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Margaret M Campbell.

Suggestive lessons in numbering arranged for individual work, fifth grade online

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ARRANGED FOR INDIVIDUAL WORK 47

this long piece be? How thick? (f) Then what is an-
other measure for a "board foot"? It is usually written
12 ft, X 1 in. X 1 in., or 12'Xl"Xl".

3. If 12' X l"Xl"=l foot of lumber, then
12' X 2"Xl"= .................. feet of lumber;

12' X 3" XI" .................. " "

12' X 4"Xl"= .................. " "

12' X 6"Xl"= .................. " "



tf



12' y 8"Vl"= " " "

12'XlO"Xl"= .................. " "

12' X 2"X2"= .................. " "

12'X 4"X2"= .................. " " "

12' X 6"X2"= .................. " "

12'X12"X2"= .................. " "

12' X 4"X4"= " " "

4. If 12'Xl2"Xl"=l board foot, then
12" X 6"X1"= ..... - ........... board foot;

12" X 4"Xl"= ............. - "

\fyrr\s Q"\/1" *' "

A^ X O X 1 = ..................

12" X 5"Xl"= .................. "

19"\/ 7"v1" tf ft

*-& X ' X-L = ..................

24" X 6"X1"= .................. "

24"X8"Xl"
- = .................. board feet ;



24"X9"XI"
= board feet.



5. Find out how much lumber would be needed to



48 SUGGESTIVE LESSONS IN NUMBERING

make this bookcase, (a) How many pieces are necessary?
(b) How long is each piece? (c) What is the width of
each piece ?

4"X26"X7"X1"

= board feet ;

12"X12"X1"

l"X26"X5"Xl"

= board feet.

12"X12"X1"

Total = board feet,

6. White pine costs 30 cents a board foot, and bass
35 cents a board foot, (a) Find the cost of the lumber
if the bookcase is made of white pine, (b) If made of
bass wood.

7. If the bookcase is to be finished up, you will need
5 cents for stain, 15 cents for shellac, 5 cents for nails and
5 cents for cord. What would be the entire cost of such a
bookcase?

LESSON XVIII.

The Public Library of Los Angeles suggested this list
of books for Children's Book Week:

"Little Women." L. M. Alcott. Little. $1.75; $3.00.

"Hans Andersen's Fairy Tales." Illus. by Louis Rhead.
Harper. $1.75.

"Old Mother West Wind." T. W. Burgess. Little. $1.20.

"Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the
Looking Glass." Lewis Carroll. MacMillan. $1.75.

"The Brownies; Their Book." Palmer Cox. Century.
$1.75.



ARRANGED FOR INDIVIDUAL WORK 49

"Cinderella's Granddaughter." B. B. Gilchrist. Century.
$1.75.

"The Mutineers." C. B. Hawes. Atlantic Monthly
Press. $2.00.

"High Benton." William Heyhger. Appleton. $1.75.

"Nelly's Silver Mine." Mrs. H. H. Jackson. Little. $1.75.

"Toby Tyler." J. O. Kaler. Harper. $1.60.

"The Jungle Book." Rudyard Kipling. Doubleday. $2.00.

"Dr. Doiittle." Hugh Lofting. Stokes. $2.25.

"Pinocchio." Carlo Lorenzini. LeRoy Phillips. $2.25;
Ginn, 75 cents.

"The Boys' Life of Edison." W. H. Meadowcroft. Har-
per. $1.75.

"The Dutch Twins." L. F. Perkins. Houghton. $1.75.

"The Tale of Peter Rabbit." Beatrix Potter. Warne.
75 cents.

"The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood." Howard Pyle.
Scribner. $3.50.

"The Real Mother Goose." Illus. by Blanche Fisher
Wright. Rand, McNally. $2.50.

"The James Whitcomb Riley Reader." Bobbs-Merrill.
$1.00.

"The Children's Book." H. E. Scudder. Houghton. $5.00.

"Heidi." Johanna Spyri. Lippincott. $1.50.

"The Home Book of Verse for Young Folk." B. B.
Stevenson. Holt. $2.75.

"The Child's Garden of Verses." R. L. Stevenson. Scrib-
ner. $1.00.

