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929.2

B731b GENEALOGY COLLECTION

V.I

1152382




LICY .UilG.VIL BR.UXARD



mimn



3 1833 01794 7257

THE GENEALOGY

OF THE

BE AINEPvD - BE AIN ARD

FAMILY IN AMERICA

1649-1908

BY

LUCY ABIGAIL BRAINARD

A LIFE MEMBER OF THE CONNECTICOT HISTORICAL SOCIETY, HARTFORD, CONN.

A MEMBER OP THE ROTH WYLLYS CHAPTER OF THE DAUGHTERS OF THE

AMERICAN REVOLUTION AT HARTFORD, CONN., AND A MEMBER

OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY OP DAUGHTERS OF

FOUNDERS AND PATRIOTS OF AJIERICA

jHttBtratclJ

prmtfb bn the Jtutbot



"Happy he who with bright regard looks back upon
hie father's fathers, who mth joy recoants their
deeds of grace, and in himself values the latest link
in the fair chain of noble sequences."' — Goethe.



DESCENDANTS OF DANIEL

THE EMIGRANT ANCESTOR

PUBLISHED IN SEVEN PARTS



HARTFORD PRESS

THE CASE, LCCKWOOD & BRAINARD COMPANY



THE GENEALOGY

OF THE

BR AINEPvD -BRAIN ARD

FAMILY IN AMERICA

1649-1908

BY

LUCY ABIGAIL BRAINARD



Vol. I

PARTS I II III

DESCENDANTS OF DANIEL^ JAMES AND JOSHUA

BRAINERD, SONS OF DANIEL' AND

HANNAH (SPENCER) BRAINERD



lIluBtratfli
jerinteb bp tbe 2Cutbor



HARTFORD PRESS

THE CASE, LOCKWOOD & BRAINARD COMPANY



oJftf.O.^^-






^

jy



^



1152382



Co tbe CbrrtabtJ ifltmorp



OF A NOBLE AND GENEROUS FATHER AND A GENTLE

AND DEVOTED MOTHER,

WHOaE INTEREST IN THE LINEAGE OF HERSELF AND HER HUSBAND

WAS EVER DEAR TO HER,

AN INTEREST WHICH INSPIRED HER ONLY DAUGHTER

TO THE COMPILING OF THIS WORK,

THESE VOLUMES ARE MOST AFFECTIONATELY

DEDICATED



CONTENTS.



Preface, ......

A Genealogist's Reward, ....

iNTBODUCnON.

a. The Origin of the Name, ....

b. On the Name Brainerd, ....

0. Commissary Court for Essex and Hertfordshire,
d. Probate and Admon Acts,

€. Archdeaconry Court for Essex, .

f. The Orthography of the Name, .

g. Coat of Arms, .....
h. Dea. Elijah Brainerd's Statement,

i. English Investigation, ....
;. Jeremiah Gates Brainerd,

1. Explanatory, . . . . •



Daniel's Line.

First Generation, .

o. I^etters of Administration,

Second Generation,

Third

Fourth

Fifth

Sixth

Seventh "

Eighth

Ninth

Military Records,

Inventors,

Summary,



James' Line.

Second Generation,

Third

Fourth "

Fifth

Sixth

Seventh "

Eighth "

Ninth "

Tenth

Military Records,

Inventors,

Summary,

Jo8hva"s Line.

Second Generation,

Third

Fourth "

Fifth

Sixth

Seventh "

Eighth

Ninth

Military Records,

Inventors,

Summary ,



Page
9

U



Contents.



William's Line.














Second Generation, . . . . . . 41


Third












42


Fourth












46


Fifth












58


Sixth












82


Seventh












137


Eighth












194


Ninth












218


Military Eecords,












220


Inventors,












225


Summary,












225


Caleb's Line.


Second Generation, . . . . . . 41


Third












42


Fourth












45


Fifth












50


Sixth












66


Seventh












107


Eighth • "












161


Military Records,












18.3


Inventors,












185


Summary,












187


Elijah's Line.




