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Maurice Agnus Oudin.

The Lilliputian magazine, or, The young gentleman and lady's golden library. Being an attempt to mend the world, to render the society of man more amiable, and to establish the plainness, simplicity, virtue and wisdom of the golden age, so much celebrated by the poets and historians online

. (page 4 of 6)
Online LibraryMaurice Agnus OudinThe Lilliputian magazine, or, The young gentleman and lady's golden library. Being an attempt to mend the world, to render the society of man more amiable, and to establish the plainness, simplicity, virtue and wisdom of the golden age, so much celebrated by the poets and historians → online text (page 4 of 6)
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own country on board his Jhip that had none ?
Jemmy afifwered in the affirmative, and all
the people cried out, Cog ma Goothal Cog
ma Gootha! that is, in Englijh, let him fuf-
fer! let him fuffer! upon which matter
Jemmy was thrown into a prifon, where he
endured innumerable harcimips ; for the
gaolers there are not like thofe in England ;

they



( 7- )

they would not accept of any bribe to lefien
his confinement, or to remove his chains ;
but behaved to him, in allrefpefts, as their
law directed.

Mafter Gadabout, after being confined
about a month, was taken very ill, which
being made known to the magiitrates by the
gaolers, who are in that country mighty
honeft good people, a phyfician was or-
dered to attend him. The phyficians of
Angelica don't affect an unintelligible jar-
gon of unmeaning fyllables, to give a high
opinion of their knowledge, as is cuftomary
in fome other countries; nor do they ever
deftroy their patients by an inundation of
phyfic; what they principally regard, is the
nature of the diforder, and the confutation
of the patient ; and towards a true invefti-
gation of both thefe, the eye at the end
of the middle finger doth not a little con-
tribute, as the reader will fee in our next
volume.

As foon as the doctor had thruft his eye-
finger down yemmy's throat, he turned to
the magiftrates, and delivered himfelf in
the following manner.

" This patient has heretofore ufed a

" great deal of exercife, and fince his con-

*< foemto* here, has been in a ftate of in-

" dolence,



( 7* )

dolence, by which means the tubes and
glands, or pipes and ilrainers, whereof
the body is compofed, being deprived
of their ufual activity or motion, are as
it were rufted over, like the wheels of a
jack for want of ufe; you muft there-
fore calbolade him; but give him no
other phyfic."

Matter Jemmy was very earned to know
what phyfic they would prepare for him,
and often made figns to the nurfe for his
medicines; but inftead of Pills, Potions,
Boluffesy Draughts, Lotions, and Liniments,
he was furpriled to fee four of the ftrong-
eft Avgelicans enter the next morning with
a blanket ; however, amazed as he was,
they threw him in, and carrying him up to
the funny fide of the hill, there firft fwung
him, and after that tofled him gently, till
he was in a profufe fweat, and then being
wrapped up in the blanket, he was again
conveyed home to his own bed.

Jemmy the next morning complained
that he was cold, which the doclor being
informed of, ordered fo large a parcel of
billet-wood into his apartment, that you
would have thought he had intended to
burn down the whole houfe, and on that
fcore Jemmy was in fome pain ; but when

fijjns



( 73 )

figns were made for him to carry this
wood up Hairs, and lay it in the room
above, his fears difperfed, and finding
himfelf fufHciently warmed, and much
better for the exercife, he every day dur-
ing his confinement, carried the fame wood
up flairs and down, till he was both warm-
ed and weary, and by that means foon re-
covered both his health and ftrength. And
this method of getting well without phy-
fic, and keeping himfelf warm without the
expence of fire, Jemmy has defired us to
publifh for the benefit of the Britijk
nation.

N. B. Here it unfortunately happens that
<we are obliged to break off, and that abruptly ',
'which may feem fome-ijuhat like a dif appoint-
ment to our readers. However, as Mr. Jona-
than Gadabout has unhappily loft, or mijlaid,
the papers that came from his fon, nve muft beg
cf our readers to fufpend their curiofay till
thejt valuable materials can be obtained, for
the recovery cf which a reward is hzreby of-
fered of twenty thoufand pounds.



