Maine. State Board of Arbitration and Conciliatio Maine. Dept. of Labor and Industry.

Biennial report of the Department of Labor and Industry of the ..., Volume 3 online

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investigations as possible without money available for such
work. The samples of mitkerals which we have gathered and
had assayed, and other information which we are in posses-
sion of will, we believe, convince even the doubtful that the
mineral resources of Maine are worthy of very immediate and
energetic attention. In the course of the slight investigation
we were able to make we were convinced that there are great
possibilities in the feldspar deposits of the State. The quantity
appears to be unlimited and from evidence which we have
secured, it seems that the grade of ore is far superior to
any which is now being mined, though it is evident that the
feldspar industry of the State at the present time is being
successfully operated as many new companies have been organ-
ized during the past year for the purpose of mining and devel-
oping the minerals contained in the feldspar group.



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14 I«ABOR AND INDUSTRY.

The results obtained from samples of zmc ore deposits in
this State which were assayed by reliable metallurgical agei*-
cies were astonishing. Samples of the ore were submitted to
the University of Maine, also to two reliable assayers of New
York City. The University of Maine reported that the sam-
ples assayed 17% zinc. Of the other agencies one reported
23.21% and the second notified us that he found the ore sent
to him to be 32.18% zinc. It would seem that these findings
invite further investigation and that the State should not
longer withhold its assistance from an industry which has such
good prospects and such great possibilities.

Several years ago the Legislature enacted a law which pro-
vided in part that the Land Agent, the Commissioner of Agri-
culture and the Commissioner of Labor are constituted a min-
ing board to be known as the Maine Mining Bureau. "Said
board shall collect reliable information concerning the deposits
of all precious and useful minerals, establish a metallurgical
cabinet in the State House, and in such cabinet they shall
properly arrange samples and specimens of ore, valuable rocks
and metals collected by them. They shall biennially issue
a pamphlet containing information concerning the mineral
resources of the State and shall distribute at least one thou-
sand copies of such pamphlet among the business men and
capitalists of other states." Such a board has never been
organized nor any of the requirements of the law complied
with because no appropriation was ever made for the purpose
of carrying out the provisions of the law.

The members of the incoming Legislature should not fail to
make the necessary appropriation for this important work and
it would in our opinion do well to enact some legislation that
would stimulate the search for precious metals and the mining
of the same. It has been suggested that a mining law could
be enacted to provide that whoever discovers or finds ores,
minerals or precious stones upon land of another or beneath
the surface thereof shall be entitled to the same. In such
event provisions should of course be made for the land owner
to collect a reasonable royalty and, if it is deemed wise the
State should retain an interest. Such a law would encourage
efforts to locate ores and minerals and the report of prospects
when they are found. Under the existing conditions there is



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I.ABOR AND INDUSTRY. 1 5

no inducement for any prospector to use time and money in
making an attempt to find ore or minerals on land of another
for if he succeeds the law will not allow him the enjoyment of
his discovery. Some will say that the suggestion made above
is far too drastic and subversive of property rights and this
may be true. What we wish to convey is that Maine has a
very considerable undeveloped mineral wealth and it is desir-
able that this should be developed. Under present conditions
there is little or no effort to locate what might prove to be
very valuable minerals. It is a source of potential wealth
that should not be longer overlooked nor neglected.



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l6 LABOR AND INDUSTRY.



LIST OF PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATION OF
LABOR LAWS.



LUBEC.
1914
Oct. i6th Superintendent of sardine canning factory employed a

boy without a work permit, and two girls under 14 years
of age. Court held defendant guilty in case of boy work-
ing without a work permit and fined him $50 and costs.
Evidence as to employment of the two girls under 14 years
of age was deemed by the court insufficient to prove de-
fendant guilty. Defendant appealed from fine and case
was continued pending compliance with the law. Later
reports indicated that concern affected was complying
with the law.

EASTPORT.

Oct. i6th. Foreman of sardine canning factory employed two boys

under 14 years of age. Pleaded guilty and was fined.

Oct. 23rd Superintendent of sardine canning factory employed two

boys under 14 years of age, found guilty and fined $50 and
costs in each case. Appealed.

Proprietor of sardine canning factory employed three
boys under 14 years of age. Found guilty and fined $5C
and costs. Appealed.

Appealed cases mentioned above were continued pending
future compliance with the law. Later reports indicated
that all of the sardine canning factories in Eastport were
complying with the law.

JAY.