Second Generation,


41


Third












42


Fourth












48


Fifth












61


Sixth












101


Seventh












15S


Eighth












217


Ninth . "












2.38


Military Records,












241


Inventors,












244


Summary,








245


Hezekiah's Line.


Second Generation, . . . • . ■ • 41


Third "












67


Fourth












78


Fifth












85


Sixth












91


Seventh












97


Eighth












103


Military Records,












104. 106


Summary,












105


Inventors,












113-155


Miscellaneous Records












115



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



Brainabd, Ltjcy Abigail,



frontispie



INTRODUCTORY.

Braintree, Eng., Ancient Houses, between pp. 24 and 25.

Braintree, Eng., Upper Comer of the Market Square, between pp. 24 and 25.

Old Haddam, facing p. 30.

The Headstone of Daniel Brainekd, facing p. 32.
Thirty Mile I8laj«d, . . . facing p. 29.



DANIEL'S LINE.



Brainard, Albert,




facing


P-


80, N


0. 53— ii.




"


Charles Edwin,






P-


117, " 118— ii.




"


HULDAH (FOOTE),






P-


79, " 53.






Leverett, .




"


P-


115, " 118.






Morgan Bulkelet, .






P-


157, " 227.






Newton Case, .






P-


118, " 118— vii




Brainekd, Amaziah, .






P-


148, " 205.




"


Charles Green,






P-


162, " 247— ii.




"


Chables Greene,




between


pp.


162 and 163, No.


247.


"


Charlotte Doolittle,




"


pp.


162 and 163, No.


247.




Commissions,




between


pp.


56 and 57.




"


Daniel Adams, .




facing


P-


124, " 125.




"


Daniel Adams, .




between


pp.


158 and 159, No.


231-


"


Florence Elizabeth


(Doo-










little).






pp.


162 and 163, No.


247.




George Dewane,






pp.


158 and 159, No.


231-




lEA, ....




between


PP


124 and 125, No.


126.




Ira Dewane,




facing


P-


158, No. 231.






Jemima (Beebe),




between


pp.


124 and 125, No.


126.


"


John G. C,






PP


62 and 63, "


28


"


John Gardiner Caulkins,




PP


62 and 63, "


28


"


Lyman Bushnell,




facing


P-


150, No. 210.




"


Mart Gardiner,




"


P-


93,


' 76— iv.




"


Oliver Day,






P-


113,


' 113.




"


Patience (Foote), .






P-


77,


' 49.




Brooks


, Marcia L. (Brainerd),






P-


154,


' 221.




BUELL,


Dorothy (Brainerd) Staples,


"


P-


83,


' 59.




Fuller


Sarah (Brainerd) ( Emmons j


, "


P-


82,


' 58.




Lord, Lucy Day (Brainerd),




"


P-


123,


' 124.




Usher,


Ldcy (Brainerd),






P-


78,


' 52.




"


Olive (Brainerd),






P-


114,


' 114.





Bramerd-Brainard Genealogy.

JAAIES' LINE.



Brainebd, Austin,



" Cephas, Jr.,

" Rev. Thomas, .

" Thomas Chalmei

Mather, Samuel Holmes, LL.D.



facing



p. 172, No. 289

p. 291, No. 624.

p. 415, " 1036.

p. 164, " 280.

p. 284, " 611.

p. 189, " 331-



JOSHUA'S LINE.
View in Co^^E Burting Ground, . facing p.



WILLIAM'S LINE.



Brainerd, Albert,

Albert W.,

Calvin,

Chauncet Niles,

Clara (Castle),

Cyprlan S.,

Ctpbian S'.,

David,

Dwelling House of

Edward R.,

Ezra,

Ezra, D.D., LL.D.,

Fred Alfred,

FiSK,

Geo. Bradford,

Hannah (Dart),

Henry Allen,

Henrt Hall,

Henrt Hall,

Henrt Lawrence,

Hon. Lawrence,

John,

John B.,

Lawrence Robbins,

Library Building,

P. C. M., .

Sabah (Bbainebd),

Timothy Green,

William Chauncey,

William Fisk,

Wilson Fisk,
Chaffee, Adeoza (Brainerd),
Smith, Mrs. Ann Eliza (Brainerd),
Stranahan, Mrs. Miranda (Brainekd),
Taebox, Julia (Brainerd),



p-


184, No


324-


p-


183, "


