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Mass.) Boston Landmarks Commission (Boston.

North End / Waterfront preservation study online

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OWNER




William Cress et al.


original




present


PHOTOGRAPHS







9/33195/469285 Ward 3. Parcel 3511



TYPE Cresidential) single
tnon-residential)



double



row 2-fam.



3-deck



ten



apt.



NO. OF STORIES tlst to cornice)



plus 3 fr-iplpy r>n t-hp tnp



'AOOF



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



c lapbo ards
dSrick^



s hing les stucco



asphalt
concrete



asbestos alum/vinyl
iron/steel/alum.



(trim S foundation)
BRIEF DESCRIPTION . ^ stone post and beam system extends across the first floor of the
building. The whole first floor is recessed; there are three pairs of tall narrow
windows and a wooden double front door on this level. The second and third floors are
three bays wide. The stone sills on the second floor and the stone lintels on the third
floor remain. The space between the second and third floors has been filled with clap-
boarding. _ Wooden flower boxe s projec t from the second and third story windows. (con't)



EXTERIOR ALTERATION minor



CONDITION (gooj) fair poor



drastic



_LOT ARE A ifiqn



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS rpy,^ wipw fT-nm f-hig VMi-ilHi-ng (ogpor-i aT 1 y i-ho <-np flo^r) -i g



arross Atlanti.r;- Avgnug trj thg harbor.



#



CMap)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

On July 1, 1841, the Lewis Wharf Corporation sold the
lot on which this building stands to Robert G. Shaw for
$6,890.18. Shaw probably built the brick warehouse soon
after he purchased the lot. Anna B. Green inherited the
property from Shaw. This building has had many uses over
the years. In 1912 the upper floors served as a lodging
house and the first floor was a store. At that time it
was known as the Atlantic House. In 1917 the building



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable )

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

suffered a fire, but it continued to be used as a lodging house until 1927 when the
use was changed to light manufacturing. Specifically the use was candy manufacturing;
by the San-Man Chocolates Co., the new owner.

The building was damaged by fire again in 1929. Then it went through a series of
new owners: Morton Smith, 50 State St. (1938), Lewis Wharf, Inc. (1946), Edward A.
Simone, Winchester (1961) . In 1961 the building was declared unsafe due to a bulging
front wall.

Gerard Cugini was the owner in 1967 and he made the changes which we see today. The«
first four floors are used for commercial or office space and the top floor is a triplex
apartment .



Description (con't) : The balcony for the triplex on the fourth floor projects well
over the sidewalk;, the same wooden clapboarding is used on the top floor.

Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) City of Boston Assessor's records.

(2) City of Boston Building Department Documents.

(3) "Architect Raises the Roof to Create Wharf side Complex," House and Garden: Remodelim
Guide to Home Improvement , Spring, Summer 1970, p. 98.

(4) Interiors, Vol. 129, May 1970, p. 120-121.

(5) G.M. Hopkins Atlas of the County of Suffolk, Mass., 1874.

(6) Suffolk County Courthouse Registry of Deeds. f




Building Information Form Form No.

ADDRES S 236-238 Commercial Stg OR.

NAME



Area North Edd



present
MAP NO. 26N-13E



SUB AREA



original
N/W



DATE 1841-1848


4






ARCHITECT


source






source

BUILDER


OWNER Mathew W. Green


source
John


McNear




original
PHOTOGRAPHS






present



iq/-^3iqS/4fiQ?»S Wnrrl "^ , P^rrpl ISIO



1YPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt,
Cnon-r e sident ial )



NO. OF STORIES Clst to cornice)



plus



ppnthnnsp — (5th floor)



ROOF



flat



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) clapbo ards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
(other) ^rici^ stone ^concrete iron/steel/alum.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION = Simple, four story brick structure. First floor - granite post
and beam system; four bays with three pairs of slightly recessed, tall, narrow windows
and a new door. Second through fourth floors have same window treatment - three bays
with new metal framed, casement windows; stone lintels and sills. Simple brick corbelling
at the roof line. Set back penthouse with gable roof, sliding glass door and skylights.



EXTERIOR ALTERATION ^no^ moderate drastic conversion from a warehouse to apartments
CONDITION (goo^ fair poor



and restaurant.
_LOT AREA 1178



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS Faces the harbor across Atlantic.



