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tunities, almost any student's interest
could be matched. Some students
worked doing blood research at a ma-
jor Boston hospital, while others
coached afternoon basketball teams
made up of inner-city youths.

The opportunities were endless.
The resources were not. The biggest
source of volunteers came from work-
study allotted by financial aid to stu-
dents. Unlike the proverbial useless,
know-nothing work-studies that did
their homework on the job — these
students put their effort into real posi-
tions that made a huge difference to
the communities of Northeastern and



Boston.

In 1994, The Fenway Project offered
an after-school program for children in
Mission Hill twice a week.

With the senior citizens from homes
in the Feway/Roxbury
area, The Fenway
Project sponsored day
trips to New England
malls, restaurants —
even a trip to Cape Cod
in the summer. They
used the university
buses during regular
business hours.

The volunteers
from the project also
sponsored bi-monthly
dances for the devel-
opmentally delayed
from homes all over
suburban Mass. The
homes supplied their
own qualifies staff
members, but The
Fenway Project coor-
dinated the dances and
invited Northeastern
fraternities and sorori-
ties to attend as well.
These groups, as well
as some human ser-
vice classes were on
hand to provide re-
freshments and dance
partners.



These students found out that thei
could get paid for volunteering and thl
experience was worth more than thei
ever expected.




170



CLUBS-& ORGANIZATIONS




Photos courtesy of Fenway Project





FINANCE CLUB

Members: Tina Petruzzielo, Pasha Trayers, Anna Chan, Trevor Calvey,
Marc Monnier, Guillaume Garoff, Tracy Vivenzo, Mike Shannon, Ping
Zhou, David Runs, Julie Cournoyer, Peter Philbrick, James Malone, Jeremy
Koslow, Lucas Brunelle, Holly Whiting, Jerome Coudrier, Edwin Chin,
Caroline Landrieu, Thomas Vettier, John Shayne, Jonathan Modry, Jayson
Hreczuck, Raj Barua, Elizabeth Caldas, Yee Leong, LeiSameir Savara,
Monica Torres, James Campbell, Kris Tomasulo, Karim Farra, Daphne
Loiseau, Robert Rosine, Robert Riker, Melaina Clymer, Christian Fregin,
Advisor Carolyn Schellhorn.




ASIAN-AMERICAN SOCIETY

Jin Hee Bae, Kim Barnes, Anna Chau, Nhan Tu Chau, Tao Chen,
Julie Chin, Lisa Chin, Steve Chin, Jonathan Chou, Amy Chu,
Sharon Chung, Qin Cong, Binh Duong, Joe Fang, Maria Lisa
Flordeliza, Dickson Fong, Michael Fung, Christopher Gong, Uong
Hoaug, Henry Horn, Vibulzos John Iamranond, Doreina Icuspit,
Jayna Jovviwala, Daniel Kim, Morgan Kim, Sonmi Kim, Stephen
Kim, Korng Kouch, Patrick Lee, Chi Leung, Arnold Ley va, Chester
Li, Kenny Lin, Michael Lucero, Dinh Ly, James Min, Nihar Mohan,
Tony Moy, Jantina Mui, Cynthia Nguyen, Yean Ou, Kama Patel,
Thavy Pen, Thanh Pham, Doung Phen, Joshi Rajehdra, Rowell
Santiago, Samantha Sihapanya, Inhye Stevens, Glenn Tan, Hing
Klin Tsang, Ly Vu, Shu Rong Wang, Tommy Way, Simon Castro
Wdimm, Mona Weng, Xia Ying Wong, Christopher Yee, John Yee,
Pamela Yee, Alan Yung



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



171



m




AJORITY RULE



SGA FLOURISHED BEHIND STRONG LEGISLATION



The Student Government As-
sociation worked diligently dur-
ing 1993 and '94 to bring nu-
merous changes to the univer-
sity.