Dec. Manager of a wood working establishment for violation

of the Child Labor Law employing minors under 14 years
of age. Three warrants were issued and conviction secured
in all cases.



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LABOR AND INDUSTRY. \^

GILEAD.

I915
April 9th Proprietor of saw mill for violation of the weekly pay-

ment of wages law. Continuation granted by Court pend-
ing compliance by defendant. No further complaints have
been received. Costs of Court have been paid by de-
fendant. Fourteen warrants were issued.

MADISON.

April 21 St Parent permitted his minor son to submit a birth paper

on which an erasure had been made changing date of birth,
and for which a work permit was issued. The father was
found guilty and fined $10 and costs.

PORTLAND.

Aug. 20th Complaint was made against the proprietor of a res-

taurant for violation of the weekly payment of wages law.
He was, owing to lack of evidence, found not guilty.

WESTBROOK.

Sept. 2nd Parent permitted his son to submit a birth paper on

which an erasure had been made as to year of birth. A

conviction was secured and he was allowed to go on
pa3rment of a nominal fine and costs of Court.

On same date parent was found guilty of similar offence.
A nominal fine was imposed with costs.

SKOWHEGAN.

Sept. 23rd Superintendent for road building contractor violated the

weekly payment of wages law. Was fined $10 and costs of
Court in one case. Two other cases were nol prossed upon
payment of costs.

BANGOR.

Oct. 9th Secretary of a New York Paper concern hiring men to

take place of strikers did not either orally or in a news-
paper ad for men state that there was a strike. Pleading
nolo was made to pay costs of Court.

AUGUSTA.

Nov. 23rd Ten warrants were issued against a building contractor

for violation of the weekly payment of wages law. Date of
trial set. Continuation granted pending defendant's com-
pliance with the law. Later employees questioned stated



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l8 LABOR AND INDUSTRY.

that they were receiving their wages weekly, and had been
paid wages due at time complaint was made.
Dec. nth Relative furnished a minor child with a birth paper con-

taining a false statement as to date of the child's birth, and
upon which a work permit was issued. Conviction was
secured and fine of $io and costs of Court was imposed.

SACO.

Decr 23rd An agent hiring men to take the place of strikers did not

orally or in a newspaper ad for men state there was a strike.
He pleaded nolo and was fined $25 and costs. The fine was
remitted and he was freed on payment of costs.

SANFORD.
1916
Feb. 3rd Parent permitted his minor son to submit a birth paper

on which an erasure had been made changing date of birth,
and upon which a work permit was issued. The father was
found guilty and fined $25 and costs.

On same date a parent was found guilty for same offence
and fined $10 and costs.

SEBAGO LAKE.

March ist Proprietor of a saw mill — case nol prossed on payment
of costs and his promise to comply with the weekly pay-
ment of wages law.

LEWISTON.

July 21 st Parents complained of as being jointly responsible for

allowing their son, aged 13, to work on an older brother's
birth paper, giving his age as 16 years. Father was found
not guilty. Mother was found guilty and fined $15 and
costs.

WATERVILLE.

Oct. 30th Parent permitted his minor daughter to submit a record

on which an erasure had been made changing date of birth
and upon which a work permit had been issued. Father
found not guilty, court stated because of lack of proof
connecting father with erasure on birth record.



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LABOR AND INDUSTRY.



19



SUMMARY OF MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES OF

MAINE.



The information herein contained was obtained through
various sources, viz: Through the officials connected directly
with the Department, through special agents, through reports
direct from the manufacturers and through the town clerks of
the several towns.

The employers have answered communications promptly and
cooperated with this Department at all times and under all
conditions and we desire to thank them for their courtesy.

Number of employes in manufacturing establishments by
counties :





1912


1914


1916


C0UNTIB8.


Male.


Female.


Male.


Female.


Male.


Female.