"Tom Sawyer." Mark Twain. Harper. $1.75.

"A Short History of Discovery." H. W. Van Loon.
McKay. $3.00.

1. How many of these books have you already read!
If you had to buy them, how much would they cost!



50 SUGGESTIVE LESSONS IN NUMBERING

2. Make a list of the books that you would like to read.
How much money would you need to buy them?

3. Name the books that you would like to own. What
would be the cost of these books?

4. Select two of these books that you would like to
give to two of your friends, (a) If you bought them, how
much would they cost you? (b) If you could save 25 cents
a week, how long would it take you to get money enough
to buy them? (c) How long would it take you with what
you do save to buy them?

5. If you had five dollars to buy some of these books,
which ones would you choose? What would they cost?

6. (a) Suggest a number of books that would cost
about $10.00; about $15.00.

7. Write a letter ordering two or three books that can
be bought from the same firm. In your letter, be careful
that you name the books, their authors and the price of
each; also, the whole cost.

8. Get blanks, "Application for Money Orders," from
your nearest postoffice, and fill them out for $3.50 ; $4.75 ;
$5.25.

10. How far is it from San Diego to Linda Vista?
From Irvine to Anaheim? From Santa Ana to Los Nietos?
From Anaheim to Rivera? From Aliso to Los Angeles?

11. How long does it take No. 76 to run from Los
Angeles to Orange? What is the distance between these
two places? About how far does this train run in one
minute ? At this rate, how far would it travel in one hour ?

12. How long does it take No. 74 to run from Los
Angeles to San Diego? How far apart are these two
cities? About how many miles does this train go in
one hour? In fifteen minutes?



ARRANGED FOR INDIVIDUAL WORK 51

LESSON XIX.

FOOTBALL.

"Rule I, Section I. The game shall be played on a
rectangular field, 360 feet in length and 160 feet in width.
The lines at the ends of the field shall be termed 'End
Lines.' Those at the sides shall be termed 'Side Lines'
and shall extend indefinitely beyond their points of inter-
section with the goal lines."

1. (a) The length of a football field is how many
times its width? (b) Its width is what part of its length!

2. (a) If in drawing a football field you made its
width 2 inches, what should you make its length? (b)
If the width were 4 inches, what should the length be?

(c) If the width is 6 inches, the length will be inches.

(d) If the length is 18 inches, the width will be -...inches.

3. (a) If 1 inch in your drawing equals 1 foot in the
length of the field, how many inches long should you make
your drawing? (b) If % inch equals 1 foot, the drawing
should be how long? (c) If % inch = 1 foot, the drawing
will measure how many inches? (d) If %e i ncn = 1 foot,
how many inches wide will your drawing be?

4. (a) If 1 inch in the drawing equals 10 feet of the
field, how long should the drawing be? How wide? (b)
Let 1 inch equal 20 feet. What is the length of the draw-
ing? What is the width? (c) Let 1 inch equal 40 feet.
Find the length and width of the drawing, (d) If 1 inch

equals 60 feet, the length of the drawing is inches

and the width is inches.

5. Draw the football field to the scale of 1 inch equals
40 feet. Remember to let the side lines extend beyond the
end lines.

6. "Section 1. The 'Goal Lines' shall be established in



52 SUGGESTIVE LESSONS IN NUMBERING

the field of play ten yards from and parallel to the end
lines. The space bounded by the goal lines and the side
lines shall be termed the 'Field of Play.' The spaces
bounded by the goal lines, the end lines, and the side
lines shall be termed the 'End Zones.' (a) Ten yards
equal how many feet? (b) How far are the goal lines
from the end lines? (c) 30 feet are what part of 40 feet?
(d) If 1 inch equals 40 feet, what part of an inch equals
30 feet? (e) How far should you measure from the end
lines to show where the goal lines should be placed?
(f) How many points should be located? (g) Draw the
goal lines in your drawing.

7. How long is the Field of Play? How wide is it?
Find the number of square feet in it.

8. How long is an End Zone? How wide is it? How
many square feet are there in an End Zone? How many
in both of them?

9. How does an End Zone compare in size with a
Field of Play? How many times as large is the Field of
Play? (Do you add, subtract, multiply or divide to find
out?)

