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George Cleeve and the said Richard Tucker their heirs and assigns, together with the said por-
tion of lands .-ind premises all the soils grounds woods and underwoods havens i>oris rivers
waters lakei fishings, fowlings mines and minerals as well royall mines of gold and silver as
other mines and minerals precious stones quarries and all and singular other commodities ju-
risdictions royalties privileges franchises and phenxinences whatsoever within the said tract of
lands and premises or within any pan or parcel thereof. Saving excepting and reserving only
out of this present gi-ant the first part of all the ore of gold and silver found and to be found
in or upon the premises or any part or parcel thereof due unto his majesty his heirs and suc-
cessors and now or at any other time hereafter reserved or to be r.seneii. To have and to
hold all and singular the said part purpart, and p-ortion of lands and all other the pre mise.s herein
mentioned to be bargained sold or granted with their and every of their appurtenances unto
the said George Cleeve and Richard Tucker their heirs and assigns to the only and proper use
and bcho^jf of them the said George Cleeve and Richard Tucker their h-irs and a.-^signs to the
end and full term of two thoa-and years fully to be complete and ended, to be holden of the
said Sir Ferdinando Gorges and his h<-irs Lord or Lords of the said Province of Xew Somersett-
iUr.3 as of his or thr.ir mannor of Willitton and free mannors in free an.l common soccage by
feaUty only for all manner of services, and the yearly rent of two shillings the hundred for
every hundred acres thereof be it in wood me^dowing pasture or tillage. The same to be levied
by distress or othe.rwLse according tn the law- and cu=toma of th<- realm of England used and ai>
proved within the same for tenants of like nature; and the .wd Ferdinando Gorges for him-
eelf hU heirs and assigns doth covenant promise and gmnt to and with the said George
Cleeve and Richard Tucker their heirs and a.'sign» by th<'=<> pre-Mits that he the r..id Sir
Ferdinando Gorg&i his heirs and aiiigns shall and will from time to lime and at all times



544



MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY.



hereaftor do mak? acknowledge execute and PufTor, or caiise to be done made Rckno-n-'e^lp^d
cxccut.-^ and suffer^ all and every smh further and other rensouaWe act and acts thins and
things devise .v.iJ devisc-s in the liw for the further and better a.<.>urauce and sure in.ikin^ of
all and eingTiIar the said lands and other the s;ud premises with their and every of th.'ir ap-
purtenances unto the said George Cleeve and the said Ricliard Tucker their heirs and as^ipis
es by his and their councell learned in the laws shall be reasonabley devised advis-d or re-
quired and la-stly the said Sir Ferdinando Gorges hath constituted ordained and appoint^xi, and
by these presents doth constituto ordain and appoint his trusty and well-beloved Isaache Aller-
ton and Arthur Maekworth geutleniua his true and lawful attorney and attomies jointly or
Bcverally for him and in Ids uanie to enter into the said lands and other the said banrained pre-
mises or into any part or parcel thereof in the name of the whole and thereof to take fuH and
peaceable possession and seizen, and after such possession and scizeu so had and taken then for
him and in his name to deUver full and peaceable pHjssession and seizen of the same lands and
premises unto the Siiid Gw^rge Cleeve and Richard Tucker their heirs and assigns according to
the tenour eflect and true meaning of these presents. lu witness whereof the s;iid pni ties to
these present indentures interehangeably have set their hands and se^ls. Dated the day and
year first herein above written Annoque Domini 16G6. Ferp. Goeoes.

Sealed signed and delivered ) 'William M'ithington
in the presence of / John Minnington
Memorandum that I Arthur Mackworth gent, have taken and delivered possession and sei7>>n
onto George Qeeve Es.^. and Kichard Tucker gent. acconUng to the order within pr^^-cribed.
In TV-ituess whcrt«f I have hereunto set my hand this eight day of June 1&3T.

AKIUUR MtCKWORTH,

In the presence of Thomas Lewis,
John Lukeford, Geo. Frost.
, This is a true copy of the original deed examined and recorded the 24th day of May— by me.

K'JGER G Ann, Recorder.



LETTERS OF GORGES, VINES, JEXXER, AXD CLEEVES.

