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59TH CONGRESS, 1st SESSION
DECEMBER 4, 1905 - JUNE 30, 1906
SENATE DOCUMENTS
VOL. 14, 1906


SENATE: 59TH CONGRESS: 1st Session
DOCUMENT No. 202
FINAL REPORT OF THE
LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION COMMISSION
1906
FEBRUARY 8, 1906
READ, REFERRED TO THE COMMITTEE ON INDUSTRIAL
EXPOSITIONS, AND ORDERED TO BE PRINTED
WASHINGTON, GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE, 1906


CONTENTS.

Letters of transmittal
Final report
Centennial Day
Diplomatic Day
State Day
Appendices:
Report on Accounts and Statement of Receipts and Disbursements
Disposal of Salvage
Reports of Foreign Countries
Reports of States, Territories, and Districts
Report of Board of Lady Managers
Statement of Expenditures




LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.

_To the Senate and House of Representatives:_

I transmit herewith a communication from the Secretary of State
submitting the final report of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Commission, furnished in pursuance of section 11 of the "Act to provide
for celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of the purchase of the
Louisiana Territory," etc., approved March 3, 1901.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT.
THE WHITE HOUSE,
_February 8, 1906._

* * * * *

The PRESIDENT:

The undersigned, Secretary of State, has the honor to lay before the
President the final report of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Commission, presented, as required by section 11 of the act of Congress
approved March 3, 1901, entitled "An act to provide for celebrating the
one hundredth anniversary of the Louisiana Territory by the United
States by holding an international exhibition of arts, industries,
manufactures, and the products of the soil, mine, forest, and sea in the
city of St. Louis, in the State of Missouri."

Respectfully submitted.

ELIHU ROOT.
DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
_Washington, February 5, 1906._








FINAL REPORT
OF THE
LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION COMMISSION.

As required by section 11 of an act of Congress entitled "An act to
provide for the celebrating of the one hundredth anniversary of the
purchase of the Louisiana Territory by the United States by holding an
international exhibition of arts, industries, manufacturers, and the
products of the soil, mine, forest, and the sea in the city of St.
Louis, in the State of Missouri," approved March 3, 1901, this final
report is here presented:

In the early part of the year 1900 the citizens of St. Louis inaugurated
a movement looking to the celebration of the one hundredth anniversary
of the acquisition of the Louisiana Territory by an international
exposition. A temporary organization having been effected, the subject
was presented to Congress through a committee of citizens appointed for
that purpose. Congress conditionally approved the enterprise by enacting
a law which in substance provided that the Government would extend the
required aid to the proposed exposition, providing the petitioners would
furnish assurance that the sum of $10,000,000 had been raised for and on
account of inaugurating and carrying forward an exposition at the city
of St. Louis, Mo., in the year 1903, to celebrate the one hundredth
anniversary of the purchase of the Louisiana Territory.

Prior to March 3, 1901, the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company, then
consisting of an association of persons, furnished the Secretary of the
Treasury proof to his satisfaction that said sum of $10,000,000 had been
raised for the purpose indicated. Thereupon the act hereinbefore cited
was passed and duly approved by the President.

Including the appropriation made by the act of Congress, the sum of
$15,000,000 was provided for the exposition, as follows:

Donated by the city of St. Louis ...................... $5,000,000
Subscription to the capital stock of the Louisiana
Purchase Exposition Company ......................... 5,000,000
Appropriated by Congress, through the act aforesaid ... 5,000,000


On April 1, 1901, in accordance with section 2 of the act of Congress,
the President appointed a nonpartisan commission, consisting of nine
members, known and designated as the "Louisiana Purchase Exposition
Commission," the names of the appointees and the States in which they
resided being as follows:

JOHN M. THURSTON Nebraska.
THOMAS H. CARTER Montana.
WILLIAM LINDSAY Kentucky.
GEORGE W. MCBRIDE Oregon.
FREDERICK A. BETTS Connecticut.
JOHN M. ALLEN Mississippi.
MARTIN H. GLYNN New York.
JOHN F. MILLER Indiana.
PHILIP D. SCOTT Arkansas.