LESSON XX.

"Section 2. The Field of Play shall be marked at inter-
vals of five yards with white lines parallel to the goal
lines."

1. (a) Five yards equals how many feet? (b) 15 feet
is what part of 40 feet? (c) What part of an inch shall
you measure off to show five yards in your drawing?
(d) Locate all the five-yard lines that cross the Field of
Play.

1 'Section 3. The goal posts shall be placed in the middle






ARRANGED FOR INDIVIDUAL WORK 53

of each goal line, shall exceed 20 feet in height and be
placed 18 feet 6 inches apart."

2. (a) Twenty feet is what part of forty feet? (b)
What part of an inch represents 20 feet in your drawing!
(c) About how long shall you make the line that stands
for 18 feet 6 inches? This lacks how much of being 20
feet? (d) How can you find the middle of the goal line?
(e) If the goal posts are % inch apart in your drawing,
how far is each from the middle point of the goal line?
What is y 2 of one-half inch? (f) How far are the goal
posts from the side lines? (g) How far apart should
they be on your drawing? Measure your drawing to see
if it is right.

"Rule V. The game shall be decided by the final score
at the end of the four periods. The following shall be the
value of the plays in scoring:

Touch down 6 points

Goal from touch down 1 point

Goal from the field 3 points

Safety by opponents 2 points"

3. Find the final scores for these games:

(a) FuUerton (Cal.) High School

5 Touch downs
2 Goals from touch downs
Covina 0.

(b) FuUerton

7 Touch downs
1 Goal from touch down
1 Goal from the field
1 Safety by opponents
Riverside 0.

(c) FuUerton



54 SUGGESTIVE LESSONS IN NUMBERING

San Diego
3 Touch downs

3 Goals from touch downs.

(d) Fullerton and Santa Ana each had

1 Touch down

1 Goal from a touch down.

(e) Manual Art High School, Los Angeles,

2 Touch downs

1 Safety by opponents
Pasadena 0.

(f) Manual Art

4 Touch downs

4 Goals from touch downs
Whittier High School.
1 Touch down

1 Goal from touch down.

(g) University of California, Berkeley,

2 Touch downs

1 Goal from touch down
1 Goal from the field
Oregon Agriculture
1 Touch down
1 Goal from touch down,
(h) University of California
4 Touch downs
4 Goals from touch downs
Ohio State University 0.



ARRANGED FOR INDIVIDUAL WORK



55



LESSON XXI.
HOW TO BEAD THE TABLE.



HEIGHT and WEIGHT TABLE for BOYS


u


5

Yrs.


Yrs.


Yrs.


A:


Yrs.


10
Yrs.


11

Yrs.


Yrs.


13

Yrs.


14
Yrs.


&


A


A


18


39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47

I

51
52
53
54
55

1

61
62
63
64

i

70

8
1

76


35

11

41

43
45
47
48


36
38
40
42
44
46
47
49
51
53
55


87
89

I

45
46

i

52
54
.56

8

62


44

J?

48
50

59

66
69


40
51

1

64

I


54

63
65
68

78
81
84

i


11

61
64

75

85
88
92

105


62
65

76

8

86
89
93
97
102
107

m


71

81
84

15

94
99
104
109
115
120
125
130
134
138























78
88

9

102
106
111
117
122
126
131
135
139
142
147
152
157
1C2


86
90
94
90

104
109
114

us

123

127
132
136
140
144
149
154
159
164
169
174


91
96
101
106
111
115
119
124
128
133
137
141
145
150
155
160
165
170
175


97

102
108
113

ffi

125
129
134
138
142
146
151
156
161
166

m

178


110

18

123
126
130
135
139
143
147
152

ll

167
172
177










































































v.




























































































(






































....i








































































1






























PfiCPARED BY OH. THOMAS D. WOOD











1. What should a 5-year-old boy who is 39 inches tall
weigh? A boy of six years? One of seven years? Why



56



SUGGESTIVE LESSONS IN NUMBERING



doesn't the table give weights for 8, 9 and 10 years for
children who are 39 inches tall?

