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Development Corporation. The space was to be used as a restaurant and off ice^ and Car'
Koch was hired as the architect. The next year the buildings at no. 44 through 48 were
taken down. Since 1973 many alterations have taken place which allows the building
to be used as a restaurant and offices; some of thses changes include erection of new
signs, construction of office partitions, installation of new electrical and mechanical
systems.

The handsome Pilot House is the focal point of the Lewis Wharf development plan.
The Pilot House now provides 23,000 square feet of office space and a 13,00 square (con'1
Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)

National Register Nomination



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) City of Boston Building Department Documents. ']

(2) City of Boston Assessor's Records.

(3) VanMeter, Mary, The Boston Waterfront: Summary of a Survey Conducted Under the Auspice
of the City Conservation League (Boston, December, 1976) .

(4) "Historic Pilot House At Lewis Wharf Proving Prime Tenant Attraction," in Lewis Wharf
Newsletter , (Progress Report #2, June, 1973), p. 2.

(5) Cohen, Cecile L. Fulton - Commercial Historic District Survey (Boston; Massachuse',(
Historical Commission, June 1, 1972), p. 6.



.^. , ,^£ s: tjr T\ Pilot House

Description (con't from front of page 1)

building. Its lack of ornamentation and its architectural plan which, as with other
A^aterfront buildings, relies upon the repetition of a series of similar bays. Changes
since construction include termination of the building at five bays, an- unknown number
having been removed at the Atlantic Avenue end, and the addition of elevators on the
north side with their characteristic appurtenances. The appearance of the situ has
been further altered by the filling of the slip between this site and Lewis Wharf.

The roof is gabled with flat section on peak which accommodates mechanical systems
and modem version of a widow's walk; four bay, two story section set near east end
on the south side of roof. Very simple windows set right on top of each other, separated
by a metal band. East end same round-arched opening treatment; central bay larger with
granite sills filled with sliding glass doors. Doorway on first floor has granite
keystone and posts on each side. Brick patio leading right to the edge of the harbor.
West end has no openings, still evident where other buildings were torn idown.

Significance (con't from reverse of page 1)

foot restaurant called the Winery. The restored Pilot House provides four full floors
of office space and a skylit mezzanine. The orginal brick and beam interiors, restored
to their natural splendor, is enhanced by high ceilings and large windows looking over
the gardens, pool club, and Marina of Lewis Wharf to Boston Harbor. The original
widow's walk, where pilots once watched for ships in the harbor was also restored. The
multi- leveled Winery Restaurant housed in the lower floors of the Pilot House features
the original massive ceiling beams at a height of 12 feet and floor to ceiling arched
whindows offering a panoramic harbor view. Glass enclosed terracing is also evident.
Financing for the development was arranged with CBT Corporation. An affiliate of the

^Connecticut Bank and Trust Company of Hartford, and the Builders Investment Group of

W Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.



#



(




Building Information Form Fointi No.

ADDRES S 43-63 Atlantic Ave. COR.

NAM E Prince Building



Are^orth End



present
MAP NO. 26N-13E



Prince Macaroni Factory



SUB AREA



original
N/W



DATE 1917



source
B.S. Brown (original) 1
ARCHITEC T Tim Anderson (Rehab, 1968) 2

source



M BUILDE R Gerry and Northrup Company (Rehab. 1968) 7.



OWNER



original
PHOTOGRAPHS



Prince Macaroni Company Prince Condominiun} Tru st



present



19/331100/469:780 W3r-r^ ^^ V^^^n^l ^^47



TyPE Cresidential) single " double row 2-fam.
Cnon-residential) Offices



3-deck ten



apt,



NO. OF STORIES Ust to cornice)



10



plus



ROOF



flat



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



cla^E^ards shingles stucco as phalt asbestos alum/vinyl
^rick_^ stone /Joncrete) iron/steel/alum.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This structure is made of reinforced concrete with twelve-fort ceilings
and heavy concrete capitals. The building is ten stories in height; it contains one
story of office space, two levels of enclosed tenant parking, and the remaining seven
floors contain 42 family size apartments. Because the concrete construction was so sturdy,
it was possible to add two and a half additional floors. Concrete balconies were added
to the original structures. Tha. jndu.-gtrial windows were replaced by sliding (con't)

cnnvprqinn nf -Faf-hn-ry ep^^p t:r^ hOUSJng;



EXTERIOR ALTERATION minor



drastic



2h floors were added to the original seven.
CONDITION /t^oo^ fair poor



LOT AREA



8470,



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS



Thj . q hnilriing far^gq; Bo s ton' s watorfront.