The name of the Commission being somewhat lengthy it became known and
was referred to in the law and proceedings throughout as "The National
Commission."

Pursuant to a call by the Secretary of State, the members of the
Commission met at the Southern Hotel, in the city of St. Louis, on April
23, 1901, and adjourned until the following day, when organization was
perfected.

Thomas H. Carter, of Montana, was elected president; Martin H. Glynn, of
New York, vice-president, and Mr. Joseph Flory, of St. Louis, Mo.,
secretary.

The following committees were appointed:

_Executive._
THOMAS H. CARTER.
JOHN F. MILLER.
PHILIP D. SCOTT.
JOHN M. ALLEN.
FREDERICK A. BETTS.

_Judiciary._
WILLIAM LINDSAY.
JOHN M. THURSTON.
GEORGE W. MCBRIDE.

_Plan and Scope._
GEORGE W. MCBRIDE.
FREDERICK A. BETTS.
WILLIAM LINDSAY.
MARTIN H. GLYNN.
JOHN F. MILLER.

_Members of Board of Arbitration._
JOHN M. THURSTON.
JOHN M. ALLEN.

_Auditing._
JOHN F. MILLER.
PHILIP D. SCOTT.
JOHN M. THURSTON.

_Insurance._
THOMAS H. CARTER.
MARTIN H. GLYNN.
FREDERICK A. BETTS.

_Ceremonies._
THOMAS H. CARTER.
JOHN M. ALLEN.
JOHN M. THURSTON.
WILLIAM LINDSAY.


Mr. Claude Hough, of Sedalia, Mo., was appointed official stenographer
of the Commission on May 6, 1901, and has capably and efficiently served
in that capacity throughout.

The organization of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company was not
formally perfected until about a month after the first meeting of the
National Commission, when the association which had theretofore existed
under that name was duly organized and became an incorporated company
under and in conformity with the laws of the State of Missouri. In the
meantime informal conferences were held between the Commission and the
prospective officers of the company in reference to a site for the
exposition.

The municipal assembly of the city of St. Louis enacted an ordinance
authorizing the use of a portion of Forest Park as a site for the
exposition, as follows:

An ordinance authorizing the use of either O'Fallon Park or
Carondelet Park or a portion of Forest Park as a site for the
world's fair, to be held in commemoration of the Louisiana
Purchase.

_Be it ordained by the municipal assembly of the city of St.
Louis as follows:_

SECTION 1. The corporation or association formed to manage and
conduct the world's fair or exposition in commemoration of the
purchase of the Louisiana Territory, when organized or
incorporated in accordance with the law, is hereby granted the
privilege of using either O'Fallon Park or Carondelet Park or
that portion of Forest Park lying west of the line described as
follows, to wit: Beginning at the intersection of the south line
of Forest Park with the north line of Clayton road, and running
thence in a northerly direction along the west line of the
Concourse drive two thousand five hundred fifty feet; thence in
a northerly direction to the east end of the large lake, a
distance of twelve hundred feet; thence northwesterly direction
about two thousand feet to the intersection of the south line of
Lindell avenue, with the west line of De Baliviere avenue
produced southwardly, for and as a site for said world's fair or
exposition, reserving, however, unto the city of St. Louis all
regulation and control of any of the sites above described,
together with all right to excises and licenses.

SEC. 2. The board of public improvements shall at all times,
beginning with the selection of the site out of the three sites
above referred to, until the close of said world's fair or
exposition, and until the complete restoration of said site as
hereinafter provided, have the power to provide such
regulations, conditions, and requirements as it may deem
necessary to protect the interests of the city with respect to
the construction of all sewers, drains, and conduits of any
kind, and the laying of water pipes or fixtures; and the plans
and specifications for the construction of the foregoing work
shall be subject to the approval of the board of public
improvements, and no such work of any kind shall be done without
such approval by the board. All such sewers, drains, conduits,
pipes, and fixtures shall become and be the property of the
city.

