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BOSTON
PUBLIC

LIBPvARY




Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Boston Public Library



http://www.archive.org/details/northendwaterfroOObost




^V e>i'573



NORTH END/WATERFRONT
PRESERVATION STUDY




PREPARED BY VINCENT MARSH
FOR
THE BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION

JULY, 1980



Supported through a grant
from the National Endown-
ment for the Arts, Design
Arts Program.







'. .5^%



.-s>, ^




EXISTING NATIONAL REGISTER HISTORIC DISTRICTS / SITES
PROPOSED HISTORIC STRUCTURES/ OPEN SPACE SURVEY
VINCENT MARSH MARCH. 1980



NORTH END






:-j.l:'Z^OU.






,'H r^xycifii.: h.



NORTH END/WATERFRONT PRESERVATION STUDY
VINCENT MARSH, JULY, 1980



Existing National Register Individual Listings

Copps Hill Burial Ground

Snow Hill/Charter and Hull Streets

Old North Church
193 Salem Street

Saint Stephen ' s Church
Hanover Street

Paul Revere House
19 North Square

Moses Pierce Hichborn House
29 North Street

McLauthlin Elevator Building
120 Fulton Street

Union Wharf
Commercial Street

Long Wharf and Custom Block
Atlantic Avenue



Existing National Register Districts

Fulton - Commercial District

Blackstone Block

Quincy Markets/Faneuil Hall



Waterfront and/or Wharf Buildings

Battery Wharf

211-2^1 Commercial Street

Commercial Wharf
33-66 Commercial Wharf

Commercial Wharf North
65-69 Atlantic Avenue

Commercial Wharf South
81-85 Atlantic Avenue

Constitution Wharf
405-427 Commercial Street

Joseph's Aquarium Restaurant
98-112 Atlantic Avenue

Lewis Wharf
14-40 Lewis Wharf

Lincoln Wharf

365 Commercial Street

Pilot House

38-50 Eastern Avenue

Prince Building
43-63 Atlantic Avenue

U.S. Coast Guard Base
427-467 Commercial Street

The Wharf Bar/Restaurant
71-77 Commercial Street



■> -SSXaOT'E : ,



.p '-icj:-



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION



Building Information Form Form No,



Area North End



#



ADDRESS 377-397 Commercial StCOR.



NAME Battery Wharf



Battery Wharf



present
MAP NO. 26N-13E



SUB AREA



original
N/W




DATE 1883


1


ARCHITECT


source


source
BUILDER


OWNER Johnson s Younq


source Richard, Joseph, 2

James and Angelo Faro
of the Battery Wharf


original
PHOTOGRAPHS


Realty: present
Company



19/331120/4692110 Ward 3, Parcel 3041

TYPE (residential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.
Cnon-residential) Commercial Complex



'0. OF STORIES Cist to cornice)

ROOF f 1 ;,f. ^cupola



_plus



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) clapboards shingles stucco asphalt asbe stos alum/vinyl
(other) brick stone concrete (TroriVsteel/alum.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION. Nondescript wooden structures with iron siding painted brown. Two

stories with recessed walkway on northern side of structure. U-shaped in design has been

added onto over time. Eastern-most portion of the earliest section, retail outlets

include newly created Dunkin Do nuts outlet, Bay State Lobster retail outlet. Butcher

Block JMeat Store, Fleet fruit and Warehouses for Bay State Lobster. This complex has

large sign detached from the site with a park jing lot for freight pickups and (con't)
EXTERIOR ALTERATION minor moderate



CONDITION good (fai^ poor



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS



Dock 54,825
_LOT AREA piT^ ^, 1^^^ f^^^^fiT sq.ft.

Solid 80,080



CiSIap)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

Battery Wharf is also known as North Battery Wharf. It
was from here that many of the British troops embarked on
their way to force the American works at Breed's Hill.
When a blue flag was displayed as a signal, the men in
scarlet uniforms moved regiilarly forward in boats furt>
nished by the British warships to the Battle of Bunker
Hill. 3 The North Battery was erected here in 1546.
Battery Wharf now houses various commerical buildings of



undistinguished architecture.



