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INDEX

TO THE SECOND SERIES

OF THE

PROCEEDINGS

OF THE

MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY



Commfttee to Supabfise tfje Intizx.

ALBERT BUSHNELL HART.
ROGER BIGELOW MERRIMAN.



DAVID MAYDOLE MATTESON.



INDEX



TO THE SECOND SERIES



PEOCEEDINGS



tTassac|usttls historical ^ocld^.



1884-1907.



^uilisbeti at tl)c C!)arge of t^e pcaiotig Junti.




BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY.

MDCCCCIX



janibersttg ^rcss:
John Wilson and Son, Cambridge, U.S.A.



PREFACE.

1128373

Mr. Matteson's very complete explanatory introduc-
tion which follows renders unnecessary any extended
preface by the Committee which has supervised his work.
It has been the aim of the Committee to follow as far as
possible the precedents set in the Index to the First Series
of the Proceedings of the Society, taking due account of
advances in the modern practice of indexing ; the few
innovations made are intended to secure increased clear-
ness and convenience. There remains the pleasant duty
of grateful acknowledgment of the help received from
Dr. Samuel A. Green, First Vice-President and Librarian
of the Society, and from Mr. Julius H. Tuttle, Assistant
Librarian, who have revised and corrected the proofs of
the Index, and solved many troublesome problems in
connection with its preparation.

ALBERT BUSHNELL HART.
ROGER BIGELOW MERRIMAN.

June, 1908.



expla:n'atory mTRODUCTio:^".



Ix the compiling of this Index three purposes have been
kept in view : (1) to show the activities of the Society as
a whole and of the different members at the various
meetings of which the Second Series of the Proceedings
is the record ; (2) to analyze the historical and biographical
matter in the Series ; (3) to record all names of possible
genealogical or geographical value.

Under the general heading of " Massachusetts Historical
Society," and the cross-references from it, have been
arranged all the items which relate to the proceedings
of the Society as a whole. The names of all members of
the Society, past or present — resident, corresponding, or
honorary — appear as headings in black-faced type, and
with the names given in full. If the communications of
a member have been numerous enough to warrant it, they
have been arranged by themselves in a second paragraph
under his name, and this fact is indicated by the words
^^ \_Commiinications follow]" immediately after the heading.
In this second paragraph are entered all communications
of which the contents are given, or at least the character
indicated, in the Proceedings ; but " remarks," as merely
indicative of the member's presence at the meeting and
participation in the proceedings, are grouped under an
entry in the first paragraph. A communication is usually
indicated by the word " on," but more formal papers are
entered by title in small capitals. In general, the use of



viii EXPLANATORY INTRODUCTION.

small capitals in this connection shows that the com-
munication is of some length and receives a title in the
Proceedings, but the form is also used for some communi-
cations not so presented but yet involving much research.
Biographical accounts of members are entered under the
general title "Memoirs," as vt^ell as under the names
of the writers and subjects ; all memoirs and tributes are
analyzed under the names of the subjects. Portraits and
autographs are also grouped under the general headings
of " Portraits " and " Autographs," besides being in-
dexed under the names of the subjects.

The analysis of the historical matter in the Series is
carried out largely by means of a system of cross-references.
Because of the varied nature of the communications, it
has not been practical to resolve the analysis into a few
general headings ; but through the titles " Economic
conditions," " Geography," " Government," " History,"
" Social conditions," and " Sources," together with the
various political divisions and wars by name, and the
cross-references under these, most of the strictly historical
items can be found. Cross-references are of three kinds.
(1) When the subject is complex (e. g. American Revolu-
tion) the cross-references from the general title to its
sub-titles are placed at the beginning of the entries. This
is done to save search through the general topic for
items which have been placed under a sub-title. (2) In
simpler subjects all cross-references are at the end of the
entries, and there also are placed in all cases cross-
references from the sub-title to the more general heading.
(3) A comprehensive reference, if not followed by entries
giving the analysis, has after it in brackets a cross-
reference showing under what heading the analysis may
be found ; but this cross-reference is omitted if the word-
ing of the entry gives a sufficient clew to the analytic



EXPLANATORY INTRODUCTION. IX

title. If such a comprehensive reference (usually to a
whole communication) is analyzed in the midst of a more
general title, the termination of the analysis is shown by
a dash [ — ].