SEC. 3. Within six months after the close of said fair or
exposition, the corporation or association aforesaid shall clear
the park, or in the event of the selection of Forest Park, the
part thereof above described, of all tramways and railway
tracks, rubbish and debris, and of all buildings, sheds,
pavilions, towers, and other structures of every kind, and shall
within twelve months after the close of such fair or exposition,
fully restore the park selected as a site, or in the case of
Forest Park, that portion thereof above-described, by doing all
necessary grading, the restoration and repair, or the formation
of all walks and roads, the planting of trees, the placing of
sod and the planting of shrubs and plants, all in accordance
with plans to be approved by the board of public improvements,
and all to be done subject to the inspection of the park
commissioner, and to his entire satisfaction and approval.

SEC. 4. The corporation or association aforesaid shall, within
six months after the approval of this ordinance by the mayor,
file its written acceptance thereof with the city register, and
make its selection of the park to be used as aforesaid; and said
corporation or association shall also, within the same time,
file its bond in the sum of one hundred thousand dollars, with
good and sufficient sureties, to be approved by the mayor and
council, conditioned for a full compliance with and performance
of all the terms, requirements, and conditions of this
ordinance. Said board of public improvements shall have the
right, however, at any time before the opening of said fair or
exposition, if it deems it necessary in the interest of the
city, to require an additional bond in such amount as it may
believe to be proper, whereupon said corporation or company
shall give such bond with sureties to be approved in like
manner, and said corporation or association shall have no
authority to open or hold any fair or exposition upon the site
so selected, and no machinery or improvements of any kind shall
be removed from the premises of said world's fair site until
said bond in the sum so demanded shall have been so filed and
approved.

Approved May 16, 1901.

Considerable correspondence ensued between the Commission and the
Exposition Company in reference to the proposed site, the Commission
particularly insisting upon an adequate water supply and proper drainage
and grading of the property. On June 28, 1901, the site was formally
approved by the Commission and, according to section 9 of the act
authorizing the exposition, the President of the United States was duly
notified.

Prior to August 15, 1901, the National Commission having ascertained
that due provision had been made for grounds and buildings for the uses
contemplated by the act of Congress, so certified to the President of
the United States, who did thereafter, to wit, on the 20th day of
August, 1901, in behalf of the Government and the people, invite foreign
nations to take part in said exposition, and to appoint representatives
thereto, the President's proclamation reading as follows:

Whereas notice has been given me by the Louisiana Purchase
Exposition Commission, in accordance with the provisions of
section 9 of the act of Congress, approved March 3, 1901,
entitled "An act to provide for celebrating the one hundredth
anniversary of the purchase of the Louisiana Territory by the
United States by holding an international exhibition of arts,
industries, manufactures, and the products of the soil, mine,
forest, and sea in the city of St. Louis, in the State of
Missouri," that provision has been made for grounds and
buildings for the uses provided for in the said act of Congress:

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United
States, by virtue of the authority vested in me by said act, do
hereby declare and proclaim that such international exhibition
will be opened in the city of St. Louis, in the State of
Missouri, not later than the first day of May, nineteen hundred
and three, and will be closed not later than the first day of
December thereafter. And in the name of the Government and of
the people of the United States, I do hereby invite all the
nations of the earth to take part in the commemoration of the
purchase of the Louisiana Territory, an event of great interest
to the United States and of abiding effect on their development,
by appointing representatives and sending such exhibits to the
Louisiana Purchase Exposition as will most fitly and fully
illustrate their resources, their industries, and their progress
in civilization.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the
seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this twentieth day of August,
one thousand nine hundred and one, and of the Independence of
the United States the one hundred and twenty-sixth.

[SEAL.]

WILLIAM MCKINLEY.

By the President:
JOHN HAY,
_Secretary of State_.

At a meeting of the Commission held on October 15, 1901, the following
resolution relative to the lamented death of President McKinley was
unanimously adopted by the Commission:

Resolution.

