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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



GIFT OF

Mrs. Ben B. Lindsey




PAUL



A HERALD OF THE CROSS



BY



FLORENCE MORSE KINGSLEY

Author of" Titus " and "Stephen ''



Philadelphia

HENRY ALTEMUS

1898



COPYRIGHT, 1897, BY FLOHENCB MORSE KINGSLEY



1IENKV AI.TF.Ml'S, MANUFACTURER

I IIII.Alil I 11I1A



rs

2/7J



TO MY FATHER



1106228

(Hi)



PREFACE.



TN "Titus," the first of this series, I endeavored to
-* make new "the old, old story," to depict a real,
a living Jesus, not enthroned in some far-away inac
cessible glory, but " with us alway, even unto the
end."

In "Stephen," I showed the bereft disciples, com
forted with the comfort which streamed down into
their sad hearts in abundant measure from the Master
who had gone away because it was "expedient" for
them, joyful with the joy which he had given them,
and serene in the midst of trial and persecution with
the peace which he had bestowed upon them, a last
precious legacy.

In " Paul," I have carried the story further, and
with it I have interwoven some account of the great
world without the confines of the Holy Land ; the
world which lay in misery and sin, and into which
Christ had bidden his disciples go forth to carry the
Glad-tidings of the Cross.



vi PREFACE.

Saul the persecutor, the relentless Pharisee, the
learned rabbi, has become Paul, the herald of the
Cross. We see his heroic figure starting out into the
night alone, in that darkest hour which comes before
dawn, proclaiming in trumpet-tones the glorious tidings
of the coming day. We see the brood of evil crea
tures, that loved darkness rather than light, bestir
themselves to do him battle. We see the conflict
joined, never to be given over for a moment till the
worn conqueror lays his armor down to receive the
crown of victory from the hand of the Lord, the right
eous Judge.

To fully understand the life and labors of the great
apostle, it is necessary to also comprehend something
of the hopeless degradation of those in high places, to
look for an instant into the frightful abysses into which
the decadent religions were hurrying mankind. I have
therefore endeavored to portray the Christless world
the world as it was in the " fullness of time," as well
as the divine remedy applied.

It seems scarcely necessary to give the long list of
authorities consulted in the preparation of this volume.
It will be noticed, however, that I refer most frequently
in my occasional notes to Farrar's " Life and Work of
St. Paul," and to "The Life and Epistles of St. Paul "
by Conybeare and Howson. And, indeed, while I



PREFACE. vii

had in my possession many of the authorities to which
these authors in their turn refer, I would acknowledge
my great indebtedness to their scholarly works. I
should also mention Guhl and Koner's " Life of the
Greeks and Romans," to which I referred continually
for information relating to dress, customs, etc. ; and to
the ancient chronicles of Josephus, where I found the
stories of Agrippa, of Caius, of Herodias, and of the
other historical personages who figure more or less
largely in these pages.

If in these scenes from the life and times of St. Paul,
I have succeeded, in some small measure, in enabling
the reader to see for himself not merely Paul, the the
ologian ; Paul, the setter-forth of " the scheme of sal
vation ;" Paul, the stern ascetic, thundering forth reproof
and denunciation against evil-doers but Paul, the fear
less herald of the Cross, pouring out his life like water,
that he might save the lost ; Paul, the tent-maker,
laboring with his hands that he might minister to the
necessities of others ; " Paul, the aged ;" " Paul, the
prisoner of the Lord Jesus," healing the sick, cheer
ing the oppressed and down-trodden, the father of all
the churches, the friend of sinners and of God if we
shall look upon him thus, we shall read the Epistles
with new eyes, seeing in them the outpourings of a
great loving heart which beat divinely for all human-



viii PREFACE.

ity ; and so reading, we shall long to be numbered
among the saints and faithful brethren to whom he
writes.

FLORENCE MORSE KINGSLEY.

WEST NEW BRIGHTON, Feb. 6, 1897.

STATEN ISLAND, N. Y.



