Lyman Horace Weeks.

The American turf: an historical account of racing in the United States : with biographical sketches of turf celebrities. 1898 online

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Silver Brook property
has since then been extensively improved and devel-
oped, and as it now stands is the result of its owner's
long experience with horses and his complete knowl-
edge of the best methods that have been devised for the
care and successful breeding of the thoroughbred.

Mr. Appleby has a wide acquaintance with the lead-
ing men of the contemporary turf and is himself one of



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those who are best known to the general public in con-
nection therewith. His popularity with all classes is un-
bounded, and he possesses, moreover, the reputation of
being an enthusiastic sportsman, which is shown not
only by the scale upon which his breeding interests at
Silver Brook are conducted, but in the record of the ani-
mals that have carried his colors on the track or that
now ornament his stud.

The horses he has owned include such valuable per-
formers as Forrester, Jack of Hearts, Turco, Knight of
Ellerslie, Tristan, Oneko, Stockton, Almy, Diadem and
Carnation, and many others who have all given the best
account of themselves in racing. At the head of the
Silver Brook Stud is Knight of Ellerslie and Moss Rose,
the sire and dam of Henry of Navarre, the acknowledged
king of the turf, and probably one of the best horses
ever seen in the country, a fact that invests Knight of
Ellerslie with a remarkable degree of interest for all
admirers of the purest and most perfect type of the
modern running horse. This notable sire is a chest-
nut of grand conformation and was foaled in 1881.
His parentage was aristocratic, he being by Eolus out of
Lizzie Hazelwood by Scathlock. Eolus was the sire of
probably as many high class race horses as any stallion in
the country, the number including Eole, Eon, St. Saviour,
Elkwood, Eurus, Diablo, Russell, Morello, Eolian and
other equines. On the dam's side, too, the record tells of
families that were both speedy and productive. His
dam threw winners, Charley Dreux, Thomasia, Thorn-
dale, Chauncey and Unicorn, while his second dam was
the famous brood mare War Song, the dam of Eole,
Eon, Eolist, St. Saviour, Eolo and others.

Knight of Ellerslie maintained the high standing of
his descent. He won the Preakness, the Army and
Navy, and the Vernal Stakes, and a number of other
races, and ran second to Panique in the Belmont. As a
sire, however, he has covered himself with glory through
having begotten such a noble animal as Henry of
Navarre, the winner of 29 races out of 42 starts, in
which he was unplaced on only two occasions, while
his aggregate winnings in four seasons footed up
$71,015. It is to be observed, however, that, overshad-
owing as the fame of Henry of Navarre is, it should not
cause us to overlook the other excellent horses whom
his worthy sire has produced. Knight of Ellerslie's get
include such winners as Herald, J. W. Brooks, Whist,
Agnes H., Ruth Cleveland, Hazel, Knight, Trump, Sir
Alfred, EUsmere, Ellerdie Phaedra, Knight of Honor,
Silver Brook, Knight of the Garter, Enchanter, Miss
Prim, Nearest, The Huguenot, Sir Knight, Motor, and
others. It may, indeed, be claimed that considering his
opportunities, he has been as successful a sire of reliable
animals as any in America.

Moss Rose, the dam of Henry of Navarre, although



only one of the twenty-four matrons at Silver Brook, is
well entitled to the distinction she enjoys through the
fame of her great son. She was foaled in 1883 at the cel-
ebrated Nursery Stud, and was by imported The 111-
Used out of Scarlett, a mare that on the side of her dam
combined the blood of imported Glencoe with that of
Kentucky and his father, the immortal Lexington.
Imported The lU-Used, though perhaps not favored by
Mr. Belmont to the same extent that he favored others
among his high grade stallions, came from the very pick
of the Old World horses, being by Breadalbane out of
Ellermire, and having for grandparents that remarkable
sire Stockwell and the no less famous brood mare Blink
Bonny. Moss Rose's sire, in fact, represents what the
English turf has sagaciously called the " ready-money
cross " in its perfection, while on the maternal side she
belongs to the family which gave America its best
horses up to the modern development of scientific
breeding. Moss Rose also foaled Turk I!., a frequent
winner, and has produced several full brothers to the
great Henry of Navarre, of whom good results may be
expected. The Huguenot, foaled in 1895, has shown
himself to be a very high class colt.