After considerable progress had been m;ide in the publication of this volume, I had the privi-
lege, by the kindness of Charles Deane, Ksq., of Cambridge, of examining several very interest-
ing letters from the early settlers of Maine written to Gov. John Winthrop of Mas=achasetts.
The Winthrop papers are in process of publication by the Mass. Historical Society, Vol. VH.
of their -ith series, under editorship of Mr. Deane, and will throw much light upon the early,
and hitherto somewhat obscure transactions of that distracted peri'>i of our history. I am
permitted to make extracts from those letters, and to furnish /ac-similfj of the signatures. I
feel gratified that they confirm my conji ctures on the causes that seriously disturbed the first
coloaists upon these chores. Jealousy among the principal men, ambition to rule, di-putes as
to titles and jurL«di'.tion, and reli:riou.9 differences, were the prominent causes of mort of the
troubles which produced the agitations and conllicts of that day, and opened the door for Massa-
chusetts to come in and assume the government. I have room for only a few extracts, and I
take those which have the most direct application to our local history. The letters of Gorge*
cast a dark shaiiow upon th« character of Cleeves which is however relieved by the favorabl*
opinion of Gov. Winthrop, and we may reasonably supi>06e that the e.^pressions freely bestowed
upon each party by its opponents, are to be attributed rather to partizan zeal thau as true ex-
ponents of charitcter.



BIR FERDIN.^NDO GORGES TO SIR UENRY VANE, JOIIX ArnsTHROP, AXD OTHERS.

Tomt/mucJirtsp-icifd/reindes, Ucnry VuTie, Jofen Winlhropp, John Ha^Kts, John Ilumfrty and

John Dudley, Eiqui'>rt,giLt lhf.U wi'h fpffd.

Maib it h.ease Tor, — Having rf-c^aved several lores from my servant Vines, Jt others, of
tlie generall di?like conceaved against JIi-. Cleeves, for having to doe with anle my a.laired, by



644 MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

hereafter do mak? acknowledge execute and ^iifTer. or cause to be done made Rcknc^^■ie^^g'•d
cxecut.^ and sviJered all and every smli iTirther and ether reasonable act and acts thins and
things devise .\;id devises in the l.iw for the further and Letter a-<sunince and sure making of
all and einrular the said lands and otlier the s;ud premises with their and every of th-,=ir ap-
purtenances unto the said George Cleeve and the said Richanl Tucker their heirs and assis^ns
BS by his and their councell learned in the laws shall be reasonabley devised advis-d or re-
quired and lastly the said Sir Ferdinando Gorges lialh constituted ord;uned and appointed, and
by these presents doth constitute ordain and appoint his trusty and well-beloved Isaache Aller-
ton and Arthur Maekworth gentlemen his true and lawful attorney and attnmies jointly or
severally for him and in his name to enter into the said lands and other the said bargained pre-
mises or into any part or parcel thereof in the name of the whole and thereof to take full and
peaceable possession and seizen, and after such possession and scizen so had and taken then for
him and in his name to deliver full and peaceable possession and seizen of the same lands and
premises unto t'de s;iid Ge<?rge Clecvo and Richard Tucker their heirs and assigns according to
the teuour efi'ect and true meaning of these presents. lu witness whereof the s;iid pai ties to
these present indentures interehangeably have set their hands and seals. Dated the day and
year first herein above wTitten Annoque Domini 1636. Ferd. Goeoes.

Sealed signed and delivered ) ^Yilliam Withington
in the presence of j Oohn Winnington
Memorandtun that I Arthur Mackworth gent, have taken and delivered possession and seizen
unto George Cleeve Es'^. and Kichard Tucker gent, according to the order within prescribed.
In ivituesa whereof I have hereunto set my hand this eight day of June 1637.

ABinUB JliCKWORTH.

In the presence of Thomas Lewis,
John Lukeford, Geo. Frost.
^ This is a true copy of the original deed examined and recorded the 24th day of May— by kp.

EOGER Gard, Recorder.



LETTERS OF GORGES, VINES, JEXXER, AND CLEEVES.

