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Massachusetts Daughters of the American Revolution.

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spect the 1897 Hartfords.

•75, MO, 950,. 845.

Tuition fee refunded if bicycle |is sub-
sequently purchased.



Boston Bnmoli,

Pope Mantifacttiring Co,,



2S8 Columbus ATorne*



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Paugus (who came to avenge the death of his father), near a brook-
that is now called Paugus brook.

HOLLISTON. Daniel Shay bom here, 1 747 ; leader in the insur-
rection called " Shay's rebellion."

LEXINGTON. Monument on Common. High school, site where
Earl Percy with reinforcements planted a field piece to cover the retreat
of the British troops, April 19, 1775 > House of Jonathan Harrington
wounded on the Common, 1775. "The Munroe Tavern" Earl Percy's
headquarters and hospital; Buckman Tavern built 1690, a rendezvous
of the minute men. Clark House, built 1698, Samuel Adams and John
Hancock were sleeping here, when aroused by Paul Revere. Dorothy
Quincy accompanied Hancock to Burlington next day.

MALDEN. " Bell Rock," in 1682 the town bell was placed upon
this elevated rock.

MEDFORD. Winter Hill, the place of encampment of Gen. Bur-
goyne and his army after the capture.

NATICK. The First Indian Church was removed here from New-
ton by Rev. John Eliot in 1651 : here he translated the Bible into the
Nipmuc (Natick) dialect. While engaged in this work he came to the
passage, ** The mother of Sisera looked out at the window and cried

184B 1897

THE

MUTUAL BENEFIT LIFE

INSURANCE COMPANY,
OF NEWARK, N. J.



Premium Receipts to January i, 1897 |i77>i39»493 79

Of this sum there has already been returned to Policy-
holders : —

For Policy Claims, 46.1 per cent. $ 81,734,225 59

For Surrendered Policies, 12.2 " 21,616,402 45

For Dividends, 27.4 " 48,521,910 24

Total, 85.7 per cent. 115^,872,53628

Leaving still in Company's possession, $ 25,266,957 51

The Company's investments have yielded sufficient returns
to pay all Expenses and Taxes, and still to add to the
Policy-holders fund for the fulfillment of existing con-
tracts, 35.476,027 95

Total Assets, January i, 1887, Market Values, $ 60,742,985 46

HEDGES & HODGES, State Agents,

4^ M1L.K SrneBT, BOSTOAI.
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through the lattice ;" the word which he gathered from the natives to
mean lattice he afterward found was the term for " eelpot." This was
the first Bible printed in America, Cambridge 1663.

NEWTON. Newton was the birthplace of Roger Sherman, one of
the signers of the Declaration of Independence. The Jackson home-
stead on Washington street has sheltered eight generations of a family
distinguished for having forty-six of its sons in the Revolution. Original
house built 1670, present house, embracing a well preserved portion of
the old one, built 1809. First burial ground. First church, 1660.
Beneath the large elm trees on the Wisnall estate, Capt. Wisnall
assembled his men and marched to the battle of Lexington.

At Newton Highlands stands the Woodward homestead erected in
1 68 1, also the Bethuel Allen house of early colonial days, long occupied
by Ralph Waldo Emerson. On Walnut street, Newtonville, was the
home of Thomas Mayhew, Governor of Martha's Vineyard. In 18 14
it became the home of Gen. Hull of the American army and Governor
of Michigan. In 1854 the estate passed to Gov. William Claflin of
Massachusetts.

SUDBURY. Monument to Capt. Samuel Wadsworth of Milton,
Lieut. Sharpe of Brookline and Capt. Broclebank of Rowley with about
twenty-six soldiers slain by the Indians, April 18, 1676.



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523-525 Washington Street.



Otibopeaic Shoes

For Men,
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ESTABLISHED 1850.



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WALTHAM. Gov. Winthrop and his companions here in 1632.
Beaver Brook named "because the beavers had shorn down divers
trees and made divers dams across the brook." Two miles farther is
Norumbega Tower in commemoration of the Norsemen.

WATERTOWN. Norse Amphitheatre; Stone dam, docks, and
wharves of Norumbega. House where Paul Revere lived. '* Warren
House" in which Gen. Warren slept the night before the battle. Cool-
idge Tavern. Site of the Parish Church, in which met the Provincial
Congress. Gen. Gore estate.