Led by President Katy
Zeidler, the senate passed sev-
eral important pieces of legisla-
tion. The most important reso-
lutions included:

- the implementation of a sys-
tem through which food left af-
ter catered events would be do-
nated to charity rather than dis-
carded.

- a request for a policy con-
cerning non-compliance with
TCE legislation.

- the establishment of a buffer
time of coverage in the insur-
ance plan for graduating seniors.

In addition to working on
legislation, the senate worked
with other student groups such
as the Northeastern Black Stu-
dents Association, Hillel, and
NUBilaga to sponsor events on
campus.

Probably the most imporatnt
project that SGA developed was
the new election process for
senators. After working several




SGA teamed with The Fenway Project to capture the 1993
Homecoming Float.



DaVoi*

most creative*



quarters to perfect the procedure,
the university finally saw its first
elected senate in the Fall of 1 994.

But who believes in all work
and no play? To ease the tension
of the the workload, the senate
participated in several uplifting
activities.

SGA built a float for the Home-
coming Parade in conjunction
with the Fenway Project. The



float, based on the first World
Series, was named most creative
float at the homecoming game.
In addition, the senate went
on a winter at the NUHOC lodge
where they went hiking, played
games, saw the first snowfall of
the year (of many), and strength-
ened their friendships.



By ALLISON PERKINS




■■ ■■'■^~ : \ :



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS





PSYCHOLOGY CLUB

Members: Justine Duhoffmann, Virginia Ricker (Vice
President), Karen Schwartz, Eric Osborn (Secretary),
Maria Sclafani (President).




STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

Members: Melissa Alosso; Samah Alrayyes; Kevin Baker;
Matthew Bowie; Jenn Buell; Jason Burke; Sean Carroll;
Zenas Choi; Amy Conefrey; John Coughlin; Marc Duval;
Herby Duverne; Dan Ely; Lauren Gainor; Susan Jhun;
Caroline Joyce; Kathy Klostermann; Theresa Medeiros;
Joseph Natanski; Chakin Ng; Paolo Palazzi-Xirinachs;
Robert Pepe; Allison Perkins; Voravut Ratanakommon;
David Remick; Shawn Sameiro; Chris Schoenenberger;
Nicole Solano; Aulii Taitano; Jenn Taymor; Noel Texeira;
George Van der Velden; H. Alex Van der Velden; Laura
Waters; Maryellen Wilson; Dan Bernal; Kathy Kane; Jer-
emy Koslow; Kevin Watts.



oto courtesy ofSGA



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



173




ARCHING ON



WOMEN'S CENTER HOT ON HEELS OF EQUALITY



The Northeastern Women's Cen-
ter spent 1994 trying to "recognize
and seize" the same power that has
"traditionally been denied" women
since the women's movement first
began in the 60s.

When Anna Kornilakis, Susan
Jhun and Rachel Beaton took over
the group in the spring of 1993, the
Women's Center hadn't been in-
volved in the NU community in two
years. They sparked a new interest in
dealing with the issues of today's
society — health issues, economic
issues, political and social issues fac-
ing women.

With seminars on self-defense and
receptions to honor Boston's 'Lead-
ing Women' , this small group — not
just women, but men as well —
brought empowerment and a posi-
tive environment to the women of
Northeastern.

The Center was a place where stu-
dents could find support, equitable
treatment and concerned people with
whom they could discuss current is-
sues. A forum led by the Women's
Center discussed a topic that many
members felt needed to be addressed
— sexual harrassment. With pres-
sure from the Women's Center, the
NU Co-op Department made emo-
tional and legal counseling available
for those victims that had been
harrassed while on co-op. Then it
went on to create the Sexual







Harrassment Network, widely publicized
across NU's campus.

Not just concerned with what was hap-
pening on Northeastern' s campus, the
Women's Center also participated in
Boston affairs such as the Jane Doe Walk.
This was sponsored by the Massachu-
setts Coalition for Battered Women and
state-wide. Itraised awareness and money
to support battered women's shelters.
They raised a total of $800 and took part
in the effort to "keep all women safe."

