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Mass.) Boston Landmarks Commission (Boston.

North End / Waterfront preservation study online

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2. Boston Globe , Jan. 2, 1976, "City Closes Vandal-Wrecked Facility, Bath House for 900
North End Poor, "

3. Architectural Review, Vol. II, 1904, p. 254.

4. City of Boston, Assessor's records. ,:;=•:}

5. Landow, Sandra. Municipal Building in the North End c. 1800-1979 (Prepared for ^
Historic Neighborhoods Foundation, Boston, 1979) . ^^;



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION




Building Information Form ForT:n No.
ADDRESS 25 Parmenter Street COR.



AreaNorth End



NAME North End Branch Library



present
MAP NO.



original



SUB AREA



DATE 1963






building permit










source




ARCHITECT carl


Koch


Si


Associates "










source




BUILDER Joseph


Fish,


Peabodv Construction Co . ,


Inc.








source




OWNER City of Rof^f.on








original






pre


sent


PHOTOGRAPHS








v



iq/??mSS/46q:?115 ward 3. Parcel 2365



TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt,
vnon-residential; -\ ^y^y^yy



'NO."Op-STORIES Cist to cornice)



_plus



'Rd9F



flat



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) clapb oards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl

(other) ( bricT?) '=;tone ^concrete iron/steel/alum.

(founaation)
BRIEF DESCRIPTION

An interesting roof supported on nine interior columns, from which spring concrete
hyperbolic-paraboloids that make up the roof. The walls are non-bearing. An interior .
"atrium" or courtyard, lavishly planted, with a pool under clerestory windows adds color
and meaning to the building.- The exterior is relieved with touches of color in small
sculptural panels, wit h gla ss ceramics of gay hues.
EXTERIOR ALTERATION ^inor^ moderate drastic



CONDITION (goo^ fair poor_



LOT AREA



9932



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS



)



(Map)



SIGNIFICANCE Ccon't on reverse)

Library service in the North End began in 1882 with a book
delivery station in the Hancock School building on
Parmenter Street. The station was moved to a second-
story room at 166 Hanover Street in 1890. The opening
of the West End Branch in 1896 eliminated the book
delivery station. Three years later the station was
reopened in the North Bennet Industrial School. The first
building occupied solely by the North End Branch Library



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable)



Aboriginal
Agricultural
Architectural
The Arts
Commerce
Communication
Community/
Development



Conservation
Education
Exploration/
settlement
Industry
Military
Political



Recreation

Religion

Science/

invention
Social/

humanitarian
Transporation



Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

was opened on February 28, 1913, when it moved to 30 North Bennet Street; this structure
was foinnerly the Portuguese Church of St. John the Baptist.

The present structure blends in nicely with its surroundings. The design seems to captur
some of the spirit of the Italian neighborhood which it serves. The library is on the
site of the Cushman School, which was built sometime before 1874.

Description (cont'd)

The library contains three art objects. A white marble relief with a bust of Dante
Alighieri dominates the atrium. This work was done by Luciano Campise and was given to
the Library by the Boston Branch of the Dante Alighieri Society. It was unveiled
on June 1, 1913. M>.

Another art object is the enclosed diorama of the Ducal Palace in Venice. The model of t
palace was made in plaster by Miss Henrietta Macy, who once taught kindergarten in the
North End and later settled in Venice. The model was given to the library of the
City of Boston in 1936 by Miss Nina C. Mitchell, a friend of Miss Macy's. The last of th
art objects is a bust of King Humberti, which is displayed in the atrium. The bust was
executed by Luigini Tassi an Italian sculptor. King Hxjmbert I presented the bust to the
City of Boston in 1883. From 1883 to 1903, it was housed in the Boston Museum of Fine Ar;
Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)

after that time it was moved to the North End Branch Library.



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

1. City of Boston Building Department documents.

2. City of Boston Assessor's records.

3. Southworth, Michael and Susan, Boston 20 Discovery Network, North End Survey,
"Boston Public Library Description of New North End Branch Library" (ioston, MA
Boston 200 Bicentennial Commission Publication, 1975) .



t



1




rJoftj?/ eA/o sjiwcv hJBfi^Ay



)



t



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION



Building Information Form Form No. Are a North End

ADDRESS 332 Hanover Street C OR. North Bennet Street

North End Community

NAME Health Center First Universalist Church



present

26N-13E
MAP NO.

