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HENRY WARD BEECHER. With Portraits.
Crown 8vo, $1.75, net. Postage extra.

THE RIGHTS OF MAN. A Study in Twentieth-
Century Problems. Crown 8vo, $1.30, net.
Postpaid, ^1.44.

THE LIFE AND LITERATURE OF THE AN-
CIENT HEBREWS. Crown 8vo, $2.00.

THE EVOLUTION OF CHRISTIANITY. i6mo,
$1.25.

CHRISTIANITY AND SOCIAL PROBLEMS.
i6mo, $1.25.

THE THEOLOGY OF AN EVOLUTIONIST.
i6mo, $1.25.

THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF PAUL THE
APOSTLE. Crown 8vo, $1.50.

HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN, AND COMPANY,
Boston and New York.



THE NEW YORK /

PUBLIC library'



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BOSTON AND NEW YORK
HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY

1903



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PUBLIC LIBRARY

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COPYRIGHT 1903 BY LYMAN ABBOTT
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED



Published November igos



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TO PLYMOUTH CHURCH

IN APPRECIATION OF THE KINDLY WELCOME
AND CORDIAL SUPPORT EXTENDED TO ME,
WHEN, ON THE DEATH OF MR. BEECHER, I WAS
CALLED TO SUCCEED HIM IN THE PASTORATE,
THIS VOLUME IS GRATEFULLY DEDICATED.



INTRODUCTORY

In 1854 I entered the law office of my brothers in
New York City, and went to live with the older of
them in Brooldyn. He was attending Plymouth
Church and I naturally went there with him. He
was a son of New England, a Puritan, though of
liberal temper, and a Webster Whig, and therefore
originally had a triple jDrejudice against the young
preacher who had recently come to Brooklyn, and
who was in manner a Westerner, and in theology
and politics a radical. But my brother had char-
acteristically resolved to listen to six successive
sermons from the preacher before finally deciding
about him, and, as a result, was already a sympa-
thetic listener and a devoted friend. I was not yet
twenty years of age, and the defects and the excel-
lences of Mr. Beecher appealed alike to my boyish
nature : his exuberant life, his startling audacity,
his dramatic oratory, his passionate fire, liis flashes
of humor, his native boyishness, all combined to
fascinate me. But this superficial enthusiasm soon
gave place to a deeper feeling. I had constructed
for myself a crude theology, doubtless largely bor-



viii INTRODUCTORY

rowed from others, but for wMch I ought not to
make others responsible. That theology may be
briefly described in a sentence thus : I had in-
herited from a depraved ancestry a depraved na-
ture ; I had broken the laws of God, and deserved
punishment ; God was a just God, and justice
compelled him to insist on the penalty ; but Christ
had borne the penalty that the law might be justi-
fied and still God's justice maintained ) if I accepted
Christ as my Saviour, the law would be honored,
God could be merciful, and I could be released
from the penalty. For me, religion was acceptance
of this mercy, and obedience to the laws which I
had before disobeyed ; the Bible was the source of
my knowledge of those laws ; the Holy Spirit was
a helper to enable me to keep them. I was afraid
of God, I was attracted to Christ, and, partly im-
pelled by the fear, and partly inspired by aspiration,
I wished to listen to conscience, to obey the law,
to do my duty; but I had no assurance that I
could, or perhaps I should rather say, that I would
do either persistently.

Mr. Beecher revolutionized my theology by
revolutionizing my life. I obtained through him a
new experience of God, of Christ, of salvation, of
religion : I began to see that Jesus Christ was
what God eternally is, that his laws are the laws



INTRODUCTORY ix

of my own nature ; that I have not more truly in-
herited disease than health, depravity than virtue,
from my ancestors ; that salvation is life, and that
Jesus Christ came into the world to give me life ;
that God is my Father and my Friend, and that
my fellowship may be with him ; that the Bible is
the record of the experiences of men who knew him
and his love and his fellowship, and who narrated
their experiences that others might share them ;
that reliorion is not the obedience of a reluctant soul
to law, but the glad captivity of a loyal soul to the
best of all loved friends. As this new life was
born in me, there was born also in me the strong
desire to impart it to others ; and after long hesi-
tation, and much debate with myself, I abandoned
the profession of the law in which, at the age of
twenty-two, I was already successfully engaged as
a member of the New York bar, thanks to my two
older brothers with whom I was associated. After
a year of special study, with some accompanying
experience in preaching to a village congregation in
Maine, I gave myself to the work of the Christian
ministry. From that day to this my desire has been
by voice and pen to give to others the life which
had been o^iven to me when I learned that God is
love and Jesus Christ is love's interpreter, and
therefore God's interpreter.