2. (a) Find the weight for a boy 42 inches tall who
is 7 years of age. (b) For one who is 46 inches tall and
9 years of age. (c) For a boy who is 57 inches tall and
11 years of age.



HEIGHT and WEIGHT TABLE for GIRLS



Yrs.



Yrs.



Yrs.



Yrs.



10
Yrs. Yrs.



12
Yrs.



Yrs.



14

Yra.



A



16
Yra



A



A



40



48



68




BY OR. THOMM 0> WOOD



ARRANGED FOR INDIVIDUAL WORK 57

3. Read the table for a height of 61 inches, putting it
down in this way:

age. weight.

61



4. (a) Find the weight of a boy 65 inches tall and
15 years of age. (b) 52 inches tall and 9 years of age.
(c) 48 inches tall and 8 years of age. (d) 59 inches tall
and 10 years of age. (e) 43 inches tall and 7 years of age.

5. (a) How old and how tall should a boy be who
weighs 68 pounds? (b) One who weighs 56 pounds?
(c) One who weighs 70 pounds? (d) One who weighs
46 pounds.

6. (a) What is the weight of a 7-year-old girl whose
height is 42 inches? What is the weight of a 10-year-
old girl whose height is 48 inches? (c) Of a girl who is
9 years old and 47 inches in height?

7. (a) Find the weight of a girl who is 11 years old
and 50 inches tall, (b) Of one who is 8 years old and
48 inches in height, (c) Of one who is 12 years of age
and 57 inches tall.

8. (a) Find the height and the age for a girl who
weighs 51 pounds, (b) For one who weighs 54 pounds.
(c) For one who weighs 58 pounds, (d) For one who
weighs 74 pounds.

9. (a) How much does the table show that a boy 51
inches in height and 10 years of age should weigh? (b)
A girl of the same height and weight? (c) What weight
does the table give for a girl 54 inches in height and
12 years of age? (d) For a boy of the same height and
age?

10. (a) How much taller is a boy who weighs 100
pounds than a girl who weighs 100 pounds? (b) What is



58 SUGGESTIVE LESSONS IN NUMBERING

the difference in their ages? (c) How much taller is
a boy who weighs 123 pounds than a girl of the same
weight? (d) What is the difference in their ages?

11. (a) What is the height and age of a girl who
weighs 144 pounds? (b) Of a boy? (c) What is the
difference in their heights?

LESSON XXII.

ABOUT WHAT A GIRL ABOUT WHAT A BOY
SHOULD GAIN EACH SHOULD GAIN EACH
MONTH. MONTH.

5 to 8 6 oz. 5 to 8 6 oz.

8 to 11 8 oz. 8 to 12 8 oz.

11 to 14 12 oz. 12 to 14 12 oz.

14 to 16 8 oz. 14 to 16 16 oz.

16 to 18 4 oz. 16 to 18 8 oz.

Try to do as much better than the average as you can.

1. (a) If a child from 5 to 8 should gain 6 ounces a
month, how many ounces would such a child gain in a year ?
(b) How many ounces in a pound? (c) 6 ounces is what
part of a pound? (d) How many pounds in a year?

2. (a) A child 8 to 12 will gain how many ounces in

3 months? (b) This equals how many pounds? (c) What
part of a pound does such a child gain in one month?
(d) How much more does a boy 8 to 12 gain in one month
than a child 5 to 8? (e) This is what part of a pound?

3. (a) A boy 12 to 14 gains how many ounces in

4 months? Hoy many pounds? (b) 12 ounces is what
part of a pound? (c) What part of a pound more does a
boy 12 to 14 gain in one month than a child of 5 or 8?

4. (a) How many months will it take a boy 16 to 18
to gain one pound? To gain 3 pounds? to gain 6 pounds?






ARRANGED FOR INDIVIDUAL WORK 59

(b) How many months will it take a girl 16 to 18 to gain
one pound? To gain 4 pounds? To gain one-half pound?
To gain 5 pounds? Is this more or less than one year?
How much?