A ndroscoggi'* r ^


8.339
3.793
8.613
2.670
2r374
6.040
2.879
740
5.091
8.163
2,367
2.166
4.206
1.586
5.852
9.288


5.746
110

3,122
568
508

2,600
957
287

1.092
835
318
165
914
482

3,171

4,966


9,108
3.801
9,086
2,976
2,106
6,217
2,719
577
4.611
8,309
2,083
2,388
3.971
1.389
5,515
8,231


5.690
130

3,113
605
633

2,722
913
207
793

1,072
352
190
945
569

2,956

4.910


-. 9.256
3.333
. 9,450
2,554
1,924
6,656
2,867
532
4.652
7,704
2.424
2,422
3,787
1,323
5,449
9,035


6,572


AroOBtook


92


Cumberland


3,615


Fr Anklin ...,-,.,.,.,


682


Hancock


530


Kennebec


2,694


Knox


949


Lincoln


209


Oxford


988


Penobscot


1,062


Piscataquis


311


Sagadahoc


176


Somerset


974


Waldo


477


Washington


3,135


Y<S^ ..:::::::::


6,031






Total


73.467


25.840


73,087


25.800


73,368


26,297







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20



LABOR AND INDUSTRY.



Boot and Shoe Industry.



1


Total Value of


Total Amount


Average Number Employed 1916.


fl










Product 1915.


of pay roU 1915.






Males be-


Females






Men.


Women.


tween 14


between^ 14


:2:«


-








and 16 yn.


and 16 yrs.


1


$453,376 00


$125,000 00


100


75








2


309.482 43


82.164 23


200


225


7





3


382.830 40


93.086 37


98


58








♦4


7.805 11


4.852 24


35


38








6


1.764 20


1.611 70


8


1








6


139.320 67


38.965 58


85


30








7


23.596 12


4.860 03


40


20








8


397.683 89


104.052 96


125


125








9


161.617 31


45.576 34


55










10


555.534 22


115.986 83


150


60








11


1.919.095 13


491.072 80


548


352


5


4


12


168.390 32


50.192 06


85


45








13


1.876,238 96


533.643 64


867


. 556


12


5


14


2.469.200 05


547.327 20


800


276


14


20


15


79,656 35


31.396 30


65


32








16


2.000.000 00


480.000 00


608


276








17


2,982 47


1.474 00


3


-








18


5.000 00


2.028 00


3


-








19


423,795 00


102.726 84


177


67


1





20


918.000 00


218.489 00


300


125








21


2,250.973 54


430.181 65


593


319


6





22




175.430 21


180


102


1





23


1.035.785 77


185.445 72


252


125


1


2


♦24


74.858 54


24.925 50


172


80


4


3


25


73.913 00


23.684 08


27


29








26


6.979 00


3.358 58


10


10








27


279,570 88


114,332 48


181


140








28


99,032 65


27.542 16


50


30








29


275,000 00


59.912 63


100


40








30


66,758 31


26.211 61


35


32








31


512.202 29


131,313 04


220


100








32


2.416,062 00


521.629 00


563


354


8


10


33


299.155 96


81.459 36


95


80


2


2


34






200


100


1


3


35


50.000 00


14.031 00


30


14








36


-


-


300


500








37


-


-


160


85


6


1




$19,734,660 57


$4,893,963 14


7.520


4.501


68


50



* No. 4 began manufacturing in September. 1915.

* No. 24 began manufacturing in October, 1915.



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labor and industry.
Pulp and Paper Industry.



21



1
il






Average Number Employed 1916.


Total Value of


Total Amount
of Pay RoU
















Product 1915.


1915.






Males be-


Females






Men.


Women.


tween 14


between 14


:2:«




'






and 16 3^*8.


and 16 yrs.


1


$667,084 37


$105,974 78


250


10








2


124.605 00


32.441 00


46










3


3.539.321 00


780.449 00


1.275


" 200








4


600.410 00


117,990 00


200










5


106.047 20


36.163 90


36


-.








6


652.183 08


103.428 76


150


20








7


38,767 61


7.736 72


17


2








8


207.624 62


32.271 26


40










9


536.209 69


136.946 74


201


-








10


265.740 89


46.427 04


60


.