Titles of unusual length are divided into paragraphs
wherever this is practical. Attention has already been
called to this arrangement in the case of entries under
the name of a member of the Society. In the historical
analysis the division is usually chronological, and in bio-
graphical topics a separate paragraph has been used for
letters where the number of such documents seemed to
require it.

Source material, besides being analyzed by subjects, is
grouped under general headings given as cross-references
under the title " Sources." Documents and diaries are
also indexed under the names of the writers ; and letters,
entered under both the writer and receiver, are roughly
calendared under the name of the writer. They are
calendared under the name of the receiver also when of
personal interest to him ; and an extended correspondence
is calendared under the same heading, with cross-references
under the names of the writers. The typical form for
such calendar entries is as follows : " letter to Jos. Jones
(1785) Va. election," the words after the date indicating
the contents of the letter. When many letters are calen-
dared under one name (e. g. William Duane) they are
arranged alphabetically by correspondents, with a chrono-
logical sub-arrangement and a dash to separate the letters
of different men. Other group titles have been arranged,
such as those of broadsides, memoirs, autographs, and
portraits (previously mentioned), forts, and ships ; but
forts and ships are also entered under their names. Be-
sides their use for communications, small capitals, whether
as headings or in the body of titles, indicate that the sub-



X EXPLANATORY INTRODUCTION.

ject indexed is not merely mentioned or described but
appears in the Proceedings.

References are to the first page only unless the subject
matter continues on the second page in a new paragraph,
or extends over more than two pages. References to two
contiguous pages are joined by a dash [-] when the subject
matter is continued without break, and separated by a
comma when this is not the case. References to volumes
are in black-faced numerals.

Reference to a person or place which is merely mentioned
in the Proceedings has formed no part in the plan of the
Index ; but wherever anything is told of the person or
place the name is not only entered but an indication
given of what is said of it. On the other hand, all
names mentioned in source material or memoirs, if of any
possible genealogical or geographical value, find a place
in this volume ; so that the entry of a name alone is
evidence that it is there for this purpose only. Pre-
nomens have been added wherever possible, initials have
been filled out, and names clearly intended supplied.
Persons of the same prenomen have been distinguished
and arranged chronologically; unbroken descent is shown
by numbers, and in other cases some significant date or
title is given to indicate the particular person meant.
Nobles are entered under their highest titles, but the
family names are likewise given (e. g. Abingdon, Wil-
loughby Bertie, 4^^ ^<^''^ 9f) ^^^ ^^^o cross-references under
the family names. In a few cases, where the men have
been more widely known by the family name or a lower
title, the cross-reference is reversed. Women appear
under both the maiden and married names when both
are known, and under each form the other name is also
given : e. g. Babson, Mary C. (Rogers) ; Rogers, Mary C.
[Mrs. Babson]. In the case of a married woman who has



BXPLAKATORY INTRODUCTION". xi

had two or more previous names, all of them are given,
if known, and separated by vertical rules: e. g. Hammond,
Abigail "(Collins jWillet). The double entry of a married
woman's name serves also as a cross-reference ; search
should be made under both headings, as all the references
to the subject may not have been placed under either
name. Personal names are spelled in the Index accord-
ing to the usage of some accepted authority in each case ;
or else as in the text, unless obviously wrong ; but the
attempt has been made by means of cross-references to
show the various spellings of the same name which
appear in the Index.

Dates have been freely used throughout as a means
of identification, and they are all new style. Common
abbreviations have been adopted, the only special abbre-
viation being the M.H.S., which stands for the name
of the Society. In the arrangement of headings. Cutter,
Rules for a Dictionary Catalog (ed. of 1904), has been
followed. This calls for persons before places and places
before things of the same name, and also gives preference
to place names with a separate prefix over those with the
same prefix united to the rest of the word (e. g. New York
before Newport). Foreign personal names beginning
with a separate prefix (except French names which contain
the definite article) are entered under the main name.

The compiler desires to express his cordial thanks to
Mr. T. Herbert Chase for his assistance in the preparation
of the Index for the press.

DAVID MAYDOLE MATTESON.



Yol,


Page


Line


I.


28


32




305


22




319


13




321


37


II.


