Mass.) Northeastern University (Boston.

Cauldron (Volume 1993) online

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Liz Karsten, Merri Mongeau, Eileen Olifiers, LoriBeth Sklar, TriciaTankevich, Heather Tarter. Dana DeVagno, Lana
Schiferman.







GREEKS



153




One of the oldest chapters in the nation, ftlpha
'Epsilon Thi first made its appearance on
'Hgrtkeastenis campus in 1990. In that short
span, J3. £ Thi managed to cart home two Sister
of the 'year awards and a first place award for
their homecoming f bat in 1992.

Assisting with victims of Breast cancer,
Silpha 'Epsilon Thi remained committed to the
community as well as the university. c Ihrough
their continued participation in Qreel^commu-
nity, they earn the well-deserved distinction of
being named most improved sororiety in 1993.




154




9VCem6ers



Sara Bodnar, Dawn Buccellato, Melissa Buckley, Lori Choyka, Melissa Fetzer, Debra Harmatz, Jen Klein, Kyle
Klein, Tiffany Kopp, Brittany Makol, Diana Martinez, Dawn Oschman, Michelle Ozegowsky, Cori Prilik, Julie Pizzi,
Lani Rabitor, Elyse Schwartz, Gretchen Zimmerman, Courtney Brenner, Tara Colnick, Pam Gallagher, Monique
Heiseu, Meghan Kelly, Michelle Martel, Jade Platanio, Rachel Rosendorf, Wendy Swartz.



GREEKS



::





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Ihough small in size, 'Delta Sigma Iheta's

scope was overwhelming. One of9\(ortheastern's

premier blacfcjororities, it carted home several

achievement awards





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and always k^pt fo-
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and strong alumni
Backing, friendship
came easy in this very
personalgroup. ( Ihey
will last forever.




Members



Tiniece Roberson, Treasurer; Shawan Edwards, President; Shanta White, Corre-
sponding Secretary; Monica Windley, Vice President; Deborah Dubique, Record-
ing Secretary.






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GREEKS



155




NY WRBB PLAYED TO ALL OUR NEED



"To most stations, requests are
an annoyance. To us they're the
reason we stay on the air"

- Scott Souza, General Manager

Understanding WRBB was as
simple as driving three miles from
the University. The station faded
from the airwaves.

Blessed with just 10 watts of
power, WRBB did the only thing it
could - it played to the requests of
Northeastern's students. Despite its
miniscule scope, WRBB was a mas-
terpiece of programming, with all
types of music, talk shows and game
coverage represented.

Variety was the key element to
RBB's success. After its morning
show, the station kicked in with
Level Groove, a roots and reggae
program from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Then, from 1 to 5, Boston's
Spice handled requests for all types
of music, ranging from rock to
heavy metal to early 80's to soul.
One of its most popular formats
came at 5 p.m. with Radio Bliss, a
combination of alternative rock
mixed with the week's biggest col-
lege chart hits.

In the evening, if there wasn't
a hockey or hoop game to cover,
WRBB's format made the smooth
transition to Soul's Place and then
to slow jams after midnight on Vi-
sions.




While much of the formatting was
pre-planned, WRBB gave a chance to
many rising DJ's to strut their stuff in
ad-lib manner. Many of RBB's talk
shows and request hours were well
versed, though mainly unrehearsed.

The smallish scope never seemed
to bother those at WRBB. Commer-
cialization was frowned upon and big
name pop music was not its ideal me-
dium. But setting trends was. Much of
WRBB's music laid the groundwork
for future successes like Soul Asylum,
which got its start mainly because the
small outlets played them first.



The idea to stay away from selll
ing out helped WRBB land big inters
views with underground mega sui
perstars like Chuck D., House o(
Pain, KRS-One andDigable Planets)
Just goes to show that staying out o<
the commercial end has its advam
tages.