X INTRODUCTORY

In 1858 I left Brooklyn, pt-I therefore Plymouth
Church, and did not re Lurn until 1887, when, on
Mr. Beecher's death, I beca..ne his successor. Dur-
ing those nearly thirty years of absence from
Brookl3^n, I rarely heard Mr. Beecher j)reach or
lecture. I was at one time intimately associated
Avith him in preparing a special edition of his ser-
mons, and in the work of prejDaration examined
with care several hundred of them ; and later I
was m constant fellowship with him as his asso-
ciate in the editorship) of " The Christian Union."
But during these years I was less a pupil of Mr.
Beecher than a critical student of his work. For
guidance and mspiration I went less to him than
to those to whom he had gone : first of all to the
Four Gospels ; next, to the Epistles of Paul ; then
to those teachers m the Church, from Clement of
Alexandria to Robertson and Maurice, who had
seen in religion a life rather than a law, in God a
Friend rather than a Judge, and m salvation char-
acter rather than destiny. I went back also to the in-
structors of my childhood. I read again my father's
" Young Christian," from which I had received the
first conscious impulse which any voice or pen had
given me to the Christian life. I followed the clue
which Mr. Beecher had given me, and I lived and
honored him none the less for the discovery that



INTRODUCTORY xi

the Churcli had never been without witnesses to a
faith and life like his. That faith and life were
not new except as the song of every bird is new,
though the same note has been sung by a thousand
ancestors. But they were new to me when in my
youth I heard them and accepted them in Pljnuouth
Church. To Mr. Beecher I am indebted for a new
interpretation of and a new impulse to the life of
faith and hope and love. So, when the publishers
of this volume asked me to prepare it, I acceded
to their request in the hope that it might serve to
bring to others, through the story of Mr. Beecher's
life, that conception of Christian truth and that
experience of Christian faith which Mr. Beecher
had brought to me. Nearly half a century has
passed since from the young preacher of Brooklyn
I received the impulse which sent me into the min-
istry, the message which subsequent study has done
much to develop, but nothing to contradict, and the
faith which life has never disappointed, but has
constantly enlarged and enriched. That half cen-
tury has been largely spent with other masters, and
I believe that I am now far enough from the spell
of Mr. Beecher's personal presence to estimate
justly his life and character. Certainly this volume
will not be coldly critical ; I do not mean that it
shall be indiscriminately eulogistic.



xu INTRODUCTORY

Generally the preface to a volume is the portion
last written. Before I set pen to paper on the
substance of this volume, I write this preface to
make clear to myself, and I hope also to others, my
purpose. It is not to tell the full story of Mr.
Beecher's personal life : that has already been done
by his wife and son and son-in-law, in a volume
which is essentially autobiographical and to which
I could add nothing. It is not to write the life
and times of Mr. Beecher : he was so identified
with all the great events of his time that to write
such a volume woidd be to write the history of the
United States in what is jjerhaps the most critical
and certainly the most dramatic period of the na-
tional life. In this volume, I, his friend, who
gladly acknowledge my own indebtedness to him,
seek to interpret the life and character of a man of
great spiritual and intellectual genius, whose faults
were superficial, whose virtues were profound,
whose influence will outlive his fame, and who has
probably done more to change directly the religious
life, and indirectly the theological thought in Amer-
ica than any preacher since Jonathan Edwards.

LYMAN ABBOTT.

C0RNWALL-0N-HUD80N, N. Y.



*



CONTENTS

FAQE

CHAPTER I
The Meaning of Mr. Beecher's Life 1

CHAPTER n
The Making of the Man 16

CHAPTER HI
Early Ministry 39

CHAPTER IV
Plymouth Church 72

CHAPTER V
The Pastor of Plymouth Church 100

CHAPTER VI
Parenthetical . 133

CHAPTER VII

The Anti-Slavery Reformer 156

CHAPTER VHI
The Anti-Slavery Campaign 195

CHAPTER IX
The Civil War 223

CHAPTER X
The Campaign in England 244

CHAPTER XI
Reconstruction 264



siv CONTENTS

CHAPTER xn
Under Accusation 288

CHAPTER Xni
Later Ministry 300

CHAPTER XIV
Editor and Author 328

CHAPTER XV
The Yale Lectures on Preaching 353

CHAPTER XVI
He finishes his Course 374

CHAPTER XVII

Estimates and Impressions 386

APPENDIX
Mr. Beecher's Analysis of Romans, Chap. vn. . . . 422

Mr. Beecher's Theological Statement 429

Index 451



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE

Henry Ward Beecher Frontispiece

From a photograph by Georg-e G. Roekwood. This is
believed to be the latest portrait.