The first and most



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable)



mi^



Aboriginal
Agricultural
Architectural
The Arts
Commerce
Communication
Community/
Development



Conservation
Education
Exploration/
settlement
Industry
Military
Political



Recreation

Religion

Science/

invention
Social/

humanitarian
Transporation



Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

easterly section of the Battery Wharf complex was erected in 1883 of wood and was one story
It was open on all sides and was used as a market building and for storage. It measured
25x50 and the external sides were covered with iron. In 1895, the Wharf was owned by
Joseph W. Revere, Hiers, with smaller parcels on Commercial Street owned by G.A« Godbold,
Mason and Cleveland and C.E. Hatfield. By 1917, the Battery Wharf complex as it exists
now was in place, and was under the ownership of R.L. Saltonstall Trusts. In 1923,
Quincy Market Cold Storage erected a two story wood building on the Battery Wharf site
for offices and storage. Around 1942, the Standard Grocery Company, wholesale grocers
occupied this space until 1955 when it was torn down. The southern finger of Battery
Wharf was the site of the East Boston North Ferry which is now occupied by the City of
Boston Fire boats. This portion of Battery Wharf was substantially upgraded in recent
years. In 1960, the Bay State Lobster Company bought this Vharf for their retail/whole-
sale fish business. In 1975, the complex was rehabilitated and sxabdivideaa? -to -likclude ,•
an outlet of the Butcher Block Meat Store and a Dunkin Donuts. In 1980, Bay State
Lobster Company now ships lobsters and fish products to the nation and the world.



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)

Description (con't) : deliveries. The city of Boston, Marine Fire Department is located
on the southern finger of Battery Wharf. The piers and dock and one story dwell'Jjrig of the;
site have been newly rehabilitated.



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.) . -,- ■

(1) City of Boston, Building Department Records

(2) City of Boston, Assessor's Office

(3) Points of Interest in Boston and The Environs , (Boston: The Banks and Trust Companies
of Boston, 1937) p. 27.

(4) VanMeter, Mary, "The Boston Waterfront: Summary of a survey conducted , under; the auspice
of the City Conservation League," (unpublished paper, Boston, December^ 1976) p.8.

(5) Sanborn, D.A. Insurance, Maps of Boston, Volume 1 (New York, D.A. Sanborfe^fefepany,'
1873 and 1917.)



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION




Building Information Form Form No.



Area North End



ADDRESS 33-66 Commercial WhaiCfiDR.



NAME Commercial Wharf, Commercial or Granite Wharf



present
MAP NO. 26N-13E
DATE 1834



original



_SUB ARE A N/W

1



^ ARCHITEC T Isaiah Rogers



source
1



source



BUILDER



a-JNER Commercial Wharf Co,



source Arthur Blackett Trusts
Charles W. Brown, III
Konrad Gesner



original



PHOTOGRAPHS



present
Bencion >Ioskow Trusts

of Blue Water Trusts



19/331130/4692110 Ward 3, Parcel 3028

TYPE -^Cxesidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.

:( non-residential ) mercantile and wharf (original mixed commercial s residential
..r: - _ (present)

^70. OFo^^QRIESstClst to cornice) 5 plus a sixth floor over part of the

"'' isfZ -' - .'i building.
ROO F flat, .gable, mansard cupol a dorme r s



MATERIALS (Frame) c^^phoards shing les stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
(other) (bric]<) ^tone) ^concrete iron/steel/alum.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION: 5 and 6 story stone and brick warehouse building. Front of building
is south side: rough faced coursed granite blocks; 43 bays; stone lintels and sills; of
lintels are peaked on the second and third floors; heavier than on north side. Some '''
wooden siding used on first and second floors. East end wall; shows Greek Revival style;
gable roof with carved stone molding forms a pediment; semi-circular window set into
pediment; iron balcony^_ac;i::psss the three middle bays on the second, third and fourth (con't)
^"Tnop moderate drastic roof changed. 5th floor added.



EXTERIOR ALTERATION



CONDITION (goi



fair



poor



LOT AREA



n/a



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS pn the watprfront. To the south of Lewis Wharf and on the

noT-hhp-rn g>^gg> nf Phri gtnphpr rnlnmhnc; P?irk fWaterf ront ' ParkK

SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)
-r.\ This building was cut off from Commercial Wharf North

in 1868 when Atlantic Avenue was constructed. Before
.. ■•.-•;'•:-;•-.•• i.~: this major alteration was made, this building was parti-

cularly noteworthy for its massiveness. Coramerical
Wharf set the standard for size and style for later
wharf development, such as Lewis and Union Wharves.
This wharf was originally built to accommodate the East
Indian, South American, Mediterranean, West Indian, and



7« ■ <dTeii ,-isdr



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable)



Aboriginal
Agricultural
Architectural
The Arts
Commerce
Commxinication
Community/
Development



Conservation
Education
Exploration/
settlement
Industry
Military
Political



Recreation

Religion

Science/

invention
Social/

himianitarian
Transporation



Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

Northern European merchants. Many of the occupants of the old wharves, such as Long and
T wharves, were coaxed into renting space in the new facility. The occupants of Commer-
cial Wharf included: Bryant & Sturgis, Robert G. Shaw S Co., Daniel C. Bacon, Henry
Oxnard, Enoch Grain & Co., B.C. Clarke & Co., Wm. Perkins, Bates & Thaxton, Barnard
Adams S Co. , Seccomb, Bartlett & Co. , Hunnewell & Pierce, the Nickerson's , P.S. Sprague
and Ezra Weston.