The work of Souza, program!
director Chris Adams, music direct
tor Kristi Bartlett and news directot
Chris Perkins made it all possible foij
104.9 FM to reach beyond its limits



By CHRIS BURT



156



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS






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CREATIVE CROSSROADS
ADVERTISING CLUB

Members: Guy Ben-Zion, Tavish Baker, Judy Divernere, Ann
Marie Heid, Thaddeus Tresky, Pete Taveira, Tony Divenuti,
Lou Strano, John Davis, Joanne Derby, Doris Huynh, Deanna
Martin, Prof. Linda Tompkins



ri\^^i f ££jHB§ y^kH

i < 9Bfk mm Bit - jiijtf


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WRBB-FM (104.9)

Lamont Merritt, Frank Holder, Brian Miller, Robin Moran,
Chrissy Papps, Chris Perkins, Gaetano Pucci, Robin Saunders,
Calvin Smalls, Ian Smith, Scott Souza, Bob Starck, Kathy
Tibbits, Nicole Ulrick, John Vines, Catarina Vittoria, Graham
Warren, Larry Winston, Darrell Wright, Wendy Young, Jim
Halleran, Adriana Babindrock, Jen Seifert, Nancy Ciranella,
Sadiki Kambon, Nathan Cooper, Jack Biswell, Kara Kromish,
John Gettings, Matt Albanese, Paulo Prazeres, Tim Kelly,
Chris Adams, Rob Alpert, Robert Allen, Herald Aubourg,
Kristi Bartlett, RJ Bartsch, Tyrone Bell, Mary Card, Rob
Chella, Michael Collins, Floyd Cooper, Hollis Crichlow, Shiva
Damghani, Christian Del Prete, Joseph Devlin, Brian Dodds,
Chariss Douglas, Adler Eliscin, Joe Falcone, Nancy Gramella,
Kenn Haigh, Ron Hubbard, Nola Kelley, Todd Lariviere,
Bobby Lawson, Matt Lefsky, Chris Lorant, Marco Mancini,
Pete Mar, Michael Melendez



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



157




OWD PLEASER

NATIONAL SPOTLIGHT SHINES ON CHEERLEADER



Collegiate cheerleading was not
confined only to the sidelines of
university games. The co-ed squad
provided spirited support and con-
tributed greatly to the overall ath-
letic atmosphere of Northeastern.

Hard work and constant practice
paid off for the 1993 Cheerleading
squad in Dallas, TX as they placed
eighth out of 25 teams in the NCA
National Championships on Jan. 4,
5 and 6.

The team consisted of six men
and eight women, all full of school
spirit and a common commitment to
being their best.

"We were one of the few squads
to come from the Northeast, so we
were a major underdog," said Coach
Lorrie Wright, "but I think it really
pumped the team up because they
went out there and gave the best
performance of their lives."

The Huskies placed in the top 10
for only the third time in school
history, giving their team a reputa-
tion for being more than just an
extracurricular club.

"All the teams that beat us were
from the South," said graduate stu-
dent David Sentnor. "Cheerleading
down in the South is considered a
sport, where as here we are a student
activity."

The team earned their bid to com-
pete in the Nationals by placing sec-
ond overall in regional competition
at Boston University, August 1993.



The squad then went to Dallas to com-
pete in the semifinal round where only
10 schools were selected to continue to
the finals. Northeastern went up against
25 schools to qualify for the finals.

"Competing in the Nationals makes
us want to work harder because we can
see that there are teams that we can
compare ourselves to," said Captain
Becky Bourassa. "If we see a team that
is better than us, then we say, 'Well, we
can strive to be like them' instead of
trying to obtain an invisble goal," she
said.

The team held fundraisers and con-
tributed their own money to make the
trip, but they also received some major
donations. "It's a lot of hard work and
practice," said Bourassa, "but anyone
can do it."




All photos by DaVor




158



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS





SENIOR CHALLENGE

Members: Hoda Abou-Jamra, Mike Allard, Lester Allen, Ton Andre, Jennifer Braffit,
Jorge Caceras, Eric Cetnarski, John Chisholm, Ramzi Choueiri, Pat Cordeiro, Adam
Daly, Joe Dias, Amy Dong, Kerry Duggento, Jodi Edmonds, Deidre Farr, Kathleen
Gallagher, Heidi Goldstein, Garth Hamelin, Sarah Hansen, Candace Harper, Mark
Hetzke, Tracy Johnson, Claudine Johnson, Herron Johnson, Kathleen Kane, Stefanie
Katz, Tricia Kelly, Beth Lahr, Robert Lam, Andrew Lattimer, Jason Lefferts, Joel
Lemieux, Kin Loo, Carolyn Luthy, Laura Macedo, Marilyn Mathu, Mollie McCann,
Tammy McCoy, Shelly Morris, Becky Paige, Karen Patykewich, Kim Pelletier, Scott
Price, Jason Ranney, David Reid, Mark Rippa, Rebecca Rulli, Tina Ryan, Peter
Schroeder, David Speakman, Sudhira Sreedharan, Rachel Threkeld, Damon Tyson,
Brenda Williams, Holly Whiting,




