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Mass.) Boston Landmarks Commission (Boston.

North End / Waterfront preservation study online

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DATE C. 1892



Minutes of the Boston Seaman's Friend





source ^ . ^
Society


ARCHITECT






source


BUILDER






source


OWNER Methodist Church


(see attachments)


original


present


PHOTOGRAPHS





19/330135/4691120 Ward 3, Parcel 3277



TYPE Cresidential) single double
Cnon-residential) commercial



row 2-fam. 3-deck ten



apt.



NO. OF STORIES Cist to cornice) three



I



plus tower



ROOF Mansard



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



shingles stucco
granite



asphalt
concrete



asbestos alum/vinyl
iron/steel/alum.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION.



sandstone
This large structiire is an example of the High Victorian Gothic
style. A tower on the south end of the building is the dominant feature. The
upper floors are .reacTied "through a doorway in the first floor of the tower. A stone

post and beam arrangement extends across the first floor delineating the bays.
In the first floor of the tower the beam is topped by a sandstone pediment. The
third floor tower window o^ns onto a tiny balcony which is enclosed with an (con't)
EXTERIOR ALTERATION t^Inor~> moderate drastic new brick and sash on the first floor



CONDITION fgbodj) fair poor



_LOT AREA_2ii5_



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS



m



(Map)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

This building is on the site of the New Brick or
'Cockerel" church, which was organized by a group of
dissatisfied parishoners from New North Church (now
St. Stephen's). The New Brick Church united
the Old North (in North Square) in 1775, and
became known as the Second Church. Ralph Waldo
Emerson was one of the famous personalities who
reached from the pulpit of this church. The building
was demolished in 1844. The First Methodist



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable )

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )

Episcopal Church took over the site and constructed a known stone building.
This structure was damaged by a storm and street widening; the Methodist Church
built the present structure. The Boston Seaman's Friend Society purchased the
building in 1892, soon after it was completed. The purpose of this society was
to bring the gospel of Christ to men of the sea, and to provide a place where
Merchant Seamen/ Naval and Coast Guard personnel of all nations, races and creeds,
may lodge or congregate in this wholesome Christian environment. The Boston
Seaman's Friend Society is a place where every effort is made to extend
genuine American hospitality and to project the belief of the people of our
country that through ^Inderstanding and respect for one another; men of all nations
can live in peace.

The first floor was occupied by four shops. The second floor contained the
the Chapel and anterooms for the Society. The history of the Society recoionts
that John L. Sullivan fought in one of the halls and that a Jewish synagogue
used space in the building at one time.^

The Boston Seaman's Friend Society provided a variety of services to visiting
mariners. Literary, musical and dramatic entertainment were provided as well as
religious services and bible classes. One of the Society 's .pamphlets states:"The
record shows that more than forty thousand seamen visit tne rooms annually, getting
home letters and writing in reply, receiving comfort bags and packages of good
reading matter, leaving money for deposit in the savings bank, having food (con't)
Presem/ation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



(\



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) City of Boston Assessor's Records.

(2) City of Boston Building Department Documents.

(3) "Boston Seaman's Friend Society" (panphlet no. 22, in the collection of the
Congregational Church library) .

(4) Minutes of the Board of Directors of the Boston Seaman's Friend Society
(Congregational Church library) .

(5) A Home Away from Home (Boston:Boston Seaman's Friend Society, Inc.)

(6) "A Ministry to Men of The Sea", by the Congregational Churches of New England,
Pamphlet published in 1964.




dinf laiarzauiaa. Torm Toca N'o,



krsz '^°^th End



ADDBESS 26-30 Fleet St,



CCR.



^AaZ Piscopal Hotel



pras<es,c



1899



_STI3 AR£A N/W
(1)



.ificziizcr_

3tni2ES



soorca
OWKES Benjamin Piscope Rose M. Capodilupo Trust



rHOTCGRAPHS



arssaac



19/330165 / 4692165 Ward 3. Parcel 3176



TTrE (r^sidasciai) siigi^
Cioa-rs3idas.tiai)



douhLi TOW.



