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mate reality in your boudoir.

There is nothing wrong with this. Although, you do need to be a little
more sensitive to his needs ... and you run the risk of his becoming
EMOTIONALLY INVOLVED. That is a definite drawback. Find another
time to tell him you're not ready for the flowers and the diamond. Or at least
wait until the afterglow has ... dried off the sheets.




CAMPUS LIFE



27




I A CULINARY DISASTER

I ii fflWC$mSMD&nSlUZNQ&6N



Feast your eyes.

It' s one day after sign-in freshman
year and one day after devouring the
first dorm meal with your parents. You
recall the spread they laid out that first
evening - a mouthwatering turkey din-
ner with cranberry sauce, stuffing, pota-
toes, lasagne and salad.

And here you are, ready for round
two. You look at the menu and it hasn't
changed. Not so bad. Leftovers like that
would suit any college kid.

With fork and tray in hand, you
plunge your way to the front of the line,
shoving aside football players and check-
ing hockey players, ready for the heap-
ing mounds ... Yes, heaping mounds.
And they get piled on your plate. You
look at them and have no idea what they
are, except that they are heaping mounds
of something. You sniff. No smell (prob-
ably because tofu has no smell). You dig
in. And your fork stops dead at the



with ...

A tofu burger, Viennese vegetable
goulash, or maybe a cold hot dog, green
from being submerged in dirty water all
afternoon. We had stale rolls, stale
danish, and powdered eggs. We had
discolored roast beef. We had spam. By



CAMPUS CUISINE



week six, we had food poisoning. All
this for only seven bucks a meal.

The Crunch Berries went very fast as
did the Frosted Flakes . Even the Cheerios
were gone. Things got so bad, in fact,
that the ice cream cones went, despite
the fact that often there was no ice cream
left to go in them.

By the end of freshman year, the only
things that were consistently emptied
were the soda machines, the cereal bins
in the back of the cafeteria and the dish
and silverware section, which were sto-
len by students who figured they might
as well get their $7 worth if they weren't
going to eat.



frozen mass inside.

Mmmrnm, a popsicle.
"That's not a popsicle, man," a
stranger blurts out. "That's meat loaf."
What happened to the turkey? DAKA
(that's the company which furnished
our lovely dinners) threw it out with the
rest of the food that we were supposed
to get freshman year. So, we were left



Students got smarter as the first quar-
ter went on and those green dogs re-
mained in a lake of algae at the head of
the line. Students got even smarter by the
end of the year, cutting that meal plan
from 21 to 7 per week and using all the
money at Smith Hall to buy Spaghettios
and Pop Tarts. Mom's home-cooked
meals never tasted so good.



28




Tim Robinson




CAMPUS LIFE






0\ZSK WW FOOD





CAMPUS LIFE



29




C TRANGER IN MY BEDROOM

1 1 hv iemm, wmm, no-qood, \jbw



Verne Gordon



After a long night of work, I turned the
corner of Forsyth and Greenleaf on my
way to 10:30 class. Up ahead, I saw him.
I was in no mood to speak, period —
especially to him. It had been almost four
years, maybe he wouldn't recognize me,
maybe he wouldn't want to talk. Maybe
I could get away with a quick "How ya'
doin'" and continue to stumble on to
class.

It didn't happen.

My freshman-year roommate stopped
and decided he wanted to chat. He de-
cided to take this most horrendous op-
portunity to catch up on old times.

Sure, I was a bit cranky. Sure, I was a
bit unsociable. Sure, I was most defi-
nitely perturbed. But I have my reasons.
To wit:

When I moved to this fair campus in
the Fall of 1989 we lived in a more
innocent age. Diane was still on "Cheers,"
and there was a waiting list for university
housing (rumor has it there is one now —
go figure). My original roommate never




U.ilU.HU






u.



O



made it to glorious NU, and in his place
was a boy/man who had been in the
United States approximately two hours
when I first met him.

By Columbus Day, I knew it was
going to be a long haul. His musical
taste ran from Madonna to Kylie
Minogue (remake of "Locomotion" —
only I truly remember because of the
pure uselessnessofit). He bought pants



that didn't fit (he didn't know pants
have lengths here in America), and he
wallpapered a corner of the room with
pin-ups (not only did Mom disapprove,
but it left room to question what hap-
pened when all the good boys and girls
went to sleep).

It's not that he was a bad roommate,
he just wasn't a good one. He wasn't
even a fair one. OK, he was a bad one.



He watched Star Trek a lot, and he
picked fights with this guy named
"Sarge," who wore a black jacket all the
time, climbed out fifth-floor windows
and broke mirrors.