NORTHEASTERN AFRICAN
STUDENTS ORGANIZATION

Members: Ernest Tche, Victor Accam, Osei Afriyie, Chuka Ajene, Segun
Akinremi, Ayodeji, Folakemi Awobajo, Seyi Boroffice, Herman Carneiro,
Camille Charles, Nasser Djama, Emammuel Douah, Mersha Endolkachew,
Dioubane Gueye, Ebow Halm, Kweku Halm, Remilekun Ibraheem, Daniel
Igbale, Vincent Ikpoh, Yemisi Ishola, Shafig Jala, Mwenya Kabwe, Mariam
Kamara, Angela Kankam, Ogechi Kami, Abeid Karume, Irene Kiragu,
Robert Koech, Chidozie Madu, Marilyn Mathu, Abdelkerim Moulaye,
NdegwaPeterMungai, Jennifer Muthini,PatriciaMwangi,SingomaMwanza,
Kamata Ng'andwe, Lucy Ngando, Benedict Nkang, Chukwuemeka
Nwachukwu, Ositadinma Nwokolo, Babajide Odurayo, Catherine Okite,
Omoizele Okoavo, Anna Okola, Chukuemenem Okpala, Chukwudozie
Okapaobieri, Njideka, Onyemelukwe, Nike Otegbola, Henry Owunna,
Kwamina Panford, Rubim Rwakabuba, Fatouma Seid, Oumy Sene, Mukoya
Swiga, Annette Tibagwa, Didier Tslimbalanga, Tamrat Yossef



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



159



PRSSA RAN ITS OWN SHOW WITH "THINK INK'



Classes, co-op, and campaigning
... the life of a Northeastern PRSSA
member.

As the only student-run public
relations firm in New England,
Northeastern' s own Public Relations
Student Society of America has had
success beyond the classroom and
co-op jobs.

The NU chapter of this national
organization was small but effec-
tive in their work. They began with
a concept that taught the members
how to be professional before it was
a necessity — after graduation. Here
it was just for fun, and the experi-
ence they found was rewarding.

Beginning in 1991, the PRSSA
originated "Think Ink", a real firm
dealing with real clients, real prob-
lems, and real success. Work in the
firm gave the members a chance to
strengthen their resumes, and to
build on what skills they already
had.

At the beginning, Think Ink took
on mainly campus related clients.
The campaigns were small, but they
provided a strong base, and as the
firm gained experience the number
of clients increased. One of Think
Ink's first major clients was Joyce
Chen restaurants, in which the whole
campaign was developed and re-
sulted in both local and national
newspaper coverage. From there,




All photos courtesy of Tract Pena

Traci Pena spent some very valuable time learning about public relations with tit
Father of Public Relations, Edward Bernays.



the list grew to both paying and pro-
bono clients.

In 1994, Think Ink clients of note
were Double Dee, In Full Effect,
American Youth Hostels, Kelley
Chunn Associates, Wild Wiggly Wear
and Massachusetts Board of Real Es-
tate Appraisers.

Under the guidance of faculty advi-



sor Kelley Chunn, and as a result o
the hard work the staffers put in, thl
NU chapter of PRSSA gave the Norttl
eastern Public Relations students
leg up on their competition afte
graduation.



By SHELAGH BRALE r



160



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS







Press
Check-In






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PRSsa

Relations St
ty oS Ante





HAITIAN STUDENT UNITY

Members: Ridiane Denis, Jibson Prevot, Lamar Mede, Hiram
Octave Grandoit, Patrick Boisvert, Sandy Zamor, Nadine
Cherenfant, Majorie Bernadeau, Nadege Joseph, Wendy Fougi,
Mishella Etienne, John-Mara Youte, Herby Duverne, Claudy
Merlain, Katia Calixte, Nancy Presume, Fitzgeral Presume,
Jenetta Virgo, Uryl Grandoit




PUBLIC RELATIONS STUDENT
SOCIETY OF AMERICA

Members: Marloi Apostol, Dan Benedict, Eric Berman, Heather
Cabral, Karen Foran, Andrea Hawes, Shannan Jones, Ashley
Koeck, George Libbares, Christine Milligan, Traci Pena,
Andrea Presutti, Kelley Chunn, Steve Copoccia.