Tristan is another stallion who is sustaining the repu-
tation of the Silver Brook establishment by his achieve-
ments in the stud. Foaled in 1885 at the Elmendorf Stud,
he was winner of the Thistle and the Average Stakes,
and the Metropolitan, the Algeria and the Runnymede
Handicaps. Winning in all 17 races, being second in 21
and third in 8, his purses and stakes during his brilliant
career aggregated more than $32,000. His record of i
minute, ^\% seconds, for ly'a miles, carrying 114
pounds, made in the Metropolitan Handicap, when he
defeated Tenny, is still unbeaten. Among the other
rivals whom he conquered in his various races were
Prince Royal, Tea Tray, Eurus, Ambulance, Reporter,
Eric, Oriflamme, Torso, Demuth, Senorita, Clarendon,
Fitzjames, Diablo, Sir Dixon, Judge Morrow, Raceland,
Los Angeles, Inspector B., Tournament and, in addition,
a long list of other horses of no small reputation.
Tristan is by imported Glenelg, the sire of Firenze, Los
Angeles, Dry Monopole, Monitor, Louisette, Post Guard.
Insolence, Little Minch and others of a correspondingly
high quality.

Tristan is the sire of Governor Griggs, Monroe Doc-
trine, Trillo and others. The latter's get have ap-
peared on the track only since 1895. Among them
are Albanian, winner of the Bouquet Stakes at Morris
Park in 1896, and several other horses very well
regarded. Tristan still has many years of usefulness
before him in the stud, and it will be Mr. Appleby's
constant desire that the mares he serves shall be
of a grade calculated to insure successful results with
the product.



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As a type of the modern gentleman devoted to high-
class sporting matters, Mr. Augustus Ciason has been
conspicuous tor nearly a generation. A native of New
York City, he has throughout his life been prominently
identified with the business and social affairs of the
metropolis. Mr. Ciason is descended Iroin an old Con-
necticut family, from which Clason's Point on Long Isl-
and Sound took its name. He was born in New York,
May 4, 1845, i" the house of his grandfather, Mr. Reu-
ben Withers. Being a nephew of the late Mr. D. D.
Withers, Mr. Ciason came naturally by his interest in
thoroughbred racing.
His uncle's promi-
nence in racing alTairs
naturally turned his
attention in that di-
rection, and even as
a boy he began to
give attention to the
performances of the
blood horse. While
little more than a
youth he became a
gentleman rider, and
his early experiences
included a personal
participation in many
noteworthy events
that distinguished the
turf in the vicinity of
New York during the
decade or so that
immediately followed
the close of the Civil
War. One of his par-
ticular achievements
in this period, and one
that was long remem-
bered in local racing
circles, was the race
that he won in the
autumn of 1875 on Big
Sandy, one of the good
horses of that time.

The love of the turf
that thus began with

Mr. Ciason in his early years has never forsaken
him. For more than twenty years he has been
one of the prominent representatives of the gentle-
men sportsmen of New York, whose presence and
patronage exercise such a healthful influence on the
sport, and to whom the contemporaneous turt is
under such obligations of gratitude for its present high
standing. He has been untiring in his devotion to



racing, and although he has had common experience
with all other turfmen in not always seeing the hoped-for
success crowning his efforts, he has never been discour-
aged, nor has he abated in the least his energetic labors.
The spirit that animated his uncle also inspires him, and
he keeps up to the high ideal in all racing affairs that
were fixed by that eminent turfman. Believing that no
greater service can be rendered to the cause of racing
generally than by an intelligent and laborious attention to
the subject of breeding, he has engaged in that pursuit.
Of late he has laid the substantial foundation for a breed-
ing establishment that
has already had a very
pronounced influence
through several of the
thoroughbreds that it
has produced, and
that the owner is de-
termined shall grow
in extent, character
and usefulness.

For a number of
years Mr. Ciason was
interested in agricul-
tural enterprises, and
also gave attention to
the breeding of trot-
ting stock and mules.
In these occupations
he was eminently suc-
cessful, but they never
engaged his undi-
vided effort as has the
breeding'of thorough-
breds. To the latter
pursuit he has given
a great deal of time,
not only in the prac-
tical management of
breeding affairs, but
also in the study of
breeding methods. At
the present time the
Monmouth Park Stock
Farm at Long Branch
is foremost among his
racing interests and commands, exclusively, what-
ever of time he can take from purely commercial
enterprises. The estate comprises some 40 acres of
pasture and arable soil. There are pleasant turf
memories attached to it, for it was originally the
yearling sales stable connected with the Monmouth
Park Racing Association. Naturally, it became iden-
tified with Mr. D. D. Withers. As a matter of fact




AUGUSTUS CLASON
PROPRIETOR, MONMOUTH PARK STOCK FARM



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it was an adjunct to Mr. Withers' other racing enter-
prises. Although comparatively small in e.xtent, the
Monmouth Park Stock Farm is thoroughly well equipped,
while its proximity to New York City is not the least
important element in its attractiveness. Its stable is a
commodious structure, 410 feet long by 80 feet wide,
and has 104 box stalls. In connection with the building
there is also an exercise track that is a fraction over five-
eighths of a mile. The stable is always well occupied,
for outside horses are taken to board, while the fact that
Mr. Clason's principal stallion Pactolus is available to the
public attracts many brood mares there during the season.