On Jan. 2 1 , 1 994, the Center celebrated
the 21st anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the
landmark decision of the Supreme Court
to legalize abortion, with a candlelight
ceremony. The wind was strong for the
middle of the winter, but the participants'
spirits were considerably stronger than
the flames of the candles.

March is Women's History Month,
and the Women's Center concentrated



much of its effort into organizing a full
week of events celebrating women. Thiai
celebration included guest speakersn
exhibits and movie screenings.

Due in great part to member Nicole!
Ulrick, Advisor Carol Lyons and View
President of co-op Jane Scarborough (
the Co-op Department published "Thdi
Women' s Advocate." This was a direct
tory of contacts and supporters o1(
women's issues on and off campus —
including everything from health con-i
cerns and bookstores to future publica-:
tions.

Throughout 1 994, the Women' s Cen-i
ter brought important issues to the fore-i
front of the university's attention. Thd
Women's Center continued its success
by making a vital contribution to thd
growth of women on campus.



By SHELAGH BRALEY



174



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS




The key to the success of any organization - teamwork. In the
md the efforts of the Women's Center with candlelight vigils
top) and seminars on rape helped produce everlasting bonds.




WOMEN'S CENTER

Members: Susan Jhun, Jennifer Lampert, Jill Gillingham,
Lydia Zilberberg, Nora Chapkovich, Cynthia Miller, Anna
Kornilakis, Nicole Ulrick, Kathleen Bryant, Ed Kirtz, Robert
Pepe, Cheri Maniscalco, Nishit Acharya, Regina Lenaling,
Racheal Beaton, Jennifer Weisman.




PEP BAND

Members: Marcia Oswald, Kim Jenkins, Marsha Akeson,
Anna White, Mark Engelbart, Andrew Kaplan, John
Mulhall, Nate Can, Kim Hamb, Erica Staszak, Todd
Larivierre, Keith Hirst, John Bradley, Dave Akeson,
Doug Rick, Greg Stevens, John Fallon, Everett Erwin,
Carl Hoyt, Aaron Benoit, Mike Lane, Drew Bixby, Dawn
Skrobat, Sharon Hayes, Antonella Micalizzi, Brian
Hey wood, Tim Bliss, Phil Worthington, Angelo Spinosa,
Mike Ericson, Matt Picone, Jaffa Cocio, Eric Harris



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



175




EING THE LIGHT

RELIGIOUS MESSAGE DELIVERED BY FAITHFUL



College was a time of discovering
who you were, academically and so-
cially. No matter what your denomina-
tion, religious life at Northeastern in-
vited you to "Discover the journey ...
Inward and Outward."

Northeastern' s religious life was
all-inclusive ... from those who prac-
ticed their religion adamantly to those
who only had a quiet faith in an elusive
higher power. As NU students moved
through the chaotic daily life in Boston,
they might have been motivated to re-
flect from time to time on their own
inner growth as well as on the academic
growth they came here searching for.

They might have questioned what
made sense to them, what provided
meaning to their lives, what gave them
purpose each day — and Northeastern' s
Religious Life office might have given
them a connection with others who
shared their views and needs.

There were many opportunities for
students to participate in various reli-
gious practices, right on campus.

Each organization had its own spe-
cial activities and objectives — each
one unique to its students. The Urban
Quaker Group took action against ur-
ban violence and focused on issues that
were important to the urban commu-
nity of Northeastern.

The Hindu Student Council pro-
vided students with opportunities to
learn about the Hindu heritage. The
Islamic Society helped Muslim stu-
dents fulfill their Islamic duties while
adjusting to the university environment.

The Campus Crusade for Christ
tried to help fulfill Christ's Great
Comission to "go make disciples of all




the nations." It was involved in inform-
ing students in an intelligent, reasonable
yet personal way, how the claims of Christ
were relevant to college students at North-
eastern.