Nantucket Gmnty

INCORPORATED JUNE aa, 1695

NANTUCKET. Peter Folger, grandfather of Benjamin Franklin
was the prominent citizen. Old Indian deeds from the Indian sachems
were examined by him and his signature was added to that of the
Justice, for their satisfaction.

Norfolk County

INCORPORATED MARCH 26, 1793

BROOKLINE. On April 19, 1775, Brookline's military companies
met in front of the Unitarian church and marched to Lexington. Han-

Gborgb L. Stbvbns, Pres. Albert C. Warrbn, Treas. John Haskbll Butlsr, Sec
BttabUshed 1870. Incorporated 1890.



Cbe Ofarren Soap maitttfactuilnd €o.,



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Largest Manufacturers of Textile Soaps, Wool Scourers, and
Chemicals in the Country.



Offices 143 FEDERAL STREET, BOSTON.

Bunch OfflM : 113 ChMtnut 8i, Philadelphia. Works : Wattrtowa, Maat.

Long Distance Telephone No. 900.

XVII



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nah Adams, the first woman in the country to make literature a pro-
fession, lived near the Bethany Building, Washington street Site of
the old Punch Bowl Tavern. The Babcock House. Craft's House,
1709, date on the chimney.

DEDHAM. Site of first Meeting House. First Indian outrage
committed here in King Philips War, 1675. Poham slain by a party of
Dedham and Medford people, July 25, 1676. A pillar on comer of
court house square is erected in honor of William Pitt, who procured a
repeal of the Stamp Act

DORCHESTER. Town Meeting Square, here (by the records of
Oct 8, 1633) the first town meeting in the colonies was held. Meeting
House Hill, the meeting house transferred here in 1670, this is also the
location of the Mather School which is, as far as any existing records
can establish, the first school supported by general taxation. Burial
ground at Upham's comer.

MILTON. Summer residence of Gov. Thomas Hutchinson. On a
brook bordering on Milton, remains are visible pf a dam and furnace
built about 1650. Site of first paper mill built in New England.

QUINCY. Birthplace and residence of John Adams, and John Q.
Adams, Presidents of the United States. First Unitarian Church, be-
neath which the remains of the second and sixth presidents, with their



HEROES AXD STATESMEN

OF THE REVOLUTION.

PORTRAITS FROM WELL KNOWN PAINTINGS.

PUBLISHED BY CHESTER A. LAWRENCE.

HIGH STREET, DORCHESTER, MASS.



iJ^ttnttng



yor "Rocftwell & (tburcbtll

patriotic

Societies 4t sect stttet, smum

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wives are buried. Adams Academy, site of the birthplace of John
Hancock. The Abigail Adams Cairn. The Standish Cairn, on Squan-
tum Head; the spot upon which Capt. Standish with his men, guided
by the Indian " Squantum," landed Sept. 3, 1621.

ROXBURY. First Church; Old burying ground; Old fort; First
gristmill; Old tavern; Meeting House Hill common; Old parsonage
where Gen. Thomas and his stafE viewed the Battle of Bunker Hill
from the upper windows; Burying ground redoubt, first defensive
works constructed by Americans; Site of the Free School in Roxbury;
Corner Washington and Warren streets, where bread was made for the
American soldiers during the siege of Boston.

Plymouth County

INCORPORATED JUNE a, 1685

DUXBURY. " Captain's Hill," the homes of Brewster and Standish
were below the hill. John Alden's farm at Eagle Tree Pond has been
held by a John Alden to the present day. " Powder Point."

BRIDGEWATER. "Old Burying Ground." Site of an Indian
fort on Fort Hill in that part called Titicut (Tetiquet, Indian spelling);
also a fishing weir and fording place are now seen here at low water at
Pratt's Bridge. Stephen Hopkins and Edward Winslow stopped here



"TYRIAN"
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ABk your druggist for the TYRI^VN
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TTBIAN PLANT 8PRINKI.ERS.

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Town."



G)rrespondence SoIicitecL



BARNETT ROGERS,

Agent for Real Estate,

MusgYOve Blocks



XIX



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JIbbot Jlcaaetny, Aiidopen mass.