Pactolus is a brown horse, who was bred by Mr.
Withers, and was highly valued by him. He was foaled
in 1889. His sire was by the celebrated Uncas, own
brother to Wanderer by Lexington. The dam of Uncas
was Coral by Vandal, who was the sire of such noted
thoroughbreds as Chieftain, Sorcerer, Laggard, Dun-
boyne and others. Uncas has one of the fastest i j4,
miles on record, 2 minutes, 21^ seconds. Cadence, the
dam of Pactolus, was also the dam of Orator, Jack
McDonald, Trill, Cascade, and other good ones. She
was by imported Macaroon out of imported Castagnette,
who was also the dam of Casino and others. Castag-
nette was by Marsyas, son of Orlando by Touchstone,
and her dam was Cachuca by Voltigeur, who was
the sire of imported Billet, Vedette, the sire of Galopin,
Speculum and others. Further back on the side of his
dams, Uncas traced to Ayacanora by Birdcatcher; Poca-
hontas by Glencoe, who was the dam of Stockwell,
Rataplan, King Tom and others; one of the most noted
and potent racing families in the world from which, in
the direct female line, such horses as Sir Peter, Tramp,
Velocipede, Vermouth, Glaucus, Flatcatcher, Rayon
D'Or, Flying Dutchman, and many other noted ones,
besides those already referred to, have been descended.

As a race horse Pactolus had a first-class reputation.
As a two-year old he won the Red Bank Stakes at Mon-
mouth Park, ^ of a mile, in i minute, 16^ seconds,
beating a good field of colts. He then won the Free
Handicap Stakes at Monmouth Park, ^ of a mile, in i
minute, 14 seconds, upon a heavy track with a good
field behind him. Then he ran second in the Tyro
Stakes, beating Fremont, Airplant, Hell Gate and others,
and third to Merry Monarch and Victory in the Atlantic
Stakes at Jerome Park, ^ of a mile, in i minute, 18 sec-
onds. As a three-year old he won the Cape May Handi-
cap, i}i miles, in i minute, ^4j4 seconds; the Septem-
ber Stakes, i|4 miles, and the Oriental Handicap, i}{
miles, in 2 minutes, 1 1 seconds. He always traveled in
good company and in this year defeated such first-class
runners as Captain Brown, Fremont, Westchester, York-
ville Belle, The Pepper, Pickpocket, Lamplighter, Fide-
lio and Raceland.



As a four-year old he did not start, but as a five-year
old he ran second to Kingston in a ^4 '""e sweepstakes
in I minute, 17 seconds, beating two others; won a
sweepstakes ^4 of a mile, in i minute, 17 seconds, beat-
ing My Gyps, Charade and three others, and won a
purse, Ji of a mile, in i minute, 33^4 seconds, over a
heavy track, beating four others. Since 1895, he has
been at the head of the stud at the Monmouth Park
Stock Farm. Besides this notable sire of runners, Mr.
Clason owns the following brood mares : Blackey by
Warwick out of Nana; Golden Phoebus by Bullion out
of Scissors; White Label by Dry Monopole out of Ban
Flag; Stonenellie by Stonehenge out of Nell; Aria by
Ventilator out of Pouch; Blandona by Longfellow out of
Blanche J.; Miss Belmont by Prince Royal out of im-
ported Heroine; Heritiere by Sensation out of Heiress;
Nisquanona by Macaroni out of War Paint, and Syrinx
by Eolus out of Lady Grace. The last mentioned mare
has just come to the stud from her racing career.