150


20




195


2-4



ERRATA AND ADDENDA.



for "Lowes" read "Lower."

for "F. C. Varnum" read " Fortesque
Vernon."

for " Jepson " read "Jesson."

for "1693" read "1793."

for "1871" read "1867."
2-4 for " Lady Trevor, sister of Sir George Treby,
Attorney General of England, and Chief
Justice of the Common Pleas" read "Eliza-
beth Trevor, daughter of George Clark,
relict of John Trevor, and formerly widow
of William Morley."
252 12 read "but never came to this country, although
like Sir Richard Saltonstall, he was a pat-
entee of Connecticut."
419 30 for "in a Spirit of Charity" read "in the
Spu-it of Charity."
IIL 16 14 for "Rutland" read "Bretland."

for "Jan. 7" read "Jan. 24."

for "1806" read "1803."

for "Edward Wiuslow" read "Ward Chip-
man." (See Proceedings 20. 559.)

strike out " and has not given those correctly."

for "Mills" read "Miles."

for "Robin" read "Robins."

for "Mrs. Martha T. Lamb" read "Mrs.
Martha J. Lamb."
IV. 66 27 for "was asked" read "asked."

for "Martel" read "Marcel."

for "1768" read "1774."

for "happily after" read "happy after."

for "William Clarence Rurrage" read "The
Club of Odd Volumes."
396 1 for "Hawksham" read " Hawkshaw."



16


14


25


26


40


29


67


1


94


35


202


36


345


39


367


note


66


27


97


22


193


37


299


36


351


12



xiv ERRATA AND ADDENDA.



Vol.


Page


Line


V.


411


9
10




470


note


VI.


124


28




145


11




165


31




442


22


VIII.


110


9




211


28




343


30


IX.


538


39


X.


164


23 ;


XI.


105


39




106


11


XII.


322


17


XIII.


383


41




438


35

40


XIV.


369


31


XV.


52


16


XVI.


311 note 4:


XVII.


246


33


SVIII.


200


30




222


36




323


8




416





for "colleagues" read "colleague."
for "contemporary, said" read "contempo-
rary said."
for "wholly" read "largely."
for "Conn." read " R. I."
for "Rossiter?" read " Ruecastle."
for "1693" read "1690."
for "Joseph" read "Thomas."
for "1828" read "1628."
for "west" read "east."
for "April 28" read "April 23."
for "1700" read "1699."
23 and 24 for "Irving" read "Erving."
for "sis" read "five."
for "1861" read "1851."
for "not" read "wel."
for "1773" read "1753."
for "eighteen" read "twenty-eight."
for "eighteen" read "twenty-eight."
for "New Haven" read "Hartford."
for "1855" read "1895."
strike out "M. D." in line 19.
for "Cerola" read " Gerola."
for "great-uncle" read "uncle."
for "Madison" read "Adams."
for "year before" read " same year."
add as a new paragraph: "The subject of this
Memoir had nearly touched the Psalmist's
limit of desirable longevity when he died on
the seventeenth of May, 1877. But the
dates which bound a man's life give no
measure of the horizons it opens to others,
or of the human satisfactions which are
crowded into it. Coleridge has a warning
phrase about ' the subtile poison of the easy
chair.' And truly its occupant is prone to
accept plausibilities for facts, and to force
the scales of right and wrong into prepos-
terous equilibrium. If Edmund Quincy ap-
preciated ' the easy chair ' more than most
men, he was immune to the ' poison ' con-
cealed in its pliant upholstery."



ERRATA AND ADDENDA.



XV



Vol.


Page Line


XIX.


206 2




520 7iote 2




523 7


XX.


16 8



50


7


492


32




33


531


26



add "By Edmund F. Slafter."

for "1881" read "1861."

for "Douglas" read "Dudley."

for "Harrison Gray Otis" read "Timothy

Bigelow."
10 for " Timothy Bigelow " read "Harrison Gray

Otis."
for "former" read "latter."
for "four" read "five."
add "Roosevelt."
transpose "colonel" and "lieutenant-colonel."

Through inadvertence the following misreadings of names attached to
the Ipswich petition, printed in Vol. IH. page 199, were overlooked:
for " Boemau " read " Borman."

for " Corse " read " Scott."

for " Henry Syewell " read " Heugh Sherratt."
for " Cathwrite " read " Catherick."

insert "Hen Pinndar."
for " Charman " read " Sharman."

for " Trench " read " French."

for " Hasfield " read " Haffield."

for " Latchwell " read " Satchwell."

for " Thomson " read " Jhonsou."



COMMITTEES OF PUBLICATION.



Second Series.



Vol. Period covered.

