Marion Daniel Shutter.

Rev. James Harvey Tuttle, D. D. : a memoir online

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LIB RARY

OF THE

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PRIVATE LIBRARY



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JAMES HARVEY TUTTLE, D.D.



REV. JAMES
HARVEY TUTTLE, D.D.



A Mtmaxv



BY



MARION DANIEL SHUTTER

Minister of the Church of the Redeemer, Minneapolis



*



BOSTON
UNIVERSALIST PUBLISHING HOUSE

1905



COPYRIGHT, 1905,
By UNIVERSALIST PUBLISHING HOUSE



Published September, 1905



Stanbopc press

. QILSON COMPANY
BOSTON, U.S.A.






i/^



'r^



o






GEORGE MONTGOMERY TUTTLE



*' The true, faithful minister has rewards as rich as his
position is difficult. Outside of the family, there is no relation
more tender, more beautiful, more sure of sweet and lasting
friendship than that between the pastor and his congregation.
When he has succeeded in showing himself approved of God,
and has justly earned the full confidence of his people, the
blessings of Heaven are sure to fall in copious showers upon
his life, however thickly set with care it may be, and the loving
ones who gather about and cheer him in his earthly work, will
serve as an earnest of the voice he will one day hear on the
other side of the grave, saying unto him, ' Well done, good and
faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord.' "

Rev. James H. Tottle, D.D., at the Ordination
of E. W. Pierce, Owatonna, Minn.



CONTENTS



I

THE EARLY LIFE AND THE OPENING MINISTRY

Ancestry — Childhood, Youth, Call to the Ministry — First
Sermon — License to Preach — Richfield Springs — Ordina-
tion — Fulton : Marriage, Persecutions, Triumphs 1

n

ROCHESTER: THE LARGER OPPORTUNITY

Founding of the Church — George W. Montgomery — The Call
to Rochester — The New Pastor and the Retiring One —
Theological Controversies — Reform Movements — An Im-
portant Meeting — Sermons on " Human Life " — Birth of
Younger Son — The Wife and Mother — Close of Pastorate

— After Many Days 15

m

THE CHICAGO MINISTRY : PERIOD OF THE CIVIL WAR

Permanent Organization — Regular Services Began — The
Coming of Mr. Tuttle — First Sunday in Chicago — Installa-
tion Services — Building of House of "Worship — The Build-
ing Completed — The Civil War — A Sunday-school
Drill Room — The Parting Scene — Sword Presentation —
How a Young Soldier Remembered — In Labors Abundant

— Progress Through Difficulties 38



VI CONTENTS

IV

MINNEAPOLIS : BEGmNING OP A TWENTY-FIVE YEARS'
PASTORATE

Miiiueapolis in 1866 — Pirst Universalist Society — Rev. I)ol-
phus Skinner and Rev. J. W. Keyes — Call to Mr. Tuttle —
The New Pastorate — The First Church Building -The
First Organ — Increasing Prosperity — Preaching of Mr.
Tuttle 61

V

SUNSHINE AND SHADOW

Visit to a Logging-camp — Some Forest Giants — The Family
Residence — An Incident of the Time — Harriet Merriman
Tuttle — Recollections of Friends — The Voyage in Hope —
The Message of Despair — At Rest in Rosehill — A Pil-
grimage to Dresden 76

VI

A YEAR OF TRAVEL

Leave of Absence — Pulpit Supplies — On the Atlantic — From
London to the Rhine — The Rhine and the Mississippi —
Berlin and Dresden — Munich; Kaulbach, Dollinger — Rome:
Preaching in the Eternal City — "William and Mary Howitt

— Florence: Theodore Parker — The Holy Land — On the
Mount of Olives — The Return: Sv^itzerland , France, the
British Isles — The American Minister to France — Home
Again — Sunday Services — Home Ties — The Great Lessons

— Waiting for his Coming 93

VII

THE CHURCH OF THE REDEEMER

Lectures by the Pastor — Completion and Dedication of the
Church — Dedicated as Church of the Redeemer — Dr.
Miner's Sermon — Doctor of Divinity — Across tlic Plains —
A False Alarm — Custer's War-Horse — Ice-Water in the
Desert — A Traveler's Description of the Church — Church
Life and Activity 114



CONTENTS -VU

VIII

THE GENERAL CONVENTION

Importance of the Event — Woman's Centenary Association

— President's Address — Occasional Sermon — Sabbath
Worship — Influence of Science — New Questions — Report
of the Board of Trustees — Dr. Tuttle in California — Recol-
lections of Starr King — A Disciple of Otis Skinner-^
Preaching at Riverside — Conclusion liifS