Abbot Academy, founded in 1829, is a seminary for the higher education
of young women. It is distinctly Christian in its instruction, discipline,
and influence. It aims to prepare girls for useful, earnest lives by providing
opportunities for thorough intellectual culture and by endeavoring to secure
the best development of character.

Extended seminary courses in Latin, Greek, French and German
languages, with History, Literature and Science, and rare facilities for
Music and Art are fully provided for, and also a thorough college fitting
course. The College Preparatory Course gives certificate to any College
that admits on certificate.

The successful work of this Academy is exemplified in the cases of the
many who have filled and are filling important fields as missionaries, home
and foreign, as authors, librarians, physicians, artists, successful teachers
and wives of clergymen and officers of colleges and other institutions.

Andover is situated on the Boston and Maine railroad, twenty-three
miles north of Boston. It has a healthful climate, and is in a region of
beautiful scenery. As the seat of several educational institutions, Andover
offers many incidental benefits to the pupils of the Academy, while its
proximity to Boston renders the best advantages of that city easily available.

The grounds comprise about twenty-three acres, including grove, lawns
and gravel and concrete walks.

Draper Hall furnishes a home for all pupils pursuing English and Ger-
man. It is equipped with the best modem conveniences for the health and
comfort of pupils, including effective systems of hot water heating and
electric lighting. It has separate floors for Music and Art, a large reading
room, and a commodious library. The greater number of rooms in this
building are en suite^ allowing two rooms, a parlor and a bedroom, for
two pupils. There are a few larger rooms for two persons, and a few single
rooms. Each young lady has a single bed, her own bureau, closet and toilet
conveniences.

Those studying French live in Smith Hall, where P'rench is the chief
language spoken. Good accommodations are here provided, a pleasant
dining room and home-like parlors, with a separate room for each pupil.

Abbot Hall contains the chapel, class-rooms, laboratory, and gymnasium.

The Academy Library, of some five thousand volumes, is a carefully
selected reference library, especially well supplied with works for the study
of Literature, History, Science and Art. New books are constantly added
for every department of study represented in the course. Students have
access to the library, as well as to the reading-room, which is well furnished
with the leading reviews and newspapers of the day. The observatory has
a fine Clark telescope.

The Spring Term opens April 15, 1897. The first term of the sixty-ninth
year will begin September 16, 1897.

The total expense for board, including fuel, lights and washing, and for
tuition, except music and drawing, is $400 per annum.

For Catalogues address W. F. DRAPER. For additional particulars and
for admission, MISS LAURA S. WATSON, Principal.



XX



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on their journey to Mount Hope Bay in June 1621 and returned by the
same route.

EAST BRIDGE WATER. The common is the site of the "Train-
ing Field.'* Here the last review of Bridgewater troops was held
under Gov. Hutchinson before the Revolution; Col. Edson commander.
Sachem's Rock, where the original contract for the town was made by
Capt. Standish (and others) with Massasoit; near here evidences can be
seen under the water of the original fishing weir and fording place from
whence the tract was measured.

WEST BRIDGEWATER. House of Rev. James Keith of the
Keiths of Aberdeen, Scotland.

MIDDLEBOROUGH. The " Ponds " were the resort of Tispaquin
and the Namasket tribe. John Sassaman, Indian missionary murdered
here.

HINGHAM. Site of Gen. Benjamin Lincoln's house, President of
the Society of Cincinnati in Massachusetts. Oldest house of worship
in North America.

MARSH FIELD. Summer residence of Hon. Daniel Webster;
House of Edward Winslow.

PLYMOUTH. Landing of the Pilgrims here in December, 1620.
Forefather's Rock. Monument to the Pilgrim Fathers. Pilgrim Hall
erected 1824, rebuilt and made fireproof 1880; Court House, Cole's
Hill, Burying Hill and many others.

ROCHESTER. Rental of pasturage from this town and Cape Cod
fisheries, furnished the earliest support of free schools on this continent.
Dr. Benj. Church in 1675 held negotiations at "Great Head" with
Queen Avashongs the squaw sachem Here lived Rev. Timothy Rug-
gles and his son — President of the Stamp Act Congress in 1765.