H THE



( 74 )



THE

HISTORY

OF THE

MERCOLIANS.

Communicated by
Matter B R O L I O of LILLIPUT.

The Road to the Temple of FAME 13 through
the "Temple of VIRTUE.

THE MERCOLIANS, a people who
poflefTed an ifland in the Lilliputian
feas, had by their induitry, trade, and com-
merce, acquired immenfe riches. By their
ihipping they made the product of all na-
tions their own, and the inhabitants of the
neighbouring ifles, and on the continent,
were their flaves and dependants. Nothing,
however, is fo difficult to manage as too

much



( 75 )

much wealth ; and a flate may be crumed
under the weight of its own power, which
was the fate of the MERCOLIANS. They
grew proud, infolent and idle. The only
ufe they made of their riches was to pur-
chafe them new invented pleafures. They
funk in down-beds, and grew effeminate ;
exercife, which firings the nerves and pre-
ferves health, was a flranger to them ; they
turned day into night, and night into day,
and wafted their moft valuable and precious
time, in routs, drums, and riotous affem-
blies : but fee at once the force of human
folly, and the end of human grandeur !
They made a law to naturalize the flaves
and refufe of other nations ; they took
counfel of ftrangers ; they chofe their ge-
nerals and officers from a foreign people,
and were at laft plundered and difpofTefled
of their property by their own depen-
dants. Such was the fate of the MERCO-
LIANS ; and may this be a warning to all
future flates.

In this confufion fome of the beft fami-
lies left MERCOLIA, and took pofTeflion of
an ifland uninhabited in the fame feas, but
were followed by their enemies, who drew
up in battle array to deftroy them. At this
inilant of time, when no profpecl of fafety
H 2 remained,



[ 76 ]

remained, and every man expefted his fate,
Mafter TURVOLO, a lad of about fourteen
years, arofe, and thus adreffed himfelf to
the MERCOLIANS. ft Brethren ana you
men of ME R COL I A ! let not fear drive you
1o madnefs ! you have lives, you have fami-
lies, you have ejfefts voorth prefe rving, and
the means is in your hands to do it. Let every
man deliver to me his money, the only four ce
and caufe of his misfortune, and I ivill deli-
ver you from thefe people, <who from being your
Jlaves and dependants, nre novj become your
lords and dictators." He then took a large
heap of money which he divided into three
hundred bags ; untied, and diftributed
thofe bags to the fame number of men,
to each man his bag; and placed them be-
hind thofe of his friends who were armed ;
and when the purfuers came upon them,
thofe men as they were directed, fcattered
the money upon the ground, which diverted
the foldiers from their duty, and fet them
to fighting among themfelves ; and the
MERCOLIANS flood at a diftance and be-
held them deftroying one another, till fuch
time as their forces were fufficiently weak-
ened, and then they turned upon them,
and overthrew them with a great flaughter.
After this Mafter TURVOLO was placed at

the



( 77 )

3 head of the people, and made their
ig ; and in order to eltahliih in them
tuous and good principles, he erefted
> temples, one whereof was called the
uple of FAME, and built on the top of
igh hill, fortified round with a ftrong
11 and deep ditch ; and the other was
ced in the middle of the road, leading
that on the hill ; fo that there was no
ling through it; and this was called
temple of VIRTUE. The firft portal
this temple was dignified with this in-
ption, namely,

c Road to the Temple r>f FAME is through
the Temple cf VIRTUE.

id after paffing through a fpacious court,
beautiful portico prefented itfelf, on
nich was written in azure and gold, the
1 lowing letters, Thou jha.lt lo<ve the LORD
y GOD with all thy heart, with all thy
u/, and with all thy Jlrength, and thy
.igbbour as thyfelf.