IX

A PERIOD OF EXPANSION: THE SECOND, OR ALL SOULS',
CHURCH

First Universalist Society in Minnesota — Two Important Res-
olutions — Founding of the Second Church — Rev. L. I).
Boynton — Dedication of the Second, or All Souls', Chm-ch

— Subsequent History — Twentieth Anniversary — Letter
to Mrs. Alcott 143

X

A CONFERENCE WITH DR. TUTTLE AND ITS RESULTS

Resignation of Writer from Olivet Baptist Church — A Letter
from Dr. Tuttle — A Conference with Dr. Tuttle — A
Second Meeting with Dr. Tuttle — First Sermon in the
Church of the Redeemer — The Decision Reached — Death
of James C. Tuttle — Tributes to James C. Tuttle — A Sign
of the Millennium — A Winter in the South — A Trip to
Cuba — Letter from Thomasville 154

XI

ASHES AND BEAUTY FOR ASHES

Destroyed by Fire — Courtesy of Other Churches — Services in
the Grand Opera House — The Emblem of Hope — Re-
building the Temple — Some New Features — The Reded i-
cation — A Second Visit to California — In the Land of
the Midnight Sun — The Midnight Sunrise — The Sixty-
sixth Birthday 173



viii CONTENTS

XII

COMPLETION OF A TWENTY-FIVE YEARS' PASTORATE

Resignation — Pastor Emeritus — The Celebration ; Dr. At-
wood's Sermon — Remarks of Dr. Tuttle — Monday Evening
— Tlie Speeches — The Letters — The Presentation — The
Marble Font 192

XIII

THE THIRD, OR TUTTLE, CHITKCH

Dr. Tuttle's New Plans — Sale of Cornell Lots and New Pur-
chase — Organization and History of Third Society —
The Leadership of Dr. Tuttle — Laying a Corner-stone —
Completion and Dedication of the Building — Subsequent
History of the Tuttle Church 209

XIV

LOOKING TOWARDS THE SUNSET

In New York — Reminiscences of Dr. Chapin — Dr. Eaton —
Heber Newton — Anecdote of Robert Collyer — Beginning
of the End — Trip to Alaska — Church Reception— Review-
ing the Summer— A Bundle of Letters — Dr. Eaton's
Funeral — The Second Stroke — The Last Year — Letters to
Mrs. Hallowell, Mrs. Shutter, and Miss Cleveland — The
Last Letter — At the Gates 224

XV

BEYOND THE GATES

Death of Dr. Tuttle — The News in Minneapolis — Remains
Brought to Minneapolis for Burial — Funeral Services in
the Church of the Redeemer — Interment at Lakewood — A
Prayer 249



CONTENTS IX

XVI

"THE CONCLUSION OF THE WHOLE MATTER"

Kingship of Character — Firm Religious Faith — Broad Sym-
pathies — Loyalty to his own Church — Progressive Spirit

— Conclusion 263

APPENDIX

Letter of License — Certificate of Ordination — A Pupil of
Dr. Sawyer — Letter from Mrs. Montgomery — Dedication
of Lakewood Cemetery — Dedication of Millers' Monument

— Funeral Service of Rand and Coykendall Families —
Letter to Thomas Lowry — Letters of Congratulation on
Twenty-fifth Anniversary: from President Northrop, Dr.
Miner, Dr. Cantwell, Robert Collyer, Dr. Sawyer, F. 0. Hol-
man — Letter of Dr. Tuttle on Death of Father Throop —
Lake Minnetonka — Letter to Mrs. Taylor — Letter to
Rev. A. R. Tillinghast 276



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



PoHTHAiT OF Dr. Tuttle Frontispiece

PoBTBAiT OF Mr8. Tuttle facing page 77

Chubcu of the Rbdeemek, 1876 facing page 116

FiCTUBES FBOH LoAFDEN facing page 225

PiCTDRES FROM LoAFDEN facing page 249

Chubch of the Redeemer, 1903 facing page 263



PREFACE



At the completion of his twenty-fifth year as
pastor of the Church of the Redeemer, Dr. Tuttle
pubhshed a book entitled, The Field and the Fruity
containing a historical account of the Church and
twelve selected sermons. While the writer of the
present volume has sometimes referred to the his-
tory, his illustrations of the style and thought of
Dr. Tuttle have been drawn from other sources;
not from those twelve sermons. He did not wish
to repeat what is already in possession of many of
his readers or easily accessible. So he has gathered,
from scrap-books, files of old newspapers, and
pamphlets now out of print, extracts from sermons,
addresses and other articles, which he has used to
show Dr. Tuttle's literary style — always grace-
ful, often illuminated by poetic imagery and gentle
humor. Especially has the writer employed for
the closing chapters, materials from the Doctor's
remarkable private letters to friends, after the pub-
lic work was done and the tongue could no longer
utter the promptings of the heart. These are pub-
lished because they reveal the man — his inner
Ufe, his interests, his patience under physical limi-