SCITUATE. House built by John Williams, structure shows it was
a garrison house.

WAREHAM. In war of 1812 the Nimrod anchored off "Great
Hill" in Buzzards Bay, and 200 mariners in barges landed on the
Wareham side, and destroyed property to the amount of $25,000.

Suffolk County

INCORPORATED MAY 10, 1643

BOSTON. Old State House. Old South Meeting House. King's
Chapel. Fanueil Hall. Boston Common. Copp's Hill Old Granary
Burying Ground. Liverpool Wharf, scene of the famous Boston tea party.
Old North Church, from which Paul Revere hung lanterns. 40 State
Street, site of the Boston Massacre. Birthplace of Benj. Franklin.
Site of Liberty Tree corner Essex and Washington Streets

CHELSEA. United States Naval Hospital grounds. Site of the

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house that Samuel Maverick built, and fortified, in 1623 in front of
which is the landing of the first ferry ever set up in North America.
The Gary House. Newgate House in Revere, probably the oldest
house in what was the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

"Worcester Gmnty

INCORPORATED APRIL a, 1731

BROOKFIELD. Site of Gilbert's Fort. Marks Garrison near the
southwest end of Wickaboag Pond ; it is related, Mrs. Marks discov-
ered hostile Indians near the garrison ; she put on her husband's wig,
hat and great coat and taking the gun went to the top of the fortifica-
tions and marching backward and forward vociferating like a vigilant
sentinel, " All's well, all's well ; " the Indians concluded they could not
surprise the fort and retired.

FITCHBURG. Site of " Old Gov. Page House."

MENDON. Site of Richard Post's house.

MILFORD. Gen. Alexander Scammel (1777) a native of this town,
was at Yorktown and wounded just before the surrender of Comwallis.
Died soon after. Prisoners of war were here billeted on the people.

NEW BRAINTREE. Chief place of rendezvous of the savages
when Brookfield was destroyed.

OXFORD. Settlement here as in other places of the French ref-
ugees ; of the nine presidents of the old Congress, who conducted the
United States through the Revolution, three were descendants of
these refugees ; Henry Laurens of South Carolina, John Jay of New
York, Elias Boudinot of New Jersey.

SHREWSBURY. Monument of Hon. Artemus Ward, bom in
1727; an American general 1775 ^^^ politician.

WESTBOROUGH. House of Eli Whitney acknowledged inventor
of the cotton gin.

WEST BOYLSTON. Home of Robert B. Thomas, famed for his
Farmer's Almanac.

WORCESTER. Site of the Old South Church, erected 1763.
Hon. Isaiah Thomas read from one of its porches, for the first time, the
Declaration of Independence to the people of Worcester. Nathan
Baldwin house, oldest building in Worcester. United States Arms
Hotel, later the exchange Coffee House. Site of parsonage of Rev.
Isaac Burr, built 1740. Site of the second court house, 175 1, fitted
out with pillory, whipping post and stocks. The Salsbury Mansion,
1770, in excellent state of preservation. Monument to Col. Timothy
Bigelow, of Revolutionary fame, upon Worcester Common. Site of
the house of the Rev. Aaron Bancroft where was born his son, Hon,
George Bancroft, the historian.

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Settlement of QtSes and Towns of Massachusetts

J620— J8J6

Airanged in chronological order by Mrs, S. J. Marland from the data
found in the Manual of the General Court, compiled under the direction
of Robert T. Swan, Esq., Commissioner of Public Records.



Cidet and Towns.


Incorporation or firs
mention.


t From What Established, etc.


I Plymouth




1620




2 Charlestown


Aug


23, 1630


Incorporated as a city, 1847. An-
nexed to Boston May 14. 1873.


3 Salem


Aug


23, 1630


Incorporated as a city, 1836.


4 Boston


Sept


7, 1630


Tri-Mountain. Incorporated as
a city, 1822.


5 Dorchester


Sept


7, 1630


Annexed to Boston in 1869.


6 Watertown


Sept


7, 1630


The town upon the Charles River.


7 Roxbury


Sept


28, 1630


Incorporated as a city, 1846. An-
nexed to Boston, 1867.


8 Medford


Sept


28, 1630


Mistick or Mystic.


