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Mass.) Boston Landmarks Commission (Boston.

North End / Waterfront preservation study online

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Quincy Cold Storage complex of buildings, faded lettering is evident on it's southerly
most side. It is a massive five story brick building which is inoperative at the
present time. The central freight entryway on the first level has been bricked over,
A Plaque directly abovg_j_adicates that "here was built the Frigate Constitution, 'Old
EXTERIOR ALTERATION ( ginor > moderate drastic



CONDITION



good



fair



LOT AREA



60,100



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS



(Map)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

In 1797, the U.S.S, Constitution, the first warship
built in the United States was erected in the yard
of Benjamin Goodwin at Hudson's Point, now known as
Constitution Wharf. Mr, Goodwin bought the wharf in 1768,
ran a bakehouse and blacksmith shop and lived opposite
his wharf on the corner of Chapter Street. The famous
ship, U.S.S. Constitution was built by Edmund Harrt,
at his wharf which he bought in 1786. He too, lived
opposite his yard, between battery and Hanover Street.
He bought the yard and house of Abiel Ruddock, and at



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) /

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military himianitarian

Community/ . Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

that time the site was known as Thornton's Shipyard. Thornton was the son-in-law of
Water Merry, Issac Harris was apprentice at this yard and the Skilling Brothers carved
the figure head and ornaments of "Old Ironsides. " (3) in 1797, the U.S.S. Constitution
was launched from this wharf and became known as the remarkable warship. Old
Ironsides. She was designed by Joshua Humphries of Philadelphia, Emhriam Thayer
supplied the fourty-four gun carriages, and Paul Revere, made the copper bolts,
screws and blocks . The famous sailing ship was built by Edmund Hartt when his
yard was privately owned on the site of what was the Naval Yard in the 1800' s,
"Old Ironsides" was so called after she engaged in her well known encounter with the
British Guerriere during the war of 1812. This ship, our oldest man-of-war, is moored
today at the Boston Naval Shipyard in Charlestown and is visited by thousands yearly, (4)
During the early 1800' s, the Boston 28, which captxired several French armed ships and
The Argy's 16, which burnt so many British prizes off the English Coast that she was
said to have "set the Channels all ablaze" were also built at the Constitution Wharf./
But the U.S.S, Constitution alone is the only ship that has survived till today,
and it is the oldest warship afloat in the world, (6)

The site and buildings as they stand today consists of two massive brick buildings owned
orginally by the Constitution Wharf Company, The building now known as 405-411
Commercial Street is six stories, has a block granite foundation on piles and brick
walls. The building at 415-427 Commercial Street is also of brick, is five stories and

Preservation Consideration (accessibility, re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) City of Boston, Building Department Records

(2) City of Boston, Assessor's Office

(3) Thwing, Annie Haven The Crooked and Narrow Streets of the Town of Boston 1630-1822
(Boston, Marshall Jones Company, 1920)

C4) Drake-Ross, Marjorie. The Book of Boston; The Fede ral Period 1775 to 1837

(New York: Hastings House, Pub, 1961) p, 25-26
C5) Constitution Wharf, Bostonian Society, Scrapbook Collection (■

(6) Murphy, Ray, Fascinating Update of "Old Ironsides" History Book Review of

Tyrone Martin's, A Most Fortunate Ship, Boston Sunday Globe, (June 15, 1980) p. A9



significance Ccon't) Constitution Wharf

as a stone foundation on piles. In 1917, there were four buildings on this
site. The two brick buildings which face Commercial Street and two wooden buildings in
the rear, which were utilized for storage. By 1920, Quincy Market Cold Storage
occupied 405-411 Commercial Street for General Dry Storage of Goods and were using
the rear of #409 for offices. Building Department Records that by 1940, Quincy
Market Cold Storage had built a massive warehouse on Sargeant's Wharf and the
Boston Sausage and Provision Company had taken over the building at 415 to 427
Commercial Street for a meat processing and packing plant. In 1956, this company was
employing 470 people annually. Much of its labor force came from the adjacent Italian
North End, and Americanization classes were offered to new employees, if desired
By 1967, industrial usage and light manufacturing in this area was beginning to minimize
due to urban renewal programs and the Boston Sausage and Provision Company was
causing pollution problems in the area. The plant closed down totally in 1977 and
is now vacant.