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



161




RIKING A




U BANDS HIT ALL THE RIGHT NOTES



If you went to the games, you
would see them — the dedicated
few that played for the Huskies ...
not on the teams but in the stands.
They didn't play halfback, or cen-
ter. They played the tuba, the drums
and the saxophone.

The Northeastern Bands were col-
lected under one big university um-
brella, but existed in many different
forms. The Pep Band was the most
visible of the bands, playing at many
events including football, hockey
and basketball games. Trying to in-
spire some school spirit at North-
eastern was a difficult task, but the
Pep Band added the necessary noise
to the gymnasium when the crowd
lacked vigor. Taking musical direc-
tion from student, their purpose was
to encourage crowd involvement at
sporting events ... when in fact there
was a crowd. They also participated
in other Boston area events such as
the Special Olympics, Veteran's
Day and Memorial Day parades.

The Concert Band was a student-
run group conducted by a faculty
advisor that performed and provided
an outlet for students that enjoyed
playing and studying music. Under
the hand of Director Allen Feinstein
since 1990, the Concert Band gave
concerts for those students who ap-
preciated their music.

The Jazz Ensemble and
Composer's Collective were both
run by Professor Bill Lowe. These
two programs arranged to have pro-




fessional musicians come to North-
eastern to teach the players by ex-
ample. The students and professionals
created a unique sound and a unique
program. This contributed significant
diversity to the Band, and generated a
learning-conducive and synergic at-
mosphere.

The diversity of the separate groups
were necessary to those members of
the university who wanted to broaden
their experiences beyond work and the
classroom — from students who par-
ticipated, to those who just came to
listen, to the professors who took time
to teach and conduct. The practice
took time, but the efforts were well-
worth it, judging the finished sound.




Sean McGrory



162



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS




Sean McGrory





JAZZ ENSEMBLE

Members: Nate Carr, Nicole Hoffman, David Kaminski,
Tricia McMillian, Travis Bowerman, Lance Houston, Taylor
Cote, Jason Rogers, Mike Brick, Yvenne Cobbige, Rory
Gage, Brad Greenstein, Oren Levine, Mark Manczuk, Sean
O'Neal, Brian Vance, Phil Williams, Paul McGowen, Keith
Hirst, Chris Hayden, Phillippe Crettien, Jeff Niestefski




CONCERT BAND

Members: Marshe Akeson, Marc Altman, Aaron Benoit,
Nicole Blanche, Tim Bliss, Travis Bowerman, John Bradley,
Ken Bushwell, Jeanine Carlisle, Nate Carr, Brendon Collins,
Lee Durocher, Mark Engelbart, Everett Erwin, Jonathan
Fallon, Frank Gibbons, Janelle Helser, Brian Hey wood, Ardyth
Hulse, Keith Hirst, Yvonne Jones, David Kaminski, Michael
Lane, Winnie Leung, Renee Mercier, Antonella Micalizzi,
Skip Mills, Ken Mithchell, Jason Miller, Bill Pawlak, Jim
Pelletier, Kim Pelletier, Amy Piper, Dawn Skrobat, Lynne
Somin, Angelo Spinosa, Erica Staszak, Greg Stevens, Randy
Stimson, Emily-Rose Welsh, Mike White, Katy Wood, Lydia
Zilberberg



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



163







X. JL JL i JfL. JL i ^»wb*i0 -A. JUL. ^a,,/ \bsii/ k«J^ m JJ



ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES SWEPT UP BY S.E J



Greener pastures and cleaner
oceans.

In a world sometimes igno-
rant to the pollutants that harmed
nature, the Students for Environmen-
tal Action, or SEA, stepped in to help
achieve the above.

SEA was not only there to
increase awareness about the envi-
ronment, but also to actually make
things more environmentally sound.
And its scope was not solely isolated
to our 55-acre campus.

As part of its core of chal-
lenges, NU took on Hydro-Quebec,
the sixth largest multi-national cor-
poration in the world. Hydro-Que-
bec had plans to build a massive
hydropower plant in Northern Que-
bec near James Bay. Citing human
rights violations and destruction of
ecosystems, NU' s alliance along with
several other area colleges encour-
aged divestment of bonds from Hy-
dro Quebec. The result was that
Harvard, Tufts, Dartmouth, BU, and
Wellesley all divested their bonds
away from HQ.

