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Bulletin - Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station (Volume no.379-398) online

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types are rapidly being produced, assuring both an earlier and a longer blooming
season. In this bulletin the earliest bloomers are listed.

Confusion is general as to the common name of Chrysanthemum maximtim.
The approved name is Pyrenees Chrysanthemum and not Shasta Daisy which
designates a particular variety or clonal form of this species.

Iris

The American Iris Society divides the irises herein listed into two main divi-
sions: (1) Bearded and (2) Beardless Irises.

The Bearded group (incorrectly known as German Iris) is distinguished by
the beard on the lower petal or fall and by the broad rhizome growing at the
surface of the soil. Forms of this group are designated in the lists as TB (Tall
Bearded, 30 inches or over); IB (Intermediate Bearded, 18to 28 Inches, inclusive);
and DB (Dwarf Bearded, up to 17 inches, inclusive).

The Beardless Irises included In the lists are Siberian (sibirica) blooming
shortly after the bearded group, and the Japanese (kaempferi) blooming in early
July. Characteristics of this group include: the lack of the beard on the lower
petal or fall; narrower, more grasslike leaves; and a fibrous root system.

The tall bearded irises herein listed do not include a representation of the entire
color range which is now included In the test gardens, for In 1940-41, through the
efforts of Mr. Harold T. Bent, the iris plantings were thoroughly revised, in co-



BLOOMING DATES OF PERENxMALS 5

operation with the New England Division of the American Iris Society. Further
reports will include these newer varieties, which are entirely within the price range
of the average purse.

Peony

All commonly cultivated herbaceous peonies come from the species Paeonia
albiflora sinensis. They might be divided roughly into three groups: (1) the
Single type, with one or two rows of guard petals and numerous pollen-covered
stamens; (2) the Double type, which may be fully double without stamens or
semi-double with stamens intermingled with the petals (there are many grada-
tions from semi-double to the fully double in which the seed pods or ovaries
also have become petals); and (3) the Japanese type, which appears quite like
the single type in the singleness of the guard petals but differs in the effect pro-
duced by the stamens, which have been bred into quite narrow, thickened petals
or petaloids almost devoid of pollen. This characteristic results in a cushion-
like effect of multiplied stamens which often take on the color of the guard
petals, giving the entire flower a single tone of color. They have become the
favorite of the Japanese, who have developed them exclusively, and it is for this
reason that the group is known as the Japanese type. Their flowers, having less
weight than the double types, are not so likely to remain prostrate after storms;
the blooms last well when cut and are particularly desirable for their decorative
effect.

Following the varietal name of the various peonies in the lists is the numerical
rating given each by the American Peony Society. The highest possible rating
is 10.

Summer Phlox

Phlox, which contributes more generously to July-August garden color than
any othei genus, is well represented here. Time of bloom (early, mid-season, or
late), dwartness and tallness, good branching habit, size of floret, and color have
all been considered. With the exception of a few newer forms of particular prom-
ise, those listed represent the best of the standard phlox which are generally
available in Massachusetts.

Tulip

Only the best of the tulip species for use in the rock garden have been included
in the lists. While these are not now generally available on account of inter-
national conditions, they have been included because of the early, crisp brilliance
with which their vivid colors open the season. For a succession of vivid ver-
milion-scarlet, as few as three bulbs each oi fosteriana, praestans, eichleri, wilson-
iana and greigi will create a surprising effect. Plant them near blue-flowering
plants such as Grape Hyacinth and delight in the sparkle their color brings to
the blue masses.



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Online LibraryMassachusetts Agricultural Experiment StationBulletin - Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station (Volume no.379-398) → online text (page 57 of 77)