Description Ccon ' t)

Ironside ' " The first level north has an indented entryway with a cast iron support
beam and granite posing above. Two other wooden freight doorways are evident on the
first level. The second through sixth stories have two sets of symmetrical
^wind - >W'3, The second and third stories have large granite lentils, decorative brick
"work en third through sixth levels is rectangular in motif. Large lettering on third
level identifies the structure, simple brick corbelling is evident at the roof line.
The second or northerly building at #415-427 Commercial Street is a large nondescript
on the second level connected the two structures is not in use at this time. Central
freight entryway and two window opening on each level with wooden shutters break
the otherwise flat brick facade. Large white lettering on third level identify the
building tie rops on four levels and simple brick corbelling with fan shaped brick lentils
further define the building.




r



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION



Building Information Form Form No.



Area North End




ADDRESS 98-112 Atlantic Ave .COR.



NAME Joseph's Aquarium Restaurant



present
MAP NO. 26N-13E



original



DATE 1925



_SUB ARE A NA?

1



ARCHITECT Brooks Skinner Co.



^wM


BUILDER
















OWNER Commercial


Wharf


Corp


source


Joseph


Calia


Trusts




original
PHOTOGRAPHS










pres


lent




19/331130/4692110


Ward


1 3,


Parcel


3616























TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.
Cnon-residential) restaurant



NO. OF STORIES Cist to cornice)



plus



ROOF



flat



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) clapboards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos ^Ixmyvinyl
(other) brick stone concrete iron/steel/alum.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION, twq Stories tall. Wooden building with aluminvim siding. Front facade
divided into three sections by fluted pilasters; each section has gabled parapet wall.
New casement windows with aluminum awnings and shutters. Recessed entrance; wooden
surrounded with dentilled pediment Back portion of building painted brick. Another two
story wooden section facing on the harbor.



EXTERIOR ALTERATION minor <moderj
CONDITION (^ooSy fair poor



drastic



npw farpirip; alnminnTn sidinQ



LOT AREA



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS ^n th^ <^nnt-h of rr^mm^y-ni^t Whar-f R;=,r-V nf hnilHing f^r^<^



Ri-ig-hnn HavhoT-



CMap)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

This building began as a potatoe shed. The following

description is taken from a building permit: "This

building is to rest on wharf platform. No foundation,

no floor, construction Brooks Skinner designed a wharf

to carry load 200 # square feet. Maximum load to be allowed

in building, 150 # square inches." In 1972 the building

was owned by Blue Water Trust, the developer of Commercial

Wharf, some improvements were made at that time.



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) r

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Commiinity/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

Today this building is part of the redevelopment of Boston's waterfront, situated in
a prime location beside Commercial Wharf and adjacent to the Waterfront Park.



C



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility, re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc)

(1) City of Boston Building Department Documents.

(2) City of Boston Assessor's Records.



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION Building Information Form Form No. Area



North End




^] 28-32 Atlantic Avenue

. ADDRESS 14-40 Lewis Wharf COR.



L .^^NAM E Lewis Wharf



Lewis Wharf



present
MAP NO. 26N - 13E



original



SUB AREA N/W



DATE 1836-1838



source
ARCHITECT Richard Bond 1



source

UILDER Gardiner Greenleaf 1



source



[OWNE R Lewis Wharf Co.
original

HOTOGRAPHS



Waterfront Development Corpora tion
present



19/331130/4692100 Ward 3. Parcel 3030-3036



TYPE



Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten ■ apt.
Cnon-r e sident ial ) mercantile S wharf (original^ mixed rnrnTnPT-ri ;q1 , nff-ir-,=> ^nA
residential (present)
NO. OF STORIES Cist to cornice) ^plus