I. Jan., 1884 -Feb., 1885

II. March, 1885 -May, 1886

III. June, 1886 -Oct., 1887

IV. Nov., 1887 -June, 1889

V. Oct., 1889 -April, 1890

VI. May, 1890 -June, 1891

VII. Oct., 1891 -June, 1892

VIII. Oct., 1892 -March, 1894

IX. April, 1894 -Feb., 1895

X. March, 1895 -April, 1896

XL May, 1896 -July, 1897

XII. Oct., 1897 -Feb., 1899

XIII. March, 1899 -Feb., 1900

XIV. March, 1900 -Feb., 1901
XV. March, 1901 -Feb., 1902

XVI. March, 1902 -Dec, 1902

XVII. Jan., 1903 -Oct., 1903

XVIII. Nov., 1903 -Dec, 1904

XIX. Jan., 1905 -Dec, 1905

XX.



Edward J. Young.
" Clement Hugh Hill.
Alexander McKenzie.



Edward J. Young.
Alexander McKenzie.
Charles C. Smith.



Alexander McKenzie.



Jan., 1906 -March, 1907- Charles C.Smith.

I Edward Stanwood.



INDEX



INDEX



Abarca de Boleo. -See Aranda.

Abbot. See also Abbott.

Abbot, Lieut, 11; at battle of Lake
George, 18. 318, 320.

Abbot, Rev. Abiel [H. C. 1787], biog.
notes, 3. 48 n., 16. 311 n.; at Cov-
entry, 3. 50; dismissed, 51; Har-
vard D. D. (1838), 5. 225; sec.
B K (1787), 16. 311.

Abbot, Rev. Abiel [H. C. 1792], jour-
ney to Providence and New Haven
(1795), 3. 41-52; biog. notes, 41 n.,
9. 115n. ; preaches, 3. 45, 51; Har-
vard D. D. (1821), 5. 189; 0BK
prayer (1815), 9. 115.

Abbot, Benjamin, scholar at Town-
send, Mass. (1772), 4. 386.

Abbot, Benjamin, exhibition part
(1788), 16. 409; biog. note, 409 n. ;
mentioned, 413; Commencement
part (1788), 439.

Abbot, Mrs. Benjamin (Perkins), 7.
428.

Abbot, Caleb F., Commencement
part (1831) and biog. note, 5. 206,
206 n.

Abbot, Daniel, R. I. sheriff (1732),
19. 29.

Abbot, Archbishop George, and Book
of Sports, 19. 93.

Abbot, Hannah T. (Emery), 16.
330 n.

Abbot, John [H. C. 1784], biog. note,
16. 304 n.

Abbot, John [H. C. 1798], at class
reunion (1848), 5. 255-258.

Abbot, Rev. John E., biog. note, 16.
330 n.

Abbot, William L., 16. 407; J. Q.
Adams on, 407 n. ; biog. note,
407 n.

Abbott, Charles C, conclusions from
Trenton-gravel discoveries, 5. 338;
on tomahawks, 6. 37.

Abbott, David, 14. 361.

Abbott, Major Henry L., Palfrey's
memoir, 5. 145, 7. 42,



I Abbott, Jabez, killed at Wyoming
(1778), 3. 345.

Abbott, Josiah G., Commencement
part (1832), 5. 208 n.; in Mass.
Conven. (1853), 18. 34, 37.

Abdy, Anthony, bequest for trans-
porting children (1680), 6. 264.

Abdy, Nicholas, bequest for trans-
porting children (1642), 6. 264.

Abdy, Roger, bequest for transport-
ing cliildren (1641), 5. 264.

Abeel, John N., Harvard D. D.
(1804), 5. 170.

Abercrombie, Gen. James, L^vis's
sketch of attack on Ticonderoga,

4. 94.
Abercrombie, Lieut-Col. James, letter

to Colden (1775) on Lexington, 11.

304-306.
Abercrombie, Rev. James, attack on

Unitarians, 3. 18.
Abercromby, Sir Ralph, panorama of

death of, 2. 8.
Aberdeen, George H. Gordon, 4th earl

of, and Oswald map of Northeast-
ern boundary, 3. 368.
Aberdeen, John C. H. Gordon, 7th

earl of, at Cabot celebration, 12. 6.
Abijah, in Phips's Quebec expedition,

15. 306.
Abimelech, Indian, protest (1698),

5. 297.
Abingdon, Willoughby Bertie, J^th earl

of, pamphlet (1777), 17. 313.

Abney, Sir Thomas, and Isaac Watts,
9. 334.

