Marcus Tullius Cicero.

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before the 16th. On tiie 13th, before Tiro's return, Cicero replies to that
letter, and says (468, 1) he will < worry through* those three days (Quare obdu-
retur hoe triduum) as well as be can. Tiro returns late on the 13th, and
brings news that Atticus looked flushed and unwell. Cicero fears that he will
not be able to come at all, but is relieved by a letter from Atticus, received on
the 14th (and answered in 469), saying that he wants Cicero to wait only one
da^r longer than the day which was originally arranged, viz. the 14th. Atticus
arrived on the 16th, and he and Cicero soon after letumed to Borne.

470. To Varro. Caesar was expected to arrive verv soon (§ 1). He sailed from

Sardinia on June 27th ; but as be took a coastmg voyage, and was delayed by
storms, he did not arrive till July 26th (B. A&. 9, 8).

471. Cicero has finished his * Cato/ which was first sketched about June 14th (469).

From this time he seeks to conciliate the Caesarians.

472. To Paetus. DolabeUa and Hirtius took lessons in rhetoric (§ 7) during July,

before Caesar's arrival.

473. To Paetus. This is an answer to the reply of Paetus to 472, and was written a

few days before Caesar's return. Dolabella and Hirtius had gone to meet him
(§1). Cicero probably returned to Rome about July 26th, and remained there
till Caesar's departure for Spain, in the second intercalary month : cp. 481, 5.

474. To Volumnius. This letter ought to have been placed before 473, as reference is

made in it (§ 2) to the lessons given to Dolabella as in progress.

475. To Paetus. Evidently written shortly after Cicero's return to Rome, when he

had got into the full swing of city life ( § 3).

476. To Gallus. Probably written about the time when Cicero interested himself so

much about exiles.

477. To Curius. Probably written about the same time as 476, as the mode of life

sketched in both is much the same : cp. 475, 3, and 477, 2.

478. To Paetus. Cicero is still dining out, and living in the manner described in 476 :

cp. also 479.

479. The last words do not prove that Cicero was meditating a^ ioumey to Campania.

He is constantly joking with Paetus about bis own gluttony, and even in
August he says (476, 2), Froinde te para : eum homineet edaei tibi res est et qui
%am aliquid intelUgaty when he had no thoughts of such a journey : cp. 476, 1.

480. To Paetus. This letter cannot be removed far from 478, as there is a reference

in both to the visit of Balbus to Paetus.



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XCVl



INTRODUCTION.



481


Fam. ix. 16, .


Borne,


Nov. (see note), .




482
483


„ xiii. 68, .
„ iv. 13, .








September, .




484


„ iv. 16, .













485


„ iv. 8, .








• •




486


, iv. 7, . .








• •




487


„ iv. 9,' . .








• •




488


„ vi. 6, . .








„ end (see note)




489


„ vi. 13, .








„ (first half).




490


„ vi. 12, .








t) 19




491


„ vi. 10, J} 4-6,
„ vi. 10,{§l-3,








f 9 t9




492








19 99




493


„ xii. 17, .








„ (latter half)




494


„ iv. 8, . .








Sept. (first half)i or
October, .
















496


„ iv. 4, . .


))






99 99




496


„ iv. 11, .


Mytaene,






October (end),




497


„ ix. 21, .


Borne,


99





482.



483.



484.



486.



481. To Paetns. The reference to the smnptnary law (§ 6) led us to place this letter
in connexion with 479. But we were wrong. It should have been placed very
late in Caesar's stay, probably November. It implies ({ 6) Uiat there had been
time for the receipt of replies to despatches to Armenia, which were probably
sent after Caesar's return from A^ca. It was also written when Oaeear's
departure for Spain was impending : op. Schmidt, p. 269.

To Servilius Isauricus. Perhaps written about this time. It was probably the
first letter to Servilius. Cicero speaks kindly of Caesar, as he is writing to a
Caesarian officer.

To Nigidius. Written about the same time as the measurements of land at
Capena and Veii (480, 2) : cp. 483, 3, versorque in eorum tuxufroffiis et bonorwn
direpiionibut, Cicero has not yet (} 6) succeeded in seeing Caesar personally.

To Plancius. Possibly written about this time ; but there does not appear to be
anything to fix the date definitely.

