory to Ifmena — O ! refle&
How ill the name of Thracia's heir agrees
With fecret nuptials and clandestine love.
JLet me embrace my fate — I die with joy,
Since I, in death, can call Timanthes mine }

TIMANTHE8.
O ! fortune, wherefore did thy lavifh hand
Give my Ifmena every charm, yet place
Her virtues in the vale of private life ? *
But be it fo ~ it refts^on me to amend
The partial error — Thrace, fome future day,
With joy fliall view her partner of my throne.
Farewell, my. love, and let this fix'd aifurance *'

Dwell in thy mind, and calm thy troubled thoughts :
Timanthes will be ever watchful o'er thee,
And hold thy peace far dearer than his own.

[Exeunt feveratfy*



End of the First Act.



AC

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i* TIMANTHES;

ACT.'II.

SCENE, A fea-pm*.

Enter Cherinthus, Ciphisa, and Attendants.
C E P H I S A.

WHAT means this fadnefs, prince? With filentgaze
You look and figh, and if With friendly fpeech
I urge your coftverfe, when you feem prepar'd
To tell me much* your faultering tongue is mute*;
Where is your wonted chearfulnefs ? the grace
That feafon'd you* difcourfe ? Are you in Thraco .
The fame Cherinthus that I knew in Phrygia ?
Or is it thus, with melancholy look^
You Thracians to her lord cor»du& a bride i *

CHERINTHUS.

If my affii&ions bear a fad prefage,

Chi me, fair princefs, every evil fall :

My liars can little add to griefs like mine,

Nor breathes a wretch fo hopelefs as Cherinthus,

C E P H I S A.

And claims Cephifa then fo little (hare

In your efteem ! The time has been —* l *


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