My roommate drank five vodka shots
in 10 minutes and threw up out the
window. My roommate tried to live this
one down, until the photos of him lean-
ing over various recepticles (including



30



CAMPUS LIFE



W\D ZOOMMflfie.




the sidewalk) were produced. My room-
mate told a friend his girlfriend was
ugly. This got him a punch in the nose
(well-deserved, she wasn't bad look-
ing), and the enduring hatred of my
friend.

Bad things happened to my live-in
goof after that. Shaving cream in the
shoe, missing pens and textbooks and a
mixture of Tide, Windex and furniture



cleaner put in his shampoo were all
inflicted on my roommate (not too bad,
considering he was short-sheeted on his
second night in our fine country).

The finale came when he interrupted
college hoops. Georgetown-Syracuse.
This was when it meant something (I
told you this was an innocent age).
Hoops turned off for Star Trek. Billy
Owens and Dikembe Mutombo



switched for Kirk and Spock. No man
(or anything else, really) comes between
myself and hoops. My roommate moved
out within three weeks.

That was it for almost four years.
Then I saw him on the street. He said he
was going back to Europe after gradua-
tion which is fine with me. I hear Kylie
Minogue and the Locomotion are really
popular there.



CAMPUS LIFE



31



HITTIN

[the]

BOOKS

All-Niters, eight cups of coffee, a trip to
the library (sneaking in food of course),
and busting your brain trying to under-
stand Shakespeare, that engineering as-
signment or a book on Logic that never
seemed all that logical.

Studying. We found out quickly just
how important this was to existence at NU.
Those who didn't study were soon elimi-
nated from the floors of dorms or sent to
other schools. For all the fun we had, there
was little time to really sit back and bask in
it. Hitting the books wasn't exciting, but it
offered knowledge and a ticket to good
grades.



SOMETHING




u.



WON'T FORGET




TURNING THE PAGE - Students flocked to Snell Library, especially around
finals to break open the more than 100,000 bound books on the library's shelves.



32



FEATURES




"^ «•>




Lauren Kolbeck



LAST MINUTE STUDIES -
Cramming for exams was a North-
eastern pastime, be it alone in a
library (above) or in the company
of others in the Ell Center dining
room.



Lauren Kolbeck









FEATURES



33



DUELING

^ iFORl

Stools

Maxwell's vs. Our House.

The dilemma raged through the minds of
students almost every night - where to hang out
and party. The choice was made easy as the two
campus bars pushed their way past Punter's and
into the limelight. Each had its own splendor and
each had its, well, negative qualities.

Maxwell's, a converted basement made
homey by its exposed brick, was a place for thue
partier. The clientele was blue-collar. Beer often
splattered the floor and the percentage of
stumblers was far higher than that of its counter-
part. The main attraction was acoustical whiz
Chad LaMarsh on Wednesday's.

Our House, an upscale, brightly-lit bar ca-
tered mainly to those with a sophisticated taste
for drinking. Food, karaoke nights and cheap
Knicks were keys to keeping the battle raging.



SOMETHING




WONT FORGET




ALWAYS A GOOD
TIME - Maxwell's
brought out the best
in everyone, includ-
ing many of its work-
ers, like senior Matt
Hodus (right).







FEATURES




CLASSY JOINT? - You
better believe it. Compare
with Punter's Pub (below),
Our House East was 10
steps above. The decor
made it feel like, well, al-
most like we weren't even
at a bar at times.






FEATURES



35



WINTER

_.._. T [of]

Wonder

It bordered on ridiculous. The 100 inches
of snow dumped on Boston in the winter of
our senior year was the most the city had
ever seen. Thankfully, we dug our way
through the massive drifts and frozen ter-
rain. There were those who struggled, how-
ever.

Northeastern, which nicely lays claim
to the streets in the area (that's why NU so
easily forced the canteen trucks offcampus),
got a major headache from all the snow. NU,
forced to find plows to shovel away the
white blankets, overstepped its snow re-
moval budget by nearly $100,000. For us,
coping wasn't so bad - afew cancelled classes,
a nice cover for the concrete. By March,
however, we were all just a little sick of it.

SOMETHING




U.



WONT FORGET



36




Photo courtesy of The NU News



FEATURES



*W «MI Mm fl





Eustacio Humphrey




Eustacio Humphrey



FEATURES



37




PEOPLE

[WITHl



Power

We heard a lot about leaders in their
respective fields during our stay at NU. There
was Jack Levin, James Fox and Michael
Dukakis. But the men with the most clout
overall at the University were the ones who
dealt most closely with student affairs, not a
national television talk show.