To Marcellus. Written before 486, 487} as these letters are much more definite

and detailed in the matter of the return of Marcellus.
486-7. Written shortly before the return of Marcellus was voted (about the middle of

September).
488. To Caecina. Written shortly after the pardon of Marcellus ({ 10).

489-92. To Ligarius, Ampins, and Trebianus. We should have placed these four
letters, and probably 494, before 488, as there is little doubt tbey were written
before the pardon of Marcellus. Cicero says nothing in them about direct
influence with Caesar, but he is in cordial relations with important Caesaiians
(490, 2 ; 492, 2). The gloomy tone of 494 would suit the time before the
pardon of Marcellus, though of course it might equally well have been written
when Cicero*s hopes, inspired by that event, had disappeared.

To Comificius. This is in answer to the first letter of Comificius from Sjria.
It was probably written shortly after the pardon of Marcellus, when Cicero
entertained hopes that Caesar was intending to take some steps to restore the
free state (§ 1) : cp. p. liii.

To Sulpicius. See on 494.

To Sulpicius. Shortly after the pardon of Marcellus (§3).

496. Marcellus to Cicero. An answer to Cicero's congratulations on his pardon. It

would take a letter five or six weeks to reach Mytilene from Bome.

497. To Paetus. Possibly, as Schmidt suggests (p. 364), the opening words refer to

Cicero*s speech iVo MarceUo.



493.



494,
496



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THE ORDER OF THE LETTERS.



xovu



498


Fam.


vi. 14, .


Rome,


November 26,


§2.


499


Att.


xii. 6, .


Tuscidnm, .


Second intercalary
month.




600


»>


xn. 7, . .


,, ...




601


»»


xii. 8, .


,, ...


>» >>




602


»»


xii. 11, .


»> ...


(or Dec.),
xiv. Kal. Dec.




603


Fam.


Tii. 4, .


>» • •


Init.


604


>>


ix. 23, .


,, ...


xiii. „


Init.


605


Att.


xii. 1, .


Arpinum, .


ix. „


§1-


606


Fam.


xiii. 66, .


Home,


January, 709 (46),
(see note), .




t607-
1611


»»


xiiL 67-72, .


,, ...


708 (46), month un-










certain.




1612-
(524


»»


xiii. 17-28 A, .


»» ...


f> >'














f526-
(626





xiii. 78-79, .


,, ...


»« »»














627


,,


Ti. 8, .


„ ...


December, .




628


»»


Ti. 9. . .


»»







629





T. 16, . .


?


?




530




XF. 18, .


Rome,


December, .

1





498. To ligarius. Date in § 2.

499-501. To Atticus. Immediately after Caesar's departure, in the second intercalary
month, Cicero went to Tusculum, and stayed there some little time. He after-
wards made a tour round his estates in Campania. These letters were written
during that visit to Tusculum.

602. To Atticus. This letter is placed by Schiche (p. 20) before the Campanian
journey, but probably Schmidt (p. 266) is right in supposing it to have been
written after Cicero's return : cp. Sed adsum ; coram igitur^ and compare the
sympathy expressed for Attica with 606, 2.

603-6. The dates of these letters are specially stated.

606-12. To Servilius Isauricus. He was governor of Asia in 708 (46), cp. Willems,
Le S^natf i. p. 482-3, so that 607-1 1 were probably written in this year ; but
we were wrong in not transferring 506 to the year 709 (45). Caecina did not
leave Sicily for Asia till January of that year.

He was governor of Achaea during this year : cp.
442. In 521, 3, Lepidus is mentioned as consul.

625-6. To Allienus. He was this year governor of Sicily :
525 in the Commentary.

627. To Caecina. Written after Caesar's departure, probably during December, cer-

tainly before January lat (§ 1).

628. To Furfonius. Enclosed in 527.

629. To Titius. See introductory note in the Commentary.

680. To Cassius. Iliis is the first of the three letters to Cassius, as no news had
arrived from Spain when it was written (§ 2).



512-24. To Servius Sulpicius,
Lange, Mm, Alt, lii' ^-



cp. introductory note to



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XOVUl



INTRODUCTION.



A. U. C. 709 = B. C. 46.



631 Fa
632


m. XV. 16, .
, vi. 7, . .


Rome,
Sicily,


•^


Jan. fend), see note
„ (beginning), .




633


, vi. 6, .


Rome,




»>




634


, vi. 18, .






„ (end), see note




636


, iv. 14, .