324.


p-


71, "


59.


p-


147, "


231.


p-


209, "


409.


p-


88, "


102.


p-


145, "


225.


p-


158, "


258.


p-


89.




p-


206, "


398.


p-


51, "


24.


p-


203, "


394.


p-


195, "


363.


p-


159, "


259.


p-


1.54, "


248-


p-


61, "


42.


p-


209, "


409.


p-


167, "


276.


p-


209, "


409-


p-


159, "


260.


p-


98, "


127.


p-


96, "


123.


p-


207, "


401.


p-


161, "


265.


p-


145.




p-


216, "


435.


p-


71 "


59.


p-


110, "


145.


p-


90, "


108.


p-


157, "


254.


p-


202, "


388.


p-


206, "


400.


p-


162, "


267.


p-


166, "


272.


p-


116, "


151.



List of Illustrations.



CALEB'S LINE.








BBAINARD, HOIIEB WOBTHINGTON,


facing


P-


US,


No.


204— i.


Mart Eliza (Goff),




P-


118,




204.


William Royal,




P-


118,


"


204.


Brainerd, Daniel, M.D.,




P-


99,


"


153.


" Wesley,




P-


129,




241.


Holm AN, Margaret Fuller (Brain ARD),


P-


118,


"


354.


Ward Grovee,


"


P-


118,




354.


ELIJAH'S LINE.








Bsainard, David Lego.


facing


P-


218,


No.


431.


Ira Fitch,




P-


211,


"


405.


Calvin Cone. .




P-


154,




245.


Brainerd. Cephas, .


"


P-


109,




147.


Polly A. (Crosby), .


■'


P-


109,




14..


JIerrill, -Jeremiah B.,


"


P-


167,


"


281.


PoLLT A. (Brainerd),


"


P-


167,


"


281.


HEZI


:kiah's


LINE.






Brainerd, Charlie Hobebt,


facing


P-


102,


No.


54— iii


David, Birthplace,


"


P-


43.






David, Diary, .


between


pp.


60


and


61.


David. Table Monument,


facing


P-


63.






" GoLDiE Maby,


''


P-


102,


No.


54— ii


" Lucy Abigail, .


'•


P-


102,


'■


54— i.


Memorial Tablet,




P-


65.







PREFACE.



The Brainerd Genealogy was commenced with the intention of
preparing the records in the line of the oldest son of the emigrant
ancestor, Daniel Brainerd. Having been favored with records of
other lines, the idea of compiling a genealogy of all the descendants
was carried into effect. The early estimate for such a work was
6,000 names, which nimiber increased to upwards of 13,000, re-
quiring much time, labor, and expense.

Many of the early correspondents gave such information as they
could, while others consigned the circulars or letters to the waste-
basket or waited a more convenient opportunity, which rarely ever
came to them. If their records are not to be found in the liook, the
delinquents must bear the blame. The younger members of the
families in the fourth generation, a few of the third, began to scatter
over the known portion of our country, going first to the northern
part of Connecticut, to 'New Hampshire, to Vermont, to Maine, to
Massachusetts, the northeastern part of New York, and a few over
the border into Canada. " The forest primeval " and the more re-
mote uncultivated lands induced many, after a few years sojourn
in those places, to migrate to other unoccupied lands, thereby en-
during great discomfort and continued hardships. With the
scarcity of paper and the infrequent correspondence with the mem-
bers of the parental homes ( letters frequently being sent iDy friends,
if sent by mail the postage was twenty-five cents on each letter)
and the hardships inseparal)le from a frontier life, the children
learned biit little of their ancestors, and when older were more
interested in their descendants than in their past history.
Eecords. if kept, were often lost or by the burning of homes were
destroyed by fire, thus rendering it difficult to get at all times
complete records, and to connect such records with the ancestral
line. Euthless hands have been a great destroyer as well as fire.

