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REYNOLDS HISTORICAL
GeMEALOGY COLLECT»W



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIE



III I III III III



imiiii



3 1833 00854 3677



PEDIGREE AND MEMOIRS

OF THE

FAMILY OF LORAINE,

OF KIRKHARLE.



FOR PRIVATE CIRCULATION.






PEDIGREE
*l AND MEMOIRS

OF

THE FAMILY OF



LORAINE,

OF KIRKHARLE.



EDITION OF 1902.



PRINTED EY
J. B. S1CHOL3 AND SONS
I'AULIAMENT MANSIONS, VICTORIA
WESTMINSTER, S.W.



17 S6342



CONTENTS.



Introduction . .

Key Pedigree

I. Origin of the Surname

II. Early Records

III. Edward Loraine (i)

IV. Edward Loraine (2)
V. Robert Loraine (i) .

VI. Robert Loraine (2) and collaterals

VII Robert Loraine (3) and collaterals

VIII. William Loraine (i) and collaterals

IX. Robert Loraine (4) and collaterals

X. Thomas Loraine (i) and collaterals.

XI. Sir Thom.\s, ist Baronet and collaterals

XII. Sir William, 2ND Baronet and collaterals

XIII Sir Charles, 3RD Baronet and collaterals

XIV. Sir William, 4TH Baronet and collaterals

XV. Sir Charles, 5TH Baronet and collaterals

XVI. Sir William, 6th Baronet and collaterals

XVII. Sir Charles Vincent, 7TH Baronet and collaterals

XVIII. Sir Henry Claude, 8th Baronet .\nd coll.\terals

XIX. Sir William, qth Baronet and collaterals

XX. Sir John Lambton, ioth Baronet and coll.\terals

XXI. Sir Lambton, i ith Baronet and coll.\terals

XXII. The Heir to the Baronetcy and collaterals

XXIII. Armorial Ensigns ....

XXIV. Landed Est.\tes, Kirkharle Parish Register
Appendi.x .....
Inde.x .....



16

27

37

40

43

48

53

65

78

92

106

123

^53

174

195
206
211
215

217

224
244
262
294

333
409



ILLUSTRATIONS,



Lady Loraine, nee Broke

The Memorial at Kirkharle, a d. 1483

The Church of Kirkharle .

The Family Seat at Kirkharle

Portrait of Sir William, 4TH Baronet

Portrait of Charles Loraine-Smith

Portrait of Sir William, 6th Baronet

Portrait of John Loraine Baldwin .

Portrait of Sir Henry Claude, 8th Baronet

Portrait of Sir William, qth Baronet

Portrait of Sir John Lambton, ioth Baronet

Portrait of Sir Lambton, i ith Baronet

Portrait of William Charles Loraine

Portrait of Lieutenant-Colonel Frederick E. B.

Portraits of Eustace Broke Loraine

Portraits of Percy Lvham Loraine .

The Family Arms as drawn by Collins

Seals of ist, 2nd, 3RD and 4TH Baronets

The Arms Invented by Sir John Borough .

Copy of Original Visitation Entry, 1666

The Family Arms with all Quarterings

Plan of Kirkharle Church, 1870

Hatchments of 4TH and 5TH Baronets

Twywell Church ....

Bramford Hall ....

Markvate Cell ....



facin"



Vll



42

65

107

153

„ 160

195

„ 202

„ 211

215

!) 217

,, 224

234

237
„ 244, 340
„ 246, 348

262
266, 267, 268

269

facing 272
278

J. 300

301, 302

facing 3 1 6

318

328



To jacc page vii.




l-'REDERICA, LADV LORAINE, NEE BROKE.
From a Portrait by the Hon. John Collier.



INTRODUCTION.



The imperfections and inaccuracies of the Genealogical Accounts
of the Loraines published in the eighteenth century justify, I hope,
this attempt to re-write for private use the modest memoirs of
the family, and to weave into them such additional material as
it has been possible to gather. The early portion of the history
cannot be altogether rescued from its nebulous condition ; but
much care has been bestowed on its examination in the hope
of discriminating between the true and the false, the probable
and the improbable.