While Mr. Clason's breeding and racing stable is not
large, it is decidedly select in its composition and has
done well on the race course. It is the owner's ambi-
tion that horses of his own breeding shall make his
colors more prominent in the near future and in that re-
spect he is following the tradition of his distinguished
uncle. His string in 1897 comprised Leonore, a brown
filly by Darebin out of La Favorita, Syrinx by Eolus out
of Lady Grace, a beautiful filly by Ludwig out of Blan-
dona, Cassette, a brown filly by Uncas out of Castalia,
and Alicia by Daniel out of Lady Alice. Cassette was
the main dependence of the stable in 1896 and again in
1897. In 1896, she won upward of $5,000 for her owner.
In 1897 her best achievement was winning the Ford-
ham High Weight Handicap for two-year olds and
upward at Morris Park in October, over the Withers
mile. She carried 102 lbs. and was ridden by Bergen,
covering the course in i minute, 43 seconds. The race
was won driving by a head, with Typhoon II. second
and Thomas Cat third.

A notable figure in connection with Mr. Clason's
establishment is Mr. William H. Antonidus. Born in
Leedsville, N. j., in 1865, he entered the establishment
of Mr. D. D. Withers when he was a boy of eleven
years of age. There he remained for sixteen years, ad-
vancing to positions of trust and responsibility and be-
coming one of the most valuable members of Mr.
Withers' staff. Upon the death of Mr. Withers it
was natural for him to transfer his allegiance to Mr.
Clason, and with the exception of a short period,
which he spent with Col. Jacob Ruppert, Jr., and Mr.
Waller Rollins, he has maintained his connection with
Mr. Clason uninterruptedly. For five years he has been
Mr. Clason's trainer and in charge of the breeding estab-
lishment.



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One of Kentucky's most celebrated stud farms has
been, and now is, the McGrathiana. It consisted orig-
inally of a property of nearly soo acres, located about
three miles from Lexington on the Newtown Turnpike.
Adjoining the Nursery Farm of Mr. August Belmont, it
is situated in what may well be called the heart of the
blue grass region. McGrathiana was founded by that
well known and lamented turfman, Mr. Henry Price
McGrath, from whom the place took the name that it
has retained even down to the present day. In the
early days of the establishment such famous racers as
Aristides, Tom Bowling, Susan Ann, Aaron Pennington,
Chesapeake, Calvin, Leonard, Thora and Passaic were
connected with it. There were few better horses in his
day than Tom Bowling,
who beat everything in
his class, while Thora
was a filly that has never
been surpassed, even if
equaled, by the fastest
of her sex in this coun-
try. The fame of Mc-
Grathiana spread
throughout the country,
and it assumed a place
in the breeding world
second to none other
of its kind. The grand
old mansion of the estate
with its massive col-
umns was a noted archi-
tectural structure, and
there its owner delighted
in the open hand of hos-
pitality.

After Mr. McGrath had
passed away, the farm
was purchased by Mr.
Milton Young, and from
being a private breeding
establishment, it became
a high class public stud,

from whence some of the most famous yearlings oi
the last decade of the century have come forth. Mr.
Young is a native Kentuckian, having been born in
Union County. He began his racing experience at
an early age, in fact long before he had passed out of
his teens, and has risen from the humblest occupations
connected with the turf, until now he is one of its most
important factors in this country. Before he became
the owner of McGrathiana he was well known on the
racing field. Such horses as Beatitude, Bancroft, Boot-
jack and others often carried his blue and white jacket
to the front in many a hard fought contest, East and



MILTON YOUNG

PROPRIETOR, THE McQRATHIANA STUD



West. As a turfman he was pre-eminently successful
and had the happy faculty of bringing out strong horses
at very opportune times. Many of the fiimous stakes of
the American turf lell to him, and no stables represented
upon the Eastern courses were ever more popular or
achieved a greater degree of merited success. In one
season he won 54 out of the 103 races in which his
stable contested.

As master of McGrathiana, he not only succeeded in
maintaining the high reputation that the establishment
had acquired under his predecessor, but has even added
greater distinction to it. During the few years that he
has given his attention to breeding, he has attained to a
position in that particular branch of turf business second

to none other of this
generation. Nor has his
success been achieved
only as a breeder. He
has been recognized as
one of the leading and
most influential spirits in
the racing world of to-
day, especially in the
South and West. The
high esteem in which he
is held by his associates
has been repeatedly
shown by his election
to office in connection
with turf affairs and in
the dependence that is
placed upon his judg-
ment in the many diffi-
cult questions that arise
in administration. For
several years he was
president of the Western
Turf Congress and was
also president of that rep-
resentative racing organ-
ization, the Kentucky
Association. He has also
been called upon to render valuable practical assistance
at racing meetings as presiding judge of the Cincinnati
Jockey Club meetings at Oakley Park and the meetings
of the Kentucky Association at Louisville. The Mc-
Grathiana farm now contains 1,050 acres of the best
blue grass pastures. The stables and other accommoda-
tions for the equine guests of the proprietor are of the
most approved character and contain over 300 box stalls.
The stallions who have stood at McGrathiana have
included some of the most famous that have graced the
American turf Their names make a long and imposing
list, on which appear such notable ones as Onondaga,