^7^' (hotel)



}iC..GI STCRiiS Clsz ;j tamica) five

RCOr flat r^ola.



ol'iS



cataera



±iIZHlALj (Traae) cla-obo ards 5fi-.-:glas aciicca aspaai:: aabescas aliia/^-iyL

CGciifir) ^rlcg ) scaas csacrsc^ ij:=ay scatii/aiua. copper (cornice)

.___ _____ floor timbers

Five stori^ Tudor influenced design on four levels, large iron balconies on second
through fourth floor. First floor altered dramatically. Rounded arch doorway of
granite with simple ornamentation. East side of first level now Fedele's
■Restaurant, west side is men's clxob. Stone quoins span length of structure from



CCWDITICN 29od



:air") rooi



ilCT AREA '^'7°3



iTOTT^STHI 2I~I CZARACTZRISTICS



SZOrrnCk^CZ (c=aa'd cc r-vsrsa)
The original owner of this building gave it its
name. The original use was listed as apartments
and two stores. The building was large enough
to accommodate 40 families. The cost of construc-
tion was $51,000. A gas accident occurred in
1919 , a tenant was overcome by gas leaking f rc"
a hot plate. The building changed ownership
twice in 1924; first it was owned by Mary K.
McCormick, et al., and then by the First Bankers
Union. G. Dragone owned the building in 1938
and in 1949 it passed to the Capodilupc family,.



iloTed; da-w if kzowa



•"Hiaaas (zhsc's. as aanv aa ai3-oIic3.bIa)



Aboriginal
Agriciinrai
Arciit^crarai
Tie ArC3
Conmercs
Cananmicatiog
CoBtnniaicy/
daveiormaac.



Coassrr^tion
iducacioa
izsloracioay
sarriaaaar.
ladiiacrv
ailitarr
Poii-ical



Secraa^oa

Ssligioa

Sciaaca/

iaveaciaa
Social/

himaaiuriaa
Traarso ria ci aa



Si<rn-jff.caac2 (iaclada asplaaacioa of thaaes caacxad ahovg)

The building has undergone a series of slight alterations and repairs. The
fire escapes were repaired in 1949. There was another gas accident in 1957.
Part of the brickwork was repointed in 1959. More work on the brick was done
in 1971. One year later the use of the building was listed as 34 apartments
and two stores. In 1974 the occupancy was officially recorded as 34 apartment,
one store and one restaurant. A sign for the Case Mia Restaurant was erected
in 1975.



Decription (con't)

second to fourth floors. Window openings surrounded with granite. Entablature

separates first and second floors. Painted sign indicating Piscopal Hotel

at roof line is fading. Battlements decorate the roof line.



CI



?rasar7atica Coasidaraciog Caccs3sibilir7, ra-'isa posaibilitias , capacir7
icr puhi.ic -is^ aad aajoyaeac, prccacrioa, ncilitiea , csacaxi)



3i"jIio?ra-nc.T aad/or rsfsr^acss (such, as local oij-rorias, daad^ , assessor' 3
racorcs, aarlT aaps, iic.j

tl) City of Boston Building Department documents
■'(2)"City of 'Boston, Assessor's Office Records.



Parks/Open Space Areas

Copps Hill Terraces,

Charter and Coininercial Streets

North End Beach Park,
Commercial Street

Paul Revere Mall; "The Prado",
Hanover Street



»i



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION




Building Information Form Form No. Are a North End

jADDRES S Charter Street ^COR.



NAME



rnpp,'



Same.



present
MAP NO. 27N-13E



original



SUB AREA



N/W



[DATE lfiqft_THq7


CI)






source




ARCHITECT Olmsted,


, Olmsted and Eliot


CD




source




BUILDER Perkins


and White (1)






source




OWNER City of Boston


same




original




present


PHOTOGRAPHS







19/330150/4692150



Ward 3, Parcel 2068



TYPE



Cresidential) single
Cnon-residential)



double row
park



2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.



go. OF STORIES Cist to cornice)

ROOF ^cupola



plus



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame)
(other)



clapboards
brick



shingles
rtone>



stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
^concrete iron/steel/alum.



BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Rough-faced coursed stone walls mark the boundary of the park along Charter Street.

Two wide sets of steps lead to the first level of the terraces. Picnic tables and

benches, a round- arched open shelter with table for chess or checkers, several large

trees and a large open space with concrete paving fills this area. There are large

stone planters on eith er si de of each group of steps. Two more sets of stone steps lead

EXTERIOR ALTERATION ^inor) moderate drastic The beach area has been filled in for use



CONDITION good ^ir) poor



as playing fields.
LOT AREA 26,108



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS The park faces Copp ' s Hill Burial Ground on the other
side of Charter Street. Copp's Hill is the highest point in the North End; from there the



land slopes down to the harbor.