CONTENTS.



PART I.
" The Night is Far Spent."

CHAPTER PAGE

I. THE VISION ON THE HOUSETOP, . . .13
II. IN THE HOUSE OF JUDAS, 23

III. THE SOOTHSAYER, 32

IV. THREE PRINCES AND A SLAVE 39

V. IN THE DESERT OF SINAI, 49

VI. THE RECLUSE OF CAPRAE 58

VII. THE ROSE OF LEBANON, 70

VIII. A FORBIDDEN VISIT, 77

IX. IN THE TEMPLE OF BAAL, 88

X. THE PHYSICIAN AND THE EMPEROR, .... 96

XI. THE MASTER OF THE WORLD, 107

XII. THE CHOSEN AND THE ACCURSED, . . . .115

XIII. SAUL IN JERUSALEM, 129

XIV. HERODIAS, ......... 143

XV. CAIUS, THE GOD, . . . . . . .152

XVI. THE COLOSSUS OF SIDON, 167

XVII. THE MEDIATOR, 180

XVIII. THE END OF THE PLAY, 191

XIX. INTERREGNUM, 201

XX. CLAUDIUS OESAR, 209

(ix)



: CONTESTS.

PART II.

" The Day is at Hand!'
CHAPTER PAGE

XXI. AN EPISTLE, . . . . . . .223

XXII. A BOATMAN OF ANTIOCH, 228

XXIII. THE KING OF THE JEWS, 2ji

XXIV. A STRONG DELIVERER, 253

XXV. RETRIBUTION, ........ 261

XXVI. SENT FORTH. . 271

XXVII. A LIGHT OF THE GENTILES, . . . . 282

XXVIII. A MESSENGER OF THE MOST HIGH, . . 291

XXIX. THE CALLING OF TIMOTHY,. .... 301

XXX. FROM JERUSALEM TO GALATIA, .... 310

XXXI. IN PIIILIPPI, . . .' 317

XXXII. A STRANGER IN ATHENS, . . . . . 329

XXXIII. THE TENT MAKER, . . . . 3^1

XXXIV. A BUSINESS MAN OF EPHESUS, . . . .353
XXXV. GREAT DIANA OF THE EPIIESIANS, . . . 366



TART III.
"An Ambassador in Bonds"

XXXVI. " DESPISED AND REJECTED," ... 381
XXXVII. A PROMISE AND A Vow, . . . . .392

XXXVIII. PAUL AND FELIX, . . . . . . .403

XXXIX. "C^ESAREM APPELLO!" . . . . , . 415

XL. ON THE WAY TO ROME, 427

XLI. " READY TO BE OFFERED," 44.0



PART I

"THE NIGHT is FAR SPENT"



(xi)



3.7;



CHAPTER I.

THE VISION ON THE HOUSETOP.

IVE the little one to me, and rest thou, queen of
my soul, while I show him the new moon
yonder."

" He is ill because of the hot wind," said the
woman wearily. " See the roses also, how they hang
their heads ; the breath of the wilderness is death to
such tender things."

"Ay," said the man, "it is an evil spirit which the
mountains yonder war against continually. But be of
good cheer, it hath again been driven back into the
fiery torments of the desert. Hark, littlest, hearest
thou the voice of the fountains, the song of many
birds also, and the rejoicing of the green leaves ?"

He paused for a moment in his slow walk and the
child hushed its fretful wail to listen ; as for the mother,
she sat quietly, her back against the parapet, her eyes
fixed upon the slender horn of the new moon which
hung above the low eastern horizon. Through the
silence came the musical gurgle and rush of water, and
the rustle of foliage from the little garden below.

"Look thou at the great mountain, son of mine,"
continued the man ; " he hath put on his robes of rose

(13)



14 PAUL.

that he may say farewell to the sun. Anon, he will
be clothed in violet, then in sad garments the color
of ashes, afterward he will sleep. Sleep thou also,
little one ; to-morrow there will be no wind from the
desert. Sleep thou, and the good Shepherd will
watch thee."