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Stnithmore, Lamplighter, Hanover, Duke of Montrose,
imported Pirate of Penzance, Sobranje, Longstreet,
Potomac, imported Rapture and many otiiers. I'oto-
mac, it will be remembered, was one of the best sons of
the great St. Blaise, and Sobranje was by imported Mor-
temer out of Spinaway. As famous as any one in this
lot is Onondaga, who still stands in service, handed
down to the present owner from his former proprietor.
Onondaga has had a sensational career. As a race horse
he ranked in the first class, as the sketch of his life,
which we have elsewhere given, clearly demonstrates.
During the latter years of his life he has been afflicted
with blindness, as was the great Lexington before him,
yet he has maintained his usual spirit and gameness. In
fact, he has acquired a considerable reputation for
viciousness. At times in his life it has been found
necessary to enclose him in stoutly protected paddocks,
while it has been scarcely safe for any one to approach
him, save his owner and familiar attendants. His suc-
cess in the stud has been not less notable than his career
on the race course, and through his famous progeny he
has transmitted to contemporaneous thoroughbreds
some of the best qualities of his sire, imported Leaming-
ton, and other noted ancestors. In one year alone, 1891,
when he headed the list of winning sires at McGrathiana,
he was represented by 60 performers, first among whom
was Curt Gunn, others being Busteed, Ambulance,
Chimes, Portlaw, Oregon, Once Again, Patti Rosa, On
the Lea, Orinoco, L. J. Knight and others.

For several years Strathmore, previous to his death,
stood at the head of the McGrathiana stud. In a single
season the son of Waverly leaped into prominence and
took a foremost place as one of the best sires of the
period. To have two such great colts as Strathmeath
and Balgowan in his first season was the making of the
reputation of Strathmore, a reputation that has steadily
increased as the years have gone by. Duke of Montrose
was for a long time one of the successful stallions of the
McGrathiana. He was by Waverly out of Kelpie by im-
ported Bonnie Scotland. His sire was a son of imported
AustraHan and imported Cicily Jopson by Weatherbit.
Through Kelpie he traced to the celebrated Levity
family, and thus belongs to a family that has produced
more winners than any in the Stud Book. As a sire he
has established a great name for himself, being the sire
of Montrose (winner of the Kentucky Derby), and other
important races; Linlithgow, Retrieve, Promenade,
Spinalong, Monterey, Skedaddle, Pocahontas, Howard
Mann and more than a score of other good ones.

Imported Pirate of Penzance, who was foaled in 1882,
has long been another of the successful stallions of this
stud. He was the son of imported Prince Charlie, who
was by Blair Athol out of Eastern Princess by Surplice.
The dam of Pirate of Penzance was Plunder by Bucca-



neer. She was a winner and the dam of Pillage, Maid
Marian, Warren Hastings and Lord Clive. The dam of
Plunder was a sister to v^gis by Defence, and out of
Soldier's Joy by The Colonel, and the pedigree goes
back through Galatea by Amadis, Paulina by Sir Peter
and Pewet by Tandem, to a mare by Bustler. Pirate of
Penzance was a winner in his two, three, four and five-
year old forms. As a sire, he has produced Bandit,
Pirate King, Bob Carter, Lucy Belle, Dawn, Penzance,
Flushing, Joe Clark, Rondo, Kenstons and numerous
other good ones.

A first-class race horse, Macduff, by imported Maca-
roon, son of Macaroni and Songstress by Chanticleer,
has also been a successful sire. His dam was Jersey
Lass by imported King Ernest; she was the dam of
Ayrshire Lass, Umilta, Ellen H., Sapphire and others.
His grandam was Jersey Belle by imported Australian,
and the dam of Favorite, Macbeth, Kingcraft and others.
His great-grandam was Aerolite by Lexington, she being
also the dam of Fellowcraft, Rutherford, Spendthrift,
Miser and others. Macduff was the winner of the
Champagne Stakes as a two-year old, and in his three-
year old form won three races, after which he was
placed in the stud. His get have included Adelbert,
Macbeth II., who won the Kentucky Derby ; Dollikins, a



Online LibraryLyman Horace WeeksThe American turf: an historical account of racing in the United States : with biographical sketches of turf celebrities. 1898 → online text (page 43 of 80)