The earliest pedigree registered in the Heralds' College
commences only with William Loraine, great-grandfather of the
first Baronet, and was certified by the latter at the Visitation of
1666, after the birth of his fourth child. He evinces, however,
great doubts in compiling it, as is manifest on the margin of the
record ; and the inaccuracy of his effort is such that his own
grandmother's place is left vacant, and her name set back and
substituted for that of the wife of his said ancestor William.
During the next two generations the pedigree appears to have
been altogether neglected by the family, and hence the great
uncertainty which exists as to the number of children born to
Sir Thomas. At length, in 1808, Mr. Edmund Lodge, Lancaster
Herald, wrote to Sir William, fourth Baronet, begging him to
collect and send information, including all entries in the Parish
Register from 1657, "in order to render the pedigree as compleat



Introduction



" as possible," and enclosing a form to be filled up and signed
by him and his son. Unfortunately this letter appears to have
received no attention, for the form survives empty and unsigned.
Sir Charles, the next baronet, attended, however, to the matter
some years later, and entered on the booivs of the Heralds' College
a continuation of the pedigree extending over about a century
and a half, and signed this on the 29th June, 1814; but, in the
particulars which he supplied, he failed to include the names
missing from the tale of Sir Thomas's issue, so urgently required
The pedigree was certified a third time by myself on the
3rd December, 1886, after being brought down to that date.

The Rev. John Hodgson, the talented historian of Northum-
berland — whose life was unhappily cut short in the midst of his
great task — was vicar of Kirk-Whelpington, the parish adjoining
Kirk-Harle ; and his desire to do justice to his neighbours in his
History is evidenced by two of his letters in my possession ; the
first addressed in 1821 to my father, and returning a copy of the
Genealogical Account of 1722 ; the second addressed five years
later to my uncle. Sir Charles, and of which the following is a
copy : —

" Whelpington, 26 Jan., 1826.

" Mr. Hodgson is much obliged to Sir Charles Loraine for the loan of the
" inclosed papers which he returns with thanks. There is a quarto edition of
" the genealogical account of the Loraine family which is much more complete
" than the two copies among the inclosed papers and is taken from Wotton's
" Baronetage 1741 — with some additions not in that work. Mr. H. derived
" much of his information respecting the Loraine family from records in the
" British Museum and the Register Office in Durham;' and he hopes that his
'■ account when published will be found accurate, for much labour has been
" bestowed upon it.''



1 Great part of Durham records are now in London Record Office.



Introduction. ix



The fuller account referred to in this letter is probably that
which is contained in the unsigned and undated MS. entitled
" Particulars illustrative," &c., quoted below as one of the autho-
rities consulted. This MS. bears an endorsement as follows : —

" Loraine, Baronet.

" Tho' it is intended to make this work as correct as possible, it is begun
" with this manuscript from the best printed authority, which is, however, far
" from accurate, but will serve both as an outline to be filled up and as an
" example to shew that a new work on the subject is very much wanted.

" The earnest request is that it may be corrected by the family, and such
" additions made and Anecdotes or History given as may be thought proper.
" At the same time, on my side, after the manuscript is returned, no pains
" will be spared in adding the information which I have obtained in order to
" make the account interesting and complete, and it will give me peculiar
" pleasure to add also what is received from the family itself."

It is evident that the request contained in this endorsement
was not complied with, for the manuscript itself remains among the
family papers.

Considering the vast field of Mr. Hodgson's researches,
detailed in the preface to his work, and the quality of the
evidences he has adduced, it is no wonder that his account of the
family is more trustworthy than any which preceded it ; and much
of his evidence I shall have to borrow while taking a like liberty
with Surtees' great work.

The plan upon which I have thought it best to arrange this
book is to divide it into chapters, of which the biographical ones
will each deal with the head of the family and his collaterals in a
horizontal fashion like a line of the Key pedigree. This plan will
be, with certain exceptions, an enumeration of the family by
generations, children not being fully described in the same chapter

b '



Introduction.



as their parents, although it is desirable to first name them there as
infants in the order of their birth. Wherever, prior to the year
1753, a date occurs earlier in the year than the 25th of March, the
year according to New Style is shown by the added figure ; but
correctness cannot be guaranteed in cases, like that of the second
Baronet's death, where there is a conflict of testimony. Such
might conceivably arise from personal hesitation between Scottish
and English methods of reckoning, for the Scotch had inaugurated
at the commencement of the seventeenth century the modern
system of commencing the year on the ist of January.