After considerable progress had been made in the pubUcation of this volume, I had the privi-
lege, by the kindness of Charles Deane, Esq., of Cambridge, of examining several very interest-
ing letters from the early settlers of Maine written to Gov. John Winthrop of Massachusetts.
The Winthrop papers are in process of publication by the Mass. Historical Society, Vol. VH.
of tlioir -Ith series, under editorship of Mr. Deane, and will throw much light upon the early,
and hitherto somewhat obscure transactions of that distracted peri.>i of our history. I aia
permitted to make extracts from those letters, and to furnish fac-similKS of the signature^. I
feel gratified that they confirm my conjectures on the causes that seriously disturbed the first
colOBists upon these shores. Jealousy among the principal men, ambition to rule, disputes as
to titles anil juri«di'-tion, and religious differencc-s, were the prominent causes of mo^t of the
troubles which produced the agiLitiuns and conflicts of that day, and opened the door for Massa-
chusetts to come in and assume the government. I have room for only a few extracts, and I
take those which have the most direct application to our local history. The letters of Gorges
cast a dark shadow upon tho character of Cleeves w hich is however relieved by the favorable
opinion of Gov. Winthrop, and we may reasonably suppose that the e.tpressions freely bestowed
npon each party by its opponents, are to be attributed rather to partizan zeal than as true ex-
ponents of chanict'.-r.



BIR FERDI.N.1.NIX) GORGES TO SIR HEXRT AAXE, JOUN ^VI>THKOP, AND OTHEKS-

TomyinuchTtsi,r/:UdfrnnfUs,nmry Vane, John Winihropp, John UaCnet, John Uumfrty and

John DadUy, Eiquii:rt,gLi.t thw tcilh spffd.

MilB IT VlXKit. rou, — Having r<-c^aved scyeral lores from my S'-rvant Vines, A oth'-r?, of
the generall disbke conceaved agajast Jli-. Cleeves, for having to doe with auic my a.lJJres, by



/:ic-:7.imilc.5 of ^icinaturi^."^ aui) $cab.



4( vVh ^- «^iL







/'



V.i





/\^ '^y-^yi^^^Xi




C^^orry- ^^a^^



F:'tCL v^■^ I:. i»>!h- -;- j-.s-



APPENDIX. 545

renfon (as it is affirme.il) of tho miscarriase of him. 85 tvcU towardcs mrsclfo in particnler, ps tho
■WTC.nges heo offered them by his misreports to meo of tlieire miscarriage iu thciro places, wliereby
lit>e hhth intni'.Ied bin.selfo into my gixxi opinion soc f.ir forth as to bee joynid ■nritli yon in mat-
ters of s^oe j;re«te trust, bt-in^; see Tnworthey. * « * As for Vines. 1 know his hrm-
esty to bee siicb a^ I could not aVaiuinn him ont of my .aft'eccion, as formerly I haue w-ritten, yet
I conceived itt not amisse to ntnckehim -nith the rest id the generall discharge, that it might
appeare then? was noo partiallity rsed, nor respect of person?, for therein I spared not my neph-
ewe,* whome I esteeme next my ovne children. As for Vines, I intend hee shall still continue
Depjtie Governonr, and sot- dc>».' pray yon to settle hiraas before hee was, and to joync with him
my nephcwe Ch.-vmpuowue, & such others «? you shall recoave notice to bee fittest for such ser-
vice: that thereby you maie avoid the troubles you may otherwise bee put vnt", by the maney
trobbles that maie arise soe farr distant from you. What resteth more to_bee done in this, I refer
to your best resolucions, as tyme & occasion serves, wherein I feare I hauc too much trenched
Tf'pon your favours. Your true friend, to ser\-e you

Pekde : Gorges.
AlSHTON PniLLlPPES, 23^. Augustij, 1637.



SIK FERDIXAXDO GORGES TO JOHN -WINTHROP.
To the Wors-hipfvU <£ my much respected /rend, John Wintrtij'p, Ksqr, at Boston in th'. Buy,

these present.

Worthy Sir, — The soddain approach of our longe wished for Parlamentinuites me to attend
the happy issue therof, that otherwise had a resolution to haue visited you this springe, but I
haue sent a ne^^r kinsman of mine own name, with other necessary seruants, for the better or-
deringe of my afToires, k makinge of my prouision agayiist the time it shall please God I come
my selfo, la the mean while I am bould to intreat of you to second this my cosen Gorges in
any just and reasonable occasion he shall haue cause to vse your fauour in, I hauinge giuen
him command to be carefull to doe his best that all fajT corrospondency lie maintayned be-
tween those two seuerall Plantations, as a speciall means, by Gods fauour, to giue fiirtheranco
to the happinesse therof. Your very louinge frend

Fekee.Gokges.