January,




636


, iv. 10, . .










637


, ix. 10, .










638


, vi. 1, . .










639


, vi. 3, .










640


, vi. 4, . ,










641


, XV. 17, .






;; (end), :




642


, XV. 19, .


BmndiBiuDi,




>> »>




643


, ix. 13, .


Rome,




February (P),




644


, xiii. 16, .


M




»>





631. We are in error as regards the position we have assigned to this letter. Schmidt
rightly shows (p. 273) tbat this is the last of the three letters to Cassius (} 1).
It should change places with 64 1. The reference in this latter epistle to the
journey of Pansa will thus be more apposite, as being made soon after the
event.

532. Caecina to Cicero. The answer to 627 ; therefore at least ten days later.

633. To Caecina. The answer to 632 ; therefore at least ten days latei^

634. To Lepta. Schmidt (p. 271) points out tbat { 6 proves that Tullia's confinement

(which took place in the middle of January) was over, and that she was nearly
well ; so that she could have gone to Tusculum, but Cicero was still detained by
business in Rome. We should accordingly have placed this letter at the end oi
the letters of January, i.e. after 542.

535. To Plancius. Ste introductory note to this letter in the Commentary.

636. To Marcellus. Cicero would hardly express a fear that Marcellus would delay

his return, unless he actually had evidence that Marcellus wm unduly delaying:
so that this letter should be placed a considerable time after the pardon of
Marcellus. We have accordingly, with Wesenberg, placed it in January,
709 (46).

637. To Dolabella. Written about the same time as 641, on account of the reference

in both to the death of Sulla (537, 3 ; 541, 2).

638—40. To Torquatus. In 638 news of some deci.sive action in Spain is expected
(6 6). 639 must come shortly after 638, for no definite news has yet arrived
($ 2). In 640, 1, the decisive action is imminent. Cicero was sml (} 3) at
Rome ; he had not gone to Tusculum with TulUa.

To Cassius. This is certainly the second of the letters to Cassius. It follows
630, as some reports, though only unofficial ones, have arrived from Spain
(§ 3): cp. note to 631.

Cassius to Cicero. This answers 631, 641, so that it must be at least nine days
later than these : cp. note to 429.

^43—4. To Dolabella and Caesar. There is nothing definite to fix the dates of these
letters, except that they were probably written before anything decisive had
been announced from bpain, and belere news had reached Rome that Caesar
had been saluted Imperator (Feb. 19, cp. Bell. ITisp. 19).



641



642.



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OBLIGATIONS TO MENDELSSOHN. xoix



IV.— OBLIGATIONS TO MENDELSSOHN.



Iq his masterly and aoourate critical edition of the Epp. ad
FamiiiareSy published in the spring of 1893, Ludwig Mendelssohn,
professor in the university of Dorpat, in a kind reference to our
work, pointed out some shortcomings in the critical department,
which his wider knowledge of the subject easily perceived ; and he
generously gave us some admonitions for our future guidance
(p. xxx). These admonitions were — (1) That the Turonensis (T)
be discarded, as being a direct descendant (copied probably from a
copy) of the Parisinus (P), and that the latter be substituted in
its place ; (2) That reference be made throughout to Palatinus
598 (Palatinus Sextus of Graevius) ; (3) That Harl. 2691 be
discarded. We gratefully accept these suggestions, and have
throughout substituted P for T, and introduced Pal. In so
doing, however, we do not profess any original study of
those oodices, and for all references to them have
drawn on the edition of Mendelssohn, whose accuracy
is only equalled by his rigorous and cautious reasonings.

But a few words must be said on the arguments by which
Mendelssohn has established these points.

I. In Vol. II., pp. Ix-lxi, we followed Streicher in holding
that T did not stand in the relation of direct descent from P, but
that both MS8 stood in the relation of descendants of a common
original. Mendelssohn, however, in Melanges Oratix (pp. 169-73)
has proved conclusively that T, which is about fifty years younger
than P, owes its origin directly to P, and is probably a copy of a
copy of that codex. His argimients are as follows : —

(1) Assuming the close connexion of T and P as proved (e.g.
by the transposition in both of i. 9, 17 (idque) to 19 (part), which
appears between mons and mihi in ii. 10, 2, and the addition of
quam rationi in vi. 8, 1), there are, however, many lacunae in T
which can be filled up from P, but none in P which can be
filled up from T. For though ni vererer (vi. 6, 4), praetereo
(vi. 6, 6), quae quidem (vii. 3ft, 2), gloriam (vii. 31, 2), are not



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INTRODUCTION.

mentioned by Chatelain (whose collection of T was used by Thurot)
as omitted from T, it was an oversight on his part not to do so.