" I hear some one knocking," said the woman.
She arose and advanced to the parapet which over
looked the street. " It is our neighbor, Simon ; he
hath returned from his jqurney to Jerusalem and
will tell thee of it. Give me the child ; he will sleep
now," and taking the little one in her arms she de
scended to the terrace.

A slow step on the stair presently announced the
new-comer. He was a stout man and breathed
heavily as he set his foot on the roof level. He was
also grumbling aloud. " Had I a garden below, such
as thine, friend Ananias," he said, " I would not
climb to the roof."

" Greetings, friend, and a welcome," returned Ana
nias with a quiet smile. "Jehovah grant that thy
ways have been prospered. My garden is indeed
good, but this is better, for here one can feel the
breath of the mountains, the fragrance of the eternal
snows on Hermon yonder."

Simon replied with a shrug of the shoulders and
an inarticulate grunt, as he settled himself upon a
bench. "There are tidings of evil," he said ab
ruptly. " Hast thou heard ?"

" Nay, I have not heard ; what hath befallen ?"



THE VISION ON THE HOUSETOP. 15

" As them knowest, I have been in Jerusalem ; there
hath been there a great persecution of them that be
lieve on the Crucified One. Many are slain ; others
are in prison, and others still are fled."

The face of Ananias grew white in the fading light.
"Who hath caused these things to be done?"

" They that slew Jesus of Nazareth, and who will
yet accomplish the destruction of all that believe on
him," answered Simon bitterly.

" Hast thou forgotten that the Christ is set down at
the right hand of Jehovah?" cried Ananias. "Surely
he will not suffer our foot to be moved."

" He hath already suffered Stephen to be killed with
stones. He hath suffered others of the disciples to be
scourged and imprisoned. He hath suffered babes
also to be left desolate, and little children to wail for
food. But the destroyers wax fat and flourishing ;
they are not moved."

" So hath it ever appeared," said Ananias. " Yet
is the Lord mindful of his own." Then, after a pause,
he added, " We are at peace, thanks be to Jehovah,
for there is no one in all Damascus who would lift up
a hand against us who also walk blameless according
to the law. Let us send word to the smitten ones that
they come hither ; here shall they find refuge."

" I have not yet told thee the worst," said Simon,
dejectedly. "A certain Saul of Tarsus, a Pharisee
taught of Gamaliel, and most bitter against the Christ,
hath come hither to Damascus with the intent to carry
away in chains to Jerusalem every least disciple of the



16 PAUL.

Crucified One. He is without mercy, and will slay
and spare not all that resist him. When I heard of
his purpose, I made haste to return to Damascus, that
I might warn the brethren. Surely it were better to
flee into the desert than to perish miserably under the
scourge."

His voice died away into silence, and in the hush
the voice of the mother singing to her babe floated up
to them.

Ananias moistened his dry lips. " Didst thou say
that the man laid his hand also upon women and
babes ?" he asked huskily.

" More than once hath he seized the mother and left
the little ones desolate in the house for so it was told
me in Jerusalem," replied Simon. "Yet it may be
that the Lord hath had mercy upon us. I heard a
strange thing concerning the man as I came hither to
night ; it was told me by Ben Ethan, one of the keepers
of the Eastern Gate. Yesterday, at about the ninth
hour, a company of men approached the city, some
riding upon beasts, others walking. In the midst was
a man, whom also two of his comrades led by the
hand. When the head keeper questioned them, say
ing, ' Who are you and whence do ye come ?' One
made answer, saying, ' The chief man of our company
is Saul, a worshipful rabbi from Jerusalem. He bear-
eth letters from the Senate and Council of Israel to the
governor of this city.'