The Episcopal Chaplaincy met for
mid-week services and held dinner meet-
ings, creating a personal relationship be-
tween the members while sharing their
faith.

The Inter Varsity Christian Fellow-
ship welcomed students from all denomi-
nations with the goal of developing strong
Biblical values.

The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
was representative of the Jewish commu-
nity at Northeastern. They held a variety
of student-planned activities including
film series and community outreach to
senior citizens.

The Orthodox Christian Fellowship
was a diverse group of students from all
different ethnic backgrounds focusing on
the teachings of the New Testament. The
Roman Catholic Community comprised
the largest student religious group on
campus.



The Christian Student Union tried I
find and implement God's purposes f
them. It led students to commitment I
Jesus Christ, trained students in effei
tively sharing their faith, involved st
dents in area churches and led them i
service to the community.

The International Students, Inc. vw
an inter-denominational which served 1
international students. It sponsored bni
study, discussion groups, local sight-sei
ing and educational trips and tours.

The Lutheran Ministry in The Fenw
served Lutheran students, staff and w
ulty offering a variety of programs ran
ing from retreats to opportunities to p;i
ticipate in community service.

If you were looking for a studd
group to join, a place of worship or ji|
someone to share your faith and questio
with, the NU Religious Life office pi
vided a place for NU students to find I
the answers.



By SHELAGH BRALE T



176



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS





CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST

Members: Rachel Benedict, Kim Chapman, Kok Loong Chew, Jennifer
Cocio, Fraser Czajkowski, Matt Donnelly, Kristen Engel, Cyrilla Etienne,
Jason Messier, Pam Moyer, Matt Olsen, Stephen Parsons, Peter Philbrick,
Duncan Phyfe, Phil Salier, Paul Scharlach, Andrew Fioramonti, Alana
Sucke, Chris George, Susan Upperman, Jeff Gilbert, Nicole Walker, Sharon
Hayes, Chuck Wells, Eric Kilby, Shaunt Kiredjian, John Lawson III, Kristin
Lindquist, Craig Zedwick, Mitsue Yoshimura, Drake Williams, Andrea
Williams.



i ^^^M^'


; ' ' /


7 ~>~~^\


j ,, «KjBF*.:-Js j.






^^Ks4r • * *





CHRISTIAN STUDENT UNION

Members: Jason Abraham, Oluseyi Boroffice, Kristen Brown, Nadine
Cherenfant, Kok Loong Chew, Junki Chung, Alison Danforth, Matt Donnelly,
Ben Doress, Donald Dwoske, Robert Elkins, Daenette Gardiner, Jen
Guerriero, John Lawson, Sean Monahan, Kevin McGovern, Stephanie
McLellan, Peter Philbrick, Chris Ratliff, William Sears, Bethany Thiboutot,
Nicole Walker, Amy Whittum.



CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS



177




GRADUATES

yyith your diploma in
your hand, you loofc^ to
the future, though it was
difficult, it was time to
say goodbye. Look^back^
on these pages fondly and
recall the memories - the
people, the friends who
made those five years
magical. These were the
final days of your youth.
May the 9{U e^erience
and The Class of '94 be
forever .,.