Among the portraits will be found none of earlier date than
the fourth Baronet ; for, of those made away with as described in
Chapter XVII., none have been recovered.

The principal authorities consulted are the following,
namely : —

1. " x\ short Account of the Genealogy and other Memoirs
" concerning the family of Loraine, sometimes anciently written
" Lorein, of Kirkharle-Tower in the County of Northumberland,
" A.D. 1722." (Collins, 4 pp. folio.)

2. MS. copy taken from Thomas Wotton's English Baronetage,
A.D. 1727.

3. " An Account of the Genealogy and other Memoirs con-
" cerning the family of Loraine of Kirkharle-Tower in the County
" of Northumberland with remarks upon some other {obiter), a.d.
" 1738." (Collins, 20 pp. 8vo.) 100 copies of this was reprinted by
M. A. Richardson of Newcastle, in 1848, forming No. LX. of his
" Reprints of Rare Tracts and Imprints of Ancient Manuscripts,
" &c."

4. MS. entitled "Particulars illustrative of the Family Character
" of Loraine of Kirkharle, Baronet."



Introduction.



5. The Kirkharle Parish Registers a.d. 1692 to 1834.

6. The Heralds' books at the College of Arms.

7. MS. family book of Sir William Loraine, 4th Baronet, a.d.
1776 to 1808, with continuation.

8. MS. family book of Sir John Lambton Loraine, loth Baronet,
A.D. 1835 to 185 1, with continuation.

g. Hodgson's " History of Noi'thumberland."

10. Brand's "History of Newcastle."

1 1. Surtees' " History of Durham."

12. Wallis' "Northumberland."

13. "The Border Papers," by Joseph Bain.

14. " Les Dues de Lorraine," by Noisy.

15. "Banks, Bankers, and Banking in Northumberland."

The late Mr. Frank Scott Haydon of the Public Record
Office, and Mr. Joseph Bain, Editor of Scottish and Border
records, gave me some kind assistance in searching for old
evidences, for which I am grateful to them ; as I am, also, to the
seventh Baronet Middleton for lending me a Deed from his
archives at Belsay Castle. For the hospitable kindness of my
friend, Mr. George Anderson, now possessor of the Kirkharle
Estate, his ready aid in my researches there, and all his good will,
I have nothing but the warmest acknowledgments.

I entertain the hope that members of the family will, in future,
record each in his or her own sphere the materials for a sequel to
these Memoirs, aiming always to surpass them in fulness and
accuracy.

L. L.



KEY I



CHAI'TERS.

m.



(ANCIENT DATES ARE GIV|



Edward (
Living in 14.:



IV.

V.

VI.

VII.



I

Robert (2)-
d. circ. 1560.



Robert (3)=pMargaret
d. 1580. I



Edward ■
d. 1480 ?j



Robert i
miird'' 141



? Sons



VIII.



William— AgpIes
d. 1593. I Waters.



Thomas-plsabella
ofWallsend. Fenwick.



Dorothy,
m. Ogle.



Ursula
of Offerton i



IX.



X.



I !

Robert (4)=pThomasine ? Ursula.



d. 1618.



Warture.



Tho.mas=j=Elizabeth
d. 1649. I Maddison.



William
of Offerton,
d. unm.



? Dorothy.



of Walker
or St. Anthony's.



Robert-j-Dorothy. Grace,



Anthony=pFrances.
of Walker. I



Sir J.

Fenwick, K

of Wallingti



Henry
of Newcastle



XI.



XV.

XIX.

XX.

XVI.

XVII.

XVIII.

XXI.

XXII.



Sir I

Tho.mas=pGrace
d. 17 18. Fenwick.



Jane.



XII.


(2) Sir i (I)
ANNE=pW I LL I a M:=ElIZABETH.
Smith. d. 1744. Lawrence.


1
Thomas=p


I
Charles-i-Mary.


Jane.










XIII.


(2) Sir 1 (I)
Dorothy=pCha rles=pMargaket
Mylolt i d. 1755. 1 Lambton.