11


428.836 49


47.966 40


59


-








12


2.679.087 36


480.074 89


637


24








13


376.626 00


69.006 00


83


22








14


367,689 66


122,355 08


189


10








15


766.698 20


130,815 62


133


16








16


3.346,429 71


748,426 69


725


65








17


2,507.456 25


471,020 34


622










18


4,908,484 67


709.336 45


970


30








19


2.920.000 00


321,406 17


350


300


2


6


20


135.018 09


26.614 36


60











21


66.466 50


23.192 42


40











22


273.211 68


63,780 87


83


1








23


1.780.691 00


416.100 00


530


262








24


771,580 00


144,626 00


214


12








26


1.142.011 03


255,713 73


425











26


925,983 17


190,786 79


250


10








27


4.170.489 33


611,725 40


750


-








28


2.279.570 20


295,408 25


300


-








29


1.125.464 33


222.678 78


300


-








30


314.614 77


110.062 60


66











31


818.867 93


146.010 60


199


-








32


89.154 00


20.791 34


39


-








33


190.907 14


61,619 03


200


-








34


530.348 09


85.875 02


95


-








35


25.667 46


4.124 25


13


-








36


57.983 39


13.587 71


50


-








37


10.646 37


573 71


11


-








38








60











39


_


-


70


65








40


42.980 60


1.956 09


10


-








41


2.609.516 96


458,231 87


625











42


195.692 46


22.502 00


35


-










$32,483,045 09


$7,675,215 54


10.366


1,048


2


6



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22



labor and industry.
Cotton Industry.



4


Total Value of


Total Amount


Average Number Employed 1916.


11










Product 1915.


of pay roU 1915.






Males be-


Females






Men.


Women.


tween 14


between 14


zs










and 16 yrs.


and 16 yrs.


1


$6,875,040 23


$1,453,144 15


1.921


1.653


27


18


2


2.181.362 00


711.298 00


1.353


887


16


23


3


1.738.041 83


403.588 70


480


460


20


26


4


1.164.854 25


303.970 55


426


328


22


10


5


1.931.562 56


493.080 02


542


643


4


e


6


708.815 20


232.881 67


460


135


1


1


7


418.607 21


90.543 53


90


110


5


1


8


575.417 46


106.008 12


140


95


6


3


9


875.323 04


329.585 69


350


450


6


3


10


1.209.468 08


354.892 15


323


541


7


3


11


355.000 00


80.372 96


92


107


1





12


2.319.881 32


670.306 19


868


714


7


6


13


1.101,515 00


375.985 00


413


312


20


24


14


126,000 00


21.510 04


22


24








16


1.324.731 99


269.628 31


278


230


13


3




$12,905,620 17


$5,896,795 08


7.758


6,689


152


129



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LABOR AND INDUSTRY.



23



Woolen Industry.



5


Total Value of


Total Amount


Average Number Employed 1916.


Ml

n










Product 1915.


of pay roll 1915.






Males be-


Females






Men.


Women.


tween 14


between 14


551










and 16 yrs.


and 16 yra.


1


$155,299 76


$39,255 97


58


49


1





2


238,722 18


51,994 66


68


20








3


311,000 00


55,500 00


60


40








4




4.232 25


2


18








6


4,239.523 40


965,712 95


860


731


16


18


6


1,225.098 91


448,508 75


547


331


8


12


7


313,000 00


30,937 00


43


45








8


**


24.376 75


35


10








9


628.911 72


62,536 74


47


78


8


5


10


459,213 00


108,130 00


150


95








11


511,587 00


92,590 00


09


43








12


409,988 00


67.633 00


66


46








*13


24.150 00


8.630 69


73


16


1





14


592.505 00


140.244 00


188


36


6


a


16


932.798 00


142.037 00


165


48








16


353.798 00


102,108 00


119


53





e


17


374.788 00


105,723 00


117


53








18


211,807 30


38.049 32


60


35








19


290.855 06


51,315 51


60


40








20


698.277 00


118,531 00


130


60








21


440.136 00


76.305 00


80


39








22


40.000 00















23


339.303 74


187995 90


45


-








24


243.000 00


44.689 76


48


28








25


308.000 00


51.527 45


63


25








26


203.593 95


38.474 40


62


34





1


27


345.074 00


87.514 00


107


37








28


209.280 00


52.849 00


63


12


1





29


923,109 82


129.649 76


132


71








30


Included in No. 29




116


35








31


120.000 00


367oOO 00


47


35


1


1


32


120.000 00


36.000 00


30


20








33


70,458 00


16.027 36


26


8








34


405.137 72


74.947 92


108


57


4


1


36


204.306 27


50.176 17


60


26








36


424.568 96


105.742 00


101


79








37


184.961 00


33.089 61


55


30


2


1


38


272,226 00


47.679 00


91


27








39


191.000 00


44,298 00


61


25








40


169.189 15


37.990 79


52


16








41


315,829 00


59,782 00


80


60


3





42


147.967 00


32.215 00


52


28








43


1,200,000 00


197,312 02


325


94


6


1


44


599,497 00


137.627 00


181


43


3





46


160.000 00


63.125 06


69


34








46


696.646 42


100.469 48


120


66








47


32.163 93


3.408 97


8


16








48


416.944 49


123.667 30


175


100


2





49


1,077.065 84


242.883 71


308


103


4





50


400.000 00


82.800 00


100


67








51


77,338 01


14,883 48


10


10








52


192.189 44


33,062 69


38


65


1





53


263.625 00


57.791 47


18


40


1





54


303,111 55


67,589 13


66


90








55


385,098 00


76.688 17


92


27








56


238.037 19


62,407 79


101


34








57


152.240 00


60.665 87


60


12








58


-


-


16


6










$13,852,309 80


$6,036,280 79


6.171


3.372


65


00



* No. 13 began manufacturing in November, 1915.