9



(Map)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

This building was seated for demolition in the late 1960 's.
Instead of being razed, the former macaroni factory became -
one of the first examples of adaptive use and served as a
catalyst for other redevelopment projects along Boston's
waterfront.

There are two very interesting design features in this
project. Each corridor in the building serves two floors
of apartments. A "skip-stop" elevator serves the bottom
two floors of apartments, and the third, fifth, eigth and



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) ^,

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectiaral Exploration/ Science/ ,

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/ I

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

penthouse floors. One either walks up or down a half flight of stairs to reach an apartme
from a given corridor. This feature increases the amount of rentable space. The 12 foot
ceilings have provided a very workable solution for the problem of installing mechanical
ducts and piping. Rather than boring through 12-inch concrete slabs, these systems have
been placed on top of the slabs with platforms built over them. This arrangement solves
a problem and at the same time allows for a more interesting room layout.



Description (con't)

glass doors. The total floor area breaks down as follows:

90,000 square feet (gross)

72,500 square feet residential

10,000 square feet parking
7,500 square feet offices.
The construction cost for the project was $1,400,000, which breaks down to $15.55 per
square foot. The financing was provided by Suffolk Franklin Savings Bank, Boston.

The building originally contained rental units, but in 1973 the apartments were
converted into condominiums.



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity

for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)

This building is on the outside edge of the Fulton-Commercial St. National Register

Historic District. The importance of this structure as an early example of adaptive

use warrants its inclusion in a National Register Historic District.



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) City of Boston Building Departimeht Documents

(2) Bunnell, Gene, editor. Built To Last: A Handbook on Recycling Old Buildings (Washingto
D.C.: The Preservation Press, National Trust for Historic Preservation, 1977).

(3) City of Bsston Assessor's Records.

(4) Architectural Record , Vol, 143, January 1968, pp. 156-157.

(5) Martin, Thomas, J. and Melvin A. Gamron, Adaptive Use: Development Economics, Proc^ ^g
and Profiles, Part 1 , (The Urban Land Institute, 1978) . (.



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION




Building Information Form Form No,

427-447 Commercial St.
ADDRESS 453-467 Commercial StCOR.



Area North End



NAME



U.S. Coast Guard Base



present
MAP NO. 27N-13E



original



SUB AREA N/W



427-439: 1896-1901
DATE 453-467: 1897



ARCHITECT



Dean and Mair

Kendall & Stevens etc.



BUILDER



Lowney Chocolate
OWNER Company, 1896



Coast Guard

United States of America



original



PHOTOGRAPHS



present



9/33190-110/4692110-120 Ward 3, Parcel 3050

TYPE (residential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten • apt.
Cnon-residential) complex of 11 buildings owned bv U.S. Coast Guard



NO. OF STORIES Ust to cornice)



1-5 stories



plus



ROOF



flat



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) cl^gboards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
(other) toric^ stone concrete iron/steel/alum.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION ; Since the Coast Guard currently contains eleven structures of various
sizes and shapes, the attached map will help pinpoint the buildings surveyed by numbers.
Building #8 of five stories is, for all intensive purposes a blank box. The front facade
has no openings. It is a solid brick wall with corbelling at the roof line. The north
facade has four sets of 2/2 double hung sash which are placed symmetrically from. theh
first to the fifth fl oors. The fifth floor contains rounded arches. (con't)
EXTERIOR ALTERATION CminoFN moderate drastic



CONDITION good CfairO poor



LOT AREA



n/a



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS Located at foor of Hanover Street is one of the main and

earliest corridors which connected the Norht End to the Port of Boston.

SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

The U.S. Coast Guard is located on the sites of Fiske,
Nichols, Young Harris Wharfs, and date back to the 1750 's.
The present brick buildings date from 1896 to 1917. An
1895 G.W. Bromley Atlas indicates that Issac Harris
CMap) owned much of these wharfs. The Winnisimet Company

ran the Chelsea Ferry from the site and most of the
buildings were of brick and wood.



f



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) ^

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military hiomanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

In 1896, the Walter M. Lowney Candy Manufacturers were noted for their chocolate '-
bonbons; In 1896, two brick buildings were constructed. (See attached U.S.C.G.
Support Center map for their locations) Building #8 housed the Merchants Warehouse
Company. By 1917, the north and south fingers of the site contained two story wooden
structures owned by the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company. Two new
Brick structures were located on the northern most part of the wharf at Commercial
Street. These two buildings were owned by the Nathaniel Tufts Meter Company and C.E,
Cotting, et al. The Lowney Chocolate Company remained till 1932. A large percentage of
the labor force for the W.M. Lowney Company came from the Italian North End. A letter
to the Building Department indicates that a waiver was requested by the company to allow
the screening of educational films for Americanization classes.' In 1932 the owners of
the chocolate factory is listed as Candy Brands, Inc. In 1935, the owners of building
#1 is listed as Deblois and Maddison and the facility is utilized for mercantile. By -
1941, this building #1 is taken over by the C. Pappas Company. Also at this time, \ .,
building #4 or # ' s 445 through 449 Commercial Street become the temporary quarters for
an Anti-Aircraft company of the U.S. Army. During World War II the U.S. Coast Guard
takes over the entire facility and have remained there until the present day. Currently
the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center serves all of New England's coastline from this site
through an elaborate complex of eleven buildings and three piers. Thousands of men are
trained and work on this base and an existing development plan recently completed by
Charles G. Hilgenhurst and Associates, architects and planners propose $20 million (con'tt
Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) City of Boston, Building Department

(2) City of Boston, Assessor's Office.

(3) Hopkins, G.M. Atlas of The County of Suffolk. Massachusetts , Vol. 1 1874.

(4) Bromley, G.W. Atlas of Boston , Vol. I. 1888.

(5) Bromley, G.W. Atlas of Boston , Vol. I, 1917.

(6) Interview with Captain Deverou, U.S. Coast Guard, Support Center Base, June 12, 1980.

(



Description (con't from front, page 1) U.S. Coast Guard

Two smaller sets of windows which run from the first to the fifth floors are centered
^between the larger windows in the north facade. An additional set of windows span the
'first to fifth floors on the northwest corner. This is a monumental building of red
brick.

Building #4 is the most elaborate of the complex. A central double door on the
first level, with four bays of 6/6 double hung sash and a southern double door entrance
make up the first level. A high basement of rough hewn granite blocks is evident.
Quoins span length of first floor. Heavy wooden entablature separate first and second
levels. Second floor has decorative bands of brick with a row of seven windows placed
symmetrically from the first to the fifth floors. Fan shaped lintels evident on second
third and fifth floors. Fourth floor has Palladio type window arches that are divided
with brick columns. Decorative use of granite and brick create the arches. Fifth floor
windows are smaller and have been modernized. Fan shaped lintels and decorative band of
granite evident. Simple corbelling at roof line. Keystone in granite at top of building
indicates a date of 1901 for the structure.