" ' Let him appear then and speak,' quoth the keeper
of the gate. To whom the other made answer, ' The



THE VISION ON THE HOUSETOP. 17

man Saul hath been grievously smitten in the way by
a great and terrible light which blazed suddenly out
of heaven as we journeyed ; and lo, he is blind, and
we have brought him hither leading him by the hand,
even as thou seest. Grant us an entrance speedily, I
pray thee, that we may fetch him to a resting-place,
for he is in a desperate strait.' '

" And as Ben Ethan looked earnestly upon the man
Saul, he perceived that he trembled exceedingly as he
stood, and seemed not to hear what was passing about
him, but continually did moan within himself, and also
that his face was as the face of one stricken with death.
Furthermore, he told me that when the business with
the chief officer of the gate was finished, that they led
the man, still trembling and moaning, into the city.
God grant that death follow hard after, and that it
overtake him speedily."

Ananias shook his head. " Thou knowest not what
thou art saying, friend. God's ways are not man's
ways, nor are his thoughts their thoughts. There is
something here that we do not understand."

" If he be smitten that he die, then shall we live we
and our little ones," said Simon obstinately. "Therefore
shall I continue to pray to God to remove him out of the
land of the living. Surely he hath deserved to die."

" Pray, rather, that God's will may be done concern
ing the man and us. Even should he rend my child
from my bosom I could not pray for his undoing.
Vengeance belongeth to the Lord, and in his hand
also is the breath of every living thing."

2



18 PA UL.

" Pray as thou wilt, friend," said Simon, rising, " and
I will pray, even as did David, for the destruction of
mine enemies. The Lord heard him and gave him his
desire upon them that sought his hurt, as thou mayst
read in the Psalms. Farewell ; Jehovah keep thee and
thine."

Ananias seemed hardly to have heard the parting
words of his guest ; he also had risen and was walking
slowly up and down. His heart had grown heavy
within him, and it was heavier still as he saw his wife
approaching from the adjoining roof-terrace.

"Our son sleeps, my lord," she said, with a low
laugh of content. " Thou shouldst have heard him
pray to the ascended One ; he repeated the prayer
that thou didst teach him, and afterward, ' Good Jesus,
let not the wind from the desert blow to-morrow.
Amen.' I could not chide him, and to-morrow the
wind will continue to set from Lebanon, thou wilt
see ; for I believe that the Ascended heeds the little
ones whom he so loved w r hen he was on earth."

" Teach him, then, to pray that our faith be not
shaken," said Ananias with a sigh.

" Assuredly, that is a good thing to ask. But what
said our friend Simon of his journey ? And why hath
he made such haste to be gone ? I would fain have
heard of the wondrous sights he beheld in Jerusalem."

" He brought tidings of evil, heart of mine. The
brethren which dwell at Jerusalem are suffering many
things at the hand of them which believe not, scourg
ing, imprisonment, and even death."



THE VISION ON THE HOUSETOP. 19

The woman shuddered. " Nay, then, I am glad
that we do not dwell there," she said quickly. " It is
r. wicked city and doubtless the vengeance of Jehovah
will yet overtake it, even as Sodom perished at his
word. But come, my lord, let us sup, for the hour
grows late. I had the intent to have bidden our
neighbor also, for to-night we shall taste the first of
the white figs from the young tree by the fountain.
They are fine, I can promise thee ; I plucked them
myself."

" Go thou and eat, little one ; I shall fast to-night for
the peace of the brethren," said Ananias, turning away
his head.

" And what will it profit them, my lord, if thou dost
fast? Wilt thou not eat of my figs even?" and the
woman laid her hand persuasively on her husband's
arm.

He looked down at her with a melancholy smile.
" Dost thou love me, rose of Lebanon ?"

" What shall I answer thee, my lord ? I love thee
even as the thirsty earth loveth the streams which flow
down from the mountain ; the desert laughs aloud
because of the abundance of waters."

" 'Tis well, life of mine. Go thou and rest in peace ;
but as for me, I must fast and pray this night, both for
the brethren that be in peril, and also for our own
souls that they faint not in the hour of trial."

The w r oman looked at him, her eyes misty with
vague alarms. " Let me fast with thee, my lord. I
also will pray."



20 P.i UL.

" Nay, I would be alone. Go."