AsHTON, March 26th, 1640.



RICHARD VIXES TO JOHX AVrXTIIROP.
To iM right W'/nhipfull hU Jujiiored ffreind, John Wmthrop : Esqr. at Bostrni, thes in Massa-

cJiusetts.

Kl'JHT ■\VoRSHil-icxL, — I received your letter concerning 3Ir. Jenner; acknowledging your
former courtesies to my selfe, and for your furtherance of a minister for vs, our whole Plantacion
ar greatly behoulding vnto you. 'We haue ioyned lx)th sides of our river together fur his mayn-
tenance, and haue willingly contributed for his stipend, 4Tfi per annum : hoping the Lord will
blesse and sanctifie hi? word vnto vs, that we may l>e both lic-arcrs and doers of the word and wiU
of God. I like Mr. Jt.-nner his life and conversai-iou, and alsoc his preaching, if he would lett
the Church of England alone ; that doth much trouble me. to heare our mother Chuix-h ques-
tioned for her impurity vpon every occaj^ion, as if Men (minL-ters I meane) had no other inarko
to aime at, but the paps that g:iue them suck, and from whenee they first received the bread of
life.

It seemea the governourt makes a question that Sir Ff.rdinando Gorges was not in tho Ffrcnch
wars inhis tyme. Capt. Ronyphon intreats me to WTitc a word or two thereof. I brlir-ue it waa
beiore Mr. Ij'.iJley liis tyme. Sir Fferd : being now nere 80 yeares ould, and ha went to those
warres very youug. and ther he received his honour. I haue often heard him discourse of those
•warlike accions, and that the king of Ffrance himselfe fetched him of from a breach, being
wounded, either at th.- Sf ige of .Ajiiien;-,* or before Paris. I know not whether.
Your as3ur<.-J freind and servant,

Ricn : Vines.

Saoo, 25 th of Jaauary, IfUO.

*[TVin. GorgM.] ffDudl^y] J[In 1597.J



546 MAINE HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

RICUARD VIXKS TO JOHN WINTIIROP.

Sir, — ^Threc or 4 reares since Mr Cleiuea (Cleeves) being in England, procured a writ out of tho
Starr chamber office to comm:iud Mr. Kilward Gotlfrey, Jlr. John Winter, Mr. Purches, an.i my
selfe, to apoare at the Counscll table ; to answear some supposed wrongs. Mr.Gudl'rey went over
to answcare for himselfe Mr. Winter, and my selfe, and out of the same Court brings awrittto
command C!oiu« to iiayvnto him 2J/i: for his charges, which he refuses to doe. \ow SirFfer-
dinaudo Gorges gaue me order to see Mr. Godfrey haue right in this case. Cleiues jays wo haue
nothing to doe, neither haue wee any power to levy money here vpon any writts that come out
of Kngland. for he wiil answearo it from whence it ciime. I shall humbly intreato your advise
herein, what course is to bo taken, that I may free my selfe from blame and the malice of Cleiues,
who is a Aire brand of disseution, and hatli sett the whole Province together by the ye;u-es.
I make bould to trouble you herin, as a case of great? difficultie, desireiug your answcare by
the first couvonienoe.

I -^Tiderstooil by ilr. Shurt that you desired some gray pease for seed. Out of my small
Btore 1 haue scut you a bushell, desiring your acceptance thereuf, ffrom

Your ffreind and servant,

RiCHiVixrs.

Saco. 25th J:ir.u : 1510.



RICHARD TINES TO JOHN WIXTHROP.

To the ripht xcorshipfuU his mi(ch honored freind John M'inthorpf^ Esqr. governor of the .Vassa-

chiuetts OAonj, thnt, Boston.