In the temple of FAME were regiftered
ic names of all thofe who were good men,
'hether ploughmen, tradefmen, or what-
ver elfe ; (for worth and honour are con-
ined to no particular ciafs of people) and
H 3 feals



remained, and every man expelled his fa
Mailer TURVOLO, a lad of about fourt<
years, arofe, and thus adreiTed himfelf
the MERCOLIANS. Brethren ana
men of ME R COL I A ! let not fear drive
io madnefs ! you have lives, you have fa.
lies, you have effects <worth preferving, <
the means is in your hands to do it. Let ei
man deliver to me his money, the only fo\
and caufe of his misfortune, and I ivill &
fuer you from thefe people, ivho from being}
jlaves and dependants, nre novj become y
lords and dictators" He then took a la:
heap of money which he divided into th
hundred bags ; untied, and diftribut
thofe bags to the fame number of me
to each man his bag; and placed them b
hind thofe of his friends who were armec
and when the purfuers came upon ther
thofe men as they were directed, fcatten
the money upon the ground, which divertt
the foldiers from their duty, and fet thei
to fighting among themftlves ; and th
MERCOLIANS flood at a diftance and be
held them deftroying one another, till fuc
time as their forces were fufficiently weak
ened, and then they turned upon them
and overthrew them with a great flaughtei
After this Mafter TURVOLO was placed a

th<



( 77 )

the head of the people, and made their
king ; and in order to eftabliih in them
virtuous and good principles, he ere&ed
two temples, one whereof was called the
temple of FAME, and built on the top of
a high hill, fortified round with a urong
wall and deep ditch ; and the other was
placed in the middle of the road, leading
to that on the hill ; fo that there was no
coming through it; and this was called
the temple of VIRTUE. The firft portal
of this temple was dignified with this in-
fcription, namely,

The Road to the Temple tf FAME is through
the Temple cf VIRTUE.

And after paffing through a fpacious court,
a beautiful portico prefented itfelf, on
which was written in azure and gold, the
following letters, Thou Jhalt love the LORD
thy GOD wit h all thy heart, with all thy
foul, and with all thy jlrengtb, and thy
neighbour as thyfelf.

In the temple of FAME were regiftered
the names of all thofe who were good men,
whether ploughmen, tradefmen, or what-
ever elfe ; (for worth and honour are con-
fined to no particular ciafs of people) and
H 3 feals



^eals were given them at the public ex-
pence, as a teftimony of their efleem ; but
to thofe who were lazy, indolent, and did
nothing for the fervice of the community,
no feais were given, nor were they fuffered
to enter the temple. And if at any time
thofe who had procured that honour, de-
generated, that mark of efteem was taken
from them, and a badge of infamy placed
on their backs, which they were obliged to
wear, or abandon their friends and country.
Nor did either honour or infamy defcend
from the father to the fon, for every man
was to win his own laurels, and be account-
able for his own actions only. Befides this,
as the ill ufe of money had corrupted the
morals of the people, rendered them effe-
minate, and overthrew them before ; he
obliged all the inhabitants every four years
to bring their money into the public trea-
fury, from which an equal diftribution was
again made, to each perfon his (hare ; and
thofe who had multiplied their (lock by
honeft means, had the thanks of the com-
munity, and fome marks of royal favour
from the king.

Thus did little king TURVOLO raife a
ruined ftate, and make a miferable people
happy ; for, in a few years, peace reigned

in



( 79 )

in every breaft, and plenty fmiled in every
valley :' They had no ambition but of ex-
celling in virtue, and no contentions, but
who ftiould be moft religious and moft juft.
Locks, bolts, and bars, they had no oc-
cafion for, iince thieves there were none,
nor did they need any of the dreadful in-
ftruments of war : For every man loved
the LORD his GOD with all bis heart, with
all his foul, and <uoitb all his Jlrengtby and
his NEIGHBOUR as himfelf.




THE



THE

HISTORY

O F
Mafter TOMMY THOROUGHGOOD,

AND
Mafter FRANCIS FROWARD,

Two Apprentices to the fame Mafter.

Inferted at the Reqneft of feveral Gentle-
men of the Common Council of the
City of LONDON.