Since this Commission last convened the President of the United
States has met a tragic death.

The manner of his death was a blow at republican institutions
and felt by every patriotic American as aimed at himself. It can
truly be said that of all our Presidents William McKinley was
the best beloved; no section of the country held him as an alien
to it. Partisan differences never led to partisan hatred of him;
party faction did not touch him. Nearly half the people differed
with him on public questions, but his opponents accorded to him
the same honesty of purpose which he always accorded to them. He
was the President of the whole people, and was received by them
as such with the honors due his great office and his splendid
manhood, from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the Lakes to
the Gulf. Pure of life, lofty of purpose, and patriotic in every
endeavor, he was the highest type of our American citizenship.

The prayers of an united people were wafted on high to spare our
President, but "God's will, not ours" was done, and the pain of
personal grief was felt in every American home.

_Resolved by the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission_,

First. That in the death of President McKinley, the United
States have lost a President who fulfilled the best ideals of
the Republic.

Second. That in every walk of life, in peace and in war, in
private and in public station, he was faithful to every trust
and did his duty as God gave him light to see it.

Third. That these resolutions be spread upon our record and a
copy thereof sent, with an expression of our tenderest sympathy,
to Mrs. McKinley.


Certain rules and regulations governing foreign exhibitors, which had
been formulated by President Carter of the Commission and President
Francis of the Exposition Company at a meeting held in Chicago, Ill., on
August 14, 1901, were approved by the National Commission on October 15,
1901. The rules are as follows:


Adopted under, and in pursuance of an act of the Congress of the
United States, entitled,

"An act to provide for celebrating the one hundredth anniversary
of the purchase of the Louisiana Territory by the United States,
by holding an international exhibition of arts, industries,
manufactures, and the products of the soil, mine, forest, and
sea in the city of Saint Louis, in the State of Missouri,"

approved March 3, 1901, a copy of which said act is hereunto
attached. As provided by law the Louisiana Purchase Exposition
will be held in the city of St. Louis, State of Missouri,
U.S.A., and will be opened on the 30th day of April, A.D. 1903,
and will be closed on the 1st day of December of that year. The
exposition will be closed on Sundays.

This exposition will embrace an exhibition of arts, industries,
manufactures, and the products of the soil, mine, forest, and
sea. It will be held to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary
of the purchase of the Louisiana Territory by the United States
from France.

The exposition will be international in character, as
contemplated by section 9 of the act of Congress, which reads as
follows:

"That whenever the President of the United States shall be
notified by the National Commission that provision has been made
for grounds and buildings for the uses herein provided for, he
shall be authorized to make proclamation of the same, through
the Department of State, setting forth the time at which said
exposition will be held, and the purposes thereof, and he shall
communicate to the diplomatic representatives of foreign nations
copies thereof, together with such regulations as may be adopted
by the Commission, for publication in their respective
countries, and he shall in behalf of the Government and the
people invite foreign nations to take part in the said
exposition and appoint representatives thereto."

Rules and regulations have been adopted by the National
Commission to be communicated to the diplomatic representatives
of foreign nations for publication in their respective countries
as follows:

ARTICLE 1. All communications relating to the exposition should
be addressed to Hon. David R. Francis, president of the
Exposition Company, St. Louis, U.S.A.

ART. 2. All applications for space for buildings must be filed
with the company on or before July 1, 1902.

ART. 3. Applications for space for exhibits in the buildings of
the Exposition Company must be filed on or before the respective
dates following, to wit:

(A) For machinery and mechanical appliances intended for
exhibition, in operation, October 1, 1902.

(B) For machinery and mechanical appliances not intended for
exhibition, in operation, November 1, 1902.

(C) For works of art, natural and manufactured, products, and
all productions not herein expressly classified, December 1,
1902.

ART. 4. Applications for special concessions to individuals,
associations, or corporations, December 1, 1902.

All applications must be in writing and should be presented on
forms which will be furnished by the Exposition Company.