1
Grace Dorothea,
m. F. Charleton.


1 / 1
Thomas. Mary.


William.




1


XIV.


^ , (2) Sir 1
Dorothy. Fran-ces=fW i l i. i a ^
Campart. d. 1S09.


(I)
t=Hannah
Allgood.







I I I



2 s5



Sir I

Charles:
d. 1S33.



:Elizabeth
Campart.



Sir ! I

William c

d. 1S51. :-



Sir I
J. La.mbton=pCaroline



d. 1852.



J. Ekins. .^,



Sir I I

William, Isabella E.,
d. 1849. m. Bell.



Charles V.
d. 1S50.



Sir Henry C,
d. 1851.



Sir I
Lambtos



Eustace Broke.



Percy Lyham.



Jacqueline Isah



3IGREE.



VCCORDING TO NEW STYLE.)



)1IANNA

Del Slriithcr.



LIZAllETH
Haicling.



I
aughters.



? A daughler.
m. Geo. Fenwick
of Bmrovvdcn and Brinkburne.



? Roger=f=Isabella.
of the Parish I
of Kirkharle.



Note.
Down to this line the Pedigree is not
quite certain as to the order of descent.



Robert:;^
Little Harle



I
Margaret.



Grace.



Dorothy.



Ambrose-pjanc.
of Hartburn.



I I I I I I I I I III

9 other sons and 4 other dau' (according to Collins).



Anne. Richard Jane,

of Middle Temple. m. J. Brown.



Charles=^Eliz. Anne
oraine-Smith I Skrine.
of Enderby.



Rev*" LambtonT^Isabella
of Milton Keynes. Allgood.



•c

c

V



jj Rev". Loraine=pJ. Charlotte, ^j^i
p of Passenham. «



.•5 ^2 «2 j= „• .

2 P_^ S^ '^ O-



James Thonias=T=Margarcl



of Ilepscot.



Haigh.



I I I I ! I

DERiCA, J.innetta H., Isabella J., Clara F., m. Willi.am C. Frederick=pEvelyn B. Arthur.

H. Broke. m. Barrow. m. B. Lennard. Fairlxiirn. E. B.,

of Lynd-
hurst.



Lennard.



I .1.

Geoffrey. Vivien.



— c ir^



Florence.



PEDIGREE AND MEMOIRS

OF

THE FAMILY OF LORAINE

OF KIRKHARLE.



ORIGIN OF THE SURNAxME.



ADDENDA AND CORRIGENDA.



Page 70. After the name of " Edward Loraine," on third hue, add the

words " second son of Thomas Loraine of Wallsend."
Page 82. At the end of ninth Hne from the bottom, for " et " read " eat."
Page 85. Footnote. Instead of " Evid. b.," read " Evid. a."
Pages 128, 129. Thomas Loraine isfirsl/>orn son, WilHam stromi son, John

third son, and VJichaxd fourth son, instead of as stated.
Page 180. At the end of the memoir of Mrs. Headlam, add the words
" "Mrs. Headlam died at Newcastle, 14 May, 1858, and was buried in

St. Andrew's Cemetery."
Page 233. After the word " died," in the fourth line from the bottom, add

the words "on the 31st May, 1901."



- .. .„ V-.. *.w ..i.v. i^.^^»i ^.-lV-^.,^.V^U UV LUC ^JUpUlitl VUICC

1 In use at the court of Philip IV. of France 1285 — 1314. The French language
was imperfect until the reign of Francis I. 1515 — 1547. (Chambers' Diet. 1752.)
^ In like manner did Carolus Magnus develop into Charlemagne.
^ Crowned 820. (Haydn's Diet, of Dates).



PEDIGREE AND MEMOIRS

OF

THE FAMILY OF LORAINE

OF KIRKHARLE.



ORIGIN OF THE SURNAME.

Historians are agreed, and it is sufficiently evident, that the
name Lorraine, which has been corrupted in our family spelling
into LoRAiNE, is a shortened form of the name given in the ninth
century to Lothair's kingdom. This name, expressed in Latin,
according to the court usage of the day, as Lotharii Regnum,
would doubtless become Lotharregne in the Romanic language '
spoken prior to the development of French ; after which it would
become by contraction among'the Gallic peoples of a later day
Loharregne," and then Lorreyne or Lorraine. The other and
later Latin form is Lotharingia, a name by which it is useful to
denote the country while in its early undivided state.