For all the criticism he faced when the
speaker was chosen for graduation, President
John Curry was outstanding in making sure
most of the student's needs were met by
helping to improve and beautify the campus
and making our instituion better academi-
cally. Dean of Students Keith Motley was
equally as influential both with the students at
NU and on a national scope. But there were
others too who had a major impact .

SOMETHING




u.



WONT FORGET




STAYING ON -

Nothing could stop
Chicken Lou (above)
from operating his
canteen on Forsyth St.
So, he got his own
piece of land, and
helped boot other can-
teens off campus.

JUSTICE AT LAST
- CJ Dean James Fox
(right) was probably
the most widely seen
NU person, appearing
on national television
several times.




38



FEATURES



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TOP DOG - Dean of Students Keith
Motley (above) surpised no one with
his move up the administrative ladder.

MEETING OUR NEEDS - President
John Curry pushed NU's co-op pro-
gram and diversity to the point that the
school was being nationally recognized
for its work bi-annually.



(All photos courtesy of The NU News)



FEATURES



39




BEATING

_ PtheI :_



Streets

In the early morning hours on January
15, 1990, Northeastern police got the call.
One of NU's own, student Mark Belmore,
had been stabbed to death on Columbus Ave.
... 22 times. It was the capper to a very
violent freshman year where the Boston
streets were filled with gunfire or murder
attempts nearly every night.

This was what students had feared for a
long time. We heard about the muggings.We
knew of the dangers of the city. Now it was
on our campus. Though NU police denied
responsibility for the incident (they claimed
it was off-campus) it clearly pushed campus
patrols to take a stand.

By 1993, serious campus crimes dropped
to 51, down from 69 in 1990.

SOMETHING



U.



WON'T FORGET




22
20
18
16
14
12
10



No. of serious crimes at NU



1990



1990





Rape/Sex. Assault Burglary Agg. Assault Robbery



40



FEATURES




Cauldron file photo




Photo courtesy of The NU News



TAKING A SPIN -
Officer William
O'Connell (above)
and the rest of the
NU police force
traded in their cars
for bikes.

FAST TRACK -Pa-
trolling busy Hun-
tington Avenue was
not always easy for
NU police as cars
blazed by causing
wrecks like the one
on the left.



Cauldroii file photo



FEATURES



41



CENTER

^ fOFl ^^

Change

So you didn't find PAWS all that appeal-
ing. And you probably thought the grimy
dining area was difficult to bear. Well, thanks
to us, the students, we finally got some big-
time results done on the Ell Center.

Ready just in time for our senior cam-
paign, the bottom floor of the Ell was gutted,
PAWS was replaced with a variety of food
places, Club Ell gave way to more open
seating areas and big glass windows gave
both the dining area and bookstore a mag-
nificent exterior.

As we departed, the Ell Center was
scheduled for more renovations, namely the
addition of air conditioning, an indoor quad
with shops and more space for student groups
- a dramatic change from 1989 for sure.

SOMETHING



U.



WON'T FORGET




42



FEATURES



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FEATURES



43



SIGHTS

SoundS

Fenway Park, the Boston Symphony,
the Boston Garden, Quincy Market, the Wang
Center, the Museum of Fine Arts and the
Orpheum just to name a few. When it came
to night life or entertainment, we were blessed
to be in Beantown.

Taking in a concert or game was at our
fingertips every day. And many wondered
why there was little action surrounding cam-
pus. Let's just say we were easily coaxed
away from the concrete. We had the chance
to witness many memorable events - John
Williams' farewell, U2 at the Garden, the
Monet exhibit, Martin at the Comedy Con-
nection, The Phantom at the Wang Center,
and a few marathons.

SOMETHING



U.



WONT FORGET




MAIN ATTRAC-
TIONS - Cheers
and the Museum of
Fine Arts were
ideal places to bring
Mom & Dad or just
to hang out.




44



FEATURES





Richard Feldman



ON THE MOVE - Conduc-
tor John Williams (above)
traded in his Boston Sym-
phony Orchestra baton for a
chance at the retired life.

PARADISE - Quincy
Market's new look brought
in a lot more tourists and a lot
more college kids looking to
party at places like the Hong
Kong.



Pat Greenhouse/Boston Globe



FEATURES



45



DRIVING

PfNH

Circles

Northeastern was a commuter's nightmare. After
battling traffic on 93 or Storrow Drive, students had
to face the land of no parking, no parking spaces and
no two-way streets.

Driving around the block a few times became
rather regular for the many student-drivers. Fellow
commuters were not difficult to spot. They were
often late to class because of the lack of sufficient
parking and often swearing under their breath at the
nightmare of NU's paved roadways.