MASTER Thomas Thorougbgood, the
younger fbn of a country gentle-
man, was put out apprentice to an emi-
nent tradefman in Cbeapfide* The mailer
finding his bufmefs increafe, was obliged
to take another about two years after, whofe
name was Francis Froward.

Thomas had behaved exceedingly well,
was very diligent and hone ft, as well as
good ; he ufed to fay his prayers conftantly
every morning and nighc ; he never went

to



to play when he fhould be at church or
about his matter's bulineis ; never was
known to tell a lye, nor ever ftaid when
he was fent on an errand. Thefe rare quali-
fications had gained him the affeclions of
his mafter and miftrefs, and made him a
favourite in the family before Francis came
to them. It was in a great meafure owing
to mafter Tommy's character in the neigh-
bourhood, that Mr. Fr award was induced
to comply with the matter's demands, not
doubting but his fon, in fuch a happy iitu-
ation, and with a companion of fo fweet a
difpofition, would one day turn cut to his
fatisfa&ion, and be a comfort to him in
his old age.

Francis, in the firtt year of his appren-
ticefhip, began to difcover the natural bent
of his inclination. He chofe to afTociate
himfelf with naughty boys in the flreets,
and feemed to place his whole delight in
loofe and idle diverfions ; he neglected the
bufmefs of the (hop when at home, and
entirely forget it when he was abroad.
Thefe, and many more indifcretions of the
like nature, Tommy Thorongkgocd concealed
at firft from his mafter, though not with-
out fome inward uneafmefs.

Jn



( 82 )

In the fourth year's fervice, our young
fpark, who was an only child, and heir to a
pretty fortune, gave farther proofs of his vi-
cious turn of mind, and frequently launched
out into follies and debaucheries of a more
heinous nature ; for now he made no fcruple
of abfenting himfelf from church on the
Lord's-day ; always ftaid out late when he
knew his mailer was engag'd in company,
and at fuch times very rarely return'd home
fober ; nay, he had fometimes the affurance
to lie out of his matter's houfe all night. In
order to deter him from purfuing this wick-
ed courfe of life, Mr. Tborougbgood threat-
ened to inform his mafter of his fcandalous
behaviour, and to acquaint his parents of his
mifcondudl. But alas ! all thefe menaces
prov'd ineffe&ual, and inftead of working
out his reformation, ferved only to heighten
his refentment, and to raife daily fquabbles
and animofities between them. Hereupon
Mr. Thoroughgood finding all his good offices
hitherto thrown away, at length determined
no more to meddle in the affair, or even to
offer his brotherly advice ; but to leave the
unhappy youth to follow the dictates of his
ownperverfe will; being refolved at the fame
time to take particular care that he mould
not, in any of his mifchievous frolicks, de-
fraud



fraud his mnfter, and thereby caft an odium
upon his fellow-prentice.

The mailer was chofen alderman of the
ward, and Mr. Thoroughgood was out of his
time in the fame year; and from his faith-
ful fervice, and unblameable conduct, had
now the whole management of the trade, as
well abroad as at home, committed to his
care and infpe&ion. This great charge ob-
lig'd him to keep a ttricler eye over Francis's
behaviour, who was juft entering into the
laft year of his apprenticefhip, and ima-
gined his aclions were above the cognizance
of one, who, the other day was but his
equal ; and on this account would neither
bear his reproof, nor hearken to his admoni-
tion ; but continued to riot in all the follies
and degeneracies of human nature, till his
apprenticemip was expired. So true it is,
that the wicked hateth reproof, but the wife
man lendeth his ear to inftruftion.

Mr. Francis having been for a long while
impatient of a fervile life, was now become
his own mailer, and feem'd eager of putting
himfelf upon a level with his late compani-
on. To eftecl: this, he goes down to his
father, and prevails upon him to fet him up
in the bufiuefs, that he might trade for him-
feif. The reins were no fooucr laid on his

neck,



neck, then he gave a loofe to his fenfual ap-
petites, and in little more than four years
had a ftatute of bankruptcy taken out a-
gainfthim. The unexpected news of thisfa-
tal event inftantly broke his mother's heart,
nor did the old gentleman furvive her long.
Hereupon our heir was obliged to fell the
perfonal and mortgage the real eftate, to
procure his liberty, and to fatisfy the af-
fignees. In this finking fituation, after the
days of mourning were over, he lett the
houfe his father lived in, and returned again
to London, where he purchafed a handfome
equipage, commenced the fine gentleman,
frequented the balls, mafquerades, play-
houfes, routs, drums, &c.l3c. and cut as
good a figure as the bell of them. But here
let us leave him for a while, and turn our
eyes to a worthier object.