Rlc.HT WoRsli)PFL-lL,— I am forced to complayne vnto you of diverse insufferable wron^ doa
Tnto Sir fierdinando Gorges, his Comtuis^ioners and Province, by Mr. Cleiues and his agent,
Mr. Tucker, who report that you protect and countenance there exorbitiint practices, which I
canot beleave, for I never yet knew you giue the least encouragement to any sinister practice.
Mr. Cleiues ha%ing perswaded Mr. Rigby, (a wonhy gent, by report) to buy the Plough Patent
which I esteemo no better then a broken tytle, by Mr. Rigby his authority, (and as he saye^ by
your approbacon) he hath nominated Commissioners, a Coronell generall, Provost marsball, and
other otlicers, extenfling his p.verument from Sackadehock to Cape Porpus, being aboue 13
leagues in lenght, haveing likewise appoy nted a Court to be kept in Casc«e bay the ioth of Man. h
next, and hath sent his agent Tucker with a paper, perswading all such as he findes any way
inclyning to iEUOvation, to set there handes to it, for the better approving of what they haue
begun, and allsoe to Intreate your Worship and the rest of your magistrates to defend them
from Ffrench, Indians, and other enemycs, which wee construe to be Sir Fferd : Gorges Com-
missioners. Neither hath Cleiues (as he ought) presented auy his authority at our last gen-
eral! Court ; but. 2 dayes before our Court tooke a vioage into the bay, and all the way as he
went from Pascataquack to E' st-.n, he roportfxl he was goeing lor ayde against mec, for that I
had threatene.1 him and his authority, to beate him out of this Province. By this false re-
port and many other the like, I am held an enemy to iustice and piety. * * • I .-vci
troubled at th«e seditious proceedings ; and much more at his most notorius scand-olls of Sir ffer-
dinando Gorgc-s.a man for his age and in integrity worthy of much honor; him he braudes v\ith the
foulenameoftraytorbycurcumstance, in reporting that he hath counterfeited the Kings brccde
Seale, (if he haue any patent f..r the Province of Mayne) ffor, sayes he, I haue serched all tbs
Courtcs of R.^cord, and can finde noe such grant. How could he haue giuen that graue Knight
ft deeper wound in his reputa/rion, the which I know is more de.ire to him then all th*; wealth
in America; he likewise mayaetaynes his false report of his de.ath. Alight into Walles, cot
with standing a letter dated the ivth of &ber la.st, from a marchant in London, of very good
credit, and brought in Mr. Payne his ship, which letter imi>orts Sir fferd : Cu,Ta'n his gcrf-d
health with the ri-.-taun«.ioti of his p<^>sserions agaj-ne. * » * Now fur the Patent that Mr.
Rigby hath b-jught, it is not from our kings majestie,as Cleiues rejwrtes, but from the President
and Counsell of N<'W-England. a.< myne and oth-rs are,whcTein Mr. Rigby hath from th.re IJx.rd-
ships jura rrnaha, but Iiis maj-stje takes that away by his royall grant to Sir iferd : aorges.



APPENDIX. 547

bearing date th!v[tpen''th of Aprill, in tho fiftepnth ycare of his highncs rai<ni<<. yn\r I cm-
cciue Mr. Ricby his a^ent is but tri rec-jrer Boe much land as the crant specifies, and t-i relin-
quish there Jura n-yaUa, as ynu may perceiue in the la*t claw.-e of our prant here with sent yru.
* * * Yet I (lid ever, and doe intend, whensoever Mr. Kigby shall semi over people, to Ictt
them settle peaceably, to ayde and as.<iist them to the best of my power, without questioning of
mcumctttium; flor this I know, if Sir Fferdinando Gorges and Mr. Rigby nicete, all matters
wil be quietly ended, if there be no incendiaries here. * * «

YourfavthfuU freind and servant,



Rich: Vises.



Saco, the 9th of January, l&W.



♦THOMAS JEXXER TO JOHN WIXTimOP.

To the Right "iVorfhip his veiy Unieiiig c£ lindjriaid Mr. ^yintroj>, at his house in Bostcni in