9 Saugus


July


5. 1631


Plantation. Name changed to
Lynn, 1637.


10 Newtowne


July


26, 1631


Name changed to Cambridge,
1638.


II Scituate


July


I. 1633


Satuit


12 Marblehead


July


2, 1633


Marble-harbor. Town, 1649.


13 Ipswich


Aug


s» 1534


Aggawam.


14 Newbur}'


May


6, 1635


Wessacucon.


15 Weymouth


Sept


2, 1635


Wessaguscus.


16 Hingham


Sept


2, 1635


Barecove.


17 Concord


Sept


3, 163s


Musketequid.


iS Cambridge


Sept


8, 1636


" Newtowne.*' Incorporated as a
city, March 17, 1846.


19 Dedham


Sept


8, 1636




20 Duxbury


June


7, 1637


Mattakeeset. Duxboro'.


21 Lynn


Nov


20, 1637


Sagus or Saugus. City 1850.


22 Barnstable


Mar


5, 1638





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Date of Establishment.
Cities and Towns. Incorporation or first
mention



23 Sandwich

24 Yarmouth

25 Taunton

26 Sudbury

27 Rowley

28 Braintree

29 Salisbury

30 Rexhame

31 Haverhill

32 Springfield

33 Marshfield

34 Gloucester

35 Woburn

36 Wenham

37 Hull

38 Reading

39 Manchester

40 Rehoboth

41 Andover



42 Topsiield

43 Maiden

44 Medfield

45 Eastham

46 Dartmouth

47 Lancaster

48 Billerica

49 Chelmsford

50 Groton

51 Northampton

52 Bridgewater

53 Marlborough

54 Hadley



Mar 6,

Jan 7,

Mar 3,

Sept 4,

Sept 4,

May 13,

Oct 7,

Mar 2,



1638
1639
1639
1639
1639
1640

1640
1 641



June


2,


1 641


June


2,


1 641


Mar


I,


1642


May


18,


1642


Sept


27,


1642


Sept


7,


1643


May


29»


1644


May


29»


1644


May


14,


1645



June 4,
May 6,



1645
1646



Oct 18, 1648



May 2, 1649



May 22,

June 7,

Oct 5,

May 18,

May 29,

May 29,

May 29,

May 14,

June 3,

May 31,

May 22,



1650
1651
1652

1653
1655
1655

1655
1656
1656

1660
1661



From What Established, etc.

Sanditch.

Mattacheeset

Cohannett. City, May, 1864.

"Mr. Ezechi Rogers' Plantation."

Part of Boston called Mt Wool-
laston.

Colechester.

Green Harbor, afterwards Marsh-
field.

Pantucket. City, March 10, 1869

Agawam. City, 1852.

Green Harbor and Rexhame.

"Cape Anne." City April 28, 1873.

Charlestowne Village. City, 1888.

£non.

Nantascot.

Part of Lynn.

Part of Salem called "Jefifrye's
Creeke."

Ceacunck.

Cochicawick now called Andover,
Mar. 4, 1634-S, "it is ordered
that the land about Cochicho-
wicke shall be preserved for an
inland plantation."

Part of Ipswich called the Village
at the New Meadows. Incor-
porated as a town Oct. 18, 1650.

Part of Charlestown called Mystic
Side. I ncorporated Mar. 3 1 , as
a city.

Part of Dedham.

Nausat

Ponegansett, Acushena and Coak-
sett.

Common land called Nashaway.



Petapawag.

Nonotuck. City 1883.

Part of Duxbury called the New
Plantation.

City 1890.

The new plantation near North-
ampton.



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Date of BttabUafament.
CitiM and Towns. Inoorpoimtion or fint



55 Milton

56 Mendon

57 Amesbury

58 Beverly

59 Swansea

60 Westfield



From What Established, etc.



May 7, 1662 Part of Dorchester called Uncat-

aquisset
Qunshapazge.
Part of Salisbury.
Part of Salem called Bass River.

