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Massachusetts Daughters of the American Revolution.

Catalogue of a loan collection of ancient and historic articles, exhibited ... online

. (page 13 of 15)
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Samuel ( -1842) 1271

Revere, Pauni735-i7i8) 2327

Richardson, Thos. (1747- ) 554

Mary (1787-1859) 554

Rindge, Mrs. Martha Dennison

(1668-1728) 1289

Ropes, Benj (i 747-1 788)
" (1721-1790)
" (1772-1845) 1276

Ruth Hardy(i79Q- )
Sarah (1717- ) 1208

" (17 52-1 796) 1220

Ross, Daniel (1754-1858) 977, 1349
Rotch, Francis (1750-1822) 1406
Wm. (1754.1828) 1405, 1406
Rust, Henry (1737-18 12) 1228

John (1762-1834) 1229

Sampson, Deborah (Shurtleiff

Robert) (1760-1827) 773
Savory, Mercy (Adams)

(1704-85) 847



Shillaber,Ebenezer( 1 760-1851) 1325
Shirley, Gov. Wm.

(1693-1771) 468,2281

Shurtliff. Benj. (1774-1847) 1299
Nat. Bradstreet

(1810^1874) 1304

Sally Shaw (1778-1845)
Sarah Eliza Smith
(1814-1886)
Shute, Samuel (1653-1742) 460

Smith, Aaron (1756-1828)

Mrs. Aaron (1754-1848) 933
Anna (1743-1781) 98

South worth, Thomas

(1616-1669) 2307

Spanford, John (1678-1735) 869
Standish, Myles

(1 584-1656) 213. 1625, 2361
Stark, Gen. John (1728-1822) 1546
Stickney, Lieut. Eleazer

(1740-1824) 1671

Matthew Adams
(1805-1894) 1327

Stimpson, Lydia Buffington

(1803-1828) 1058

Stoddard, MUes (i77 5-1799) 598
Stone, Parmelia Marsh

(1797-1820) 1095

Sarah Putman
(1800-1863) 1098

Strickland, Abigal Tuttle

(1795-1878) 1357

Warren (1794-1878) 1357
Strong, Gov. Caleb (i 745-1 81 9) 92
Sumner, Gov. Increase

(1746-1799) 2285

Samuel (i 766-1 844) 522

Gen. (1797-1863) 547

Swett, Moses (1770-1829) 2094

Swetzer, Betsey (1 769-1858) 1162

Taylor, Col. Isaac (i 787-1 765) 211

Nancy (1790-1853) 1308

Thissell, Anna (1780-1843) 1154

Tileston,Timothy (1782-1866) 38, 48

Tilton, Stephen (1769-1799)

Thaxter, Col. Samuel

(1665-1740) 2348

Maj. Sam. (1723-1771)
Thomdike, Capt. Lakin

(1730-1796) 1000

Capt. Nicholas

(1733-1788) lOOI

Tucker, Marsy (1780- ) 164



146



Digitized by V3OOQ IC



Thrasher, Lucy L. (Pierce)

(1792- ) 1 575*1595' 1 630
Tittle, John (1733-1800) 1350

Lydia Tuft (17:33-1813) 1350
Towne, Hannah Harris

(1778- . ) 1787

Tracy, Nathaniel

(1 749-1 796) 1441

Tufts, Peter (1648 172 1) 2291

Deborah (1788- ) 1385

Tyler, John (i 790-1862) 262

Upton, Marcy Townsend

(1796. ) 1073

John (1789-1825) 1073

Usher, Gov. John 63

United States Daughters I5q4

Vane, Harry (161 2-1 662 5, 461

Viles, Bowman

(1780-1838) 450, 451,
Jesse (1793-1855)
Vose, Capt. Ebenezer

(1712-1784)
Wade, Nath'l (1750-1826)
Wait, Elizabeth (i 746-1 826)

Thomas (1749- )
Walker, Bethia (1796 1833)
David (i 792-1829)
Hannah (1741-1828)



Mark (1753-1835)
Mary S. (17 59-1825
Wallis, Bartholomew

(1753.1828)
Warren, Gen. Jos. (1741-1775)
Warren, Nathan (1761-1843)
Warren, Nehemiah
(1796-1885)
Washington, George (1732-99)



452
610

741
881

t42
42
871
871
662
600
6ci



61S
603



2385



472



Watts, Isaac D. D.