NU built its own parking garage to help curb
some of the problems, but not even that five story
structure could suffice. There was always the Up-
town Garage and the NU parking lots, but their
limited spacing and safety questions still left many
searching endlessly for a few metered spaces.

SOMETHING



U.



WON'T FORGET




Cauldron file photo



SAFE HAVEN? - The Uptown Garage may not have looked like the
nicest place to park, but it actually kept cars very secure.



TOP 10 THINGS TO DO WITH
YOUR CAR AT NORTHEASTERN

1 . Get it out of the area by nightfall or else.

2. If you find a parking space, make sure to ram your car into both the car
in front and back of you for extra room.

3. If you can't find a parking space - 1. double park; 2. wait until the
weekend; 3. park it in front of the NU police station and tell them to get one
of their many cruisers from out of the fire zones.

4. Steal the radio yourself before someone else does.

5. Call the Boston Police and report it stolen before it gets stolen. This way,
by the time they get through all the paperwork and start searching for it,
your car will only have been gone a month.

6. Smash it up and put it in the quad with all the other wrecked drunken
driving cars.

7. Clip a couple of parking meters so that they finally work when you put
quarters in them.

8. Drive down Greenleaf and Leon at 80 miles an hour late at night. Almost
everyone else does.

9. Leave enough room for those hungover pedestrians who cross Hunting-
ton Ave. near the NU T stop without even looking.

10. Leave all doors unlocked and windows open. Something will get taken
inside anyway. Why replace the windows, too.



46



FEATURES




EMPTY SPACES

- There weren't too
many of these to
find, and when you
could find one, the
meters were often
disabled.



Louise Zhu



FEATURES



47




BUYING

Selling

For many area vendors, the quad was an
absolute killing ... or an Absolut killing. The
money they made from sales of T-shirts like the
"Abolut Northeastern", was overwhelming . Ev-
erything from jewelry to rollerblades to cassettes
and CD's went fast.

Recall that things got heated over the money
issue when vending canteens parked on the street
were booted from campus. Guess the administra-
tion felt these guys were hoarding too much
dough from the Ell Center and Chicken Lou, who
bought a polt of land on campus. The truth was
these were decent money makers, more than
enough to live on.

Some even bothered to get licenses (like
the Globe Lady) to sell, though many snuck in
and out of dorms.

SOMETHING



u.



WONT FORGET




DaVor



FEATURES



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SELLING POINTS -
The biggest and first
items to go in the Quad
were usually CD's
(above). But even mini-
restaurants like the Cam-
pus Trolley ( left) thrived.



Lauren Kolbeck



FEATURES



49



RIDING

_ THF — -—Z

E-unE

Elbows, dirty looks and bodychecks
aside, the T wasn't a bad way to get
around the city. Thankfully, we had one
stop right in front of campus (even if it
did so only every 20 minutes and often
passed right by with a simple toot.)

A ride on the Green Line offered some
interesting sights - fights, drunken stu-
dents from other campuses, and some
very unusual advertising, like those put
out by Northeastern telling students they
would not be just another number if they
applied and were accepted.

But graffiti-free, air-conditioned
cars proved very suitable for us, espe-
cially those of us who experienced New
York City transit firsthand.

SOMETHING



u.



WONT FORGET




A trip on the E-line afforded a grand look at Boston Garden.



50



FEATURES



J




Photo courtesy of The Boston Globe



FEATURES



51



SPORTS

r ^— iFORALLl ^~

Seasons

In Boston, the ballet, symphony and shopping all
take a backseat to the sports scene. Its heroic figures
include Larry Bird, Bobby Orr, Bill Russell, Red
Auerbach, Ted Williams, and Carl Yastrzemski . Though
Boston suffered through a tough five years, we none-
theless had a chance to view three great traditions - the
Celtics, Bruins and Red Sox - along with two of the
most legendary stadiums ever built.

Boston Garden and Fenway Park gave us some
memorable moments - Cam Neely's comeback, Mo
Vaughn's towering homeruns and Kevin, Larry and
Robert together on the Garden parquet. They gave us
triumph - victory over the Canadiens in seven games
- and tragedy - the night Reggie Lewis collapsed
during a game against Charlotte.

Sport was truly king in the Hub. These are just
some of the reminders of memories that were ...

SOMETHING



u



WONT FORGET




Witnessing Kevin McHale's moves in the paint was something to cherish.



52



FEATURES



!te.





Cauldron file photo



LEGENDARY - Fenway
Park (above) gaves us a
good view of play from
every seat in the house
(except behind those
grandstand-level poles.
And seeing Ray Bourque
and Cam Neely (left)
dance down the ice to-
gether was often as good a
masterpiece as any.