DATE 1838



original



SUB AREA



N/W



(Photo)









source












ARCHITECT
























source












BUILDER


















Unitarian
OWNER Society


Universalist


source

City


of


Be


iston ,


Trustee


6


original












pre


sent




PHOTOGRAPHS



















19/330160/4692130



Ward 3. Parcel 2313



TYPE Cresidential) single double row
Cnon-residential)



2-fam.



3-deck ten



apt.



NO. OF STORIES Cist to cornice]



_plus



ROO F gabled

MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



cupola



dormers



i^rds s hingl es stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
Drick J (^tonej ^concrete iron/steel/alum.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION

This is a brick building with stone trim. With a gable roof of composition. There
are three bays across the front with new sash. There are heavy stone moldings
around the windows, brick pilasters of the corners and a wide plain brick cornice.



EXTERIOR ALTERATION minor moderate drastic

CONDITION /"goo^ fair poor LOT AREA_



5i5Q



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS



D



(Map)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

The brick edifice at 332 Hanover Street has a long and
interesting history. In 1785, the Unitarian Universalists
purchased a meeting house at the corner of Middle and
Bennet Streets , now known as Hanover and North Bennet
Streets . This wooden two story structure was the first
home (1793-1838) of the John Murray's, first Universalist
Society. This building erected in 1741, had been
occupied since that time as an independent congregation,
known as the Church of Christ, under the leadership of



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) ^

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation _______

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/ '■ - ' -

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/ ......

Communication Military himianitarian

Commiinity/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above ) :: ^; „•,

Rev. Samuel Mather. Prior to the purchase of this building, the Rev. Mr. Murray, had
been preaching occasionally in Boston since 1774 in the manufactory house, located
opposite the site where the Park Street Church now stands, in the residence of - his
friend Mr. Peck, and at Fanueil Hall. So successful was his ministry in Boston,. and
with the opportunity of reaching greater numbers, the Rev. Mr. Murray accepted the
invitation of the First Universalist Society in Boston and became the settle- pastar
of the Society in 1793.2 In mid-October, 1809, he suffered a paralytic stroke that
left him an invalid for his remaining six years. His last preaching in the Hanover
Street Church was done as he was seated in the pulpit, being unable to stand. On the
3rd of September, 1815, John Murray, the venerable founder of organized Univeralism
in American died in Boston, a few short weeks of his seventy-fifth birthday.

The meeting house was repaired and remodeled in 1824 and 1828, and in 1838 a brick ^"
edifice was erected on the same site, which was dedicated on January 1, 1839. During the
periods of alteration and rebuilding, it is probable that the First Universalist Society
worshipped in the meeting house of the Second Universalist Society on School Street;
in any event, such invitations were extended. It is apparent from the records that a
store or stores at 332-338 Hanover Street were connected with this building. It appear
that a room in the basement was leased by the City of Boston from 1855 to
1860 for use as a primary school. Population changes in the North End in 1860 made it

Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories / deeds , assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

1. Miller, Russel E., The Larger Hope: The First Century of the Universalist Church

in American 1770-1870 . (Unitarian Universalist Association, Boston, MA 1979) p. 28.

2. Works Progrss Administration, Inventory of Universalist Archives in Massachusetts
Historic Records Survey (Sponsored by Frederick W. Cooke, Secretary of the
Commonwealth and the Division of Community Seirvice Program, Boston, MA 1.942) p.. 166.