Building #1 has had drastic alterations on the first floor. It is a mamouth, five
story structure of brick. It is attached to building #4 and faces Commercial Street.
From the north to the south on the first level there is a single doorway, a garage door,
a single 2/2 double hung sash window, a double set of 2/2 windows, a boarded up freight
entrance, a garage door, then another single doorway with lights above and three half
windows with murals painted on the upper half by the U.S. Coast Guard. The three murals
depict the Coast Guards involvement with ecology, as lifesavers, and as searchers, and
rescuers. On the second through fifth floors, windows are arranged symmetrically and
seem to follow a pattern of usage. From the north to the south they are arranged as
follows: A single 6/6, 2 more bays with iron gratings, then 2 bays more and finally/
5 single 6/6 windows. Rounded arched lintels in brick surround most window heads.
|Simple corbelling at roof line and star iron ties separate most window openings.
' Buildings #2 and #3 are located within the base on the Hanover Street extension.
These two structures are attached and are both six stories high. Extensive alterations
have occurred on first level. Nine bays are evident on second through sixth floors in
buildings #2 and #3. Rounded arches in brick above most windows. These two structures
may be demolished in the U.S. Coast Guard Support Centers planned capital improvement
program.

Buildings #7, 11, 5 and 10 are small one story structures used for marine related
and mechanical equipment purposes. All are located in the rear of the Support Center
at the bulkhead line.



Significance (con't from reverse, pagel)

dollars in renovations, take downs, and new construction over the next tea.-, years. The
U.S. Coast Guard is currently negotiating to buy the two brick warehouse facility, namely
Constitution Wharf and convert these abandoned wharehoi£fi.s into workshop and industrial
space needed for the consolidation and expansion of their Support Center operations.
A new office and gymnasium would be built on the northern most part of the Commercial
Street side of the complex. (See plan 4-A of the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center.) The
Community Services Support staff is currently working with North End groups on local
usage of this facility.



t



(^



c



• i












n



L




BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION



Building Information ForTti Form No.

71-77 Commercial Wharf
ADDRESS 78-80 Atlantic Ave. COR,



Area North End




NAME The Wharf Bar/Restaurant



present
MAP NO. 26N/13E



DATE Front Portion- 1888



_SUB AREA_
(1)



original
N/W





source


ARCHITECT






source


BUILDER






soiirce ,, , „ „ J.
Konrad Gesner Trusts


OWNER Commercial Wharf


Arthur B. Blackett


original


present




Bencio Moskow


PHOTOGRAPHS


Charles W. Brown III



19/331180/469290



of Blue Water Trusts
Ward 3, Parcel 3028



TYPE Cxesidential) single double row
Cnon-residential) Bar/Restaurant



2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.



NO. OF STORIES Clst to cornice)



plus



HOOF



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



clapboards
brick



shingles stucco asphalt asbestos felumy'vinyl
stone ^concrete iron/steel/aTum.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION

One story wooden structure resided with aluminimum siding, with gabled roof. Two

single paned flush lights in front with recessed entrance. "The Wharf" sign protrudes

from building. Concrete foundation evident in front portion of building. Three

modern bay windows exist on the waterside front of the structure. A long narrow annexation

of the building has 18 lights of ^ sin gle large pane over two smaller panels , the roof

EXTERIOR ALTERATION minor (Inoderat^ drastic



CONDITION



(good^



fair poor



LOT AREA



n/a



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS Situated close to the water's edge on commercial wharf an d

adjacent to Lewis Wharf. This bar /restaurant overlooks a small marina.

SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

In it's early days this small wood framed building
served as a storage shed for Commercial Wharf ' s in shipping
and fishing industries. In 1943, the building was
listed as the "Lighthouse Cafe" served lunches and was
CMap) owned by F. Morton Smith. In 1950, owner, trustee,

James F, Bagley, Jr, of Commercial Wharf Company repaired
fire damage which occurred to the kitchen and the dining
room. The doors, windows, electrical work and water-
front wall were repaired at a cost of $3,000. In 1964,
the commercial, Lewis Wharf Corporation bought this



f)



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) -

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultiiral Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

structure which was then listed as a storage shed to convert it into a restaurant.
The second story of this wood storage shed was removed and the roof was rebuilt
throughout the building. A new kitchen, dining room, toilets, windows and doors
were installed and new aluminum wall siding was put on the exterior, at a cost of
$9,000. C3). It's architectural significane relates to a newly revitalized waterfront,
which was being rehabilitated in the early 1960* s and has become an integral part of
Boston's waterfront in the 1980's,

Description (con't)

line drops down considerably. In the narrower rear portion of the building i •;
contains two vents for air and cooking systems.