(1674-1748)
Mary (i 764-1849)
Wayne, Gen Anthony

(1745-1796)
Webster, Daniel

(I782.r8q2) 1583, 1584

Wendall, Evert Jansen

(1675- ) 1360

West, Rev. Samuel

(1729-1807) 1403, 1404

Wheatley, Phyllis (negro au-
thoress, 1 7 53- 1 784) o
Whipple, Hannah (1747-182 1 )
John ( 1 605-16)59)
" (1689-1781)
" (17 17-1794)
Matthew (i 658-1 739)
William (i 730-1 785)
White,Peregrine( -1704) 766,920
Whittredge,George(i797- ) 1085
Livermore ( -1856) 1083
Wight, Dr. Aaron (1742-18 13) 591
Wilkins, Francis (1785-1870) 1276
Williams, Lydia (Wait)



1388
1287
1215
1289
1289

;235



(I775-I857)

Winthrop, John^(i 588-1649)



460



Winslow. Ann Green
(1760-1779)
Col. John (170^1774)
Withington, Mary (1800-34)
Wolcott, Gov. Oliver
(1760.1833)
Gov. Roger

( 1 679-1 767) 2270, 2271

Gov. Oliver
(1726-1797)477.2272,2273,2274



767
2276



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



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LOAN COLLECTION SUPPLEMENT



HISTORICAL DATA

ARRANGED BY MRS. JOSHUA BATES, BRIDGEWATER



Barnstable County

INCORPORATED JUNE a, 1685

BARNSTABLE. The Baptist Church, originally a court house,
stands back of a small common, where in 1774 a collection of citizens
from all parts of the country, styling themselves "The body of the
People", prevented the assembling of the courts, because an appeal
could be taken to royal authority therefrom. The first overt act of
rebellion in Massachusetts.

BOURNEDALE. Site of the old Pilgrim trading post at Monu-
ment River. Site of the Indian church paid for by Judge Samuel Sewall
who presided at the witchcraft trials.

CHATHAM. Champlain, the French navigator visited this location
before the Pilgrims.

EASTHAM. The last spot visited by the Mayflower's company.

NORTH TRURO. Standish and his exploring party from the
Mayflower, drank from the spring in this town.

PROVINCETOWN. Tablet erected in front of the Provincetown
Town Hall, to commemorate the First Landing of the Pilgrims and the
signing of the social compact.

SANDWICH. Visited by Gov. Bradford in 1662 to procure corn.

WEST BARNSTABLE. Birthplace, and early residence of James
Otis, also birthplace of Chief Justice Shaw.

YARMOUTH. House, in the upper rooms of which, the women of
the town sat up all night to make cartridges and other preparations for
the military company, which started the next morning for Dorchester
on the requisition of Gen. Washington.



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Berkshire County

INCORPORATED APRIL ai, 1761

ADAMS. Fort Massachusetts, famous during the French wars,
built in 1745. The Perry elm now marks the site of the old fort

CHESHIRE. The famous mammouth Cheese presented to Presi-
dent JefiEerson, Jan 1, 1802, weighing 1450 pounds, came from this
town.

CLARKSBURG. Hudson's brook perpetuates the name of the first
white settler.

GREAT HARRINGTON. Monument mountain, so named from a
rude cairn once here; William C. Bryant, a former resident, wrote a
poem on this romantic tradition.