3. Miller, Russel E. op.cit. p. 2 9 ^

4. Works Progress Administration, op.cit. p. 157 -

5 . City of Boston , Building Department records .
6o City of Boston, Assessor's Office Records.
7. Hanover Street photo file at SPNEA.



significance (Cont'd)



North End Community Health Center



difficult for the Unitarian Universalist Church to survive and its minister, '-

Mr. Sebastain Streeter went without pay. In 1964, the church was sold to the

Boston Baptist Society. The Rev. Mr. Silloway preached a farewell sermon -""'

reviewing the history of the church on May 29, 1864, and the following day the

assets of the society were divided among the proprietors. A portrait of the

Rev. Mr. Murray and the pulpit which he had occupied were given to the Universalist

Historical Society at Tufts College.'^

During the early 20th century the North Bennet Street side of the Boston Baptist
Bethel was subdivided into apartments. It was utilized primarily as a sailor's mission
and rest home. During the 1960 's, the facility was known as the Bethel Christian
center' before it was converted into the North End Community Health Center in 1974.
At that time, the trustees of the George Robert White Fund voted to purchase the land
and; building at 332 Hanover Streeet for use as a community health center in the
North* End of Boston. The architectural firm of Charles F. Jacobs, were the
principals listed in the recycling of this church/mission to a health center .



>LD.vr:." ■&




ie?i}>



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION




Building Information Form Form No.
ADDRESS 20 Parmenter Street COR.



Area North End



J NAM E North End Union, Inc. Saint Mary's Episcopal Chu rch

present original



MAP NO. 26N-13E



SUB AREA



N/W



DATE Pre, 1884


1




source


ARCHITECT






source


BUILDER




Saint Mary's


source
Benevolent Fraternity of


Qj^gj^ Episcopal Church


Unitarian Churches


original


present


PHOTOGRAPHS





19/330160/4692110 Ward 3, Parcel 2417

TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.
Cnon-residential) neighborhood center



NO. OF STORIES Cist to cornice)

ROOF flat cupola



plus



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



clapboards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl



sningK
^tone^



granite



concrete iron/steel/alum.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION, of Flemish bond brick, three stories on a high basement, five symmetri-
cal bays of 5 over 6, with new storm windows, stone lintels and sills. Lintels flared
with keystones. Rounded arched recessed doorway. Stretchers set on end over basement
windows. Double wooden recessed doorway with fanlights over top. Decorative stone and
brick work at cornice line.



EXTERIOR ALTERATION Qninorj moderate drastic

CONDITION ^ood^ fair poor

NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS



LOT AREA



<i?7n



sq.ft.



(Map)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

The North End Union was established in 1892 by the
Benevolent Fraternity of Unitarian Churches. An 1888,
Boston City atlas indicates that the North End Union was
Saint Mary's Episcopal Church. Like most settlement houses
in the early years, services centered on the immigrant
and condition of the poor. From the mid 1800' s,
successive waves of the Irish, Jewish and Italian crowded
into the North End. The North End Union under various
names has been in existence ^ l since 1854.. The North End



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable )



Aboriginal
Agricultioral
Architectural
The Arts
Commerce
Communication
Community/
^^Development



Conservation
Education
Exploration/
settlement
Industry
Military
Political



Recreation

Religion

Science/

invention
Social/

humanitarian
Transporation



Significance (include expanation of themes checked above ) _ ,:•.

■was, until the coming of the immigrant, a place of beautiful homes, many trees, and lovely
-gardens. With the arrival of the Irish immigrants in the district, the large parcels of
-land were subdivided and brick rowhouses were built in great numbers. In 1854, ., the
Benevolent Fraternity of Unitarian Churches started the "Hanover Street Mission" in the up-
per hall of the old Hancock School, (later a Police Station on Hanover Street) for the
purpose of giving religious instruction. In the spring of 1884, the present site on
,':Parmenter Street was bought, and the name was changed to the "Parmenter Street Chapel."
But the coming of the Hebrews and Italians into the district made the Fraternity realize
that its energy was wasted along religious lines, for the Synagogue and Catholic, -churches
'Could take care of their own people. In 1892, the house was remodeled at the expense of
•$12,000 and the name changed to the North End Union, and Mr. Samuel F. Hubbard .became its
first superintendent.-^ The center was established "to provide a place for -good spirit
of cooperation, and to promote the ideals of Democracy for individual, family iandvineigk-'..
borhood inmprovement . " One of the programs in the North End Union's early'- h'fStG)£'y-'"-was"
"Fruit and Flower Mission." Fresh fruit and flowers were distributed -on T!hursdays-'t6 the
sick and the needy. This service started circa 1873 and continued intophe' early -19-00' s.
The predecessor of the union, the Children's Mission, organized the first supervised-
playground in this country in 1886 in the backyard of 20 Parmenter Street. In 1893,
Dr. Gerardo Balboni, began the Milk and Baby Hygiene Association Clinic at the North End
Union, establishing a modified milk statient clubs operated in the area. These seemed to
be endemic to the North End. It is at this point that the North End Union opened three
storefront recreation centers in cooperation with the Boston Juvenile Court and William
Foote Whyte with the assistance of the head worker of the North End Union writes his
classical sociological study entitled "Street Corner Society." A drop-out program
and a youth organization for citizenship training were also established at this time.