ART. 5. No charge will be made for space allotted for buildings
or exhibits of foreign governments. Allotments of space to
exhibitors from countries whose governments have appointed
commissioners to the exposition will be made by or through such
commissioners.

ART. 6. No exhibit shall be removed in whole or in part until
the close of the exposition.

Immediately after the close of the exposition exhibitors shall
remove their effects and complete such removal before January 1,
1904.

ART. 7. Exhibits from foreign countries will be admitted free of
customs duties, as provided in the law and the regulations of
the Treasury Department.

ART. 8. The Exposition Company may from time to time, with the
approval of the National Commission, promulgate a classification
and such additional rules and regulations, not in conflict with
the law or regulations herein announced, as may be necessary to
facilitate the success of the exposition and to serve the
interest of exhibitors.

On October 15, 1901, the Commission was notified that the Exposition
Company had, by a resolution dated October 8, 1901, of which the
Secretary of the Treasury had been duly notified, authorized the
Commission to disburse the sum of $10,000 per annum for contingent
expenses, in accordance with the act of Congress therein referred to.
Following is a copy of the resolution:

_Resolved_, That the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission
be, and is hereby, authorized to disburse out of the $5,000,000
appropriated under the provisions of the act approved March 3,
1901, in aid of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, the sum of
$10,000 annually for contingent expenses of said Commission
under such rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the
Secretary of the Treasury, and upon vouchers to be approved by
him.

D.R. FRANCIS.

Attest:
W.B. STEVENS,
_Secretary_.

The question of appointing a board of lady managers, authorized by
section 6 of the act of Congress, was considered by the National
Commission and the Exposition Company at a meeting held on October 16,
1901.

After giving the matter due and careful consideration, the Commission
and the company decided to create a board of lady managers of 21
members. The membership of the board was subsequently increased to 24.
The names of the board of lady managers are as follows:

Miss Helen Miller Gould.
Mrs. John A. McCall.
Mrs. John M. Holcombe.
Miss Anna L. Dawes.
Mrs. W.E. Andrews.
Mrs. Helen-Boice Hunsicker.
Mrs. James L. Blair.
Mrs. Fannie L. Porter.
Mrs. Frederick M. Hanger.
Mrs. Jennie Gilmore Knott.
Mrs. Emily Warren Roebling.
Mrs. M.H. De Young.
Mrs. Belle L. Everest.
Mrs. Margaret P. Daly.
Mrs. W.H. Coleman.
Mrs. C.B. Buchwalter.
Mrs. Louis D. Frost.
Mrs. Finis P. Ernst.
Mrs. Mary Phelps Montgomery.
Mrs. John Miller Horton.
Mrs. Annie McLean Moores.
Mrs. A.L. Von Mayhoff.
Mrs. Daniel Manning.
Mrs. James Edmund Sullivan.
Miss Lavinia H. Egan.

Rules and regulations for the classification of exhibits at the
exposition, which had been presented for the consideration of the
Commission by the Exposition Company, and which had been discussed at
length, were finally approved on October 17, 1901, and the Exposition
Company was notified of that fact.

The matter of formulating rules and regulations for the government of
the exposition was one of the first questions to be considered by the
Commission. The matter was taken up at the various meetings of the
Commission, and conferences were held with the officers of the
Exposition Company from time to time. The Commission contended that in
the event of a disagreement between the representative of any foreign
government and the Exposition Company the representative of such foreign
government should be allowed to refer the matter to the National
Commission for joint consideration and adjustment with the company. With
that end in view the Commission insisted that the following provision
should be incorporated in the rules and regulations governing the
exposition:

Should disagreement arise between the Exposition Company and the
representative of any Government, State, Territory, or District,
such representative shall have the privilege, under such rules
of procedure as the National Commission may from time to time
promulgate, of referring the matter in disagreement between such
representative and the company to the National Commission for
joint consideration and adjustment with the company.

The company objected to the insertion of this clause.

Thereupon the Commission and the company agreed to submit the matter in



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