(2) Again, the errors of T can be explained from P : e.g. i.
2, 1, commemor (space for six letters) T ; commemor atione P, the
scribe having omitted to join the parts of the word. i. 7, 8, gau^
tuam T ; gau (at end of line), tuam at beginning of next P, the
scribe having forgotten to add -deam. iv. 9, 1, obsectaret T;
ohsec raret P ; the copyist who drew the arc made the c look like
a t. V. 5, 3, Ego . . . «rf- (in adductus) omitted in T ; in P it fills

ei

exactly one line. v. 9, 1, Vaticinius T ; Vatinius P.

(3) Further, the slight variations of spelling, and the fact
that T sometimes omits words (leaving a space), which are written
quite plainly in P, may be explained by supposing T to be copied
from a copy of P.

(4) Lastly, the inversion of leaves in the De Natura Deorum
ii., which is found in T (cp. Thurot, pp. 45-6), is also in P; and
again in De Fato 23, P, as well as T, has maltiit igitur : cp. Thurot,
p. 46.

Of course the idea cannot be at all entertained that P could
have been derived from T. It has a large portion at the end
from vii. 32, 1 [me confer ri) to viii. 8, 6 {impediendi moram)^ which
T has not ; and it does not exhibit the large lacuna from ii. 16, 4
[hoc orbia terrarum) to iv. 3, 4 (cum me colat)^ which is found in T.

II. The Palatinus 598 (cp. Vol. II., p. Ixxxiii) is a paper
MS of the fifteenth or sixteenth century. It was brought from
Heidelberg to Rome in 1623. It contains, among other works,
from fol. 49 Cicero's Epp. ad Familiares ix.-xvi. There are some
corrections introduced from Mediceus 49, 7, which is a copy of
Med. 49, 9, made in 1389, and which is the fruitful source of a
multitude of fifteenth-century manuscripts. Qruter used it while
he was librarian at Heidelberg (1692-1627),* and Graevius after-
wards used Qruter's collation. It is called * Palatinus Sextus ' in
the variorum edition of Graevius, and is spoken of with praise by

• Cp. V. Uriichfl in Miiller's HaDdbuch, i. 64, Janus Grutenis, aus Antverpen
1560—1627, hatte namentUch seit 1692 in Heidelberg einen grossen Kreis yon SchiUem
um sicb versammelt und war seit 1602 als Bibliothekar eifrig bemiiht die palatinischen
Scbatze ausEubeuten.



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OBLIGATIONS TO MENDELSSOHN. ci

the authors therein, e.g. Gebhard on ix. 26, 3, ^ Et bio hunc locum
incorruptum eustodivit laudatissimus codex Palatinus Sextus.'

The letters are given in a confused order, which we reproduce
from the account given by A. Mau in Mendelssohn (xxiii.,note 1).
xi. 1-27, 4 ipfficium) ; 27, 4-27 fin. (at a later period by the same
hand) ; xii. 1-16, part of fol. 69^ empty; ix. 1-26, part of fol.
67^ and 68^ empty ; x. 1-17, 26-29 {ego) ; then follows in same
line 20, 3 {nulla esse) — 25, 3 [sed tu)^ after; which follows in the
same line 29 (illi) — 35 ; xii. 17-21 (in different ink by the same
hand) ; 22-30 (returns to the ordinary ink of the ms) ; xi. 28,
part of fol. 83^ and 84^^ empty ; xiii. 1 — xvi. fin. The letters of
xvL are in the usual wrong order. Thus there would appear to
be omitted x. 18, 19, 20, §§ 1-3 ; xi. 29, and * optime iudicabia ' in
X. 25, 3.

m. As regards Harl. 2591, after looking through it care-
fully in 1887, we were quite satisfied that it was a late manuscript
of trifling value : cp. Hermathenay vi. 43-47. That it is of no use
at all Mendelssohn (p. xvii, note 1) has discovered by tracing its
origin to Med. 49, 7. He does not give any arguments, but in
the case of such an imimportant manuscript there is no necessity
to do so. We shall make no further reference to it.



tOL. It.