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) Bromley, G,W. Atlas of Boston , Vol.1, 1888

C2) City of Boston, Assessor's Office

(3) City of Boston, Building Department Records



Maritime Related Buildings

Howe and Bainbridge
220-230 Coitmercial Street

Atlantic House

232 Commercial Street

McNear Residence

236-238 Commercial Street

Dom's Restaurant

240-246 Commercial Street

Waterfront Haircutters
252-254 Commercial Street



<



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION




Building Information Form Form No.



Area North End



ADDRESS 220-230 Commercial StCOR.



NAME Howe and Bainbridge



present
MAP NO. 26N-13E



original



DATE 1841-1874, c.1860



_SUB ARE A tl/W
C4)





source


ARCHITECT






source


BUILDER






source


OWNER Lewis Wharf Corp,


Howe and Bainbridge


original


present


PHOTOGRAPHS





19/33195/469585



Ward 3 , Parcel 3512



TYPE Cresidential) single double row
Cnon-residential) commercial



2-fam.



3-deck ten



apt.



NO. OF STORIES Cist to cornice)^



_plus



ROOF mansard



cupola



dormers



^boards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
^brick^ Cgtonlj concrete iron/steel/alum.



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

This large brick structure is four stories in height and nine bays wide. The first floor

has been adapted for commercial use; at either end of the facade there is a large window

opening with a dooirway beside it. There are canvas awnings to protect these openings.

In the middle portion of the first floor there is a loading dock, a double door, and a

slightly recessed single door. All of the windows in the upper floors are two over two



EXTERIOR ALTERATION



moderate drastic



CONDITION fqood^ fair poor



LOT AREA



4.620



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS



t



(Map)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

Since 1841, this property has been owned by the Lewis

Wharf Corporation, as was much of the other property in

the area. It is difficult to determine when the

building was constructed because it did not change hands.

But the style indicates a date of approximately 1860,

In 1919, there were plans to have the building used

as a ship chandlery. To this end openings were cut

in party walls, a stairway was fireproof ed and an elevator

was installedo A fire occurred in 1925, In 1928, the

building was used as candy factory, machine shop, and



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable )

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultiiral Education Religion

Architectiiral Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement . invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development



Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )
for storage of cotton goods , Later the same year a permit was granted which allowed
the occupancy to be changed to a ship chandleiry and storage; and the space to be
considered one building instead of three. In 196Q, the use was changed to offices and
a retail store. A new front door was added in 1969, and the interior walls and
ceilings were refinished by sandblasting in 19.71,

Description Ccon'ti

double hung sash. On the second and third floors the windows are topped with brick
segmental arches and they have stone sills. There is brick corbelling under the roofli
The windows on the fourth floor are set into the mansard roof. Each window has a gablee
roof head with lintels . A massive chimney is located in the fourth bay from the
north side of the building; a window is set into the chimney. One of the most attracti'.
features of the building is the large sign with a black background and raised gold f'\\
letters which is set between the first and second floors, . ■ .^^



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(.11 City of Boston Assessor's records

C2) City of Boston Building Department Documents

(3) Atlases of Boston 1888 and 1908, CG.W". Bromley)

C4) Atlas of Suffolk County, Mass, 1874 CG.M, Hopkins!,

(5) Suffolk County Courthouse Registry of Deeds.



BOSTON LANDMARKS COM-'lISSION




Building Info2nnation Form Form No,



Area North End



ADDRESS 232 Commercial St.



COR.



NAME Atlantic House



present
MAP NO. 26N-13E



original



DATE C 1842



_SUB ARE A NA?
6







source


ARCHITECT Gerald


Cuqini ,


(Rehab, 1967)






source


BUILDER










source


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Online LibraryMass.) Boston Landmarks Commission (BostonNorth End / Waterfront preservation study → online text (page 3 of 10)