(Map)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

At the end of the nineteenth century, it was generally
recognized that city dwellers needed areas of open space
within their congested environment in order to maintain
their health. To this end, Copp's Hill Terraces was
proposed to replace a number of rotten wharves and wooden
dwellings. Work was started in 1894. The plantings
have not been well looked after; the original intention
was to have all the areas around the paved terraces planted
with shrubbery and trees to provide shade. The original



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable )

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )
plan called for a bridge to be built across Commerical Street on the western edge of thei
terraces; the bridge would be continued in a pier extending into the water and curving
toward the other side. This arrangement combined with the pier extending out from the
eastern side of the beach would provide a very well protected harbor for swimming and
boating. Both houses and a bandstand at the end of one of the piers were also part of
the design.

Description (con't)

down to the second level of the terrances. This space is much smaller; there are a
number of trees and benches. ., Iron fencing has been used to keep people out of the
planted area. A final set of steps leads down to Atlantic Ave.

Across Atlantic Ave. there is a boccie court , playing fields, basket ball courts and a;^J
swimming pool. This area was originally planned as a beach park.



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) Twenty-Second Annual Report of th.e Board of Commissioners for the Year Ending
January 31,1897. (Boston: Department of Parks, 1897)

(2) "Work Well Under Way on the New Marine Park", August 26, 1894 (Article in a
Bostonian Society Scrapbook, source unknown).

(3) Report on Civil Works Administration - Project #3512 (Boston: City Planning Board,
March 31, 1934) .




So



BOSTON LANDMARKS COMMISSION



Building Information Form Form No,
ADDRESS 469-521 Commercial StCOR.



Area North End



NAME North End Park



North End Beach Park



present
MAP NO. 27N-13E



original



SUB AREA N/W



(Photo)



DATE 1894








source




ARCHITECT Olmsted


Olmsted s Eliot


1




source




BUILDER Perkins


s White 1






source




CWNER City of


Boston same




original




present


PHOTOGRAPHS







lQ/:^^1Q0/4fiq?1? 5 Ward -^ . Parcel 1058

TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.
Cnon-residential) public park



A70. OF STORIES CI St to cornice)

ROOF ^cupo 1 a



jplus



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) clapboards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl
(other) brick stone ^concrete iron/steel/alum.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION . ^he six and one half acres contain a fenced in baseball diamond, a
swimming pool with dressing rooms on the east side of the park and a Bocce court immedi-
ately adjacent to the west boundary of the public park.



EXTERIOR ALTERATION minor ^^

_, ^ solid, 124,325

CONDITION good fair ( gaoF ^ LOT ARE A pn Pi- land RS.417 s q.ft.

NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS g^r^A .H p,., r.f n^.^^n H.^H^^_ F.e^ P^e^on .r.A ry..y^ ^^^r.^^

w i th — "Old Ironsides" — a j^d the Bunker H ill Monument — in prominent view

SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

The North End Beach Park along with the Copps Hill

Terraces Park were created as a pleasure ground to meet
the needs of a thickly populated North End of Boston
^ at a period of time where density of housing and over-

\y (Map) crowding were everpresent. In 1892, the city of Boston

Park's Department authorized $300,000 for the acquisition
of land and $50,000 for the construction of a beach and
passive park directly across Commercial Street adjacent to



Moved; date if known



Themes Ccheck as many as applicable ) , ^

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectviral Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Development

Significance (include expanation of themes checked above )
Copps Hill Burial Ground. This water front site was previously occupied by several antiq:
wharves. The most westerly being the North Paving Wharf (formerly Aitkens Wharf)
belonging to the municipality and the most easterly, Carney's Wharf. Commercial Street
-ftie boundary on the south and the Harbor Commissioner's Line, that on the water side.
Included within the lines mentioned are North and South Bartlett's Wharf, Grey's and
Ripley's Wharves. The only builiing of much value on the site is a brick wharehouse on •
Grey's Wharf, the rest being wooden storehouses, and sheds. This land area contains abc
six and one half acres, "The plan drafted by Olmstead, Olmstead and Eliot was designed
to make this confined space afford opportunity for the greatest possible variety of mode
of recreation, thus, Copps Hill Terraces provided a resting place commanding a view
of the water upon a broad terrace. On a level with the upper street. An ample promenadi
on-'ita west side of the North End Beach Park adjacent to the water is provided upon a
pier, the upper desk of which will be reached from the terrace by a bridge, which will ^
spanac" Commercial Street. A good place for children to play is provided on the beach ^
which will be formed by the pier line. Dressing rooms will be provided for the use of
bathers with floats and other conveniences for boatmen. The stone terraces and its
acconjpanying flights of -§teps will be plainly but substantially constructed while the
steep earth slopes at the ends and below the high wall will be planted with low shrubber
The foot bridge spanning Commercial Street will be light steel truss. The new or restoree
beach will teirminate against sea walled piers of solid filling from the end of one of
which the long and substantial pleasure pier will run out to and along the Harbor,
Preservation Consideration Caccessibility , re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)