HINSDALE. First settled by Francis, David, and Thomas Miller,
who surveyed the road from Boston to Albany, and ran the line be
tween Massachusetts and New York.

OTIS. Named in honor of Hon. Harrison Gray Otis of Boston, at
that time Speaker of the House of Representatives.



'Hl5torlc Plyn>outl>»»



SAMOSET
HOUSE.



D. II. MAYNARD, - Ownbr and Prop.



Flnt-ClaM In IiTery Respect.



Located at head of Railroad Park
and in the centre of all points of his-
toric interest.



Corregpondence Solicited.



jfern-Croft Inn

Daiyversy f\as5-

Furnished throughout with furniture of ye
olden time. Chicken (broiled) is our special-
ty. Fine Golf course of forty-five acres locar
ted here. Antiques bought and sold.

01. L Darrii. Proy.

B. PoRTBR PousLAND, Manager.

Records Searched
and Papers Drawn for

APPUCANTS TO

Patriotic * Societies

Address,

Miss A«J«Hewins^

Dbdham, Mass.
CertificatM of Revolirtioaary Service, $1*00.



II



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Dukes G>unty

INCORPORATED MAY lo, 1643

These islands discovered by Bartholomew Gosnold in 1602. Cellar of
Gosnold storehouses yet to be seen.

Bristol G>ttnty

INCORPORATED JUNE 2, 1685

ATTLEBOROUGH. Site of John Woodcock's garrison, one of
the chain of fortifications extending from Boston to Rhode Island,
stood till 1806.

BERKLEY. Contains celebrated Dighton or " Writing Rock " with
hieroglyphic inscriptions.

DIGHTON. Contains a rude flat stone, dated 1675, ^^^ar Berkley
and Dighton bridge, which marks the grave of the first white man kill-
ed in that town by the Indians.

DARTMOUTH. Cellars of Russell's garrison on the north bank of
the Aponagansett.

FAIRHAVEN. Remains of Fort Phoenix erected after the raid in
1778. A cannon used at this repulse is preserved.

First in Quality I First in Purity I

First in the mouths of our
Fair Daughters*



CNOX • CHOCOLATES •



A



AVADB BY



FOBES, HAYWOOD AND Co.,

INCORPORATED.

42 to 52 Chardon Street,

Boston, Mass*



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NEW BEDFORD. An old elm stands on the county road where
the British rested on their destructive visit, Sept. 7, 1778.

REHOBOTH. Grave of Massasoit and a well dug by hhn. Wil-
liam Blackstone was the first white settler. There Roger Williams
first pitched his tent when driven from Massachusetts. Memorable for
the capture of Annawon the last of King Philip's chieftains, Aug. 28,
1676.

RAYNHAM. Site of one of the earliest iron works. Many sites of
ancient dwellings marked by tablets.

SWANSEA. First English blood shed in King Philip's War.

TAUNTON. The old Unitarian church is the site where King
Philip met the Commissioners of the Colony just before the outbreak
of King Philip's war in 1675. Until within a few years, East Taunton
wascaUedSquawbetty ; it was purchased of "Squaw Betty" for a peck of
beans; her father was John Sausaman, an Indian Christian missionary.

Essex G>unty

INCORPORATED MAY lo, 1643

AMESBURY. Site of the birthplace of Josiah Bartlett Site
where the frigate "Alliance" was built on the banks of the Powow ;
the "Decator" notable in 181 2.



COMPLIMENTS OF



A.STOWELL&Q



BOSTON, MASS.



W.J. KNOWLTON,



Precious Stones.



165 Tremont St., Boston.

B^^ gout ciotbtng

At the Naumkeag, where you will have a
wholesale stock of fashionable goods to select
from, at reasonable prices.

Naumkeag Clothing Company, Salem, Maat.



Te^ ROOI9 Temple.



IV



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ANDOVER. Sold in 1646 by Cutshamache to Mr. John Wood-
bridge for £6 and a coat, with certain privileges to " Roger."