On campus, the group be-
came very high profile through its
media connections and its willing-
ness to go into the dorms to recruit.

With 14 members strong,
SEA drove into the residence halls
and started The Green Cup. The Cup
was a challenge to all dorms to see
which could conserve their water,




heat and electricity best. The top dorm
with the best results from March through
May won an ice cream/barbeque party.
Not a bad gift for something so posi-
tive.

Another task of SEA' s was put-
ting together the Green Wave maga-
zine. Founded in the spring of 1993, the
quarterly purposed to informed students
of environmental issues ranging from
legislation to the group's projects. As
of graduation, the magazine had pub-
lished more than 2,000 copies at a clip.



All photos courtesy ofTricia KX\



The future holds its breath o(
the environmental issue. But for SEA
the drive to clean up the earth ra
mained strong.

Proposals for major project:)
included creating an Environments
minor, something NU desperatels
needs considering its location in i
somewhat polluted city and its pus
toward campus improvement.




164



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS





STUDENTS FOR
ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION

Aki Suwa, President, Katie Sayles, Alissa Fromkin, Liz Uhlin,
Doug Kahn, Lynn Aquino, Jim Ahem, Rachel Beaton, Robin
Conlin, LisaFeeley ,Kristina George, Rob Riker, Ajit Singham,
Kim Vaccaro, Daniel Faber, Advisor, Robert Shatz, Advisor




DEBATE TEAM

Members: Sherry Shepler (Advisor), Heidi Goldstein
(Vice-President), ErikaNorton (President), Jeff Farkash,
Chuka Ajene, Camille Charles, Lea Schuster, Tony
Dielfert, Aaron Bass, Joanne Fiattaroli.



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



165




M-yM



ADISE




HOC FOUND SERENITY OUTSIDE CITY



NUHOC! We did it all ... and
had FUNN doing it. Backpacking,
skiing, canoeing, death hikes wih
Zack, and biking to the lodge with
bananas up the ying and up the
yang.

We went white-water rafting,
sky-diving, and some even at-
tempted ski-diving. We went cav-
ing and had endless rock-climbing
trips to Hammond Pond, Quincy
Quarries, and the rock gym.

Many great friends were
made, friendships that will last a
lifetime. NUHOCers will remem-
ber midnight hikes up MT.
Mooselaki, "Hat trick weekends",
the outhouse at -10, BANANA'S,
12-hour death march to Cannon
MT., the death sled, and the "jump",
Our House, Pratt St., and Ashford.
Of all the wonderful memo-
ries from our years in NUHOC,
our fondest memories will be from
our Lodge; Winter Carnival, Work
weekends, festering,
NewCommers, and New Years.

Memories from the Lodge
radiate farther than the NUHOC
community. They spread into the
many student groups and faculty/
staff who visited our home in the
White Mountains.
Long live JG.



By TRICIA KELLY




All photos courtesy ofTricia Kelly



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166



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS






NU HUS-SKIERS AND OUTING CLUB

Tricia Kelly — President; Tighe Hawkins — President; Ken Mitchell;
Ralph Horak; Jay Campopiano; Graham Ingallina; Zack Nowak;
Chris Morse; Brett Anderson; Barbara Byczkiewicz; Fritz Anthony;
Jon Watson; Matt Noonan; Miki Salman; Chris George; Bill Mays;
Mike Buckland; Jim Ahem; Aki Suv/a; Ajit Singham; Alex Dallas;
Steve Kaufman; Robert Lilly; Ben Sellers; Liz Porter; Taco; Amy
Maranhas; Tim LeBlanc; Dan Humphreys; Sam Galpin; Chip
Kennedy; Becky Jones; Wes Foster; Jon Bondlow; Amy Lorrain.