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CORRIGENDA.



When the line only is given the reference is to the text : a = first column of notes,
b ex second column of notes.



Page. Line.

8, 2, * servo* is right ; omit brackets : see Adn. Crit.

13, a 22, for *iiV read *i«.'

16, a, omit ' being.' «

19, ft 14, omit *!.'

23, ft 1, for * dices 'r#flrf *dicis.'

42, ft 10, for * apoeiopesis ' read * aposiopesis.'

74, 6, for * horibili ' read * horribili.*

101, ft 11, from end, for * cogant ' read 'cogunt.'

136, 2, &om end, transpose comma after ' Mart.* to follow ' sunt.*

141, 4, from end, for * statum * read * statim.'

162, 4, /or *percucurissem* rtfflrf 'percucurrissem.*

172, ft 3, XZ. We have misrepresented Streicher's argument here: see Adn. Grit.
It is qttare he ejects, retaining tu. In 1. 13 read < to omit quare, as it
(or quae) is found in the mss.*

210, 14, for * March * read ' January or February (beginning).'

213, 8, /or *ulli' read 'nuUi.*

246, 2, for 'April or May ' read 'April 24 (about).'

291, 6, for *medicina' read 'medicinae.*

434, 2, from end, add * ut' before * tamen.*

448, ft 13, from end, for * prasidiis * read * praesidiis.*

459, a 19, for * tv^alfxova ' read * cftSof/iora.*

472, ft 27, note should be — * sed spurdssime] nos ; epureisnme M ; ted pareistime
0. F. Hermann, quam lectionem accipere debuimus.



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PART VI.



Die M. TULLI. 2YNT0MA, CN. POMPEIO ADSENTIOR.



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PAET VI.



LETTERS FROM THE OUTBREAK OF THE CIVIL WAR TO CICERO'S
RETURN TO ITALY AFTER THE BATTLE OF PHARSALIA.

EPP. CCCI.-CCCCXIV.



A. U. C. 705, 706

B. C 49, 48

AET. CIC 67, 58



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LETTEBS OF THE TWENTIETH YEAR OF CICEBO'S
COBRESPONDENOE'.

EPP. CCCI.-CCCCV.



A. U. C. 705 ; B. C. 49 ; AET. CIC. 67.

C0S8. C. CLAUDIUS M. F. MARCELLUS AND L. CORNELIUS
LENTULUS CRUS.



Though Cicero's correspondence during this year extends over only five
months and a-half, still we have a great number of letters, especially letters
to Atticus. The theme which runs through nearly all of them is anxious
deliberation as to what course he should adopt in the crisis ; how he should
decide between, on the one hand, his long connexion with the optimates and
his personal regard for Pompey, and, on the other, his strong oonviction
that the victory would be with Caesar. Cicero's sympathies undoubtedly lay
with the optimates, or, rather, with the principles they represented, and his
conscience always pointed out to him that, if no compromise could be effected,
with them he must cast in his lot ; and he ultimately obeyed his conscience ;
but he was not for an instant blind to the inefficiency, Tiolence, and
selfishness which characterized their words and deeds. For a summary of
Cicero's political attitude during this period, see vol. I^ pp. 100-105.



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CICEEO^S COEEESPONDENCE.



CCCI. CICERO AND HIS FAMILY TO TIRO

(Fam. XVI. ii).

BEFORE ROME ; JANUARY 12 ; A. U. C. 705 ; B. C. 49 ; AET. CIC. 67.

M. Cicero Tironem rogat, ut yaletadini operam del : de buo ad nrbem adyentu, de
tuibato rei publicae statu, de triumpho ao Campana praefectura.

TULLIU8 ET CICERO. TERENTIA, TULLU, ft. ft. TIRONI 8. PLUR.

Die.

1. Etsi opportimitatem operae tuae omnibus loois desidero, tamen
non tarn mea quam tua causa doleo te non valere. Bed quoniam
in quartanam oonversa yis est morbi — sic enim scribit Curius —
spero te diligentia adhibita iam firmiorem fore. Modo fac, id
quod est humanitatis tuae, ne quid aliud cures hoc tempore nisi
ut quam commodissime convalescas. Non ignore quantum ex
desiderio labores, sed erunt omnia faoilia, si valebis. Festinare te
nolo, ne nauseae molestiam suscipias aeger et periculose hieme
naviges. 2. Ego ad urbem accessi pridie Nonas lanuar. Ob-
yiam mihi sic est proditum, ut nihil posset fieri omatius. Sed
incidi in ipsam flammam ciyilis disoordiae vel potius belli, cui
cum cuperem mederi et, ut arbitror, possem, cupiditates certorum
hominum — nam ex utraque parte sunt qui pugnare cupiant —

Q. Q.l QumHqu4f * Qaintns, father friend of Cioero ; cp. Introd. to Fam. Tii.

and son/ 28(477).