Dr. Lyman Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and
Henry Ward Beecher 30

From a photograph taken about 1861.
Henry Ward Beecher 162

From a daguerreotype taken by Irving about 1851. By

courtesy of George G. Roekwood.

Copies of English Incendiary Placards against Mr.
Beecher in 1863 253

Facsimile Letter from Mr. Beecher to Dr. Lyman
Abbott 410



BIBLIOGRAPHY

[Prepared by Rev. W. E, Davenport.]

Cincinnati Journal. Edited in part by Henry Ward
Beecher. Cincinnati, 0., 1836-37.

Sermon on the Occasion of the Funeral of Noah Noble,
late Governor of Indiana, pp. 27. Indianapolis, 1844.

Seven Lectures for Young Men. Indianapolis, 1844;
Salem, 1846 ; Boston, 1849, '51, '53, '55, '63, '65, '68, and
'69 ; New York, 1851, '53, '60, '73, '79, '81, '84, '93, '98 ;
London, England, 1851, and many reprints ; Philadelphia,
as Industry and Idleness, 1850. Copyright expired 1895,
and since that published by Henry Altemus, Philadelphia.

A Dissuasive from Moral Intolerance. Address by
Henry Ward Beecher, at Bloomington, Ind. Indianapolis,
1845.

Indiana Farmer and Gardener. Edited by Mr. Beecher.
Indianapolis, 1845. 24 numbers.

Western Farmer and Gardener. Henry Ward Beecher,
Editor, 1846. Indianapolis, 24 numbers.

A Discourse Delivered at Plymouth Church, Thanksgiving
Day, November 25, 1847. Cad^ & Burgess : 60 John St.,
New York, 1848.

Address before the Society for Promoting Collegiate Edu-
cation in the West. (In annual report of Society, 1848.)

Plymouth Church Manual. New York, 1848, '50, '54, '67,
'74. One in 1848 and one in 1850 printed by Henry Speer,
78 Wall St., by vote of the Church.

The Independent, Star Contributor, beginning October 18,
1849.

Sermon for Thanksgiving Day. Hunt's Merchant Maga-
zine, December 12, 1850. New York, 1851.

Two Papers on Politics and the Pulpit. New York, 1851.



^



xviii BIBLIOGRAPHY

National Anti-Slavery Standard (Sermons and Addresses
in). New York, 1851.

On the Choice of a Profession. Address by Henry Ward
Beecher. 1851.

Book of Eloquence, by Charles Dudley Warner. Selections
from H. W. B. Cazenovia, 1853.

Pulpit Portraits of American Preachers, by John R. Dix.
Chapter on H. W. B., with portrait. Boston, 1854.

Off-hand Takings; or. Crayon Sketches of Noticeable Men
of Our Age, by G. W. Bungay. (Article on H. W. B., and
portrait.) New York, 1854.

Autographs of Freedom. (Includes portraits of and
sketches by Lewis Tappan, H. B. Stowe, and Henry Ward
Beecher.) Auburn and Rochester, N. Y., 1854.

Star Papers. J. C. Derby: New York, 1855, '59. En-
larged edition, 1873.

The American Portrait Gallery. (Portrait and Sketch
H. W. B.) New York, 1855.

The Plymouth Collection of Hymns and Tunes. Preface
H. W. B. A. S. Barnes & Co.: New York, 1856, 'm, '59,
'62, '67, '68, '83.

Bartlett's Distinguished Modern Agitators. (Article on
H. W. B.) New York, 1855.

Fowler's American Pulpit. (Includes able article on
H. W. B.) New York, 1856.

Man and his Institutions. An address to the Society for
Promoting Collegiate Education in the West. Delivered in
Boston, May 28, 1856. American Journal of Education,
July, 1856. Republished, New York, 1856.