It has been impossible to verify all records, though I have aimed
to have them accurately transcribed. Records written at different
times by the same individual and from members of the same family
have been found to vary. Many records often appear to have been
written from memory in both church and town as well as private
records, which will account for some discrepancies that may occur.
Sometimes only an imperfect or partial list of the names of the
children of a family are found recorded in the town or church
records.

Many marriages were entered in town records thus: James
Jones ni. Ellen . To find who Ellen was, land and pro-
bate records must be searched if, perchance, the parent owned real
estate, and church records if they were church members, where the
name mnv be found recorded thus: James Jones and wife. When



10



Brainerd-Brainard Genealogy.



these sources failed, tradition may supply the missing name. Mar-
riages were often by a justice of the peace and no record of them
kept, either by church or. town.

The following paragraphs will enable the reader to estimate
somewhat the amount of work required, as well as time spent in
investigations, for compiling this work.

I have examined the land and probate records of Hartford,
which gave the first accurate information of Daniel Brainerd ; then
of Middletown, Haddam, East Haddam, Colchester, Hebron, Marl-
borough, Wethersfield, Glastonbury, East Hampton, Portland, Kil-
lingworth, Xew Haven, Ljane, Conn, and land records in East
Hartford, Branford, Guilford, Clinton, Farmiugton, Conn., and
wills and records in New London, Conn., and Albany, N. Y.

Church records have been consulted in the following places,
viz.: In Middletown, Hartford, Haddam, East Haddam, Mil-
lington, Gilead, Colchester, Westchester, Marlborough, East Hamp-
ton, Haddam N'eck, Middle Haddam, Killingworth, Higganum,
Glastonbm-y, and Bristol, Conn.

Records have been taken from genealogies wherever the name
of Brainerd has been found and entered in the Brainerd Genealogy
without further proof of their correctness.

My thanks are due to the following individuals for favors kindly
granted and for all courtesies rendered while engaged in making
researches :

To Elihu Geers Sons for the use of their large collection of
directories from all over the United States, from which were copied
post-office addresses of those bearing the name of Brainerd; to
the gentlemen of The Hartford Courant office for permission to ex-
amine such of the files of The Hartford Courant as were in their
possession from the first issue of the paper, Oct. 29, 1764, to the
present time ; to The Connecticut Historical Society for the privilege
of continuing such examination of the remainder of the file of that
paper, together with such portions of other files of ancient papers
as were found there, viz. : The New London Gazette, The Northern
Watchman, The Middlesex Gazette, The Connecticut Mirror, The
Hartford Times, The American Mercury, and The Sentinel and
Witness.

To all who have in any way contributed to the success of my
self-imposed task I wish to express my thanks, for without their aid
much less would have been siiccessfully accomplished. Special
mention should be made of a few who, in the early stages of my
work, gave much and valuable assistance, viz.: The late D. W.
Patterson of Newark Valley, N. Y. ; the late Henry Martyn Selden
of Haddam Neck, Conn., then of BrookljTi, N. Y. ; Martin L. Rob-
erts of New Haven, Conn. ; Miss A. Maritta Usher of Waterville,
N. Y. ; the late James Martin Brainerd of Gainesville, Mich. ; James
Elisha Brainerd of the same place, who finished preparing his rec-
ords ; the late Enos Post Brainerd of Ravenna, Ohio ; the late Henry
Allen Brainerd of Attica, N. Y., then of San Jose, Cal. ; Homer
Worthington Brainard of Hartford, Conn., and Rollin U. Tyler of
Haddam, Conn.