CHORAL SOCIETY

Members: Teresa Buenpacifico, Susan Dadek, Rebecca
Dowd, Bethany Konys, April Lavallee, Carey Leone, An-
drea Levin, Melissa, Macri, Jennifer Markert, Gina Fatutta
Matthews, Patricia McDonald, Xiomara Pique, Jo Anne
Spreen, Elise Tucker, Nicole Walker, Anna White, Kandrew
Caporal, Michael Colena, Albert d'Amato, Jason Gordon,
Dan Griffin, Peter Grossi, Robert Hadley, Alexander Hall,
Jeremy Lichter, Aaron Pyman, Todd Rohs, Damon Tyson,
Jon Whitney, Joanne Frattaroli, Mary Fink, Jen Guerriero,
Wiltrud Hermelink, Florence Jugy , Joanna Lampert, Claudy
Merlain, Cynthia Miller, Suzanne Mooney, Amy Mossman,
Carol NolinSmith, Kimberly O'Donnell, Eileen Olifiers,
Anne-Elisabeth Porter, Jacqueline Pou, Jeanne Segal, Dawn
Skrobat, Ruth Stone, Alana Sucke, Ann Sun-Shil, Michelle
Sweet, Christine Tall, Annie Thomas, Virgil Bozeman,
Edward Brady, Paul Coste, Edward Desmond, Ben
Eisenstadt, Andrew Fioramonti, Adam Fumia, Dareen
Mascall, David Matthews, Chad McQueen, Stephen Oxx,
Jason Small, Chris Vagnini



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



167










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IN U 1NH/WJD iDlx\L^J\w Ui rivD IvJr 1\.H/. Wll/Jlyi\JLi(



Since 1926, Northeastern stu-
dents have been informed and en-
tertained by the same source. They
have been able to get the low-down
on university happenings from the
university president to the SGA,
while at the same time laugh at
misspellings and incredibly dumb
mistakes.

That source was, and always
will be, the Northeastern News.
While the students of the university
poked fun and were angered by the
contents of the campus weekly, the
News became one of the top col-
lege newspapers in the country.

The Northeastern News was
named the best non-daily newpaper
in the region by the New England
Newspaper Association, and also
brought home a National Pace-
maker award from the Associated
College Press, making the News
one of the top 20 weekly papers in
the country.

While not always mistake-free,
the News was able to dispense
information to its readership — the
students.

In 1993-94, the News covered
Bill Clinton at Northeastern, the
death of Reggie Lewis, and the
continuing saga of the Ell Center
Renovations.

In our five years, the Northeast-
ern News was the main source of
many events that affected the stu-




dents at the university: the death of
Mark Belmore, the eternally frustrat-
ing Beanpot hockey tournament, the
tragic beating of Brad Giles, and the
annual tuition hike.

Through the efforts of editor Ja-
son Lefferts, Tracy Johnson (advertis-
ing, especially), and the persistence of



seniors Derek Matson, Tracy Verfaille l|
David Exum, Heidi Goldstein, Doum
Read, Gerry Brown and Ryan Young i
the Northeastern News did a complet
1 80-degree turnaround, taking an oftt
laughed at paper and producing one o
nation's premier publications.




CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS




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a



COUNCIL FOR

UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS

Jinn Adams, Danielle Dion, Renee Hernandez,
Jacob Brennan, Lisa Bailey, Rosetta Lauray,
Jeff Udell, Shawn Keve




THE NORTHEASTERN NEWS

Members: Craig Ball, Phil Bell, Shelagh Braley, Christine Brophy, Brenda
Buote, Jason Cristley, Natacha Dorismond, Vickie Edwards, David Exum,
Alex Foster, Heidi Goldstein, Jason Harvey, Phil Hochmuth, Eustacio
Humphrey, Tracy Johnson, Jason Lefferts, Scott Magoon, Derek Matson,
Pat McGee, Mark McConnell, Kristin McMullen, Brian Miller, Susan
Misicka, Kurt Mullen, Sue Neff, Cory Nightingale, Allison Perkins, David
Pierce, Adam Polgreen, Doug Read, Lesley Richeimer, Tim Robinson,
Laura Salter, Jason Scott, Dana Shallack, Amy Sill, Tracy Verfaille, Pam
Walsh, Laura Waters, Craig Watts, Ryan Young.



The

Northeastern

News



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



169



ELPING HANDS



FENWAY PROJECT MADE NEED 1



Northeastern University is based
on the principle of learning by doing.
Cooperative Education was a paid
way of learning, and many of us ad-
hered to that idea. But there were
some students and teachers that went
beyond the paid work. For them, there
were rewards greater than a weekly
paycheck.

You can't talk about community
service at Northeastern without men-
tioning the Fenway Project. Over 45
agencies had volunteers placed in
community service positions by the
Fenway Project in the greater Boston
area.

The volunteer experience was an
invaluable one for the NU students
that participated. Because there was
such a large base of volunteer oppor-


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