xii PREFACE

tations, his last messages to those he loved. No
pictures of his closing years could be more beau-
tiful than these which — all unconsciously — he
sketched with his own trembling hand. The
author of this book wishes to acknowledge his
indebtedness to all who have so kindly placed at
his disposal the sources of information — Church
Records, Memorial Addresses, Private Letters, and
Personal Recollections — from which the following
pages have been drawn. It should be explained,
perhaps, as the Introduction is dated from " Loaf-
den," that the work of gathering the materials was
done in Dr. Tuttle's cottage, during the summer of
1904, and there the first draft of this memoir was
written.



INTRODUCTION



The task of compiling and writing these pages
has been a labor of love. I was associated with
Dr. Tuttle and his work for about seventeen years.
It was a line he wrote me when I separated from
the Baptist Church, that led to my finally becom-
ing his assistant in the Church of the Redeemer —
tlius deciding the bent and aim of my efforts from
the day when the doors of the old church closed
behind me, until now.

Through all these years I have known him
intimately, and have loved him with an affection
that grew deeper and deeper to the day when he
fell asleep. A more unselfish soul never blos-
somed out of the Eternal Love to bless the world.
When he began to lay aside the burdens of his
ministry upon my shoulders, he used to say, " I
know that I must decrease and you must increase.
I would not have it otherwise." He was anxious
that his friends should be my friends ; that his
supporters in the Society should be mine ; that
the great work he had begun and developed should
go successfully on. How much he did to smooth
my pathway during those first years in my new

3dii



xiv INTRODUCTION

relationship ! We had differences of opinion and
of method. These we used to discuss frankly and
freely. There was no hedging or trimming. There
were consequently no misunderstandings. When
we could not agree in our opinions, we agreed in
our differences. In practical plans of usefulness,
I deferred to his larger experience and to his more
intimate knowledge of conditions and people. The
event, in most instances, showed him to be right.

I was with him in his sorrows and tried to com-
fort him in his bereavements. I knew his momen-
tary despondency, his deep and unshaken faith ;
the sympathies that were wide as human needs,
the aspirations that were high as heaven. I saw
him complete his quarter of a century's service
with the people he loved and who loved him ; and
then I saw him, declining to rest upon the laurels
of those years, go down among a struggling hand-
ful of people, put something of his own spirit and
enthusiasm into them, and stay with them until
he had built another temple, into whose corner-
stone their gratitude carved his name. He meant
to have done the same thing for another society ;
but a sudden stroke fell upon him, and that kind
of work was ended. I saw him rally his energies
for a different struggle, and so far conquer that
he reentered the circle of his friends, enjoyed the
delights of travel, and set about turning an un-
promising tract of land upon the Lake into a gar-



INTRODUCTION XV

den. The stroke was repeated, and the voice that
had charmed and instructed thousands became
strangely inarticulate. But his plans went on. In
rain and sunshine he superintended and directed
the work upon his place at the Lake, turning a
swamp and wilderness into a thing of beauty. But
he was still and above all a minister and messen-
ger of God, and even when his lips could not per-
form their complete office any longer, his pen wrote
messages of cheer and comfort.

When I knew that I should write this sketch of
my beloved friend and pastor, I wanted to come
to this spot which he beautified, and where I have
spent so many precious hours in his company. It
seemed fitting that if I was to write of him, I
should do it here. I felt that I should get my
inspiration from these scenes that blossom with so
many tender and fragrant associations. One year
ago, for the last time, we walked these paths to-
gether. It would not seem strange if his form
should reappear — if one should see him where
he sat among the trees, or standing upon the rus-
tic bridge to watch the stream that flowed beneath,
or gazing with all the delight of a child upon the
lilies in the water-garden. And who knows but
that his presence invisible hovers over this scene
to-day ? At any rate, here it is that my work has
been done — how feebly and inadequately I know
full well ; but better than I could have done it



XVI INTRODUCTION

anywhere else. I now read the pages over, and
feel the injustice they do by falling short. The
description seems cold and lifeless, compared with
the reality I knew and which has stamped its im-
age so deeply upon my heart. I only know I
loved him, and out of that love I have written ;
and I am sure that the charity which forgave so
many of my shortcomings and blunders here, will
not fail me in that higher life to which he has
risen.



c^^^>uk.-J:^^7^oa^^



LoAFDEN, Lake Minnetonka,
August, 1904



JAMES H. TUTTLE



CHAPTER I

THE EARLY LIFE AND OPENING MINISTRY

Ancestry — Childhood, Youth, Call to the Ministry — First
Sermon — License to Preach — Richfield Springs, Ordina-
tion — Fulton, Marriage, Persecutions, Triumphs.