Abolitionism, Santo Domingo as com-
ment on, 2. 352; attitude of David
Sears, 418; of J. C. Gray, 4. 26;
character of movement, 10. 514-
515; Lowell's interest in, 11. 79-
81, 86, 94; J. Q. Adams on, 15.
449, 457, 469, 470, 472-473; char-
acter of Garrison, 18. 403; prin-
ciples, 406, 415; social trials, 407-
410; Garrison mob, 20. 168-170.
See also Slavery.

Aborn, Mrs., of Washington (1812),
19. 381.



ABORN-ADAMS



Aborn, Samuel, claim (1782), 14. 69.

Abram, Tuscarora chief (1762), 7. 393.

Abrahams, Haesgen [Mrs. Marston],
6. 56.

Abstract of Laws of N. Eng., and
"Moses his Judicials," 16. 275-280.

Academy, French, meeting, 1. 145.

Acadia, protest against Argall's raid,
with answers, 1. 187-192; Cas-
grain's researches, 4. 100; docs,
on, in Parkman MSS., 6. 392. See
also Annapolis, Nova Scotia.

Account of Passages between Fletcher
and Conn., 12. 392.

Account of the Late Revolutions, 17. 66.

Achille, French war-ship, 16. 451.

Acklan, Major John D., at Freeman's
Farm, 3. 107.

Ackley, , death in Am. army

(1775), 7. 409.

Acland, Sir Henry, on Queen Vic-
toria and Civil War, 18. 126-127.

Acres (?), Elizabeth [Mrs. Keble],
17. 178.

Active, Brit, war-ship (1774), 10. 84.

Acton, John, and Lord Cutts, 2. 174,
175.

Acton, John, baron, on history and
morality, 18. 50.

Acton, Mass., commemoration of
Concord_ battle, 10. 188-193.

Acts of incorporation of M.H. S.,
bibliog., 6. 210-211.

Acts of Trade, pre-Rev. smuggling,
2. 232; Quary's report on colon,
violation (1708), 4. 147-155; papers
on Conn, and (1694-1700), 5. 296,
299; royal instructions (1702), 8.
105; Boston reprint of Act of 1696,
9. 507; Molasses Act, 10. 60; seiz-
ures in Boston (1766-71), 63, 67,

72, 73, 77; mobbing of informers,

73, 75; deliberation over enact-
ment, 11. 294-297; Dudley's Coun-
cil on (1686), 13. 240; oath to
observe (1686), 247; Randolph's
enforcement, 290 ; and peace nego-
tiations (1782), 17. 416-418; Hus-
kisson on, 19. 549. See also Cus-
toms, Writs of Assistance.

Adair, James, on Indian hemp, 6. 36.
Adam, Tuscarora chief (1762), 7. 392.
Adam of Bremen, on Vinland, 4. 43.
Adam, Sir Frederick, 19. 483.
Adams, , killed at Lake George

(1755), 18. 318, 323, 324.
Adams, Mrs., of Brookfield (1762),

7. 385.
Adams, Abigail (Smith), letter to

Mary Cranch (1799) on death of



Washington and fire in Phila-
delphia, 3. 275; to Bowdoin (1775)
on Philadelphia news, 8. 59-60; to
Jefferson (1816), 12. 272; from
J. Q. Adams (1787), 16. 358-360;
(1789), 463; return to Mass. (1788),
424, 428, 429; mentioned in son's
diary, 437; and his rumored en-
gagement, 454; on her New York
house (1789), 461 ; father's sermon
on marriage of, 19. 386.

Adams, Abigail [Mrs. Smith], 16. 329 n.

Adams, Abigail B. (Brooks), 13. 199.

Adams, Abraham, at Am. camp
(1775), 9. 70.

Adams, Alexander, death (1678), 7.
169.

Adams, Rev. Amos, death (1775), 7.
409; funeral sermon on Mrs. Paul
Dudley, 16. 41 n.; ode on death
of, 19. 434 n.

Adams, Amos, of Groton, and Shays's
Rebellion, 1. 301; minuteman, 12.
104.

Adams, Ann (Harrod), 16. 296 n.

Adams, Benjamin, of Brookfield
(1762), 7. 386, 389.

Adams, Benjamin, subscription to
Boston dinner (1830), 6. 342.

Adams, Brooks, Law of Civilization
and Decay reviewed, 11. 169-177;
elected a member M.H.S., 16. 126;
New Empire, 17. 213; on Old State
House, 20. 245, 421.