5. (a) How much should a girl 5% years of age who
is 39 inches in height weigh? (b) How much should a boy
whose age is 7 years 6 months and who is 42 inches tall
weigh? (c) Find the weight of a girl whose age is 8 years
and 4 months and whose height is 46 inches, (d) Find
the weight of a boy who is 10 years and 9 months old
and who is 50 inches tall.

6. (a) How many months are there in a year? (b) Six
months is what part of a year? (c) How many months
equal one-third of a year? (d) Three months is what part
of a year? (e) Which is the more, one-half of a year or
one-third of a year? How much more? (f) 8 months is
what part of a year? (g) Nine months is what part of
a year? (h) How many months is the same as one-sixth
of a year?

7. (a) About how much should a boy 8 to 12 gain in
one week? In two weeks? (b) How much should a boy
14 to 16 gain in 2 weeks? In 3 weeks? (c) How much
should a girl 11 to 14 gain in 3 weeks? In one week?
(d) How much more will a boy 14 to 16 gain in one month
than a girl 14 to 16?

8. (a) How much should a boy 8 to 12 gain from the
first of January to the last of May? (b) About how
much should a girl 11 to 14 gain from the Fourth of July
till Christmas? (c) About how much should you gain
from January 1 till your birthday? (d) How much
should your best friend gain from January 1 till his
birthday ?



60



SUGGESTIVE LESSONS IN NUMBERING



LESSON XXIII.

1. How many inches in a foot? 39 inches equals how
many feet? How many inches remaining? 3 inches is
what part of a foot?

39 inches = feet, inches, or 3!/4 ft.

2. 40 inches equals how many feet? How many inches
remaining? 5 inches is what part of a foot? How do
you write it?





40 inches


3.


41 inches




42 inches




43 inches




44 inches




45 inches




46 inches




47 inches




48 inches


4.


49 inches




50 inches




51 inches




52 inches




53 inches




54 inches




59 inches




60 inches


5.


61 inches




62 inches




63 inches




64 inches




65 inches




66 inches



feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet.

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,

feet, inches,



or...
or..
or..
or.,
or.,
or..
or.,
or..



it.

ft.

ft.

ft.

ft.

ft.

ft.

ft.



or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.

or ft.



ARRANGED FOR INDIVIDUAL WORK 61

67 inches = feet, inches, or ft.

68 inches = feet, inches, or .ft.

69 inches = feet, ~ inches, or it.

70 inches = feet, inches, or.

72 inches = feet, inches, or.

6. (a) If one boy measures 44 inches and another
measures 48 inches, how many inches taller is the second
boy than the first? This is what part of a foot? (b)
If one girl's height is 63 inches and another's is 71 inches,
what is the difference in their heights? This number of
inches is what part of a foot?

7. (a) Find the height of the oldest girl that weighs
120 pounds, (b) Find the height of the youngest boy
that weighs 120 pounds. Write the difference in their
heights as a part of a foot.

8. (a) Look for 130 pounds as a weight for a boy.
What age and what height are given for this weight?
(b) See how many times you can find this weight for
either a boy or a girl. Get the heights and ages for each
one of these.

9. How old and how tall is a girl who weighs 149
pounds? What is the age and what is the height of a boy
who weighs this same amount?

10. What is your weight? How tall are you? What
is your age? What does the table say that you should
weigh at your age? Do you weigh more or less? How
much?

11. Are you tall enough for your age? Are you too
tall? Do you weigh enough for your age? How can you
tell by comparing your height, age and weight with this
table?



62 SUGGESTIVE LESSONS IN NUMBERING



LESSON XXIV.

How to make a Height and Weight Table for the Boys
in your room:

1. (a) Draw an oblong 4 inches by 5 inches. The
4-inch side is the top. (b) Draw a line one-half inch
below the top line of this oblong, (c) In this space print
neatly "Height and Weight Table for Boys." (d) Draw
another line one-sixteenth of an inch below the line you
have already made.

2. (a) Make another line which is one-half inch below
the line made for (b) in problem 1. (b) How many six-
teenths of an inch are there between this line and the one
made for (d) in problem 1? (c) Divide the first inside
line into eight equal parts, (d) How wide should each
of these parts be? (e) What is the easiest way of locating
these points?