The North Parish is the older settlement (North Andover since
1855). Both towns abound in well preserved homesteads, owned through
successive generations. The oldest house, built by Gov. Simon Brad-
street, home of his wife Anne, the first woman poet of America, is in
the North Parish. The first manufactory was Judge Phillips' powder
mUl, afterwards a paper, now a woolen mill. Harvard College stored a
part of her library during the Revolution in the house where Phillips
Academy was organized, 1 778, and the first lectures before the Theo-
logical Seminary delivered, 1808. This house demolished i89o,
James Otis killed by lightning at the Osgood place. West Parish.

BRADFORD. Indian Hill, site of the old Powder House. House
of Dudley Carlton, who represented the town in the General Assembly
in 1776. This house used in the Revolutionary war for prisoners.
Bradford Academy ; a coeducational school incorporated, 1804. (Af-
terward restricted to girls). American Board of Commissioners for
Foreign Missions organized here in 18 10.

DAN VERS. Gov. Endicott's grant in 1632. The Endicott pear
tree still in good condition, yet about two hundred and sixty five years



Y^ Colonial Shop - - -

Antique ' Furniture, ' Blue • China,
Silver, * Brasses, * Etc., • Etc.



Colonial SIjI^S in Dinin$-room Furnilure

Fabrics • and • Wall • Papers

Estimates and Designs given for Interior Decorations, Upholstery
and Cabinet Work

LEE L. POWERS CO., BOSTON

406 Boylston Street 146 Providence Street

Back Bay



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old. The Rebeka Nurse House ; also her grave. Monument to those
who fell at Lexington. Site of the old Bell Tavern, where Col. Timothy
Pickering halted his Salem Regiment on their march to Bunker Hill.
Here died '* Eliza Wharton " the heroine of " The Coquette," one of
the first American novels, by Mrs. Foster.

GROVELAND. The church edifice now standing and in constant
use was erected 1790; in its belfrey hangs a Paul Revere bell with this
inscription

" The living to the Church I call
And to the grave I summon all."

Rbvbrb, 1795.

GLOUCESTER. Comprises Cape Ann. The promontory was
named " Anne " by Prince Charles out of respect for his mother.
" Mother Ann's " profile is carved by nature on a large rock at Eastern
Point and is said to be a very good likeness. A fishing and planting
station commenced here under Roger Conant in 1624; but was given
up in 1626; a few years later a permanent settlement was made by Rev.
Mr. Bl)rman and fifty others. Some remains are left at Cape Anne of
a house, built at the time John Endicott was sent there, in 1628, with
one hundred men.

HAVERHILL. Monument iu memory of Mrs. Hannah Dustin.
Capt. William Baker was the first man who knew of the intended ex-



HINCKLEY. AYERS & GO.



WHOLESALE
DEALERS IN



BUTTER,
CHEESE,
EGGS,
BEANS

n $0. market, 19 tXatbm $ts.

BOSTON, MASS.



Star



Brand



MEAL'S

When you Buy . . .

pippai) jladdie

Either Canned or Whole Fish
OBT THB BBST.



PREPARED BY

JOHNR. NEAL&CO.

T WHARF, BOSTON, MASS.



VI



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NottDOob Pte00

J. S. Gushing & Co. — Berwick & Smith

NORWCX)D, MASS.



vn



Digitized by VjOOQ IC



pedition to Concord by the British in 1775. Early in 1645 the sale of
intoxicating beverages was restrained by license, both as to the manner
of sale and as to where it should be sold. Birthplace of John G. Whit-
tier, Dec. 17, 1807.

IPSWICH. First place in Essex County visited by Europeans;
Capt Edward Hardie and Nicholas Hobson touched at this place on
their way to Virginia, 1611. Mascounomet (the sagamore) sold his
right to Ipswich for ;£2o; died 1658; buried on Sagamore Hill (now
Hamilton). A man was prosecuted, 1667, for digging up the bones of
the Sagamore, and for carrying his ''scull on a pole."