This is a biographical sketch of one who cared
to be known only as a Christian minister; who
felt that there was no calling more high and
holy, no title more honorable. Such a sketch is
not easy to write. Vast as the influence of its
subject may have been, there is usually little of
outward incident, less that is in any way striking
or spectacular. It is easy to trace the career of
one who has builded in the outward and material.
The bridge, the railroad, the warehouse — these
can be seen. The work of the statesman can be
fairly measured. The treaty he has concluded, the
policy he has inaugurated, the bill with which his
name is identified — these may be pointed out.
But of the life of a Christian minister one can
speak, at best, in vague and general terms. His
biographer may tell of the ideas that he proclaimed,

1



2 JAMES H. TUTTLE

or of a church that was builded during his min-
istry ; but, after all, his work is so largely an in-
fluence that touches individual hearts, that its
complete record is on high, and will be unfolded
only in the day when we shall see " eye to eye and
face to face."

ANCESTRY

James Harvey Tuttle was born at Salisbury,
Herkimer County, New York, July 27, 1824.
His father was Ransom Tuttle, a farmer well
known throughout all that region for his integrity
and sterling worth. His mother was Ethena Ellis.
He was one of a family of eleven children, all but
one of whom grew up to manhood and woman-
hood. William died in 1828, at the age of eleven.
On the father's side, the family are direct descen-
dants of William and Elizabeth Tuttle who came
over from Gravesend to Boston on the " Planter,"
in 1635, and subsequently removed to New Haven.
The '♦ homestead " which William Tuttle purchased
of Joshua Atwater was sold, in 1717, to the
trustees of Yale College, who immediately began
the erection upon it of the first college building.
The oldest buildings of the institution still stand
upon this plot of ground, which was the only
land owned by the college for nearly thirty years.
It is worthy of note that over four hundred de-
scendants of WilKam Tuttle have graduated at



EARLY LIFE AND OPENING MINISTRY 3

Yale. A pleasant story of this ancestor has been
preserved. While serving as constable, in 1664,
a young girl was charged with pilfering from her
master and from others, among other things some
liquoi-s. She tried to implicate Mercy Tuttle
(the young daughter of the constable) in the
crime, by saying that Mercy met her at Goodman
Thorpe's and drank some of the liquor. The child
denied the charge and it was proved false. The
girl's crime was therefore aggravated by false-
hood. Before sentence was pronounced, William
Tuttle, having liberty to speak, arose and ad-
dressed the court, and said, " the young girl's sin
was very great, yet he did much pity her, and he
hoped the court would deal leniently with her and
put her in some pious family where she could
enjoy the means of grace for her soul's good."
The court, in consideration of this appeal, said
that " her punishment should be as light as com-
ported with a proper sense of the heinousness of
her sin," and so sentenced her " to be publicly
and severely whipped to-morrow after lecture."
The descendant of William Tuttle who relates
this incident says : " It is a gratification to find
that our ancestor's ideas about the public whip-
ping-post as a means of grace or as an instru-
mentality for the reformation of young girls, were
somewhat in advance of his time."' The "quality

* The Tuttle Family, by Geo. Frederick Tuttle, published by
Tuttle and Company, Rutland, Vt., 1883.



4 JAMES H. TUTTLE

of mercy " and sympathy in the nature of William
Tuttle seems to have been transmitted through the
generations to the subject of this sketch.

EARLY LIFE

The childhood and youth of James Tuttle
were passed much as the childhood and youth of
other farmers' boys. He worked upon the farm
in summer and attended the district school in
winter. He was a diligent student, and soon be-
came competent to teach a district school himself.
He spent more than a year in the Fairfield Acad-
emy and two years at the Clinton Liberal Insti-
tute. Plans were formed for attending Harvard
University, but they were never carried out. But
from his youth down to the day of his death,
James Tuttle was a most faithful and painstaking
student. Few men were better informed than he.
His active mind searched every department of
knowledge. He was familiar with church history
and doctrine ; he was acquainted with the develop-
ments of modern science ; he was a lover of all
that was best in literature. In the completest
sense of the phrase, he was an educated man.