ROOF



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



clapboards
brick



s hing les stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
^one ^ granite ^concrete iron/steel/al\:mi.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Rough- faced, coursed granite blocks. Six stories - four original
plus two added. Forty-five bays on the side. Quoins at corners. Granite window surrounds;"
lintels on second and third floors come to a peak at the center. Heavy plain stone cornice
serves as lintel for fourth floor windows. "Lewis Wharf" is carved into this cornice.
Fifth and sixth floors set into a mansard-like roof; some openings are windows and some
are sliding glass doors with railp-ngs on the inside. Cantilevered balconies. (con't)
EXTERIOR ALTERATION minor C^oderatg? drastic t^n c^j-ori^c, ;,nH H;,i r-r^ni >.c: ^^hoH



CONDITION



dood^ fair poor



LOT AREA



200,000



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS pn thp w^i-Prf T-nnf T.n^.^-h^H Hc-t-T.,»»r, r^mm^v^H.-i wy^^r^ r^n^

what was Sargent's Wharf (now a parking ^nt) .

SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

Lewis Wharf was built by a syndicate headed by Robert
G. Shaw, John Brown and Arami C. Lombard. The mid 1830 's
was a period of wild speculation throughout the country.
The three men named above each invested nearly $50,000
(Map) in this venture. Lewis Wharf was built on what was the

old Lewis, Spear and Hancock Wharves. The block of solid
granite warehouses which were produced far surpassed all
the other wharves and docks in Boston. The Lewis Wharf







Moved; date if known



t



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable )

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultviral Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication , Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

Company had no difficulty in attracting tenants. Some of the wealthy Boston merchants who
did trade from the granite building were: Benjamin Bangs (then at the head of the
Valpariso trade), John Brown S Co., Wm. Appleton S Co. (in the China and East Indian
trade), Enoch Train S Co., and John D. Gardner. In the period from 1840 to 1850 Enoch
Train established his Liverpool line, which was composed of some of Boston's finest
ships. Clipper ships owned by Glidden and Williams heading for San Francisco left from
Lewis Wharf in the decade from 1850 to 1860. Like Commercial Wharf, a small portion of
Lewis Wharf was cut off by the construction of Atlantic Avenue; today a gas station
stands on that site.

Beginning in about 1840, New York eclipsed Boston as the largest port on the East
Coast, but Boston Harbor remained a very busy place. Along with foreign trade, coastal
commerce and the California gold rush contributed to Boston's prosperity. Economic
conditions in the 1860 's combined with the Civil War marked the end of Boston's days
as a deep-water shipping port. Boats from the fishing fleet became the most frequent
visitors to Lewis Wharf.

The warehouses continued to be used for storage, but rather than holding exotic
cargoes from the East Indies, soap products and vegetables were among the goods stored in
the buildings.

In 1965, Carl Koch, a well-known Boston architect, formed the Boston Waterfront
Development Corporation and purchased Lewis Wharf for $1 million. After an eight year
struggle to obtain financing and city approval, Lewis Wharf began a new life as a ,icon't)
Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)

National Register Nomination



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) Cohen, Cecile L. , Fulton-Commercial Historic District Survey (Boston: Massachusetts
Historical Commission, June 1, 1972) .

(2) Van Meter, Mary The Boston Waterfront (Summary of a survey conducted under the auspice
of the City Conservation League) Boston, December, 1976.

(3) Bunting, W..H. , Portrait of a Port: Boston, 1852-1914 (Cambridge, Mass. : The Belknap
Press of Harvard- University Press, 1971) .

(4) Forbes, Col. Frank H., Proceedings of the Bostonian Society , January 15, 1952. ^'

(5) City of Boston Building Department Documents.

(6) City of Boston Assessor's Records.



Lewis Wharf
Description (con't from front of page 1)

East end - six bays on second through fourth floors; three bays on first floor.
Iterick chimney and mechanical equipment project from the roof. Badly deteriorated 2 story
building on south side of Lewis Wharf along Atlantic Avenue; metal sheathing covering
wood frame. Large metal sheathed 2 story shed in bad condition extends out into the
harbor; south east of the granite building. Boston Sailing Center; north east of granite
building; 2 story building with 3rd floor over part of it; appeared to be some construction
work underway. Swimming pool; garden, bowling green, and docking space on south side of
building; parking on north side.