The first pastor was Rev. Nathaniel Ward, author of the "Simple
Cobbler of Agawam." Rev. William Hubbard settled here in 1656; in
1682 the legislature voted him £s^y for his history of New England and
the next year ordered this sum paid him now if '* he procure a f ayre
coppie to be written, that it be fitted for the presse."

LYNN. First iron works in America; the dies used for stamping
the pine-tree shilling were cast at these works. Appleton's Pulpit; to
this precipitous blu£E is fastened a tablet much defaced, reading " In
September, 1667, from this rock, resisting the tyranny of Sir Edmund
Andros, Major Samuel Appleton of Ipswich spoke to the people in
behalf of those principles which later were embodied in the Declaration
of Independence." Pirates Glen, Wolf Pits, date from 1630. L3mn
Mineral Spring; Cotton Mather extols its virtue. Dr. Crowninshield
settled here. Flax Pond; atone end is a large flat stone from which
the stem Puritan used to duck a scold until she promised to mend her
ways. Black Anne^s Corner, said to take its name from an old negro
once a scout in Gen. Washington's army. Old Blue Anchor Tavern,
half way from Salem to Boston, for a hundred and seventy years the
most celebrated tavern in Essex County.

MARBLEHEAD. Historic sites. The Tucker House, built 1640;
Home of Gen. Glover. The Old Tavern. Old Custom House. The
Eagle House. Fort Sewall ; The Home of Col. Azor Ome. The Old
Brig. The Old Burying Hill. Birthplace of Judge Story. St
Michael's Church. King Hoopers House. The Hooper House. The
Powder House. Three houses on Mugford Street. The Lee Mansion.

NEWBURYPORT. The Coffin House, erected 1645. Noyes's
House, Parker street, erected 1646. Old Garrison House erected 1648.
Old South Church, corner Federal and School streets, where Whitfield
preached and where he is buried, erected 1756. House where Whit-
field died. House where Garrison was born. School street. Residence
of Nathaniel Tracy. Dalton House, State street. Timothy Dexter
House, High street. Barlett-Hopkinson House, residence of Francis
Hopkinson, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.
The original Bartlett House was built in 1680, the door stone of which

VIII



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"Old Colony" Books.

JANE a. AUSTIN

Standlsh of Standish. i6mo, $1.25.

The Same. Holiday Edition. With 20 photogravures from designs
by Fbank T. Merrill. 2 vols., 12 mo, $5.00.
Betty Alden. i6mo, $1.25.
A Nameless Nobleman, i6mo, $1.25.
I>r. LeBaron and His Daughters. i6mo, $1.25.
David Alden's Daughter, and Other Stories of Colo-
nial Times. i6mo, I1.25.
Mrs. Austin's stories reproduce with remarkable fidelity and loyalty the
characters and incidents of the early years of the old Plymouth Colony.

JOHN A. aOODWIN

The Pilgrim Republic. An Historical Review of the Colony
of New Plymouth, with Sketches of the Rise of other New England
Settlements, a History of Congregationalism, and the Creeds of the
Period. With Maps and Plans. 8vo, 622 pages, $400 «^'-
"The most generally interesting work on the Pilgrims, of an authoritative
kind, in the whole range of the literature of the subject." Ltterary World,
Boston. ,^ ^

Sold hy BoohaelierB, Sent, powtpoM, hy

HOUGHTON, AVIFPLIN ^ <^^'> Boston



pORTR/IITS or

W/I5niNQT0N, flDfln5,
H/IMCOCK, KNOX, H/iniLTON,

And Man) Other HeroM of the ReioluUon.



5BND FOR CATAI-0«UB.



FOSTER BROTHERS. ^ ''1,'?s?Sr"'



IX



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still marks the spot The Bartletts engaged in the first tannery busi-
ness and used the famous " boiling springs ** for that purpose.