»



(Map)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

On May 20, 1841, the Lewis Wharf Corporation sold a lot

to Mathew W. Green, a wharfinger, for $4,537.50. Next

the property passed from Henry F. and Mathew W. Green

to Moses Clark on December 16, 1848. Clark paid $10,000;

the description mentions "the brick store thereon."

Clark sold the building to Edward Bell for $10,000

on May 17, 1867.



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) _

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

This building has undergone a series of changes. In 191D a rather drastic remodeling
was done by F.A. Norcross, a noted Boston builder. A building permit notes, "Change
roof from pitch to flat, building up front and rear walls, raise third, fourth and fifth
floors, remodel stairs." The owner at that time was G. Stabile and A. Marciello; the
use was a store and lofts. In 1913 the building was known as Anchor House, and the first
floor remained a store but the upper floors were used for lodging. An apllication to
keep a lodging house was filed in 1918.

In 1945, the roof of the building was changed from slate to asphalt shingles.
Three years later the building was owned by the Diamond Spring Brewing Co. and barrels
and cases of beer were stored in the first floor and the upper floors were used as officei

In 1967 the building was owned by Domeniz A. Capossela. At that time the structure ;
was rehabilitated to contain four apartments and a restaurant at a cost of $10,000.
In 1970 there was a plan to combine #236-238, #240-242, #244-246, and #248-250 into one
building. The use of the building was to be as follows: v

236-238: restaurant and 2 apartments
240-242 S 222-246: 1st floor: restaurant, coffee shop and lo\inge
2nd and 3rd floors: vacant
4th and 5th floors: office space.

Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) City of Boston Building Department Documents.

(2) City of Boston Assessor's Records

(3) 1888 Atlas of Boston (G.W. Bromley)

(4) Suffolk County Courthouse Registry of Deeds.



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION




Building Information Form Form No.
ADDRESS 240-246 Commercial StcoR.



Area North End



NAME



Dom's Restaurant



present
MAP NO. 26N-13E



original



SUB AREA



NA?



DATE 1856-1874






source


ARCHITECT






source


BUILDER






source




Edart Leo Rabinovitz


OWNER


Waterside Realty


original


present


PHOTOGRAPHS





19/33195/469285 Ward 3, Parcel 3507



TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.
Cnon-residential ) Restaurant, offices, apartments



NO. OF STORIES Clst to cornice)



plus



'ROOF



flat



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) ' c lapb oards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
(other) ( ^ric^ stone ^concrete iron/steel/alum.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION : Five stories tall, six bays wide. Really two buildings together.
First fl-or - recessed, natural finished wood and glass. All new sash; tall and narrow,
lower section opens; stone lintels and sills. Sills on fifth floor linked together to
form band around building. Brick corbelling in cream-colored brick at roof line.



EXTERIOR ALTERATION Qnino
CONDITION (good) fair poor



moderate drastic roof Tine rh^ngp^ fynm g;=.hl ^ -ho f^^^-.
new sash



LOT AREA



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS Acros.^ Atl^ntir Av^nnP fvor. rh. ,,^^^^f^^r.f p..^ of .

row of five buildings of similar style and .qralp.

SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

On June 21, 1841, the Lewis Wharf Corpoaration sold the
lot on which this building stands to Thomas G. Atkins.
Atkins bought two additional pieces of land; Atkins paid
$10,582.95. In 1856 there was a dispute over the will
I CMap) of Thomas G. Atkins; a document concerning this dispute

" describes the plots of land but there is no mention of

■ buildings. The buildings appear on the 1874 atlas.



Moved; date if known



Themes jcheck. as many as applicable ) "

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

In 1888 this building was owned by Timothy Atkins Heirs. In 1908 it was owned by
George Stabile. Two years later some major alterations were done by F.A. Norcross,
a well-known Boston builder; the roof was changed from pitch to flat by building up
the front and rear walls; the third, fourth and fifth floors were raised and the stairs
were remodelled. The use at this time was a store and lofts. In 1917 J. Stabile owned
the building; the first floor was used as a grocery and part of the upper floors were
used to make catcut. The San-Man Chocolates Col was housed .in-this space in 1924. The
Stabile Bank Co. owned the building in 1933 and it was still used as a candy factory.
In 1940 the Cole Chocolate Co. was found here. In 1969 a variance was granted which
allowed a mixed use of the structure, that is, a restaiorant, housing and office space.
That is the way in which the building is being used today. '



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility, re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records , early maps , etc . )

(1) City of Boston Building Department Docioments.