COMETHIN/C






*Mont forgeT



DIVISION



179



COLLEGE
OF



Sirts & Sciences




180



GRADUATES



Ms & Sciences




Danielle P Abbott

Mathematics
Bedford, MA

Grace Ann Acocella

Psychology
Boston, MA

Teresa Agresta

Political Science
Milford, MA
Carlton L Aiken

Elementary Education/Sociology
Ambler, PA

Kamal H Al-Amoudi

Economics
Brookline, MA
Benjamin S Albert

Political Science
Newington, CT
Sahar Alrayyes

Biology
Weston, MA

Keith I Andelman

Journalism
Groton, MA

Neil O Anderson

Human Services Education
Carolina, RI

Holly N Andrews

African American Studies
Ocean Park, ME

Mary J Arcadipane

Speech Communication
Boston, MA

Kevin M Arsenault

Speech Communication
Somerville, MA

Aric W Baker

English

Stonington, CT

Karen L Bankowski

Modern Languages/ Russian

Quincy, MA

Josephine Barber

Journalism

Norwood, MA

Ren'Ee C Barker

Sociology

Laramie, WY

Toyetta C Barnard

Human Services
Providence, RI
Michelle L Barnes
Political Science
Boston, MA
Stephen P Barry
Psychology
No Babylon, NY
Michelle C Bedusa
Journalism
Westport, CT

GRADUATES



181



Trustees approve tuition
hike of 7 % for next year

Several fees also will increase



WHAT YOU
THOUGHT..



"And that much for the following year, and

the year after that, and the year after that,

and the year after that.., "

— Heather MacAskill
Criminal Justice



SOMETHING U. WONT FORGET



182



Guy Ben-Zion

Journalism
Riverdale, NY

Patricia E Bender

Modem Languages/ Russian
Readville, MA
Robin L Berk
Speech Communication
Beverly Farms, MA
Joanne L Bigbee
Modern Languages
Scotch Plains, NJ

Arlene E Blenman

Speech Communication
Boston, MA
Bonnie S Blenner
Biology
Torrington, CT
Sara Bodnar
Speech Communication
Boston, MA
Michael W Boldezar

Art
Hawthorne, NJ

Jehan P Bonin

Political Science
Brighton, MA
Michelle Bonner
English
Milford, NH
Allison M Booker
Sociology
New York, NY
Scott A Boucher

English

Jamaica Plain, MA




GRADUATES



Ms & Sciences




Robert L Bourgault

Economics
Boston, MA
Lori A Bowman
Art

Boston, MA
Krista K Brady
Psychology
Waterbury, CT
Jennifer Braffitt
Political Science
Bedford, MA

Ingrid A Braun

Biology

Oakdale, NY

Timothy W Brennan

Journalism

Maiden, MA

Gerald E Brown Jr

Journalism
Boston, MA

Matthew Broz

Art
Shrewsbury, MA

Christopher J Burt

Journalism
Meriden, CT

Stephanie D Burton

Journalism
Bedford, NH
Cynthia Campbell
Human Services
Newton, MA
Martin J Canner

Political Science
Reston, VA

Marc T Caras

Political Science
Taunton, MA
Sean M Carleton
History

Dorchester, MA
Jason P Caruso
Journalism
Farmington, CT

Dean J Cavaretta

Political Science
Maynard, MA

Claudia A Ceraso

Modern Languages
Needham, MA
Eric M Cetnarski
Journalism
Colchester, VT
Sze C Chan
Biology
Boston, MA
Li-Fan Chang
Chemistry
Readville, MA

GRADUATES



183



M i & Sciences



Nadine Cherenfant

Psychology
Boston, MA
Ada Cherry
Human Services
Mattapan, MA
Hui-Tzu Chuang
Art

Somerville, MA
Karen Clark
Sociology
Ridgewood, NJ

Michael E Clarke

Speech Communication
Brewster, NY
Jennifer A Conti
Journalism
Westboro, MA
Patricia Cordaro
Political Science
Boston, MA

Paul D Coste

Music
Millis, MA

John J Coughlin II

Political Science
Fall River, MA

Tara A Cunningham

Psychology
Cambridge, MA
John Czainecki Jr

Political Science
Glastonbury, CT

Sophia Da Rosa

Psychology
Cambridge, MA

Arianna Daino

Early Childhood Education
Boston, MA

Michael R Dal Lago

Political Science
New Milford, NJ

Christian J Del Prete

Speech Communication
Boston, MA
Linda A Delaney

Psychology
Avon, MA

Rachel A Delpup

Political Science
Chester, NY

Vanessa J Demichele
Speech Communication
Worcester, MA
Ridiane Denis
Biology

Dorchester, MA
Julie A Dennehy
Human Services
Brockton, MA



184




GRADUATES



WHAT YOU
THOUGHT...