NEWBURY AND BYFIELD. Here are many old monuments in
Colonial graveyards. There are some milestones and stones in the
foundations of old houses, which are carved in a style very unlike that
of most Puritan monuments ; these s3rmbols are disks, whorls, fleur-de-
lis, phallic signs, and a design representing the Sun-God*s bride, with a
sunburst over it Birthplace of Theophilus Parsons.

SALEM. Essex Institute. Old First Meeting House, 1634. Tur
ner House. Birthplace of Nathaniel Bowditch. Site of Ayitchcraft
Jail ; Court Houses in Federal street, where the witchcraft records are
to be seen ; and many portraits, including Hunt's famous portrait of
Chief Justice Shaw. North Bridge, North street, scene of Leslie's
retreat, Feb. 26, 1775; Roger Williams House, comer of Essex and
North streets ; Gallows Hill, the scene of nineteen [witchcraft execu-
tions, 1692; Pickering House, Broad street, 1651. Charter street
Burial Ground, the earliest burial place in Salem.

Franklin Gmnty

INCORPORATED JUNE 24, i8ix

BERNARDSTON. "The Falls," scene of "Fall Fight "in 1676.
Sites of first four Forts belonging to Major Burk, Mr. S. Connable,
Lieut £. Sheldon, Deacon Sheldon.

DEERFIELD. Monument at Bloody Brook in memory of Capt.
Lathrop and his men who fell on this spot by an ambuscade of Indians.
House of Capt John Sheldon, only house left after the massacre
March I St 1704, headed by Major Hertel de Rouville. A journal of
one of the prisoners kept in the march to Canada where they were
taken, is in one of the Canadian convents, also a small church bell
taken then is now hanging in an Indian Church in St Regis.

GREENFIELD. The scene of many horrors of Indian warfare.
Monument of John Williams, who was captured and carried into
Canada with fifty seven captives, and who was redeemed and brought
to Boston, 1706. The celebrated Capt Jonathan Carver resided here
many years.

NEW SALEM. "Village Green," where on the intelligence of the
Battle of Lexington the people hastily assembled ; their captain, being
believed to be a Tory, William Stacy, first Lieutenant, took off his
hat and addressed them :

" Fellow soldiers, I don't know exactly how it is with you, — I will
no longer serve a king who murders my own countrymen," and tearing
his commission in pieces, trod it under foot ; Capt Stacy led this small
band to Cambridge, was finally Lieut. Col. under command of Putnam.



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NORTHFIELD. Site of horrible barbarity at Beer's plain and
Beer's Mountain.

Hampden Gmnty

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 25, 1812

BRIMFIELD. Monument of Gen. William Eaton.

LONGMEADOW. Monument of Rev. Stephen Williams, ordained
in 1 716. Son of Rev. John Williams of Deerfield, who was carried
captive with his father to Canada.

SPRINGFIELD. House still in possession of descendants of Wil-
liam P)mcheon, Esq. ; magistrate in 1629 ; came with Gov. Winthrop.
Site of Indian fort at Long Hill.

WEST SPRINGFIELD. Site of first Meetmg House. Site of
house of first minister, Rev. John Woodbridge ; an appearance here of
an underground passage connecting the cellar of the house with a
cavern, where tradition says the women and children fled in alarm
from the Indians.

WILBRAHAM. Site of first house where Nathaniel Hitchcock
and his family lived one year alone ; in i733,^,four families lived in this
place. Rev. Noah Hitchcock was ordained in Mrs. Warriner's bam*
the weather proving so stormy that they abandoned the oak tree where
their preparations for it had been made.



ESTABLISHED 1847



R. H. STEARNS & CO.



DRY GOODS



TREMONT ST. AND TEMPLE PLACE



BOSTON



WALTER M.HATGH& CO.