She lingered yet a moment, looking wistfully at the
averted face, then she turned swiftly and went away,
but not before an angry little sob had escaped her.

Ananias aroused himself at the sound. " I must
have spoken roughly to the child," he murmured peni
tently. "What if I tell her all but no, I cannot.
To-morrow I will look into the matter further, and if
a persecution be imminent I will send her away into
the mountains together with my son ; they will be safe
there." Then he fell again into a reverie, but this time
his thoughts busied themselves with the day when he
had first seen the rose of Lebanon, blooming in a
remote nook of the barren hills, and of how, saddened
and grown old before his time, he had plucked the
flower to fill his desolate home with fragrance and
beauty. " Nay, my God, I cannot again suffer as I
have suffered," he said aloud, clenching his strong
hands. " I will die for the faith if need be, but spare
thou these."

The long hours of the summer night crept slowly
by, the slender young moon, shamed by the golden
radiance of the thronging stars, hid herself behind
the rim of the desert. The breath of roses floated
spirit-like on the breeze, and in the silence the voice
of myriads of fountains cried aloud, the small silver
tinkle of the jets about the basin below, the gush and
babble of water-wheels in the neighboring gardens,
and above all dominated the solemn murmur of the
river, Barada, mother of all the waters. " From the



THE VISION ON THE HOUSETOP. 21

eternal snows I come, to the unchanging desert I go :
there is no variableness, neither shadow of change in
the God that hath set my course."

To the man, who still watched and prayed on the
housetop, there came at length peace. He knew that
the Lord had heard him, and that the blessing was
not far away, that it was even at hand as was also the
day, for all the snowy heights of Hermon were flushed
with heavenly color. He wrapped himself in his man
tle and lay down, and immediately a deep sleep fell
softly upon him. As he slept, it seemed presently
that the roseate glimmer of the dawn had deepened
and brightened into a splendor of light ; in the midst
of the light he saw the figure of a man, a man into
whose face he looked with awe and yet with an over
whelming sense of joy and love, for it was the face of
his ascended Lord.

Then was there the sound of a voice, it called him
by his name. He made answer, saying, " Behold, I
am here, Lord."

Again came the voice and these were the words
of it : " Arise, go into the street which is called
Straight, and enquire in the house of Judas for one-
called Saul of Tarsus ; for behold, he prayeth, and
hath seen in a vision a man named Ananias coming
in, and putting his hand on him, that he might receive
his sight."

To Ananias it seemed that without fear he answered
of all that was within his heart, " Lord, I have heard
of this man, how much evil he hath done to thy saints



22 PAUL.

at Jerusalem, and now he hath authority from the
chief priests to bind all that call on thy name."

But the Lord said unto him, " Go thy way : for he
is my chosen herald, to proclaim my name before the
Gentiles, and kings, and the Children of Israel : and I
will show him how great things he must suffer for my
name's sake." Then the glory faded, Ananias awoke,
and behold, it was day.



IN THE HOUSE OF JUDAS.



CHAPTER II.

IN THE HOUSE OF JUDAS.

" ' r I ^ IS a strange case, and most untoward, I would
gladly have aided the holy council of Jeru
salem in suppressing this deadly heresy ; but in a
heathen city and unsupported by outside authority,
what could we do ? If the man do not speedily re
cover his wits, we must report the matter."

"Thinkest thou that he will recover?"

Judas shrugged his shoulders. " Nay, how can I
tell ? There was a light, sayest thou ? Lightning
perchance, and yet how could that be out of a cloud
less heaven ?"

"There was a light," said the other vehemently;
" I myself saw it, as did the others of our company ;
there was also a sound, as of a voice a terrible voice,
but the sound was void of meaning."

A slight incredulous smile flitted across the atten
tive face of his listener. " If there chanced to be a
cloud overhead, we should say that the sound was
thunder."

"There was no cloud, I tell thee," said the other
hotly. " The heavens were as clear as they are at this
moment."

"Well, what was it then?"