Religiously, James Tuttle was brought up a
Baptist;^ but when quite young he changed his

* Dr. Atwood, to whom the writer is indebted for much of
the material in this chapter, says : "In Herkimer Covmty I
have visited Dr. Tuttle' s sister and have often talked with per-



EARLY LIFE AXD OPENING MINISTRY 5

religious views and became a Universalist. A note
of this event is found in tlie Evangelical Magazine
and Gospel Advocate, published for many years at
Utica, N. Y., to the effect that " a young man named
James H. Tuttle, living at or near Salisbury Cen-
ter, Herkimer Co., New York, had become a Uni-
versalist, and had been encouraged to ' testify ' in
the Universalist Church at Salisbury, of which the
Rev. P. Hathaway was at that time minister." He
thought his own way from the old faith to the
new ; and his perfect honesty of purpose is attested
by the fact that he could not have done a more
unpopular thing ; for, at that time, the sect of
Universalists was "everywhere spoken against."
In many places their meetings were broken up and
their preachers mobbed. The grossest opinions
were attributed to them. They were thought to
be dangerous to society. The fact that they hoped
for heaven at last for every soul, was interpreted
to mean license to turn this world into a hell of
passion and crime. One who trusted that others
might not be damned, was set down as doomed to

sons who knew him and knew of him in boyhood. He had a
consistent, clean, and fine reputation from the first. His people
were Baptists, and he himself united with that church at a com-
paratively early age. I have been shown the stream and spot
where he was 'buried in baptism.' I remember telling 'my
boys' in the Canton Theological School, on my return, what I
had seen, and saying I was minded to take them all down to
Herkimer County and try the effect of submerging them in the
same waters."



6 JAMES H. TUTTLE

damnation himself. If James Tuttle had been
seeking popularity or striving to attain selfish ends,
he would have gone leagues away from Univer-
salism. Only persons of deep convictions and
heroic mold had courage to enter its alien gates.

Soon after this change took place, he decided to
enter the ministry. In the enthusiasm of his new-
found views of God and of human destiny, he
wished to tell the story to the world. He preached
his first sermon at Ingham's Mills, four miles east
of Little Falls, when he was but eighteen years of
age. From the very first, he gave promise of use-
fulness and power. With utter self-abandonment,
he proclaimed the Eternal Goodness. Boy though
he was, his rural congregation listened with won-
der and tears. It seemed as if they had never be-
fore heard the message with such earnestness and
sincerity ; and when the sermon at Ingham's Mills
was finished that far-off Sunday morning, it was
felt that a new force had been born into the ranks
of the despised sect, and many " thanked God and
took courage."

No doubt his determination to become a minister
was emphasized by an incident of his early child-
hood, which left a lasting impression upon his
mind. When very young, not more than three
years old, he wandered away from his home and
was lost among the hills and woods. So soon as
missed, search was made for him in every direction,



EARLY LIFE AND OPENING MINISTRY 7

but he could not be found. Night came on, with
what anxieties, apprehensions, terrors, may be
imagined. Long after the shadows had fallen, the
search was kept up, with lanterns and torches, with
ringing of bells and blowing of horns, and shout
of troubled voices, but without avail. All the
while the hearts of the searchers were growing
chill with the thought that he must be dead. In
the morning, however, the little fellow was found
fast asleep in a distant wood where he had passed
the night. How he came there neither he nor
any one else could tell. This incident assumed in
his mind, as he grew up, the aspect of direct provi-
dential care that fitted in with his new views of
the divine love. He felt that, in his own life, he
had evidence of the Fatherhood of God, and that
he had been preserved for a purpose. But what-
ever the considerations that influenced him to the
choice of his life-work, he writes when reviewing
his career : " I can sincerely say that I never for a
single hour, if for a moment, regretted that I chose
the ministry for my profession and the Universalist
Church for my field of work."

RICHFIELD SPRINGS

The young preacher of Ingham's Mills was soon
heard from in the surrounding country. He
preached at Ford's Bush and at Little Falls, where
a society was organized about tliis time, and at



8 JAMES H. TUTTLE

other points in the neighborhood. It was not long
before he was formally licensed; in June, 1843,
before he was quite nineteen, he was received into
the fellowship of the Mohawk River Association.
In December of this same year, we find him en-
gaged as "pastor elect" at Richfield Springs; and
a notice appears in the Magazine and Advocate for
December 8, and is repeated in several subsequent
issues, that, " The Third Conference of the Otsego
Association will be held in Richfield Springs on
the second Wednesday and Thursday (10th and
11th) of January, 1844. During the meeting Br.
J. H. Tuttle will be ordained. Sermon by Br. P.
Hathaway of Salisbury. It is expected that our
venerable Br. Stacey will be present." The Rev.
W. G. Anderson reports this Conference in the
issue of the Magazine and Advocate for January


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