Japa9^5^<Joods

45 Summer Street.



A SMALL store FULL of good things
from the Orient. A delightful place to
spend an hour or a dollar.



HMk^quart^rs for



AiQ^rlcao
Forclpy.



Any piece of music published in this
country or abroad can be procured at the
shortest notice.



Oliver Ditson Company,

458-463 WasMngton 8t, BMton.



XI



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Hampsliifc County

INCORPORATED MAY 7, 166a

BELCHERTOWN. For manyyears called *Cold Springs " from a
noted spring near the path that was travelled from Northampton to
Brookfield and Boston, there being no house between Hadley and
Brookfield.

CUMMINGTON. William Cullen Bryant, bom here Nov. 3, 1794.

HADLEY. Place of refuge for GofiEe and Whalley, two judges of
Charies I (called regicides) who arrived in Boston, 1660. Unkown to
most of the inhabitants they remained at Rev. John Russell's and Peter
Tilton's sixteen years, occupying a chamber from which a secret pas-
sage led to the cellar ; Gen. Goffe left his concealment when the people
were in great consternation, assumed command and rallied them to
oppose the Indians (1676). When the Indians fled, he disappeared. It
was common at that day to suppose Hadley had been saved by its
guardian angeL

PLAINFIELD Grave of Dea. Joseph Beals (known as the
•* Mountain Miller ") who came in 1779 ^^^^ Bridgewater.

SOUTH HADLEY. Site of first Meeting House built 1737; the
people were called together by the blowing of a conch shell ; in 1 750 a



• • • 1 11 Cr • • •



Winthrop National Bank



AHES BUILDING. BOSTON.



Wilmot R. Bvans, President.

Charles H. Ramsey, Cashier.



xn



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vote was passed to build a larger church but its location was not set-
tled for thirteen years, during that time more than fifty meetings were
held to discuss the question : finally settled by lot.

WARE. Sold to John Reed, Esq., Boston^ for two coppers per
acre, by a military company, to whom it was granted for services.

WEST HAMPTON. Lemuel Strong was the first child born in
this town; in 1817 he was the oldest man.

Middlesex County

INCORPORATED MAY 10, 1643

BILLERICA. The Indian settlement was separated from the Eng-
lish settlement by a ditch, which may still be traced. Within its
limits are remains of their fort.

CAMBRIDGE. Harvard College, founded in 1636. "Washington
Elm," intersection of Garden and Mason streets ; here Washington



XIII



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drew his sword as Commander-in-Chief of the American army. ''Long,
fellow's House on Brattle street, headquarters of Gen. Washington.
Site of Leifs house, near Cambridge Hospital.

CHARLESTOWN. Bunker Hill Monument on Breed's Hill com-
memorates the battle of June 17, 1775 ; the comer stone was laid just
fifty years after the fight, by Gen. Lafayette and the oration was deliv-
ered by Daniel Webster, who was also the orator at the dedication, on
June 17, 1843. ^ sl^b ^^ ^^ ^^^^ marks the place where Gen. Joseph
Warren was killed. The United States Navy Yard established
1798.

CONCORD. " Monument on the Common." The old Manse
built for Rev. William Emerson in 1765, near the Old North Bridge.
" Knight's Tavern ** stands just as on the day when Major Pitcaim
entered it and stirred his brandy with his bloody finger, sa3ring that
he would stir the rebel's blood before night " The old Church Site."
The Battle Ground ; the old Burying Ground.

GROTON. A Monument marks the site of the house where Col.
Prescott of Bunker Hill fame, was born. Site of the Longley house,
scene of an Indian massacre. Site of Rev, Mr. Willard's meeting
house, burned by the Indians. Chamberlain killed the young Indian



MISS M. BEAMAN SCALES,
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Online LibraryMassachusetts Daughters of the American RevolutionCatalogue of a loan collection of ancient and historic articles, exhibited ... → online text (page 13 of 15)