3. (a) Make points on the bottom line which are the
same distance apart as those you have made above, (b)
Connect the top and bottom points with straight lines,
(c) How many places have you made? How many lines
are there?

4. (a) In the first little box to the left print the word,
"Height." (b) From the school register get the ages in
years, using the nearest birthday, for all the boys in the
room, (c) Arrange their ages in a column, beginning with
the youngest and ending with the oldest, (d) Now place
these ages in the remaining little boxes, putting the young-
est in the box next to the one with the word, "Height."

5. (a) Measure all the boys (without shoes) in the
room, (b) Find the height in inches of each boy. (c)
Arrange these heights in a column, being careful to begin



ARRANGED FOR INDIVIDUAL WORK 63

with the lowest number and ending with the highest.

(d) See that you have as many numbers as you have boys.

(e) Now place these heights in this order in the first
column to the left. Make as nice, neat figures as you can.

6. (a) If possible, have all the class go to the scales
where you can take turns in weighing each other without
shoes. It might be well to have your teacher or some
one who has used scales to check up each weight, (c)
Take down the weight in pounds or pounds and half-
pounds, being careful that you get the right weight for
the right boy.

7. (a) Pill in the table by putting the right weight
opposite the right height and under the right age. (b) If
this table does not show your best work, make another.

8. Make a table in this same way for the girls in the
room.

9. (a) How many boys are there in the room whose
weights are below normal? How many above? (b) How
many girls are there whose weights are below normal?
How many above? (c) What can these boys and girls do
to make their weights about right?

10. (a) Which boy lacks the most of being the right
weight? (b) About how much must he gain each month
to have the normal weight for the next year? (c) Which
girl is farthest below normal? (d) How much should she
gain each month to get her weight up?






LESSON XXV.



1. (a) Make a card upon which to keep your own
height and weight for each month of the year, (b) How
many spaces shall you need for the weights? (c) How
many for the heights? (d) How wide a space should you



64 SUGGESTIVE LESSONS IN NUMBERING

have for each? (e) What would be a convenient size for
the card!

2. (a) Upon heavy paper make a six and one-half
inch square, (b) Why is this a convenient size? (c)
Draw a line one-half inch below the top line, (d) From
the top line draw a line to the bottom; that is, one-half
inch from the left side.

3. (a) Divide the rest of the top line into twelve equal
parts, (b) Do the same with the bottom line, (c) Con-
nect these points with lines extending from top to bottom,
(d) How far apart are these lines?

4. (a) Put the name of the present month in the first
space. In the second space place the name of next
month; the next in the third space, and so on until all
twelve months have been named. Practice printing so
that you can space your letters well, (b) Try to get your
height and weight on the same day each month, and
record measurements and weights in proper place.

5. How to make a Classroom Weight Record: (a)
Secure a sheet of drawing paper that is 16 inches by
14 inches. Draw a line that is % inch from each edge,
(b) Inside of these lines you have just made, draw others
at a distance of % inch, (c) Inside of these lines draw
still another at a distance of % 6 i ncn - (d) Either shade
or ink the space between the first and second lines. These
three lines form the border, and none of the inside lines
cross them.

6. One of the 14-inch sides forms the top. (a) Measure
down 2y inches from the top. Place points on either side.
Connect these points by a heavy line, (b) % inch below
this, draw another heavy line, (c) Measure up from the
bottom 1% inches, (d) What space at the top was used
up in the border? At the bottom? At both top and



ARRANGED FOR INDIVIDUAL WORK



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bottom? (e) What is the sum of the space that has been
measured off at both top and bottom? (f) How much
space is left?

7. (a) Locate points on both sides *4 inch apart. How
many will there be on one side? (b) Connect points that
are opposite by drawing light lines. (c) How many
spaces are there?

8. (a) 2% inches from the left side, draw a heavy line
that extends from the first heavy line at the top (below
the border) to the heavy line at the bottom, (b) Measure


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Online LibraryMargaret M CampbellSuggestive lessons in numbering arranged for individual work, fifth grade → online text (page 3 of 5)