Defence of Kansas. By Henry Ward Beecher. Washing-
ton, D. C, 1856. Buell & Blanchard, printers.

Banner of Light. Includes sermons by H. W. B. Boston,
1856.

Social Reform Tracts, No. 5. The Strange Woman of the
Scriptures described and the young cautioned of her wiles
and of their dangers, being a lecture addressed to young men
by the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, U. S. (brother of Mrs.
Stowe). Edited by J. Harding. London: Simpkin, Mar-
shall & Co., 1857.



BIBLIOGRAPHY xix

Inquirer and Chronicle. Includes sermons by H. W. B.
New York, 1857.

American National Preacher, No. 1, vol. xxxi. Sermon
by H. W. B., on Christ Knocking at the Door of the Heart,
January, 1857. New York, 1857.

The Baptist Collection. Being the Plymouth Collection
adapted for Baptist use. New York, 1857.

Social Reform Tracts, No. 6. The Home of the Harlot,
its description, character, and tendencies as seen under the
Scripture lamp; being the concluding part of the celebrated
lectures to young men by the Rev. Henry Ward Beecher
(U. S.), brother of Mrs. Stowe. Edited by J. Harding. Lon-
don : Simpkin & Marshall, 1857.

Life Thoughts. Extracts from extemporaneous discourses,
edited by Edna Dean Proctor. Boston, 1858, '59 (30th
thousand). Large paper edition, 1860; London, 1860; New
York, 1860, '69, '71, '80.

Life Thoughts. Henry Ward Beecher. Complete edi-
tion. London, 1858 : Hamilton & Adams Co. Alexan-
der Strahan & Co. : Edinburgh, 1859.

Life Thoughts, by Henry Ward Beecher, with a biograph-
ical sketch. London : Simpkin, Marshall & Co., 1863.

Life Thoughts, gathered from the extemporaneous dis-
courses of Henry Ward Beecher. London: Wardlock &
Tyler, Warwick House, Paternoster Row.

God's Seal and Covenant, with a list of members of Ply-
mouth Church. Brooklyn, 1858.

Revival Hymns, by Henry Ward Beecher. Boston: Phil-
lips, Sampson & Co., 1858.

Letter to Messrs. Brown & Co., Boston, recommending
the torches manufactured by them. 1858.

The New York Ledger (many contributions). New York,
1858.

The Power of the Spirit, by Henry Ward Beecher. Lon-
don, 38 Ludgate Hill.

Men's Excuses for not becoming Christians, and Discour-
agements of the Christian Life. Two sermons by Henry
Ward Beecher, with portrait. New York, 1858.

How to become a Christian. A tract for the times.
Boston.



XX BIBLIOGRAPHY

How to become a Christian, by Henry Ward Beecber.
New York, 1858, '62 ; Brooklyn, 1862. Revised by the
author, and published by the American Tract Society of
Boston, 117 Washington St.

A Narrative of Remarkable Incidents, by W. C. Conant,
with introduction by H. W. B. Derby & Jackson: New York.

Sermons by Henry Ward Beecher (12mo). One sermon
in each number, published weekly. London: J. Heaton,
Norwich Lane, Paternoster Row, 1859.

The Telegraph and Fireside Preacher. (Includes sermons
by H. W. B.) New York, 1859.

Memorial of the Revival in Plymouth Church, Brooklyn,
in 1858, comprising incidents and fragments of lectures and
sermons by the pastor. By a member of the Church. New
York, 1859.

William Lloyd Garrison, Henry Ward Beecher, and Theo-
dore Parker. Boston, 1859. pp. 15.

Articles on T. Parker ; An Explanation of Views on Total
Depravity. Printed by authority of the Fraternity Course
Lectures Society, Boston. A. Williams & Co., 1859.

Notes from Plymouth Pulpit. A collection of memorable
passages from the discourses of Rev. Henry Ward Beecher,
with a sketch of Mr. Beecher and of the Lecture-room. By
Augusta Moore. New York : Derby & Jackson, 1859. New
edition greatly enlarged. Harper & Bros., 1865.

Pulpit and Rostrum. (Includes sermons by Mr. Beecher.)
New York, 1859.

Who is our God : the Son or the Father ? By Rev. Thos.
J. Sawyer. A reply to Henry Ward Beecher's articles on
Theo. Parker.

Vagabondia, by Adam Badeau. (Includes articles on
H. W. B.) New York, 1859.