Pat Greenhouse/Boston Globe



FEATURES



53



CAMPUS

1 WITH |-=ZL

CLOUT

Maybe we weren't Harvard, MIT or Stanford,
but we did close in on a little national attention now
and then, too. Aside fromhaving the President of the
United States, Bill Clinton, speak to our 1993 gradu-
ating class, we were also fortunate to have several
other prominent figures come to campus.

During our senior year, silver medalist Nancy
Kerrigan skated at Matthews Arena as part of a tune-
up for the Olympic Games. President Aristide of
Haiti also came to Matthews that year along with
INXS. Some of the other celebrities who came to
NU - Jay Leno, Dennis Miller, Dr. Ruth Westheimer,
Public Enemy's Chuck D, former First Lady Bar-
bara Bush, Bob Dylan, Gloria Steinem, Jessica
Hahn, The Band, Shabba Ranks and Jesse Jackson.



SOMETHING

U.

WONT FORGET




Jay Leno was one of many star comedians who showed up to strut his stuff at
Matthews Arena.



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Nancy Kerrigan skating at Matthews Arena brought in national television
cameras and several thousand fans, who shelled out $35 per ticket.



54



FEATURES




President Bill Clinton at the 1993 graduation. What more can you say? ( J - D - Levine photo. All other photos courtesy of The NU News)





A CUP HALF EMPTY - Despite their clout on
the music scene, INXS and Michael Hutchence
(above) couldn't pack Matthews Arena because
of CUP's high ticket prices.

LASHING OUT - Dennis Miller's comedy rou-
tine in 1 990 was extremely entertaining, even if it
was obnoxious at moments.



FEATURES



55



■■-■Sir



*»*■■



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ikb&




UNIVERSAL CHANGE



■■- *m* •



UNIVERSAL CHANGE












Hope for the future. Greater acceptance worldwide of problem
issues helped bond many people of many nations. The push for
a cleaner environment, the greater acceptance of AIDS as an
epidemic disease, and the celebration of hundreds of years of
racial strife ending in South Africa with Nelson Mandela's
election brought smiles to our faces. There was, however,
change which destoryed lives,and the hopes of many trying to
build that American Dream. Nationally, no story of disaster
was as hard hitting as the floods that ravaged the Midwest.




(Photos courtesy of the Associated Press)



UNIVERSAL CHANGE




YEAR IN REVIEW




TRAGEDY

The number of prominent figures who died was
staggering. Actor River Phoenix died of a drug
overdose, Nirvana lead singer Kurt Cobain com-
mitted suicide, and actor John Candy, former first
lady Jacquline Kennedy Onassis and former Presi-
dent Richard Nixon all passed away from natural





YEAR IN REVIEW |_


59




*«r«



■%&m



HI. -J MRS **(,



SUCCESS ON

THE

SILVER SCREEN

Hollywood became Comeback Central. Tom
Hanks hit superstardom as an actor with "Phila-
delphia." Meg Ryan made a very big splash with
"Sleepless in Seattle" and "When a Man Loves a
Woman." Robert Redford made a box-office
smash with "Indecent Proposal." MacAulay
Culkin struck gold with "The Good Son." And
Steven Spielberg, always on top of his game,
finally grasped his long-coveted academy award
for "Schindler's List."



SCREEN STARS





7 . - "%kSJ \
















k. *^x jnj




JHB^fl




SCREEN STARS



PRIME-TIE
PERFORMERS

From Seinfeld (left) to Melrose Place, tele-
vision had a major impact on our lives.
Ne became caught up in comedy and
^lued to our sets by Billy and Alison's love
iffair (right) on Melrose Place. Beverly
Hulls 90210 (top) lingered for awhile and
nany of us planned our studying and
partying around these prime-time play-
ers. And when all else failed there was



FOR THE



mm



Variety had its advantages. With
the grunge craze peaking and the
rap culture thriving, the sweet
sounds of just about every music
medium boomed from bars, clubs
and our apartments. Pearl Jam (far
right) made the biggest impact.
Janet Jackson and Aerosmith's
Steven Tyler (bottom) also had
giant years. Michael Jackson, on
the other hand, bottomed out af-
ter rumors spread of his alleged
molestation of a young boy.





POPULAR MUSIC




SPORTS



Jrom the booming
bodychecl^s to the div-
ing catches to the grace
and agility of a f taw-
less 6 active, 9\[Zl's
athletes were the true
bearers of the red and
blacf^. Playing in small
venues before small
crowds, they always


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