Significance (con't from reverse of page 1)

complex of condominiums, offices, restaurants and shops. The use of the building
is broken down as follows: retail stores, a grocery and two restaurants occupy the first
floor, the second floor is used for offices and the third through sixth floors serve
as residents. The waterfront has become one of the most sought after residences in the
city of Boston.




Bibliography (con't) |

C7) Atlases of the City of Boston

1873 (D.A. Sanborn, C.E. , New York)

1874 (G.M. Hopkins, Philadelphia).
1888, 1908 (G.W. Bromley, Philadelphia)



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION



Building Information Form Form No.



Area North End




ADDRESS 365 Commercial St.



COR.



NAME Lincoln Wharf



present
MAP NO. 27N-13E



original



SUB AREA N/W



DATE 1907 1




source




ARCHITECT




source




BUILDER Richardson and Young


1


source




OWNER Lincoln Wharf Corporation




original


present


PHOTOGRAPHS





19/3310/4692100 Ward 3, Parcel 3839



TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt,
Cnon-residential) power station and coal bunker



NO. OF STORIES Clst to cornice)



plus



ROOF



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) clapbo ards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
(other) (Srick) stone ^concrete iron/steel/alum.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION ; Massive brick building served as power station. Four very tall
stories. Atlantic Avenue facade: 1) first floor - brick banding; five bays wide; two
outside bays bricked up; two large doorways on either side of central doorway; central
doorway, new door inserted and most of opening bricked up, stone pediment supported by
carved stone brackets over door. 2) facade dominated by series of three round arches; the
two on the outside are wifli^ow openings going through the second and third floors; (con't)

EXTERIOR ALTERATION (minor) moderate drastic



CONDITION good (^airj poor



LOT AREA



inq,p,7n



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS pns of t.hP fpw vpm^inHng nnH^w^l^p^H e^^o. .i^^g ^>.^

waterfront.

SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

Lincoln Wharf was originally occupied by a number of
wooden buildings which were used for storage.
In 1879, a coal shed was built on the soulh side of the
pier measuring 57x50 of wood with a composition roof
m (Map) on a pile foundation. This was one of the two on the

Lincoln Wharf site. Built by Richardson and Young.
In 1971, coal pocket #1, was removed from the rear of
the Metropolitan Transit Authority property at a cost
of $92,000.



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable )

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultiiral Education Religion

Architect\iral Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

The Society of the Sacred Heart Church has plans to convert the structure into 150
condominiums to be sold to community people at prices ranging from approximately
$45,000 to $60,000 a unit. The ground floor of the building would house a lobby and
an ItMian museiim; there would be eight floors of housing above this. The San Marco
Lay Society has completed an housing project in the Fulton-Commercial Street area.

Also planned for the site, but currently held in abeyance is a plan to recycle the
coal bunkers in the rear of the building to'something called the North End Municipal
Center, which will include a community fire station. The project was sponsored by the
Boston Public Facilities Department and was designed by Anderson Notter Associates, Inc.
As George Notter and Stewart Lesser, Chief Architect at the Public Facilities' Depart-
ment explain, the abandoned bunker was selected for reuse because of its sound condition,,
prime site and the desirability of maintaining a wooden structure on the waterfront.
The adaptive-use design replaces the existing deck and locates new floors and spaces i^
the stjnacture based on a highly particularized program. The building will have dormit'- .;
lockers and duct work inside. Recreation space on the skylight perimeters and adminis-
trative offices in a two story space under the new roof. The structure will house fire
engines and fire docking facilities. In a unique joint venture with the bunker's
developer, the center will offer commercial condominiums: office. Thus sharing the project
cost on a two-third city, one third contractor basis. -' This project has been shelved
to date.

Preservation Consideration Caccessibility, re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) City of Boston Building Department Docxaments.

(2) City of Boston Assessor's Records

(3) VanMeter, Mary, The Boston Waterfront: Summary of a survey conducted under the auspic
of the City Conservation League (Boston, December, 1975) .