(2) City of Bosotn Assessor's Records.

(3) Atlases of the City of Boston (Philadelphia, G.W. Bromley, 1888 S 1908)

(4) Atlas of Suffolk County, Massachusetts 1874 (G.M. Hopkins) .

(5) Suffolk County Courthouse Registry of Deeds.



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMiMISSION




Building Information Form Form No.

ADDRESS 252-254 Commercial St . COR.

NAME Waterfront Haircutters



Area North End



Fleet St.



present
MAP NO. 26N - 13E
DATE 1841-1842



original



_SUB AREA_
4



NAf



source



ARCHITECT



BUILDER



OWNER



Amnq Rinnpy



original
PHOTOGRAPHS



Angel ina Cardone



present



iq/^-:i1QS/4PiQ78S Ward T, Parcpl -^506



■I'^ift. Cresiaenriai; single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.
Cnon-residential) commercial (1st floorV



NO. OF STORIES Cist to cornice)



plus



"<00F



flat



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) c lapb oards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
(other) f&iclQ stone (foundation) c oncrete iron/steel/alum.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION : This simple brick building is five stories in height and three bays
wide. The storefront on the first floor contains a new window and door.



EXTERIOR ALTERATION ^inor} moderate drastic

CONDITION rgoo^ fair poor ^LOT AREA 1110



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS This building faces the waterfront.



f>



(^p)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

On May 10, 1841, the Lewis Wharf Corporation sold
two parcels of land to Amos Binney for $13,539.82.
Binney sold a portion of this property to John H. Dix,
a physician on June 7, 1842; the deed for this trans-
action mentions a "new brick warehouse." The property
was held in a complicated trust arrangement by Binney 's
heirs until December 31, 1884 when Edward I. Browne et al .
Trustees sold it to Patrick Bergen for $8,700.



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) ^

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultioral Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

An atlas from 1888 lists the owner of the building as Patrick Bergen. Twenty years
later, it was owned by L. Bianco. In 1915 the building housed eight families, and there
were also two stores. Two years later the first floor was occupied by a clothing store,
a barber and a lunch room; the upper floors were occupied by seven families. In 1925
there was still a barber shop in the building.

Repair work was done on the brick work and fire escapes in the mid 20 's and
early 30 's. In 1930, the building was still owned by the Bianco family.

In 1975 there were five apartments in the building.



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) City of Boston Assessor's Records.

(2) City of Boston Building Department Documents.

(3) Atlases of Boston, 1888 & 1908 (G.W. Bromley) .

(4) Suffolk County Courthouse Registry of Deeds.



Hotels/Seaman's Homes

American House Hotel
212-228 Hanover Street

Boston Seaman's Friend Society
287-295 Hanover Street

Fayal Hotel

21-239 Fleet Street

Mariner's House
11 North Square

Piscopal Hotel
26-30 Fleet Street



(i



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION



Building Information Form Form No.




Area ^c^^^h Smj



ADDRESS 71 7_9?R y,^^ ^^,^^ sf-r-PPt-C OR ,

European Restaurant

Ji]"l in'Fi ni .sr:onnt Amprina n House Hotel



NAME



present
MAP NO. 26N-1^F



original



_SUB ARE A N/W



DATE la^S. rehuilt


1851


Kinq's handbook




ARCHITECT






source






BUILDER






source






OWNER Henry R.


Rice S


Com.


source
Capco


Realty,


LPS


original
PHOTOGRAPHS










present



19/330155/4692105



Ward 3, Parcel 2391



TYPE Cresidential) single
Cnon-residential)



double



row 2-fam.



3-deck ten



apt.