Adams, Charles [H. C. 1789], goes
to Europe (1779), 16. 294; biog.
note, 296 n. ; mentioned in J. Q.
Adams's diary (1787-88), 296,
309, 338-341, 375-377, 407, 411,
413, 430, 436-438, 452; exhibition
part (1787), 313; and disorders at
Harvard, 377.

Adams, Charles Francis[l], at Froth-
ingham's funeral, 1. 392; M.H.S.
tributes to, 3. 144-152; as diplo-
mat, 144, 148-151, 13. 204; effect
of reserve, 3. 145-146, 150; as
lawyer, 147, 13. 199; on expulsion
of Hoar, 3. 147; poUtics, 147-148,
4. 30, 11. 279, 13. 200-203, 20. 541;
Puritan, 3. 148; transmitted vir-
tue, 149; reward, 151; and public
recognition, 151; Lowell's verses
on, 151 n. ; and presidential nomi-
nation, 152, 13. 206; greatness, 3.
152; M.H.S. expression of re-
spect, 152; memoir assigned to
J. T. Morse, 221; subscription for
M.H.S. building, 292; Everett's Life
and Services, 4. 106; on com. on



ADAMS



M.H.S. semic'entenary, 6. 284 n.;
on attempt to increase M.H.S.
membership, 10. 320, 322, 323; in
public service of Quincy, 373;
Chittenden's story of Laird rams,
13. 178-186; and Forbes-Aspinwall
mission, 187-194; and irregular
emissaries, 191, 193, 16. 465;
Memoir by his son, 13. 198-207;
PORT, and AUTOG., 198; birth,
198; origin of prenomen, 199;
education, 199; marriage, 199;
poHt. articles, 199; edits family
papers, 200, 202, 205; in Congress,
203; and compromise (1861), 203;
and Geneva Arbitration, 205, 20.
472; candidacy for Gov. (1876),

13. 206; death, 206; addresses,
206; declines Harvard presidency,
206; honorary degrees, 207; chil-
dren, 207 ; Friday Club, 14. 473, 16.
465; and Trent affair, 465-467, 18.
138-141; and use of Vaughan's
letters, 17. 406; alleged interview
with Victoria (1862), 440-448; be-
lief in Southern Union men (1861),
141; and proposed mediation
(1862), 145, 149-154, 20. 471; at
bicentenary of N. Eng. Confed., 19.
361; and Pres. Johnson, 398, 20.
429.

Adams, Charles Francis [2] [Com-
munications follow], list of pub-
lications (1883-1906), 1. 169, 3.
56, 4. 348, 6. 209, 7. 368, 8. 185,
9. 22, 10. 555, 11. 317, 13. 65,

14. 128, 15. 29, 16. 129, 17. 213,
18. 268, 19. 204, 20. 207; elected to
M.H.S. Council (1884), 1. 180;
on Nominating Com. (1885), 2. 4;
report, 79; on com. on General
Index, 3. 275; elected Vice-Pres.
M.H.S. (1890-94), 5. 456, 6. 419,
7. 383, 8. 201, 9. 39; reprinted
M.H.S. paper, 6. 221, 349; me-
moir of Edmund Quincy assigned
to, 7. 6; remarks, 317, 8. 151, 10.
291, 315, 440, 552, 11. 74, 411, 12.
73, 112, 154, 167, 195, 252, 292,
371, 424, 456, 13. 62, 156, 164, 424,
14. 104, 153, 176, 360, 445, 15. 95,
105, 239, 323, 364, 479, 16. 125,
150, 232, 290, 476, 534, 17. 75, 116,
449, 18. 59, 60, 263, 291, 362, 398,
447, 471, 20. 83, 118, 232, 245, 489,
525, 537, 586; report on member-
ship, 7. 332; presides, 8. 396, 9.
244, 310, 10. 1, 116, 139, 256, 292,
315, 363, 404, 441, 540, 11. 1, 67,
103, 156, 197, 411, 450, 12. 55, 74,



138, 155, 168, 196, 259, 293, 340,
352, 372, 425, 13. 1, 63, 142, 165,
208, 310, 379, 14. 1, 127, 163, 189,
255, 303, 369, 386, 425, 483, 15.
25, 69, 105, 180, 264, 324, 365, 493,
16. 126, 151, 233, 251, 291, 477, 17.



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