On the death in 840 of the Emperor Louis le Debonnaire,
son of Charlemagne, his empire was divided among his three sons
as settled by a diet held at Worms in the preceding year ; Lothair,
the eldest, then King of Italy,^ succeeding to the title of Emperor
of the West to which he had been elected by the popular voice.

1 In use at the court of Philip IV. of France 1285 — 1314. The French language
was imperfect until the reign of Francis I. 151 5 — 1547- (Chambers' Diet. 1752.)
- In like manner did Carolus Magnus develop into Charlemagne.
» Crowned S20. (Haydn's Diet, of Dates).



2 Origin of tJie Si(rnat7te. [chap. i.

By a fresh treaty of partition executed at Verdun in 843, after
a fruitless war waged by Lothair against his allied brothers for the
crown of France, it was agreed that his brother Charles the Bald
should retain the kingdom of France — that is to say, the Gallic
territory lying to the west of the Meuse, Saone, and Rhone —
together with north-eastern provinces of Spain comprised between
the Pyrenees and the Ebro. To his youngest brother, Louis the
German, was assigned Germany, that is to say, the portion of
Charlemagne's empire contained, roughly speaking, between the
Elbe on the east and the Rhine on the west, having the coast line
of Bremen for its northern, and the borders of Switzerland and the
Tyrol for its southern boundaries. Lothair, the Emperor, retained
for his own Government all Italy from the Alps to the borders
of Calabria and from the German frontier of Carinthia westward to
the Rhone and Saone ; Provence (with its ports of Toulon and
Marseilles) being the southernmost, and Switzerland the northern-
most of the western provinces of his kingdom.

In the following year, however, the Emperor added to his
Italian kingdom the important territory afterwards to be known
as Lotharingia, an immense tract of Europe stretching from
Switzerland in a north-westerly direction between the Rhine and
the Kingdom of France ; including the rich provinces lying
between part of that river and the Meuse, and also all the
countries then forming the Netherlands. With this enormous
accession to his dominions Lothair's rule extended from the
Mediterranean to the North Sea, and over all space between the
kingdoms of his two brothers.

On the Emperor's death in 855 it was provided that the added
territory just described should be parted from the inheritance of
his son the Emperor Louis II., and be given to his second son the
next Lothair as a separate kingdom, of which Metz was the capital.^
It may be assumed that it was upon this event that the new State,

1 The third son, Charles, was made King of Provence.



CHAP. I.J Origin of the Surname. 3

consisting of many provinces with separate names and govern-
ments, obtained the name of Lotharii Regnnm.

King LoTHAiR reigned fourteen years, and after his death,
which occurred in 869, Lotharingia appears to have been, for some
little time, divided into two kingdoms administered respectively
by Charles the Bald and Louis the German. After the death of
the latter in 876, his son Louis the Saxon obtained the French
King's half of Lotharingia, and the whole, reunited, became a fief
of the imperial crown under Charles the Fat, his elder brother,
who became Emperor in 880. In 883 Charles conferred the
government of the reunited State on Regnier Count of Hainault ; ^
and Regnier was succeeded by Arnulf Duke of Carinthia, natural
son of Carloman IL Arnulf took the royal title, but did not
reign more than two years, for on the Emperor, his uncle, being
deposed in 888, and Germany proclaimed a distinct empire, he
was elected first Emperor thereof, upon which he gave the crown
of Lotharingia to his natural son Zwentibold.

The tyranny and cruelty displayed by this new ruler filled
Lotharingia with desolation, provoking his vassals to rebellion, and
he was killed in battle. Louis, his brother, nominally succeeded,
but the country threw itself into the arms of Charles the Simple,
of France, who, in 917, having assumed the sovereignty, nominated
Gislebert as Governor or Duke of Lotharingia. Charles, how-
ever, had soon to encounter the revolt of his nominee, who had
gained the powerful support of the Emperor, Henry the Fowler,
yet did not carry with him all the great lords of his Kingdom,
some of whom still looked to France. In the wars which ensued,
Gislebert's powerful ally forced Metz, and compelled the French
King to cede Lotharingia to his arms.