By 1840, New York was becoming the major port on the East coast, but Boston
Habor remaind a very busy place. One day in 1843, there were eight ships, four barks
and a brig lying at Commercial Wharf. Along with foreign trade, coastal commerce and
the California gold r^ish contributed to Boston's prosperity. Economic conditions in the
1860 's combined with the Civil War marked the end of Boston's days as a deep-water
shipping port. By 1870, Commerical Wharf welcomed the fishing boats that had been turned
away when the facility was first. ,-' '■■ '' ~ /

As the shipping trade declined the use of this building also changed^" ltir%.hout 1 .5,
the building was used for light manufacturing, warehouses and storage and stores. These
uses continued through the 1940 's; the storage of canned goods and oil being the predom-
inant purpose of the structure.

In 1958 the owner. The Commercial Wharf Company, appealed to the Building Commissionej
to allow a change of occupany from storage and offices to stores and apartments. This
appeal was granted. Over the last twenty years many changes have occurred. The upper
stories of the building now serve as apartments, dormers have been added in some cases. (coi
Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity j

for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context) 1

National Register Nomination.



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's

records , early maps , etc . )

(1) Van Meter, Mary, The Boston Waterfront (Summary of a survey conducted under the auspicji
of the City Conservation League) Boston, December 1976. '

Biinting, W.H., Portrait of a Port: Boston, 1852-1914, (Cambridge, Mass.: The Belknap



(2)

(3)

(4)
(5)
(6)



Press of Harvard University Press, 1971) , p. 8.

Cohen, Cecile L. , Fulton-Commercial Historic District Survey (Boston, K[assaehu setts
Historical Commission, June 1, 1972) . - e.-.jt; i.c ,-

Forbes, Col. Frank H. , Proceedings of the Bostonian Society , January -:i5,/T952T. (
City of Boston Building Department Documents. , - ■ -: . ,: ■ .^

City of Boston Assessor's Records. .- ;- .- -



^ ■^- / ij.jr j: j. e -w Commercial Wharf

Description (con't from front of page 1)

floors. West end wall constiructed when Atlantic Avenue was cut through; seven bays wide;
*B)riansard roof with three window openings with Victorian wooden surrounds. One and two
story sheds extend out into the harbor on the south side of the wharf building;
2 story portion now used for offices; 1 story sheds sheathed in metal.



Significance (con't from reverse of page 1)

The first floor space is used for either stores or offices. The Blue Water Trust purchased
the property in 1978 and since that time the apartments have been converted to Condominiums.
Once again the waterfront is a very vital and active part of Boston.

Various changes in the appearance of the building accompanied the changes in use.
The mansard roof which is on the end of the building facing Atlantic Avenue was added when
that roadway was built. The brick additions to the roof of the building were completed
by 1915. And various other changes such as the addition of balconies of wooden siding
on the first floor were part of the conversion to apartments and stores from warehouses.

Commercial Wharf was designed by Isaiah Rogers (1800-1869) , one of the most impor-
tant architects of the early Greek Revival style in New England. Rogers began his
career as a carpenter, but he received his architectural training in the office of
Solomon Willard in Boston.

At the age of 24, Rogers opened his own office in Boston. Within a few years, he
had attained an excellent reputation in the field of architecture. He was particularly
well-noted for his designs for hotels, the first one being the Tremont House in Boston
(1828-29) . This building, of classic design was known as the finest hotel in Boston .-
for many years; it was demolished in 1894. Rogers also designed the Bangor House
^. '.n Mainej^r in the 1830's, Rogers became involved in the design of the Astor House, a
hotel in New York City, and lived there for the next 15 years. Among Rogers' other
hotel designs were the Battle House, Mobile, Alabama; Planters Hotel, Richmond, Virginia;
Gait House, Louisville, Kentucky and Maxwell House, Nashville, Tennessee.