Significanee (con't) : Commissioner's Line. Between the beach and Commercial Street thei
is room for a little greensward and a screening background of shrubbery." By 1898, the
promenade and a bath house were in place. At the end of the pier, near the promenade a
Bandstand was erected for open air concerts. The beach was constructed of hard gravel. 1
men ' s batftiouse was located on the westerly end of the park and a women's bathhouse housec
150 bathing rooms, and a laundry. By 1933, the park had changed usuage from that of a be
to a ball field. The front portion of this park was used for baseball, but was (con't).
Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's
records, early maps, etc.)

(1) City of Boston, Parks Department (19th Annual Report 1893-94) Drawing by Olmstead
and Eliot, 1894.

(2) Bostonian Society, Scrapebook Collection, (Vol. S 122)

(3) Letter Siibmitted by Olmsted, Olmsted and Eliot, within the (City of Boston, Parks
Department, Twentieth Annual Report, January, 1895) p. 76-77.

(4) City of Boston, Planning Board Report of the Civil Works Administration , Project 3512.
(March 31, 1934) p. 115.



, significance (con't from reverse of page 1) North End Park

^ot of sufficient size for league ball. Bleachers were placed on the westerly side of
the field with a seating capacity of 2500. The promenade pier was still evident but
later burnt down. In 1951, the George Robert White Fund granted $30,000 for the
construction of a swimming pool within the park which is still in usuage but in a
state of disrepair.




(J




Building Information Form Form No.



Area North End



ADDRESS Between Hanover and COR. Unity Streets



NAME Paul Revere Mall also known as "The Prado"



present
MAP NO. 26N-13N



original



SUB AREA



N/W



DATE 1933




(2)














source








ARCHITECT Arthur A.


Shurcliff ,


Landscape


Architect


(2)






source








BUILDER A.G. Tomase


llo and


Son


Inc




(2)








source








OWNER City of Boston


- Same












original










present




PHOTOGRAPHS















19/330150-160/4692130-140



Ward 3, Parcel 2074



TYPE Cresidential) single double row 2-fam. 3-deck ten apt.
Cnon-residential) Public Park



•JO. OF STORIES Cist to cornice)



_plus



ROOF



cupola



dormers



MATERIALS (Frame) clapboards shingles stucco asphalt asbestos alum/vinyl

(other) ^ic_^ wall <g^on^ fountain concrete iron/steel/alum, bronze

tablets and statt
BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Tha mall is 343, feet long from Hanover Street to Unity Street and extends another 182
feet from Unity Street, Salem Street, and Christ Church. The overall length then being
525 feet. The width varies from 86 feet at Hanover Street to 70 feet at the rear
of the Paul Revere Statue to 140 feet through the center of the fountain, to 60 feet
wide at Unity Street . Cro ssing Unity Street into the Christ Church property a wrath of
EXTERIOR ALTERATION <jninor> moderate drastic



CONDITION



fair



poor



LOT AREA



sq.ft.



NOTEWORTHY SITE CHARACTERISTICS



i



(xMap)



SIGNIFICANCE (con't on reverse)

One of the memorial plaques set into the brick walls
of the Mall states that a major portion of "the site
of this mall was once the pasture of Christopher
Stanley who died in 1640 leaving a parcel of land for
the maintenance of the free school and thus the first
benefactor of the public education in Boston. This
tract of land was always maintained as an open space
and was used as a playgroundo Webster Avenue stretched
fron Hanover St. to Unity St., and the houses which



Moved; date if known

Themes Ccheck as many as applicable )