24 PAUL.

The man, who was called Silas Ben Ezra, dropped
his eyes in silence, seemingly intent on nothing more
important than the pattern of the rich Persian carpet
beneath his feet.

" It is evident that thou hast an opinion, friend,"
continued Judas. " Come, explain the matter accord
ing to thy thought concerning it, thou wast an eye
witness.'"

Ben Ezra raised his head and looked squarely into
the face of his host. " I will tell thee what I think
hath befallen the man," he said, and there was a shade
of defiance in his low tones. " He beheld the cruci
fied Nazarene and was rebuked of him."

"What sayest thou?" cried Judas angrily. "Art
thou also apostate, who wert chosen by the holy San
hedrim to perform this sacred mission?"

" If it be heresy to believe the evidence of one's
senses then am I apostate," declared the other boldly.
" Saul answered the voice ; twice answered he and
after this manner ; first he cried out as one greatly
astonished and afraid, 'Who art thou, Lord?' And
afterward, ' What wilt thou have me to do ?' "

"The man was crazed by the heat," said Judas,
with an easy wave of the hand. " 'Tis no less than
the act of a fool to travel at midday in this clime."

Ben Ezra's black eyes flashed angrily. "Think as
thou wilt, my worshipful host," he said coldly. "And
I also, who was eye-witness, will hold to mine own
opinion of the matter."

"Nay, but friend," said Judas softly, "hast thou



IN THE HOUSE OF JUDAS. 25

duly weighed and considered the matter aright ? Thou
hast as yet spoken of this to no other save myself;
but and if thou shalt return to Jerusalem and say to
the most holy and reverend high priest, Saul hath
had a vision of the Nazarene whom ye lately slew, and
hath been smitten with blindness because of his
glory, what then will befall thee ? Will it not be
better to say, Saul was smitten with the fierce heat of
the sun, insomuch that he fell to the earth blind and
senseless ; for because of his zeal in thy service he
was traveling at midday. If it was in truth a vision,
then let the man declare it for himself, and bear the
consequences thereof that is, if ever he recover his
lost wits, which I myself doubt."

Ben Ezra stroked his beard in silence for a time,
then he said slowly, " Thou hast spoken words of
wisdom ; and I have heard and understood ; also it is
an evil thing to be an apostate, and a foolish thing to
interpret a vision which hath appeared to another.
For the present I will not return to the Sanhedrim.
The others of the company may report the matter as
seemeth best to them."

"As to the man himself," pursued Judas, " if indeed
he be mad, or if an unclean spirit hath entered in and
taken possession of him, he must needs go forth into
the desert ; so shall he recover himself, if it be the will
of Jehovah."

" Thou wouldst not thrust him forth, blind and help
less as he is !" said Ben Ezra, aghast.

" If Jehovah hath smitten him, or if the evil one



26 PAUL.

hath obtained the mastery over him, it signifieth one
and the same thing according to the law," said the
other judicially. " He hath gravely sinned, and it ill
becometh man to strive against unseen powers ; besides
all this, he that hath disordered wits is unclean and
polluteth the house of a righteous man. How now,
Malluch ! What wouldst thou ?"

"I kiss thy feet, most worshipful master," replied
the slave, who had noiselessly entered the apartment.
"There is a man without who desires entrance, one
Ananias, a Jew. He would see Saul of Tarsus."

" Admit him at once, and conduct him to our pres
ence ; I would fain know his errand with the man."

The slave bowed himself before his master and with
drew, to return a moment later followed by a man,
upon whom both Judas and Ben Ezra fixed their eyes
with some curiosity.

"Greetings, friend," said Judas, "thou art known
unto me by reputation as one that is zealous for the
law and also for the peace of Israel ; I am glad, there
fore, that thou hast sought my dwelling. Most wel
come in these troublous times is the converse of holy
men."

Ananias bowed his head courteously in response to
these greetings. " My errand is with one Saul of Tar
sus, who is abiding under this roof," he said gravely.
" I pray you to conduct me without delay into his



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