In the fame fpaceof time which Mr. Fro-
c ward took to fquander away a good eftate,
Mr. Tborougbgeod\ia&,\>y his own induftry,
and from a fmall fortune, gained one con-
fiderably better, and was in a fair way of
encreaiinfrit. The former made pleafure his
bunnefs, but the latter made bufmefs his
pleafare, and was rewarded accordingly.
The alderman, who by his own application
and Mr. TboroHghgootFs afliduity, was grown

very



very rich, had no child now living but a
daughter, of whom both he and his lady
were extremely fond ; they had nothing fo
much at heart as to fee her well fettled in
the world. She was the youngeft, and juft
now turned of twenty. She had many
fuitors, but refolved to encourage none
without the confent of her parents, who
would often, when by themfelves, tell her
that it was their joint opinion me could not
difpofe of herfelf better than to Mr. Thomas,
and would frequently afk how flic liked
him ? for they would be unwilling to marry
her againft her own inclination. Her ufual
anfwer was, " Your choice mail be mine ;
" my duty mall never be made fubfer-
*' vient to any fenfual paflion." This re-
ply was not fo full and exprefiive as they
expected ; and as mothers are commonly
very dexterous in finding out their daugh-
ters maladies, madam had good reafon to
believe, from fome obfervations (he made on
iniis's behaviour, that her affections were al-
ready fixed, and that fne was deeply in love
with fomebody elfb, which was the caufe of
her unufual anxiety. Hereupon, as fne was
fitting at work one evening in a melan-
choly poilure, they called her, and deired
to be informed whether the hulband they
1 p rope fed



( 86 )

propofed was difagreeable to her, if To, (he
fhould chufe for herfelf.

The young lady (after fome hefitation)
with blufhes confefTed her regard for Mr.
< Thoronghgood\ which gave infinite fatisfac-
tion to the alderman and his lady, who
were overjoyed at the profpedt they had of
marrying their daughter to a perfon of fuch
prudence, integrity and honour.

The next day, as foon as dinner was
over, the alderman and his lady withdrew,
and left the two lovers together ail the
evening; from this interview they became
fenfible of each other's approaching happi-
nefs, and about a month after were joined
together, to the great fatisfac~tion of all
parties concerned. From this day the bride-
groom was taken into partnerfhip, and tranf-
a&ed the whole bufinefs himfelf. In pro-
cefs of time his father-in-law died, and left
him in pofTeffion of all his fubflance. lie
fucceeded him alfo in his dignity, and after
having ferved the office of fherifF, was in
a few years called to the chair.

Mr. Froward, whom we left a while ago
purfuing his pieafures and wicked inclina^
tions, had long before this time been re- .
duced to poverty ; and, like many other
thoughtlefs wretches, betook himfelf to the



highway and the gaming-table, in hopes of
recovering a loit fortune. He had followed
this deftrudive trade with fome fuccefs,
and, without being difcovered, above three
years ; but was at length taken near Endfeld,
and brought to his trial at the Old-Bailey t
during his fellow-prentice's mayoralty, and
call for his life. When he was brought to
the bar to receive fentence, his lordfhip re-
collecting Mr. Froward's name, examined
who he was, and afked if he was not the
fame perfon that ferved his time with Mr.
Alderman ***, in Cbeapjtde. This he pofi-
tively denied ; but notwithftanding he ufed
all poffible means to difguife himfelf, his
perfon and fpeech betrayed him. My lord,
animated with the principles of compaifion
and benevolence, and imagining that his
deiign of concealing himfelf in this wretch-
ed fituadon might very probably proceed
from fhame or defpair, took no farther no-
tice of it in court, but, forgetting his prefent
difgrace, as well as his former arrogance and
mdifcretion, privately procured his fentence
k o be changed into tranfportation for life.