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^



labor and industry.
Synopsis.



1914



Male. Female. Total.



1916



Male. Female. Total,



Boot and Shoe Industry .
Pulp and Paper Industry

Cotton Industry

Textile Industry

Woolen Industry

Other Industries

Total



5.920
9.698

13.591

43.878



73.087



3.179
890



11.065
10.666



9.099
10.588

24.656

64.544



7,520
10.366
7.75S

67l71
41.553



25.800



98.887



73.368



4.501
1.048
6.689

3.372
10,687



12.021
11.414
14.447

9.543
52.240



26.297



99.665



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LABOR AND INDUSTRY.



INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS.

In the sub- joined tables, we give statistics of industrial acci-
dents for the period from July i, 191 4, to July i, 19 16, these
being compiled from the reports of employers. The Work-
men's Compensation law went into effect January i, 1916, and
the provisions of section six of the act were promptly complied
with by employers of the State who with very few exceptions
expressed their desire to operate in compliance with the pro-
visions of the law.

As the act requires all assenting employers to report in-
dustrial accidents to the Workmen's Compensation Commission,
they were not longer required to make reports to the Depart-
ment of Labor and Industry as in the past. For this reason,
the number of accidents reported to this Department during the
last six months of the two-year period covered, this being from
January i, 1916, to July i, 1916, is but few and it is expected
that in the future it will not be necessary for this Department
to make reports of industrial accidents, this branch being en-
tirely covered by provisions of the Workmen's Compensation
law that requires from the Industrial Accident Commission
a full and complete report of accidents which come under the
Compensation law.

Reports of industrial accidents, in accordance with section 15
of the Revised Statutes of 1916, are required from all em-
ployers who have not complied with the provisions of the
Workmen's Compensation act.

In the tabulation that follows, it is interesting to note that of
the 2,057 accidents recorded but 35 proved fatal, the victims
being all of the male sex. The most prolific forms of accident
■ were fractures, bruises, crushings, lacerations, sprains, disloca-
tions, burns and scalds, these classes aggregating 75 per cent of
the entire accidents reported.

More than half of the accidents as reported occurred in the
pulp and paper industry, the total number there being 1,052,
while other industries that were prolific in victims were
foundry, iron, steel and metal products with 259, textile in-
dustries with 247 and the lumbering industry with 240.



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26



LABOR AND INDUSTRY.



Table No. 1.

Whole Number of Accidents Reported in which Disability

Exceeds Six Days, Occurring During Period from

June I, 1914, to June 30, 1916, Classified

by Nature and Extent di Injury.



EUTBNT OF InJUBT.



Males.



Females.



Male

minors

between

14 and 16

years of age.



Female

mincMrs

between

14 and 16

years of age.



Total.



Fatal

Loss of eye

Loss of hand

Loss of arm

Loss of leg

Loss of foot

Loss of fingers

Loss of toes

Internal injuries

Injury to arm or leg ...

Injury to fingers

Fractures

Bruises and crushings . .

Lacerations

Sprains and dislocations

Burns and scalds

Injury to e^es, lessor. . .
Internal injuries* lessor.
Infected bruises .......

Infected lacerations. . . .

Miscellaneous

Not stated

Total



34


-


6


.


3


-


6


_


1


_


3


_


96


5


3




7


_


28


_


38


1


220


5


506


17


515


25


118


8


123


-


52


1


100


1


22


1


57


2


14


1


6


-


1.951


67



31



35
6

4

6

1

3

106

3

7

28

40

229

529

567

121

123

53

101

24

60

16

6



2.057



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LABOR AND INDUSTRY.



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Online LibraryMaine. State Board of Arbitration and Conciliatio Maine. Dept. of Labor and IndustryBiennial report of the Department of Labor and Industry of the ..., Volume 3 → online text (page 2 of 6)