Chronicle of the Hundredth Birthday of Robert Burns.
(Includes oration by H. W. B.) Edinburgh, 1859.

Plain and Pleasant Talk about Fruits, Flowers, and
Farming, by Henry Ward Beecher. Derby & Jackson : New
York, 1859; Boston: Brown, Taggard & Chase, 25 & 29
Cornhill, 1859 ; London, 1859.

Pleasant Talk about Fruits, Flowers, and Farming, by



BIBLIOGRAPHY xxi

Henry W. Beecher. New edition, with additional matter
from recent writings, published and unpublished. J. B.
Ford & Co.: New York, 1874.

New Star Papers; or. Views and Experiences of Religious
Subjects. Derby & Jackson : New York, 1859, '69. Pub-
lished as Summer of the Soul, London.

Address on Mental Culture for Women, by H. W. B,
and James T. Brady, in Pulpit and Rostrum. New York,
1859.

Echoes from Harper's Ferry, by James Redpath. Includes
pp. 257-279, sermon by H. W. B. preached in Plymouth
Church, Sunday evening, October 30, 1859.

Italian Independence, by J. P. Thompson. (Includes ad-
dress by H. W. B.) New York, 1860.

Woman's Influence in Politics. An address in New York,
February 2, 1860. Boston, 1860, '69, '71.

Civil War : Its Causes, its Consequences, its Crimes, and
its Compromises. Series No. 1, by Henry Ward Beecher
and Archbishop Hughes. Published by Reuben Vose, New
York, 1851. 8vo. pp. about 24. Pamphlet appeal against
Mr. Beecher and in favor of stopping " this horrid war " ;
quotes from Mr. Beecher's addresses.

Remarks by Henry Ward Beecher, at the funeral of Ed-
ward Corning, Plymouth Church, Thursday afternoon, Janu-
ary 31, 1861. For private circulation.

War and Emancipation. A Thanksgiving Sermon
preached in Plymouth Church, November 21, 1861. Phila-
delphia, 1861.

The Independent. Edited by H. W. B., December 19,
1861, to December 21, 1862.

The Love Element of the Gospel. H. W. B. Printed at
request of Father Cleveland, Boston.

Crime and its Remedy. H. W. B. Issued by the Howard
Association, London.

Fast-Day Sermons ; or. The Pulpit on the State of the
Country. Peace be Still. H. W. B. pp. 265-292 ; Rudd
& Carlton: New York, 1861.

Sermon before the Thirty-fourth Annual Meeting of the
New York and Brooklyn Foreign Missionary Society. Pub-
lished with the Proceedings. New York, 1862.



xxii BIBLIOGRAPHY

Eyes and Ears, from the New York Ledger. Boston, 1862 ;
London, 1862 ; Boston, 1863 ; (3d edition) Boston, 1866,
'67; New York, 1887. Printed in England as Royal
Truths.

Eyes and Ears, by Henry Ward Beecher (author of Life
Thoughts). London: Sampson & Co., 1862,

The Methodist. (Includes sermons by H. W. B.) New
York, 1862.

Royal Truths, by Henry Ward Beecher. (6th thousand.)
Alexander Strahan & Co.; Edinburgh ; Hamilton Adam &
Co.: London, 1862.

Freedom and War. Discourses on Topics Suggested by
the Times. Boston : Ticknor & Fields, 1863.

American Cause in England. Address at Manchester,
England, October, 1863. James Redpath, Boston, 1863 ;
New York, 1863.

American Rebellion. Report of Speeches of Henry Ward
Beecher delivered in England at Public Meetings in Man-
chester, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Liverpool, and London; and
at the farewell breakfasts in London, etc. Manchester,
England, 1864 ; London, 1864.

Sermons by Henry Ward Beecher. (15 nos.) London;
J. Heaton & Son, 42 Paternoster Row, E. C, 1864.

Sermons of H. W. Beecher. 2 vols. Dickinson; London,
1864.

Aids to Prayer. New York: A. D. F. Randolph & Co.,

1864, '66, '87.

Our Minister Plenipotentiary, by O. W. Holmes, in The
Atlantic Monthly. Boston, 1864.

Universal Suffrage. An Argument hj H. W. Beecher,
including report of conference between Secretary Stanton,
General Sherman, and Freedmen in Savannah. Delivered in
Plymouth Church, Sunday evening, February 2, 1865.
Printed by William E. Whiting, New York, 1865.