1. opporttmitatm] * although at 2. e^torum} We may translate 'oer-

eTery turn I miss )rour ever-season- tain.' The epithet signifies that the

able assistance.' Reid, on Lael. 22, author knows exactly who are the men

remari^s that opporiunitat is * op- referred to (the expression therein differ-

portuneness,' rather than * opportu- ing &om nstoiQ qtU), but does not wish

nity.' to specify them further : cp. Best. 41»

Omim] a banker at Patne, and dose Marc. 16, Deiot. 11.



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6 CCCII. {FAM. r. 20).

impedimento mihi fuerunt. Omnino et ipse Gaeseur, amicus noster,
minaoes ad senatum et acerbas litteras miserat et erat adhuo
impudens, qui ezeroitum et proyinoiam invito senatu teneret, et
Curio meus ilium incitabat. Antonius quidem noster et Q.
Cassius nulla vi expulsi ad Caesarem oum Curione profeoti erant,
postea quam senatus consulibus, praetoribus, tribunis pi. et nobis,
qui pro ooss. sumus, negotium dederat ut ouraremus ke qtjid rbs
PUBLICA DETRiMENTi CAPERET. 3. Numquam maioro in perioulo
oivitas fuit : numquam improbi cives habuerunt paratiorem duoem.
Omnino ex hao quoque parte diligentissime oomparatur. Id fit
auotoritate et studio Pompeii nostri, qui Caesarem sero ooepit
timere. Nobis inter has turbas senatus tamen frequens flagitavit
triumphum, sed Lentulus consul, quo mains suimi beneficium
faceret, simul atque ezpedisset quae eseijet necessaria de re publioa,
dixit se relaturum. Nos agimus nihil cupide eoque est nostra
pluris auctoritas. Italiae regiones discriptae sunt, quam quisque
partem tueretur. Nos Capuam simipsimus. Haec te scire volui.
Tu etiam atque etiam oura ut valeas litterasque ad me mittas,
quotienscumque habebis oui des. Etiam atque etiam vale. D.
pridie Idus Ian.



CCCn. CICERO TO MESCINIUS RTTFUS (Fam. v. 20).

BEFORE ROME ; MIDDLE OF JANUARY ; A. U. C. 706 ; B. C. 49 ;

AET. CIC. 67.

Ezcusat 86 M. Cicero Rufo, quod ante eius reditum rationes proyindales, in quibus
ille quaedam vel addita yel immutata cupiebat, ad aeraiium rettulerit

CICERO RUFO.

1. Quojtto modo potuissem, te oonvenissem, si eo, quo oon-
stitueras, venire voluisses. Qua re etsi mei oommodi oausa oom-

Omnino] ' to sum up,' ' looking on nulla vt\ cp. vol. iii., pp. zciii., xdT.

the whole affidr ' : see Reid on Lael. 78. 3. quo maiut . . . fae^rtt'^ * that he

amieui nosUr] Note how Cicero im- might bring bis own service into greater

plies that the reason why he could not prominence.'
mediate was because he was friendly with

both sides : cp. below Curio m#t<#, An- Itufo"] This Mescinius Rufus was one

toniut noster. By mous a closer ^end- of the quaestors of Cicero in Cilicia ; and

ship is marked than by noiter, has be^ described (Att. tI. 3, 1» ep.

adhue] <eyen still,' trot being the 264) as Uvit Hbidinotut tagax. The

epistolary impttf ect. present letter is in answer to a letter from



Digitized by LjOOQIC



CCCII. {FAM. r. 90). 7

moTere me nolaiBti, tamen ita existimes velim me antelaturum
fniflse, si ad me misisseSy voluntatem tuam commodo meo. Ad ea,
quae soripsisti, oommodius equidem possem de fiingulis ad te
rebus scribere, si M. Tullius, scriba mens, adesset : a quo mihi



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