University quietly
considers changing to
trimester system



"It gives us more time to learn material —
not such a rush like spring quarter (ten
weeks. ) What is the effect on co-ops
though?" -Michael Lucas

Civil Engineering



SOMETHING U. WONT FORGET




Joanne M Derby

Journalism
Floral Park, NY

Gina M Derosa

Psychology

North Haven, CT

Joanne M Digregorio

Journalism

Norwood, NJ

Judith Lee Divenere

Journalism

Bristol, CT

Natacha Dor ismond

Journalism

Brockton, MA

Thomas Dubitsky

English

Stoughton, MA

Matthew R Dubois

Political Science

Jamaica Plain, MA

Amy E Dunne

Journalism

N Kingstown, RI

Eric C Dupaul

Art

Reading, MA
Sharon E Dussault

Sociology/Anthropology
Boston, MA
Jean C Edmond

Speech Communication
Boston, MA

Kenyia Elisa

Human Services Education
Cambridge, MA

GRADUATES



185



Dukakis plans to
teach in fall qtr.



"As long as he doesn't teach a course on
tank design,.. "

— Marc Altman

Electrical Engineering



SOMETHING U. WON'T FORGET



WHAT YOU
THOUGHT...




186



Jennifer M Ercolini

Journalism
Somerville, MA
Cecily A Eschmann
Political Science
Boston, NJ
David R Exum
Journalism
N. Reading, MA
Jeffrey D Farkash
Political Science
Wallingford, CT

Steven D Farrell

Political Science
Watertown, MA
Taaeba A Fattah

Political Science

Boston, MA

Mark S Feitelberg

History

Fall River, MA

Christine L Filippo

Speech Communication
Boston, MA

Dennis C Flaherty

History

Scituate, MA

John J Foley

English

Marlboro, MA

David A Folk

English

Basking Ridge, NJ

Karen M Foran

Journalism

Roslindale, MA

GRADUATES




Ms & Sciences




Amy C Forastiere

Art

Boston, MA
Robert J Fucci

Journalism
Natick, MA
Cynthia B Gabriel

Sociology/Anthropology
Newburyport, MA

Janis Galins III

Speech Communication
Medway, MA

Alicia S Galper

Human Services Education

Norwood, MA

Christopher Garofalo

Biology

S. Weymouth, MA

Elizabeth M Gaynor

Elementary Education

Summit, NJ

Joshua S Getman

English

Hanover, MA

Gina M Giacobelli

Art

Medford, MA
Lisa D Giampa

Early Childhood Education
Norwood, MA

Michelle L Giroux

Art

East Lyme, CT

Heidi E. Goldstein

Speech Communication
Needham, MA

Matthew A Goldstone

Political Science
Hamden, CT

Kevin A Golemme

Art
Hanover, MA

Gina A Gomes

Art

Acushnet, MA
Julie A Gomes

Speech Communication
Boston, MA

Michael D Gomes

Journalism
S Weymouth, MA
Vonnessa P Goode
Psychology
Stoughton, MA
Jason B Goodman
Psychology
Cambridge, MA
Celia A Gordon
Modern Languages
Boston, MA