Preface. il

Many thanks are to be extended to the custodians of our public
and private libraries, which contain a large collection of historical
and genealogical books that have been consulted, for the courteous
privileges accorded me in my investigations, viz. : Tlie Congressional
Library, Washington, D. C. ; the Long Island Genealogical and
Historical Society, Brooklyn, X. y. ; the State Library at the State
House, Albany, N. Y. ; the Joel Mimsell's Sous private library,
Albany, N". Y. ; the Library of the American Antiquarian Society,
Worcester, Mass. ; the Yale College Library, New Haven, Conn. ;
the State Library at the State House, Hartford, Conn. ; the Con-
necticut Historical Society, Hartford, Conn.; the New England
Genealogical and Historical Society, Boston, Mass. ; the Theological
Seminary, Hartford, Conn., and at Memorial Hall, Hartford, where
many of the Congregational Church records are deposited; the
library of the late D. W. Patterson, Newark Valley, N. Y., which
afterward was purchased by the Connecticut Historical Society,
Hartford, Conn.; the private libran' of the late Edmund Janes
Cleveland of Hartford, Conn., the compiler of the Cleveland Gen-
ealogy ; and the library of The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Com-
pany, Hartford, Conn., and to the late Kev. Henry M. Field, editor
of The New York Evangelist, for the privilege of looking over the
letters and papers pertaining to the Brainerd family in his posses-
sion, left by his father, the late Rev. D. D. Field, D.D., before they
were deposited in the Connecticut Historical Society of Hartford,
Conn.



A GENEALOGIST'S REWARD.

The following paragraph was inserted in the circular printed
February, 1904, of which 1,350 copies were mailed to descendants,
viz. : " The compiling of this book (Brainerd .Genealogy) and the
arrangement of the material sent me has required many years of
patient labor and research and has necessarily been somewhat ex-
pensive. Many members of the family would deem it a privilege
to bear a portion of the expense in printing and binding so that
the whole of my time for many years past will not have been ,i:iven
wholly without compensation. Those who can and will aid me in
bearing the expense of putting the large work through the press,
either by subscribing for a number of copies or by contributing to
the fund for printing, are earnestly and cordially invited to do so."

Besides my brother's family I have had sixty-six subscriptions.
Three gentlemen subscribed for two copies each, one gentleman
subscribed for six copies; one lady sent me five dollars, another
lady sent me the widow's mite, fourteen two-cent postage stamps,
saying in her letter that she knew I " must have been at great ex-
pense in preparing the genealogy."

It is more than twenty years since I took hold of the work
earnestly, and during that time I have received no pecuniary
assistance. I call the working years fourteen (though three or four
more could be added to that number of years) at five hundred dol-



12 Brainerd-Brainard Genealogy.

lars per j-ear (low wages for a genealogist) would be seven thousand
dollars. I have spent in money about one thousand dollars. I call
it five hundred dollars. The estimated cost for printing was thirty-
five hundred dollars. At the lowest calculation the cost of the
genealogy has been eleven thousand dollars. The genealogy was
estimated to contain six hundred and fifty pages each volume, two
volumes, with an index of nearly three hundred pages to be added
(which was not included in the estimate of the size of the geneal-
ogy given in the circular), making a total of sixteen hundred and
fifty pages, which was offered for twelve dollars. The copies sub-
scribed for would net seven hundred and ninety-two dollars in
return for an outlay of eleven thousand dollars in time and money.
Hoping for a more favorable response, the genealcg}- has been
divided into seven parts, each part containing the descendants of
one of the seven sons of the emigrant ancestor, Daniel Brainerd.

Perhaps those who have not worked at preparing a genealog>'
infer that the facts marshal themselves in order ready for printing.
Such is not the case. The whole genealogy has been twice wi-itten
by hand, first, to arrange the records as sent; second, to copy and
arrange them for reference, -which copy by constant use became so
worn that the third copying was necessars'. The third copy was
done on the typewriter by a stenogi-apher hired for the purpose.

In obtaining records I have had often to write six letters to find
out where I could obtain a certain record of a family, and then as
many more to get the record well filled out. Four bureau drawers
packed full of letters testify to the faithfulness with which I have
worked. I have sat at my table weeks at a time from eight o'cloclc
in the morning till six o'clock at night working constantly at the
genealogy. If there are any doubting Thomases among those who
read this statement, let them work for a year in collecting genea-
logical facts and they will be convinced of its truth and decide
they had rather buy a genealogy than to prepare one.



THE INTRODUCTION.



THE OKIGIN OF THE NAJVIE.