NO. OF STORIES CI St to cornice)



plus



ROOF



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



.clapboards



shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
:one5 ^concrete iron/steel/alum.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Five stories of brick with stone trim and some marble. Sixteen bays wide. Symmetrical
arrangement on the facade. Most of the alterations have taken place on the first floor
which now contains a restaurant and three storefronts. As well as two entrances to
the upper stories. Each doorway has marble panels on either side of it, is surrounded
by brick and dentiled cornice overhea d with a foliate ornament supported by a pair of
EXTERIOR ALTERATION minor (pioderat^ drastic



CONDITION



fair poor



LOT AREA



11,979



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS



CMap)



SIGNIFICANCE Ccon't on reverse)
At No. 55 Hanover Street, Henry B. Rice S Com.,
proprietors, operated the leading business house hotel
of the city kept under the American plan. It was first
opened in 1835, and was entirely rebuilt in 1851,
covering the sites of the old American House, Hanover
house and Earl's and Merchant's Hotels. On part of
this ground stood the home of General Warren. Additions
and improvements have often been made; and it is now one
of the largest, as it is reputed to be one of the best



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) /'

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

managed hotels in New England. It is finely furnished, has wide corridors, spacious
;^iiblic drawing rooms, and all modern improvements for the convenience of its guests.
The first passenger elevator in Boston was constructed for this house. The original
American house and the present one have been during forty consecutive years, under
the management of the late Lewis Rice and his son Henry B. Rice. It was the headquarters
of the shoe and leather trade, and a popular resort for western and southern merchants.!
in 1916 a single ran $3.50-$4.00 per night, a double $5.00-6.00 and a suite $8.00-10.00.
All with baths. The American House is one of the finest architectural ornaments of the
city, presenting a beautiful front of the Italian style. The main building is 112 feet
front on Hanover Street, with two wings of six stories, 250 feet deep to Sudbury Street,
having a passage between them of twenty feet in width, the area being disposed into
five different courts, or openings — thus furnishing light and air abundantly, on all side^
the whole covering 27,000 feet of land, erected and finished at a cost of about $300, OQ'
It has 340 rooms, and will accomodate 500 persons. The ladies' and gentlemen's parlor '
occupy the whole front on the first floor, approached by wide halls, with ample receiving;
rooms. A balcony extends along the entire front, the entrance to which is from the orioll
windows in the parlor. It contains suits of splendid rooms for private families and
parties travelling together. The spacious entrance hall or gentleman's exchange on
the street level, extends through the entre of the building, and measures 160 feet in
length by thirty in width. Besides five main stairways leading to the upper floor, there*

Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records , early maps , etc . )

1. King's Handbook of Boston , c. 1878.

2. City of Boston, Assessor's Office.

3. City of Boston, Building Department.

4. Metropolitan Boston: Facts, Figures and Information of Interest to Tourists ,
(Boston Chamber of Commerce, May, 1926) ( (UF at Harvard GSD) ) .

5. Hanover Street file on American House Hotel at SPNEA.



Description Cont. American House Hotel

I

foliate brackets. Heads of a bear or wolf decorate each bracket. Wide metal cornice

separates first floor from upper stories. Most of the 1/1 double hung sash have

flared stone lintels and sills. Windows are arranged as follows: two bays, then

four bays grouped togehter by a wide stone molding that runs through the second, third,

fourth, and fifth floors and across the top of the windows. There is a shield-type

ornament at the top of this molding. Some of the windows within this grouping have

wide stone moldings with a keystone. A stone balcony supported by brackets projects from

a pair of windows on the fourth floor. There are several marble panels surrounded

by brick in this area. The windows continue with four more bays, the two pairs are

separated by stone blocks which run up through the second through fifth floors, then

there is another four bay arrangement like the other side and finally, two more

bays. Simple stone molding at the roof line and quoins at the corners complete this

building.

Signi-ficancs rnnt.

are several other flights in various parts of the American House, so that in the case of fire
or for any other cause, ample means of egress are provided. The immense structure has
been built upon - a unique plan, combing the utmost convenience of arrangement with
great elegance and thoroughness of finish, and the introduction of all the desired
modern improvements, and it is probably the best calculated in all its appointments
^for a large business house, of any in the country. A number of our best artisans,
mechanics and furnishers, have contributed their skill and taste to this noble
pile, which of itself sufficiently speaks their praise, as seldom is there found in a
single building so much of general perfection. With these few brief remarks relative to
this favorite public house, let, us recommend our distant friends when they visit Boston,
to remember the American House. It is a matter of no slight importance when a traveler
arrives in a strange city, for him to know where to tell the hackman, who takes his
baggage, to drivehim. His own mind is relieved, too, of a burthen, in being informed
whither he can go and be sure of those comforts and elegant accommodations that cost
him no more than he would be obliged to pay at a second-rate hotel. Besides which,
one likes to hail from a good house when one visits a new city. To persons acquainted
with Boston and our public houses, the American House will require no compliment from
us; but to our distant readers, this advice may be of service; and such will perhaps profit
by this reference to one of the very best hotels on the American continent.^ Numbers
215 to 228 Hanover Street now accomodate the European Restaurant; Julio ' s D'iscount
Store and Trio's I^violi's on the first level and forty eight apartments on the upper
levels.