X. E.giuc thcise I pray.

Worthy Sir : — My due respect being retpembered to you, I heartily salute you in the Lord ;
giueing you humble thanks, for your favourable aspect which liath alwaies bin towards me,
(though of me most unde.senied,; and especially for your late kind letter on my K-balfe; for
■which sake I -.vas kindly imbraced, aboue the expectation of my selfe, k others, and am still (I
thaiik God) loueingly respected amongst them : but not with out some hot discourses,! espc-ciall.y
fcbout the ceremonies ;) yet they all haue ended (through mercy) in peace ; and fvr aught I can
perceiue, doe prize the word, k relish it, dayly better then other, and some promise faire ; cnen
in Mr. Vines his family. But generally they were very ignorant, superstitious, & vitious : and
scarce any religious. Ffreleuue they giuc me to doe what soever I please; imposeicg nothing
on me, either pul.likl,v or privately, which mj- selfe dislike, onely this, Mr. Vines i the raptaine+
both, haue timely expressed thcmsclues to be utterly against church-way, saying, th-ir Tutout
doth prohibit the same : yet I, for my part neuorocce tuached upon it, except when they thcm-
gelues haue in private discourse put me upon it by questions of their owne, ffor I count it no
season asyet to go build, before God sends vs materials to build with all. Thus being in some
hast, I end humbly craueing your prayers :

Your worships to command

Tho: JtxMiR.

Saco, 4th of the last, 1&40. /



THOMAS JEXNER TO JOHN WIXTHROP.
To the Right WirshipfuU his vfry worthy friend Jo : Wintrop Kiqr. <£• Deputy Gousrnor of

JV. £. at his hoicse in Rostmi give theise.

RjGHT WoRSUiPFULL, — My due respects remembred to you. This is to informe you 'aecording
to request made vnto me, I)Oth by Mr. Jocelyne k Mr. Cleeve) that in Cascoe Bay on tho last
of March tho major part of the Province of Lygonia meet together, at an inti-ndel O -urt of Mr
Cleeve. Mr. jL>celyne i his company came armed with gunes & swords, or both ; Mr. Cleeve &

•[Thomas Jenner was at Saco as early as the winter of 1C40-1, and was probably the first min-
ister of the Puritan faith that ever preachcj in Maine; unless that -^vretchej man. Burditt,
preached at York as early. Jenner was, without doubt, the first minister settled at ?a/.o. Rich-
ard Gibson, an Episco])al clergyman, liricg in the vicinity, at Spurwink, as early as lC->0, may
Bcmetimea have preached hpr>r. Jenner remained here till 1046, as appears by a letter of his in
this volume, dated April 6, 1»>46 ; in w hi' h he says, " T am. as it were, on tho w ing of rt/ujoval ;
but whither, as yet I know not."'

Jenner was of Roxbury iu 10:^4 or I6;:^i, but not long after went to Weymouth, vtich town
he represented in tho General Court of lo40. He is said to have returned to Ecgland b-JXore
1550, and Uj have resided in Norfolk. He waa compelled by straitened circumstances, to sell bis
library befure his d<.ath.]

t[Bonyth'.n.]



.548 MAINE HISTOKICAL SOCIETY.

his cowipanj- vnarmed. After sermon was ended, Mr. .T'lsclyne A- his companv separated them-
eelues about a furlong from Mr. Cleeve i !iis company. Thuy sunt Tnto Mr. Cleove a d. man 1 in
Tniting (with all their hands sutecribcd,) to haiie a sight of his oricinals, promising a f;.^f<> tf-
tume. After some ha'sitalion A demur, Mr. Cleeve. Tpon condition they would conio to^'.rihi'r
into one place, promised to pratifie them. The which being puldikely read & scanned, the n.'xt
morneiui^ Mr. Jocelyne i his company delinered mto Mr. Cleeve in writinjre, with all ihcir
hands subscribed, a Protest against Mr. Kighbies authority of gouerment, that is to say, in any
part of that bound or tract of land which Mr. CleeTe doth ehalleng by vertue of his Patent, viz.
from SacadeUock River to Cape Porpus. They furthermore required & injoined Mr. Cb ave A
his company to submit theniselues vnto the authority & gouerment derived from Sir Fferdinando
Gorges, A that for the future they addresse theniselues vnto their Courts.

Lastly they demanded of Mr. Cleeve a friendly triall concerneing the bounds afore sayd, ffor
Mr. Jocelyne v.ould that Mr. Cleeve his (emiitius a quo should begin 60 miles yy Chenebec River,
because the Paient siiith. it must lie nor( two Hands which are about 60 miles from th'.- sea.
Ffor answer to it the Patent also saith, the tract of land of 40 miles square, must lie on the south
side of ,?acadehock-River.

Now Sacadehock riuer reacheth but to Merry Meeting, & then its branched into Begipscot, &



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