GRADUATES



187



Ali i & Sciences



188



Andrew G Grant

Economics

Boston, MA

Lisa A Graybeal

Journalism
Peach Bottom, PA

Michael J Green

Economics
Roosevelt, NY

Kelley F Greenwood

Psychology
Wildwoodcrest, NJ

Julie A Grimaldi

Political Science

Boston, MA

Robert A Grimmett

Journalism

N Andover, MA

Beth M Gronros

Political Science
Boston, MA

Toni L Guishard

African American Studies
Boston, MA

Pamela S Habib

Mathematics
Westwood, MA

James J Halleran

Speech Communication

Jackson, NJ

Daniel L Hammond

Speech Communication
E Weymouth, MA
Lynn Hansberry

Modem Languages
Hingham, MA

Candace L Harper

Speech Communication
Seekonk, MA

Heather Harrold

Psychology
Pawtucket, RI

Miles T Healey

Economics
Concord, MA
Ann Marie Heid

Journalism
Arnold, MD

Claudia J Heiman

English

Needham, MA

Suzanne J Hirsh

English

Newton, MA

Walter V Ho

English

Boston, MA

Nicole L Holyoke

Sociology

E Bridgewater, MA

GRADUATES




Students say 'yes'
to Ell Ctr. fix-up



"It's about time,
but I'll never see
the end of it."



— Rachel Weinstein
Elementary Ed.





"Students say yes to
Ell Center fix-up ...
Did we have a



choice?"



-Andrew Lattimer
Accounting




Catherine E Hope

English
Cambridge, MA

Sara B Hoss

Mathematics
Boston, MA

Matthew J House

Environmental Geology
S Windsor, CT
Andrew Howes

Biology
Rockland, MA

Glen D Isemann

Art

Long Valley, NJ

Michael J Janis

Biology
Shelburne. VT
Susan E Jhun
Political Science
Fulton, NY
Paul D Johnson
Mathematics
Sanford, ME

Tracy P Johnson

Journalism
Boston, MA
Charissa L Jones
Art

Norwood, MA
Toru Kawamura
Human Services
Watertown, MA
Deborah L Keating
Psychology
Topsfield, MA

GRADUATES



189



NU officials hit
the streets to curb
student rowdiness



"They must have missed Hemenway
Street!"

— Kimberly O'Donnell
Psychology



SOMETHING U. WON'T FORGET



WHAT YOU
THOUGHT.




Kyle Kendrow

Art

New York, NY

Elizabeth M Kennedy

Elementary Education/ Psychology

W Roxbury, MA

Michael P Kennedy

Psychology

E Bridgewater, MA

Milanne J Kentrup

Art

Smithtown, NY

Jennifer Klein

Sociology
Livingston, NJ

Kimberley A Klingbeil
Psychology
Howes Cave, NY
Anne E Knights
Journalism
Medfield, MA

Ashley M Koeck

Journalism
Windham, NH

Glenn A Kopelman

Speech Communication
Rockville Ctr, NY
Vasilios B Kotsiris

Political Science
Barrington, RI

Evan M Krieger

Political Science
New York, NY
Tessa J Lafortune



190



Gardner, MA



GRADUATES




Ms & Sciences




Nancy A Laitinen

Elementary Education/ Psychology
Quincy, MA

Jennifer L Lampert
Sociology/Anthropology
Newton, MA
Jennifer Landry

English
Melrose, MA
Steven G Lapitzki

Environmental Geology
Old Bridge, NJ

James E Lay

Speech Communication
Cambridge, MA
Jaymes B Leavitt

Art
Paxton, MA

Scott E Lebed

Art

Laverock, PA
Joseph C Leddy

Art
Raymond, NH

Jason W Lefferts

Journalism
S China, ME
Matthew Lefsky

Speech Communication
Roxbury, MA

Matthew J Leger

Speech Communication
Swampscott, MA
Marnie A Lewis

Elementary Education/ Psychology
Boston. MA

Monica R Lindsay

Political Science
Holbrook, MA
James W Ling Jr
Journalism
Edison, NJ
Cale List

Art

Medford, MA
Ivan D Lizarazo

Economics
Allston, MA

Melanie R Lombardo

Environmental Geology
Kearny, NJ
John B Long
Speech Communication


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Online LibraryMass.) Northeastern University (BostonCauldron (Volume 1993) → online text (page 7 of 16)