(4) "Church group hopes to Recycle Lincoln Wharf," Boston Herald-American, January 21, 19
pp. I-1-I-2.

(5) Welsh, Katharyn, "Adaptive Use: Boston Recycles its Historic Buildings," Preservatf -i
News (Vol. XV, No. 8, August, 1975) p. 9.



Lincoln Wharf

Description - -^ .

decorative metal bars and panels separate the windows; middle arch filled with decorative
^^rickwork in a diamond- shaped pattern; copper eagle supported by a heavy bracket at the
Icop of the middle round arch; Keyiones at the top of each round arch; a window on the
outside of each large round-arched opening on both second and third floors; second
floor windows very tall with brick lintels; third floor windows smaller with flared
stone lintels and sills. 3) Top floor-diamond-patterned brickwork; corbelling with
a round-arched motif; two windows aligned over the outside round arches; copper cornice.

Sides of building basically the same treatment, but the round-arched openings are
only one story in height; this section three bays wide. Back portion is eight bays
wide and three stories tall with dormers in the roof; very large smoke stacks project
from this section.

Coal bunker stands between the back of the power plant and the water's edge five
stories in height; the first floor is open. Wooden frame with metal sheathing. Outside
staircase leads to roof. Two windows and a door on the top floor.



i









Building Information Form Form No.
ADDRESS 50-38 Eastern Ave. COR.



Area North End



NAME Pilot House



present
MAP NO. 26N-13E



original



SUB AREA



N/W



DATE 1863






source


ARCHITECT






source


BUILDER






source


CWNEREastern Railroad


Waterfront Development Corporat


original


present


PHOTOGRAPHS





19/331150/469280 Ward 3; Parcel 3034

TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.

Cnon-residential ) Warehouse (original) restaurant and offices (present)



NO. OF STORIES Ust to cornice)



Jh-



plus widow's walk



ROOF



ga]?],g



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) clapb oards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
(other) ^ric)c^ ston e foundation concrete iron/steel/alum.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION . Massive brick building. Four stories tall and 10 bays wide on the
south side and five bays wide on the east end. Looks like it was built in five sections;
slight seamlines visible between each pair of bays. First floor covered by projecting
one story glass enclosure.; All windows: round-arched, brownstone sills, new sash, two rows
of headers outline round arches. The arched windows at all levels suggest earlier
Federalist influences - An illusion which is quickly dispelled by the size of the (con't)
EXTERIOR ALTERATION minor ( moderj ^i drastic Portions torn down; new glass enclosure '



CONDITION



fair



on 1st floor; mechanical systems on roof,
poor LOT AREA t^/^



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS Adjacent to Lewis Wharf complex; on edge of harbor; large

parVing 1 nt nn wPdl- =;irlp nf hnilHing. ,

SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

This building was first used as a land-sea transfer station
for cargo traveling by rail. The structure was built by - .
Eastern Railroad As the shipping trade declined other
uses were found for buildings along the waterfront. In
(Map) 1912, the building was owned by Albert R. Whittier. At

that time the building contained 28 rooms and all the
business done on the premises was conducted by mail.



e>



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) ^ "^ i

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

There was a dispute concerning the adequacy of the means of egress. In 1915 the last
use of the building was listed as storage and the intended use was packing tea. The
next year the last use was once again listed as storage, this time the intended use was
once candy packing. The stairs were altered in that year. The use in 1917 gives a
description of what the space looked like: "This block composes 7 buildings, all connecte(
by openings in the party walls. There are five doors, but owing to the occupancy, they
are always open and practically form one building, as far as fire is concerned. The
balconies in rear connects several buildings, but are useless under present conditions." ■
Fire escapes were erected in that year to correct this condition; the use at that time
was listed as tea and coffee,, In 1933 the buildings at No. 42 and 44 were torn down.
The occupancy of no 46-48 was changed in 1946 from grocery storage to auto repair shop
on the first floor.

In 1972 the building began a new life; it was purchased by the Boston Waterfront .


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Online LibraryMass.) Boston Landmarks Commission (BostonNorth End / Waterfront preservation study → online text (page 2 of 10)