In the survey of Domesday, Braintree has two names, Kaines
and Branchetren, of which one is Saxon, the other British. The
meaning is a town npon a hill or a town near a river, which last
applies with some propriety to this place, for on the southern side
of it is Podd's brook and on its northern, Blackwater. Braintree
is probably derived from the two names. — Page 16, History of
Essex Co., England.

The name of Brainwood is said to have been derived from
Brentwood, a small town in Essex. Brentwood is a corruption of
Burntwood, and was derived from the burning long ago of a cir-
cumjacent forest.

The late Dr. Bradley of Xew Haven sought the origin of names
in the meaning of words. He was said to lie versed in sixteen
different languages and had traveled extensively in Europe and Asia,
minister plenipotentiary to the court of Siam in Polk's administra-
tion, and for a w'hile mandarin in China, when preparing to publish
his book on Patrinomatology, searched in England for the origin of
the name of Brainard. His search w-as not as definitely gratified
as lie wished, but he concluded from what he could ascertain that
it was from a Celtic word noble-brained, but added that it should
be spelled Brainard and not Brainerd, as the latter meant nothing
at all. Therefore, as one branch spells it one way and one the
other way, I think it a pity that both should not have the high
privilege of being noble-brained men. His pamphlet was never
completed, but was probably deposited in the Library of Yale Col-
lege.

The above paragraph was scut me by a descendant in .Joshua's
line. She has since died.

The family is said to have come originally from the town of
Braine in Flanders, or from the town of that name in France.
(Braine, France, 10m. E. Soissons. There are in Flanders two
towns called Braine. distinguished by th#>after name, viz. : Braine
le Alen, 10 miles X. E. : Braine le Corate and Braine le Comte in
Brainault, 15m. X.-X. E. Mons. 16 S. S. W. Brussels.)

The name Brainard is said to be common in France on the
border of Germany, and that the two different ways of spelling the
name Brainerd and Brainard are the French and German way.

One of the descendants thought the Brainerds might be of
Spanish descent, as the Spanish made a settlement in the south of
England in the early history of England.

From a letter received it is said that the first Brainerd in
America was a boy who smuggled himself on board a vessel and
came to this country about 1650 and was told by the captain of



1-t Brainerd-Brainard Genealogy.

the vessel if he would take the name of Brainard he would make
him Ills heir, which he did. I have found nothing to sustain this
statement.

It has also been said by one of the descendants that they orig-
inated in France.

Notwithstanding these various statements, I think the name is
of English descent.



No extensive research has been made in England for the an-
cestry of Daniel Brainerd, whose birthplace, by tradition, was in
Braintree, England, yet most interesting facts are not lacking, and
these are here given in the hope that some future genealogist may
be induced to make more extended investigation.

The name is found as early as the middle of the fourteenth
century in the form of Brendewoode or Brendewode. The different
forms are numerous, but the name may be easily traced from
Brendewode through Brendewood, Brandwood, Brainwood, Brayn-
wood to the modern form Brainard or Brainerd.

The following article, written for this work by a somewhat
noted genealogist in England, treating of the evolution of the name,
is here printed entire. It was mailed to me Sept. 2, 1891.

ON THE li.A.ME BRAINARD.

The contribution which I willingly make to this important work
has a precise and definite object in view, to wit, the illustration of
the name Brainard. It is well that this be distinctly stated at the
outset and, moreover, that with matters genealogical, I have no
concern, so that readers may know both what to expect and what
they must not look for in the remarks I have to offer. It is true
that the evidence to be adduced will chiefly consist of parish regis-
ters and wills, but these records will be used solely for my imme-
diate purpose and will not be applied in any way to matters of
pedigree.

The family Ijelief is, I understand, that the name which beyond
the Atlantic assumed the form of Brainard was in England Brain-
wood or Branwood, and that the English home of the parents of
the emigrant who was himself a mere lad was in Essex. To what
extent, if at all, this be correct is the first point which presents itself



Online LibraryLucy Abigail BrainardThe genealogy of the Brainerd-Brainard family in America, 1649-1908 → online text (page 1 of 68)