City March 23. 1894.
The township of Wannamoiset
Part of Springfield called Woron-

oake.
61 Middleborough June i, 1669 Common land called Namassakett



May 15, 1667
May 27, 1668
Oct 14, 1668



Mar
May



5,1668
19,1669



62 Hatfield

63 Edgartown

64 Tisbury

65 Wrentham

66 Brookfield

67 Sherborn

68 Bradford

69 Framingham

70 Deerfield

71 Natick

72 Dunstable

73 Stow



May 31, 1670
July 8, 1671
8, 1671
15, 1673
15, 1673



July
Oct
Oct



Oct 7, 1674
Oct 13, 1675



Oct
Oct
Apr
Oct
May



13, 1675
22, 1677
16, 1679
13, 1680
16, 1683



74 Worcester Oct 15, 1684



75 Rochester

76 Sherbum

77 Newton



78 Oxford

79 Chilmark



June 4, 1686

June 27, 1687

Dec 15, 1691

May 31. 1693

Sept 14, 1694



80 Boxford Sept 14, 1694

Si Falmouth Sept 14, 1694

82 Harwich Sept 14, 1694

83 Attleborough Oct 19, 1694



84 Dracut

85 Brookline



Feb 26, 1701
Nov 13, 1705



Great Harbor.
Middletowne.

Common land called Quobauge.
A town 1 718.

Formerly Sherbum.

A part of Rowley called Merri-
mack.



Incorporated as a town 1781.

The plantation between Concord

and Lancaster called Pompo-

sitticutt
Plantation called Quansigamond.

Made a city Feb. 29, 1848.
Sippican.
Name changed to Nantucket, June

8, 1795.
Cambridge Village, sometimes

called Little Cambridge. City

in 1873.

Sometimes called Mannour of Tis-
bury.

Part of Rowley.

Satuckett.

Part of Rehoboth called the North
Purchase.

Part of Boston called Muddy
River.



XXVI



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Date of Establishment.


Cities and Towns.


Incorporation or first




mention.


86 Plympton


June 4, 1707


87 Truro


July 16, 1709


SS Norton


Mar 17, 1710


89 Needham


Nov 5, 1 71 1


90 Weston


Jan I, 1712


91 Pembroke


Mar 21, 1712


92 Dighton


May 30, 1712


93 Chatham


June II, 1712


94 Abington


June 10, 1 71 2


95 Leicester


Feb 15, 1713


96 Northfield


Feb 22, 1713


97 Rutland


Feb 23, 1 713


98 Lexington


Mar 20, 1713


99 Medway


Oct 24, 1 713


100 Sutton


Oct 28, 1714


loi Littleton


Dec 3, 1 71 5


102 Hopkinton


Dec 13, 1715


103 Westborough


Nov 18, 1717


104 Simderland


Nov 12, 1718


105 Bellingham


Nov 27, 1719


106 Shrewsbury


Dec 6, 1720


107 Brimfield


Aug 16, 1722


108 HoUiston


Dec 3, 1724


109 Walpole


Dec 10, 1724


no Easton


Dec I, 1725


III Methuen


Dec 8, 1725 :


112 Stoneham


Dec 17, 1725


113 Kingston


June 16, 1726


114 Stoughton


Dec 22, 1726 :


115 Provincetown


June 14, 1727


116 Hanover


June 14, 1727


117 Uxbridge


June 27, 1727


118 Southborough


July 6, 1727


119 Middleton


June 20, 1728 .


120 Lunenburg


Aug I, 1728 ;


121 Westford


Sept 23, 1729


122 Bedford


Sept 23, 1729


J 23 Wilmington


Sept 25, 1730



From What Established, etc.

Part of Plymouth.

Common land called Pawmet

Part of Taunton.

Part of Dedham.

The west precinct of Watertown.

Part of Duxbury called Mattea-

keeset
Part of Taunton.
District of Manamoit.
Part of Bridgewater.
Common land called Towtaid.
Plantation called Squakead.
Common land called Naquog.
The north precinct of Cambridge.
Part of Medfield.



Plantation called Moguncoy.
Part of Marlborough called
Chauncey, and other lands.

Parts of Dedham, Mendon and
Wrentham.

Incorporated as a town Dec 24,

1731.
Part of Sherbom.

Part of Dedham.

Part of Norton called the North


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14

Online LibraryMassachusetts Daughters of the American RevolutionCatalogue of a loan collection of ancient and historic articles, exhibited ... → online text (page 14 of 15)