Trip of the Oceanus. Address at Fort Sumter, April 14,

1865. New York, 1865. Also reprinted as an Old South
Leaflet, Boston.

Sermon on Lincoln's Death. New York, 1865.
Universal Suffrage and Complete Equality in Citizenship.



BIBLIOGRAPHY xxiii

Discourses by H. W. Beecher, Andrew Johnson, and Wen-
dell Phillips. Boston, 1865.

Reports of the Xew England Society of New York. (In-
clude addresses by H. W. B.) See Reports for 1866, '67,
'71, '72, '73, '74, and '83.

Presentation Memorial to Workingmen. Oration at the
raising of the old flag at Sumter, and sermon on the death
of Lincoln, with sketch of Lincoln. Manchester, England,
1865.

Letter to the Soldiers and Sailors. New York, 1866.

The Political Status of Women, by Henry Ward Beecher,
in The Friend, vol. i. New York, 1866.

Address at the Anniversary of the American Missionary
Association, 1866.

595 Pulpit Pungencies. G. W. Carleton: New York, 1866 ;
London, 1866.

Address at National Woman's Rights Convention, May 10,
1866. Reprinted as Woman's Duty to Vote, 1866. Re-
printed, 1898.

The Methodist. Has fortnightly sermons by H. W. B.
New York, December 8, 'G6, to February 13, '69.

Norwood, a novel (from New York Ledger). New York,
3 vols., by Scribners, 1867, '68, '80, '91. J. B. Ford, 1874
and 1898; London, 1867; Sampson, Low & Co., 1887.

Address at Laying Corner-stone of Adelphi Academy,
Brooklyn. Brooklyn, 1867.

On Health. An Address delivered before the New York
Medical Students' Union, Brooklyn. Brooklyn, 1867.

Royal Truths, by Henry Ward Beecher. Boston : Tick-
nor & Fields, 1867.

Prayers from Plymouth Pulpit. Stenographically re-
ported. A. C. Armstrong : New York, 1867 ; Scribners'
seventh edition, 1868 , Armstrong, 1895.

Famous Americans, by James Parton. Chapter on
H. W. B. and his Church. 1867.

Article on Plymouth Church, The Atlantic Monthly, Bos-
ton, 1867.

Sermons by Henry Ward Beecher. Edited by Lyman
Abbott. 2 vols. Harper & Bros.: New York, 1808.



xxiv BIBLIOGRAPHY

Prayers in the Congregation, by Henry Ward Beeeher,
D. D. Strahan & Co.: 58 Ludgate Hill, London, 1868.

Putnam's Magazine (sketch of H. W. B.). New York,
1868.

Sunshine and Shadow in Xew York. Chapter on Beeeher
and Plymouth Church, by Matthew Hale Smith. Hartford:
T. B. Bun & Co., 1868.

Men of our Times, by H. B. Stowe. (Includes chapter on
H. W. B., and portrait.) 1868.

Illustrated Bible Biography. (Introduction by H. W. B.)
Boston, 1868.

Plymouth Pulpit, New York, September, 1868, to Septem-
ber, 1873. J. B. Ford & Co.

Gnaw-Wood ; or. New England Life in a Village. A
satire on Norwood. New York : National News Co., 1868.

Sermons, by H. W. Beeeher. Dickinson : London, 1869,
and thereafter to 1886.

Oratory, Sacred and Secular, by Wm. Pittenger. In-
cludes note on and sketch of H. W. B. New York : Samuel
R. Wells, 1869.

The Funeral Service of Mrs. Lucy W. Bullard. Address
bv H. W. B. Worcester, 1869.

How Beeeher Makes his Sermons, by Ralph Meeker.
Packard's Monthly, March, 1869.

The Overture of the Angels, by H. W. Beeeher. J. B.
Ford, 1869.

The Great Metropolis, by J. N. Browne. Chapter 27 on
H. W. B. Hartford, 1869.

The Christian Union. Edited by Henry Ward Beeeher,
January 1, 1870, to November 2, 1881. New York. Now
The Outlook.

The Potato Book, by G. W. Beat. Includes article on the
Potato Mania by H. W. B. 1870.

Familiar Talks on General Christian Experience, by
Henry Ward Beeeher. London : Nelson & Sons, Paternos-
ter Row, 1870 ; Edinburgh and New York.



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