The fhip in which Mr. Froward em-
barked, by llrefs of weather drove into a
certain port in "Jamaica, where he, in lefs
than ten days, was fold to a noted planter,
I 2 and



( 88 )

and doomed to perpetual flavery. You
may imagine how fhocking this profpeft
inuii: appear to a gentleman, who had juft
before fquandered away a good eftate in in-
dolence and pleafure, who never knew what
it was to work, nor had ever given himfelf
time to think upon the nature of induftry.
However, he no fooner began to reflec~l up-
on his prefent wretched fituation, and his
late providential deliverance from death,
than he alfo began to repent of his former
tranfgreiftons ; and finding himfelf in a
ftrange country, unknown to any perfon
about him, he patiently fubmitted his neck
to the yoke, and endured his fervility with
an uncommon fortitude of mind. In the
rft place, he determined, during all the
time of his labour, to offer up continual
thankfgivings to Almighty God for his ma-
nifold mercies beftowed on fo unworthy a
creature, and to devote all his leifure hours
to the duty of repentance. His next refolu-
tion was to obey his mailer's commands, to
ferve him faithfully, and to perform what-
ever bufinefs was impofed on him, fb far and
fo long as his health and ftrength would
permit ; not doubting but the fame God,
who had preferved him hitherto, in fuch a
wonderful manner, would accept the obla-
tions



tlons of a contrite heart, and enable hirn^to
go thro' it with courage and chearfulnefs.'

The ril month's fervice, as he himfelf
told me, went very hard with him. His
hands bliitered, his feet grew fore and raw,
and the heat of the climate \vas almoft in-
fupponable ; but as cuftom makes every
ilation familiar, before three months were
expired, all theie grievances were at an end ;
and he, naturally endued with a fpirit of
emulation, would not fuffer himfelf to be
outdone by any of his fellow naves. The
fuperintendant obferving his extraordinary
ailiduity, could not help taking notice of
him, and would frequently give him en-
couragement, either by calling him off to
go on a trivial errand, or by ihrufting fome
money into his hand. He behaved in this
manner near two years, when his mafter
was informed of his good difpofition, and
removed him from that laborious employ-
ment to an eafier, where he had more fre-
quent opportunities of paying adoration to
that Almighty Being, who fupported him
under all his afflictions. In thefe intervals,
he was generally found with a book in his
hand, or on his knees, from which practice
he received great confolation, as he often af-
fured me.

I At



( 9 )

At the expiration of three years, Sir Tbo.
Thorougbgood, who made previous inquiry
after his fellow-prentice's behaviour abroad,
fent orders to his agent in Jamaica, to pur-
chafe Mr. F reward's freedom, and to advance
him ioo/. that he might be enabled to get
his own livelihood ; but at the fame time
gave ftrift orders to his friend, not to let
Mr. Froward know who was his benefaclor,
and to lay his mailer under the like injunc-
tion. In a fhort time after, Mr. Pro-ward
was difcharged from flavery; but did not
exprefs fo much joy on the occafion, as
might have been reasonably expecled. From
the good ufage he met with in fervitude,
and the unufual favours he received from
the fuperintendant, as well as the planter,
he had conceived a great liking for the lat-
ter, and feemed to part with him not with-
out fome inward reluftance, tho' with ap-
parent furprife; which was much height-
ened by the additional favour of a note for
a hundred pounds payable upon fight to
Mr. Francis Frvwttrd or order, delivered to


1 2 4 6

Online LibraryMaurice Agnus OudinThe Lilliputian magazine, or, The young gentleman and lady's golden library. Being an attempt to mend the world, to render the society of man more amiable, and to establish the plainness, simplicity, virtue and wisdom of the golden age, so much celebrated by the poets and historians → online text (page 4 of 6)