Aboriginal Conservation Recreation

Agricultural Education Religion

Architectural Exploration/ Science/

The Arts settlement invention

Commerce Industry Social/

Communication Military humanitarian

Community/ Political Transporation

Etevelopment



(H



Significance (include expanatioh of themes checked above )

lined (n\imbering approximately 16) with wire purchased by the George Robert White Fund ;
1933, and demolished to make way for the Prado. The W.Pj^A. provided some of the work
force for the project. The Prado cost approximately $275,000. The Paul Revere Mall
(as it was officially renamed in 1935) serves two important functions. First it
visually connects two important landmarks, Christ Church of Paul Revere fame and St.
Stephen's, which was designed by Charles Bulfinch in 1804 for a Protestant
Congregation, but became Roman Catholic in 1862 as the character of the neighborhood
changed. The open space also serves as a gathering place for local residents of all
ages. It is one of the few places in the North End where one can get relief from the
highly concentrated and intense environment. Robert Savage Chase wrote an editorial on
the occasion of the dedication of the Prado; it siommarizes the significance of this
space: (See attachement entitled Paul Revere Mall, Significance (con't)).



Preservation Consideration Caccessibility, re-use possibilities, capacity
for public use and enjoyment, protection, utilities, context)

Both St. Stephen's Church and Christ Church are listed on the National Register of
Historic Places; it seems appropriate that the link between these two structures should
also be listed.



Bibliography and/or references (such as local histories, deeds, assessor's

records , early maps , etc . )

(1) City of "Boston Assessor's Records.

(2) Minutes of the George Robert White Fund.

(3) Bostonian Society Scrapbook Collection (one article was from the Boston Evening
Transcript , June 30, 1934).

(4) Boston: The Official Bicentennial Guidebook (E.P Dutton and Co,, 1975)

(5) Schofield, William G. Freedom by the Sea: The Boston Freedom Trial (Chicago:
Rand, McNally and Co., 1974) |l

C6) Forbes, Allan and Ralph M. Eastman, Some Statues of Boston (Boston: State Street

Trust Co., 1946)
C7) Shurcliff, Arthur "A. , "The Boston Prado". Landscape Architecture , Vol. XXV, July

1935 ^ pp. 117-182.



Description (con't) Paul Revere Mall

«4 feet is expressed with a eight foot wide gate and sidewalk for entry and. up a
ive foot wide and four and a half foot high series of steps which brings one to a passage
measuring eight feet wide bounded on one side by the wall of the Old North Museum
(formerly an Italian Espiscopal Church) and on the other side by the tall walls
of Christ Churcho

The visual boundaries on the North and South ends of the Prado are provided by Christ
• Church and St. Stephen's Church. The East and West boundaries of the space were
principally determined by existing two- three and four- story buildings. A nine foot
five inch brick wall actually contains the space. A continuous concrete bench provides
seating along both sides of the wall.

The most dominant features of the Prado are the many large shade trees, the fountain,
the statue of Paul Revere and the bronze commemorative plaques set in the brick walls.
The trees seem to help define the space and establish scale as well as providing
shade for the North Enders of every age who frequent the Mall. The fountain is made of
granite, and it is 30 feet in diameter. It has been enclosed by a wrought iron fence
to protect it against vandalism. The equestrian statue of Paul Revere was designed
by Cyrus E. Dallin. It was added to the Mall in 1940, even though it was actually
modeled in 1885. The memorial plaques were also dedicated in 1940. The 13 tablets
were designed by Robert Savage Chase, an artist and long time resident of the North
End. The central plaque contains a reproduction of Bonner's Map from 1722. The others
contain inscriptions concerning men and important events which are linked to the
North End. The subjects of the plaques are as follows: (1) Memorial to the men of the
North End who gave their lives in the Civil War; (2) Reminder of the Salutation
jpavern, called by Webster "The headquarters of the Revolution", (3) St. Stephen's Church
designed by Bulfinch; (4) John Winthrop, Nicholas Upsall, Cotton Mather, John Hull,
all residents of the North End; (5) Sir William Phips , Joseph Warren, John Manly,
Edmund Hartt, the latter the builder of the Constitution, all of the North End,
(6) Paul Revere and William Davies, messengers of the early Revolution; (7) John
Tileston, famous teacher, and a group of soldiers who brought the United States into
being; (8) Samuel Tucker, Increase Mather, Edward Everett and Christian Gullager, the
last an artist who painted Washington; (9) John Greenwood, Ann Pollard, Charlotte Saunders,
Cushman, the last a great actress; (10) Christ Church, oldest house of worship in


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Online LibraryMass.) Boston Landmarks Commission (BostonNorth End / Waterfront preservation study → online text (page 5 of 10)