Rogers designed other types of buildings besides hotels. Other designs in Boston
included the Merchants Exchange on State Street (built in 1842, now the site of the
Exchange Building) ; the Brarer Building and Suffolk Bank, both on State Street; and
Boston's first Masonic Temple on the corner of Tremont Street and Temple Place (used
as the U.S. Court and the first R.H. Stearns Company).

After designed the Burnet House in Cincinnati, Ohio in the early 1850 's. Rogers
made that city his home for the rest of his life.



Bibliography (con't)

^"^tlases o^f the City of Boston

W 187J-^(lJ.A. - ^ambom, C.E., New York)

1874 (G.M. Hopkins, Philadelphia)

1888, 1908 (G.W. Bromley, Philadelphia) '■'-,:.
3) Witney, Henry F. and Elsie Rathburn, Biographical Dictionary of American Architects (deceased]
(Los Angeles: New Age Publishing Co., 1956). - -



#



^




COMMERCIAL WHARF



(,



c;



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION




Building Information Form Form No.

20-27 Commercial Wharf North
ADDRESS 65-69 Atlantic Ave. COR.



AreaNorth End



NAME Commercial Wharf North



present
MAP NO. 26-N-13E'



original



DATE 1894



_SUB AREA_
(1)



N/W



source



ARCHITECT



BUILDER M.L. Sullivan



CD



source Teresa M. Doncaster
Robert M, Lairo
CWNE R Commercial Wharf Corp. John C. Dellelis Trus t



original



PHOTOGRAPHS



present
D.F. Wharf Realty Trusts



19/33195 / 469285



Ward 3 . Parcel 3648



TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.

Cnon-residential) Mercantile Coriginal) commercial and apartments (present^



NO. OF STORIES Clst to cornice) three



_plus



ROOF



flat



cupola



dormers



cj^apb oards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl

^ric^ stone ^concrete iron/steel/alum.

(common bond)



MATERIALS (Frame)

(other)

foundation
BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Simpliest of the Commercial Wharf buildings. Trapezoidal shape with 18 bays on
the south side and 9 bays face Atlantic Ave. All new sash in the window openings; size
of some openings changed to accommodate doorways and mechanical systems . Larger openings
intended to accommodate freight; some pulley equipment still evident. All opeings have
_rough cut granite sil ls; j^r ick segmental arch made of three rows of headers over each window



EXTERIOR ALTERATION



moderate



drastic



CONDITION c ^oodj fair poor



LOT AREA



4snn



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS c^^^p-t-rh^^ hA^w^Pn Cnmrr^^yni ^^ ^t ^nrS a^-^an^-^•r a..^.

Bricked courtyard with h^nrhpg anrl planl-ing c;ppa-ra-|-pc; it f-rnm rnTnmPrf"-' ^1 Wh^r-f Wpgt- .

SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

At the time this building was erected it was intended
to be used as a fish market. The upper two floors were
to be used for storage only. In 1924, the use is listed
as poultry buisness; there must have been a fire at that
time because the building permit records, "To repair
fire damage to windows, doors, sheathing, painting and
electric worko"(l) The owner of #67-69 Atlantic Ave.
in 1952 was the Massasort Fish Co, and the use was
unoccupied factory space. In 1966, there was a change
of occupancy from a warehouse to ten apartments ,







(Wap)



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable )

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultijral Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Commimity/ Political Transporation

Development



Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

restaurant and retail stores; the owner at that time was Commercial Inland Property Corp,
In 1974, rather major renovations took place under the supervision of the architects
Anderson, Notter; the wooden floor on the first floor was replaced by a concrete
slab, the brick' was repointed, the roof and the windows on Atlantic Ave^ were replaced,
and the electrical service was increased. Another changed of occupancy took place two
years later, the first floor was to be used for real estate office, bank, retail sale
of beer and wine and other general office use. In 1978, a fire caused minor damage.



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

CD City of Boston Building Department Documents
C2) City of Boston Assessor's Records.

C3) Van Meter, Mary, The Boston Waterfront CSummary of a siirvey conducted under the
auspices of the City Conservation League, December, 1976,

f .-s?-l)



BOSTON LANDMARKS CQMMTc




Building Information Form Form No.



^e^ North End



ADDRESS



31 -P!^ ai-1an^ir- STrc ,



COR.



NAME Commercial Wharf South



present
MAP NO. 25N/13E



original



SUB AREA N/W



DATE 1832-1834


CD




source


ARCHITECT Isaiah Rogers


(1)




source


BUILDER






source




Michael Giglio Trusts


CWNER Commercial Wharf Co.


Anthony Orlandello Trusts


original


present


PHOTOGRAPHS





19/331180/469290 Ward 3, Parcel 3549



TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.