Dying in 936 Henry was succeeded as Emperor by his son
Otho the Great, who restored the Empire of the West, mciking
Rome once more its capital, but Gislebert turned against him as he

1 Said to be the original of Goethe's " Reynard the Fox."
A 2



4 Origin of the Surname. [chap. i.

tad against his previous suzerain, and, in so doing, brought about
his own discomfiture. Hereupon the Crown of Lotharingia was
oflFered by Otho to Louis IV. of France (called " d'Outre Mer "
because he had been to England in his youth), but, afterwards
changing his mind, the Emperor repossessed himself of it, and
allowed Gislebert's son Henry I., a minor, to govern the country
for four years ; then he gave it (944) to Conrad the Wise, Duke
of Franconia, but encountered the rebellion of this Duke, and
despoiled him as he had despoiled Gislebert. Lotharingia, mean-
while, was in an unsettled and miserable state ; the prelates of
Cologne, Treves, Liege, Metz, Toul, and Verdun were striving for
dominion in their respective sees ; and churches, abbeys, and
monasteries were likewise asserting their rule. Eventually Otho
gave the whole country to his brother Bruno, Archbishop of
Cologne, who assumed the title of Archduke.

Bruno found a difficulty in administering so vast a State ; and,
about the year 960, the permanent division of Lotharingia was
effected. It was settled that there should be an Upper and a
Lower Province, each to be ruled by a Duke. The Upper, or
south-easterly portion, henceforward to be known as " Upper
Lorraine " (or sometimes " Mosellane," because it enclosed the
whole course of the Moselle), comprised the Lorraine of modern
times, also the Rhenish provinces, besides Alsace, Bar, Luxem-
burg, and Treves. The north-westerly portion called " Lower
Lorraine" or " Lothier " — and sometimes " Brabant "—stretched
from Coblentz and the Moselle to the mouth of the Rhine and
adjacent sea coast, including what we now know as Rhenish
Prussia and Belgium. The dukedom of this province was reserved
by Bruno for himself; and he was succeeded in 977, on the
nomination of Otho II., by Charles of France, uncle to Louis le
Faineant, and the last of the Carlovingians ; a prince whose
subsequent unsuccessful struggle against Hugh Capet for the crown
of France ended in his imprisonment at Orleans in the vear 990,



CHAP. I.] Origin of the Surname. 5

and the consequent passing of the duchy of Lothier to Otho his
son. Otho of Lothier reigned about fifteen years, and after him
came Godfrey, Count of Ardennes, among whose successors was
the famed Godfrey de Bouillon.

The first Duke of Lorraine, — the Upper or Southern Duchy
with which alone we are concerned here, — was Frederic Count of
Bar, who had married in 954 Beatrix the sister of Hugh Capet.
He died 984, and was succeeded in the duchy by his son
Theodoric (fr. Thierry), who is said to have married Gertrude,
daughter of the King of England. ^ This Duke died about 1026)
and was succeeded by his son Frederic IL, who died childless in
1033. The Emperor, Conrad H. the Salic, then gave Lorraine to
GoTHELO, called the Great, Duke of Lothier, adding it to this
dukedom.

On Gothelo's death in 1043 the united rule ceased ; Lothier
going to his son Gothelo H. and Lorraine to his son Godfrey the
Hardy. Godfrey, however, was discontented with this allotment,
and arranged an exchange of duchies with his brother, for which
he was deposed by the Emperor from the throne of Lorraine,
Albert, Count of Alsace, being put in his place ; while Gothelo
had similarly to make way in Lothier for Frederic of Luxemburg.
War ensued, and Godfrey, assisted by Baldwin, Count of Flanders,
ended it by invading Lorraine, to which he revived his claim,
burning Verdun, and causing Duke Albert to be assassinated.'^

This crime, which happened in 1048, appears to have influenced
the Emperor Henry HL in deciding, as he did, to endow the
Dukes of Lorraine with the right of hereditary succession. He
appointed, at once, as the first Duke of the hereditary line,
Gerard of Alsace, nephew of the murdered Duke. Gerard
married Gerberge, younger daughter of Charles of France, second



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