I



1



30STQH LA-NTil-AaZS C2W?lISSi




^Idiaf Infaraatioa Tora Tom ^o. Araa^°^^^ ^"<^



AIlIffiZ3S 21-23A Fleet St. COR .



1940 's Fayal Hotel



prssasc
"iAS So. 26N-13E



H AT? 1911



_SuB >Jl£A N/W
(1)





sourca




.i£uiiii-iLT Max M. Kalman


• (1)


,


^


saaxzs




aU L liln iTl ^XiflUi' ^ PonriiTTi








sourc2




QVKE3. Joseph Paul


HSR Trust Corp.


(2)


ongr.rui


prssaac




PEOTCGHAPHS







19/330165/4692155 Ward 3. P^rrPl ^7T^

frE (rssideacialT si^^ie daubld row. 2-faia. l-^scis ilia ape.
(aoa-raaideaiiai)



}I0. CI 3TCRIZ3 (lac la cariiica) four
?.CCr flat crooli



oliis



aoraers



ii-iIZSlAl-3 CTraae] cii,Bboards salr.g las 5cucsa asuoal:. ascescas ainm/^lzyl

Four stories brick building with stone foundation. Flat roof with metal cornice.
Altered extensively on first level. Five symmetrical bays of 2/2 on 2nd, 3rd,
and 4th levels. Central doorway with storefront converted to apartment of first
level.



ZSTZPJCH .^irZP-aTIGJf fenor) aodaraca drastic
CGirDITrGN(^ood) fair poor ^LCT ARIA



1700



^rOTTVORTaZ 3111 CEJGJiCn^ZSIZZS



Orginally a tenement apartment building housing
fourteen families, this structure served for a
number of years during the late 1940 's till the
late 1950 's as the Fayal Lodging House. For
a number of years from 1915 until 1955 the Martini
Family owned the building and had a bakery on
the first level. From 1958 till around 1974, the
building was owned by Carol A. Luiso who was the
proprietor of the Fayal Hotel and ran a coffee
shop on th^ first level. In 1974, HSR Trust
Co. bought the building and rehabilitated the ict-..
■ terior before converting the building to 14 con-
dominiums units .



iloved; data ii taown



Ahoriginal
Agricilraral
ArchiJiuacrarai
tSia Arrs
Cammarcs
Coaaaimi cari a
Commmiiry/
dfi^Teio-cmfiiC



CanserTacion
Idudtioa
Is? lo ration/
setrlaaenc
ladmcr/
!liiitir7
Paliticai



Rficraacioa

Haligioa

Sciaaca/

iavcacioa
Social/

tmnani iariaa
TranroQ nation



Sisaifisancs (iaclada asalaaatiog or tiiaaas cae-ckad ajovg)



Prgsarvatiaa Coasideratisa (accsasibilitr, ra— ise oossioilitiaa , capacity
for puoiic asa aad aajoyiaeat, protactioa, utilitiaa , cantaxt)



3i3Lio-;ra-ac7 aad/or rsfar-sacas (suca as local ai^tcrias, d
racoras, aariy aaos, atc.j

(1) City of Boston, Building Department Records

(2) City of Boston, Assessor's Office.



£ic^ , assassor 3



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION




Building Information Form Form No.



Area North End



ADDRESS 287-295 Hanover St. COR.



NAME Boston Seaman's Friend Society



present
MAP NO. 26N-13E



original



SUB AREA N A?


1 2 4 6 7 8 9 10

Online LibraryMass.) Boston Landmarks Commission (BostonNorth End / Waterfront preservation study → online text (page 4 of 10)