Cnon-residential) mercantile Coriginal) mixed commercial and residential (present)



NO. OF STORIES Cist to cornice)



four



ROO F pitched and flat



cupola



plus a fifth stojry over most of the

building
dormers



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



clapb oards
fbriclc^



shing les stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl

ston^^ ^concrete iron/steel/al\im.

Matioiy



BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Combined use of brick and granite in four, sometimes five story building. First floor;
granite post and beam system; some openings filled in with brick or stucco. 17 bays
on north side. Windows diminish in size as you proceed upward; all have simple stone
lintels and sills. Balconies extend from many of the windows. East wall which faces
Atlantic Ave. and sou th wal l are faced in granite; windows have granite surrounds; heads
EXTERIOR ALTERATION /minor) moderate drastic



CONDITION (good/7 fair poor



LOT AREA



12.600



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS Stretches from Altantic Ave, to Commercial Street.



Separated from Commercial Wharf north by a brick paved and planted courtyard.



CMap)



SIGNIFICANCE Ccon't on reverse) ,,.. .

This building was cut off from the rest of Commercial "'*'
Wharf in 1868 when Atlantic Ave. was constructed. It
was originally built to accommodate the East Indian,
South American, Mediterranean, West Indian, and North
of Europe merchants. By 1840, New York was becoming
the major port on the East Coast, but Boston harbor
remained a very busy place. One day in 1843 there were
eight strips, four barks and a brig lying at Commercial
Wharf C5) , Along with foreign, trade, the coastal com-
merce and the California gold rush contributed to Boston's



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) /"

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

prosperity. Economic conditions combined with the Civil War marked the end of Boston's

days as a deep-water shipping port. By 1870, Commerical Wharf welcomed the fishing
boats that had been turned away when the facility was first built.

As the shipping trade declined the use of this building changed. In 1970, a new

use was proposed for the structure. The owners. Commercial Inland Property sought to

change the occupancy from warehousing, manufacturing and saloon to 47 apartments, shops,

and a restaurant/bar. The change of occupancy was granted in 1972, The owners

at that time were Michael F. Giglio and Anthony L. Orlandello. The architect for the

project was J. Timothy Anderson and Associates,

Description Ccon't)

are peaked in the center. South side slightly curved near Atlantic Ave. Some (

of the fifth floor is constructed of brick; set back decks and penthouses. A brass clock

in the westerly face of the building — the original end of the structure — has been
found to be the work of Simon Williard.



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)

This building is a good example of the type of redevelopment activity that has taken
place along the waterfront. This building along with the main portion of Commercial
Wharf and Commercial Wharf North warrant listing on the National Register of Historic
Places.



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)
CD Van Meter, Mary, The Boston Waterfront CSummary of a survey conducted under the

auspices of the city Conservation League) Boston, December 1976.
(2)= City of Boston Building Department Documents
C3) City of Boston Assessor's Records

(4) Atlas of the City of Boston (G.W. Bromley, 1888 and 1908)

C5). Bunting, W.H. , Portrait of a Port; Boston, 1852-1914 _^^ ^^^

CCambridge, Mass: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1971) p.S^*'- \>'



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION




Building Information Form Form No.

405-411 Commercial Street
ADDRESS 415-427 Comm. Street COR,



Area North End



NAME Constitution Wharf



Constitution Stores



present



MAP NO.



DATE



27N-13E



SUB AREA



original
N/W



405-411, 1888
415-427, 1893



(1)



source
405-411 Comm. St, M.D, Stafford, 1888
ARCHITEC T 415-427 Comm. St.. Andrew Jacques S Rantoul,189 3

source



BUILDER



source Harold Harmon Trusts

Herbert J, Chermis, Trust
OWNE R Constitution Wharf Company Stephen J. Miller Tru sts



original



PHOTOGRAPHS



present
Florence Harmon Trusts



19/331130/46Q2110 Ward ^. Parcel 3042/3044



TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam.
Cnon-residential) Light Manufacturing



3-deck ten



apt.



NO. OF STORIES Cist to cornice) 2 bldgs, 5 S 6 stories p l^s



ROOF



flat



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



clapbo ards
DricK^



shingles stucco
ston e granite



asphalt asbestos alxim/vinyl
concrete iron/steel/alum.



Foundation
BRIEF DESCRIPTION

The southernly most building at #405-411 Commercial Street is formerly part of the


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Online LibraryMass.) Boston Landmarks Commission (BostonNorth End / Waterfront preservation study → online text (page 1 of 10)