In the 1950 's and the 1960 's, two large public works programs within the boundaries
of the neighborhood required many families to move. This was followed by massive urban
renewal projects on every border, justifiably caused grave concern for the future of this ■
tight, high density family neighborhood. The North End Union once again expanded its
citizen work for wider community participation through the establishment of the North

-'E'lVd-iRe'habiiitation and Conservation Committee. Their imput in the urban renewal process
along with the Waterfront Residents Association and the BRA's Tenant Selection Committee
brought important and lasting changes for the waterfront and the North End. These included
an enlarged waterfront park, housing for the elderly, mixed income rehabilitated housing
and certain controls over future planning.



Significance (con't) North End Union, Inc.

In the 1970 's the North End Union was encouraging improved interagency collaboration
in the delivery of h\iman services. Current programming includes Adult Education classes,
Teen and Elderly programs, in school and after school recreation programs, neighborhood
and community development programs through the North End Neighborhood Task Force and
Arts programs through the North End Waterfront Arts Council.

The Benevolent Fraternity of Unitarian Churches has governed the affairs of the
North End Union since its inception. Presidents over the years had included Rev. Edward
A. Horton, Paul Revere Frothingham, Eugene R. Shippen and Alexander S. Porter, Jr.
In recent years, there were Rev. Dana McLean Greeley, Jr., Russell Abbot, Mrs. Charles S.
Bolster, Ralph A. MacGilvra, Daniel Needham, Jr., C. Eliot Sands and Guy A Beninati.
Administrators of the Union include Samuel F. Hubbard, as its first director. Miss Mattie
L. Foster, from 1918 to 1935, Martha Blume, Acting Headworker between 1935 and 1937 and
program coordinator for many years. Harry R. Clark and Frank L. Havey who served as
executive director from 1940 to his retirement in 1975. He was a legend and Man for all
Seasons in the history of the North End Union, the Neighborhood and Settlement House
Movement. From 1975 to 1979, Vincent Scaramuzzo Marsh served as executive director
and Fritz Cerrullo currently serves in that capacity.

In 1892, as mentioned previously, the North End Union opened its doors in a newly
renovated building alternately called the "Parmenter Street Chapel," and Saint Mary's
Episcopal Church which existed on the site. In April of 1916, architects Kilham and
Hopkins were hired to install a steam heating system and upgrade the facility for new
usages at a cost of $25,000. In 1936, a fire in the auditorium destroyed the stage.
This was upgraded and a new plumbing and heating system was installed at a cost of
$18,000. In 1958, an upper gymnasium was added to the rear of the building, and in
the mid 70 's the front facade brick work was restored and extensive rehabilitation and
upgrading of the facility occurred in the interior of the building.



Bibliography (con't)

(7) "North End Union Is 70 Years Young," The Italian News , April 13, 1962, p. 1-5.

(8) Whyte, William Foote, "The Social Role of The Settlement House," Applied Anthropology
(Vol. I, number 1, October - December, 1941) p.

(9) The North End Union, (publication of the Greater Boston Settlement Week, May 19-24th,
1980 in cooperation with Jubilee 350) .

(10) North End Union Is 70 Years Young, Op. Cit. p. 5.

(11) City of Boston, Building Department, Op Cit.






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Online LibraryMass.) Boston Landmarks Commission (BostonNorth End / Waterfront preservation study → online text (page 10 of 10)