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SOUTHERN LIFE IN SOUTHERN
LITERATURE



SELECTIONS OF REPRESENTATIVE
PROSE AND POETRY



SELECTED AND EDITED BY

MAURICE GARLAND FULTON

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH, DAVIDSON COLLEGE



GINN AND COMPANY

BOSTON NEW YORK CHICAGO LONDON-
ATLANTA DALLAS COLUMBUS SAX FRAXCISCO



COPYRIGHT, 1917, BY MAURICE GARLAND FULTON
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED



217.]



CINN AND COMPANY PRO
PRIETORS BOSTON U.S.A.



PREFACE

In this book I have endeavored to represent as adequately
as might be possible within the limits of a volume of moderate
size the work of the more important Southern writers. My at
tempt has been not merely to show the value of literary effort
in the South as absolute achievement but also to emphasize its
importance as a record of Southern life and character.

Taking literature in the stricter sense of fiction, essay, and
poetry, I have omitted the historians, the biographers, and the
political writers so frequently used to swell the bulk of Southern
literature. In poetry I have endeavored to select poems which
have attained some measure of general critical approval. But
in some instances, especially in the Civil War poetry, I have
included poems obviously without much literary merit because
they were household poems of an older generation and embodied
in a characteristic way the traditions and spirit of the people
who loved them. For much the same reason I have included
a few specimens of the vanishing survivals of old English bal
lads to the presence of which in the South attention has lately
been turned.

In the case of the older prose writers, I have drawn upon a
very limited number of the most significant works. As most of
these were out of print or difficult to secure, I have tried to give
a general idea of each by means of liberal excerpts and suitable
summaries. Coming to the recent novelists and story-writers,
whose number is almost legion, I was compelled to confine my
self rigidly to the five pioneers in the new development of fiction

360494



vi SOUTHERN LIFE IN SOUTHERN LITERATURE

in the eighties. The single departure from this principle in the
case of William Sidney Porter (" O. Henry ") will require no
explanation. I have devoted much attention to the humorous
writers of the South because of my belief that, although much
of this work was rough and crude, it was nevertheless very
influential not only in the development of American humor but
also in that of realistic fiction.

Better to fit the book to the needs of students, I have tried
to organize the material effectively. The table of contents will
show that the arrangement is roughly chronological, with such
subdivisions as would bring together writers of the same type
of literature. Further aids to students have been given in
biographical notes, summaries of literary developments, explana
tions of unfamiliar matters in the selections, and bibliographies
all being held to the briefest compass.

I have given at appropriate places in the book acknowledg
ments for permission to reprint such of the selections as were
under copyright, but I wish here to record in a general way
grateful appreciation of the courtesy extended to me in this
matter by authors and by publishers.

M. G. F.

Davidson College,
Davidson, N. C.



CONTENTS

PART I. THE OLD SOUTH IX LITERATURE

ESSAYISTS AND DESCRIPTIVE WRITERS
WILLIAM WIRT PAGE

THE BRITISH SPY S OPINION OF THE SPECTATOR .... i
AN OLD VIRGINIA PREACHER 4

DAVID CROCKETT

THE BEAR HUNT 8

JOHN JAMES AUDUBOX

EARLY SETTLERS ALONG THE MISSISSIPPI 14

WILLIAM ELLIOTT

A DEER HUNT 19

ROMANCERS AND STORY WRITERS
EDGAR ALLAX POE

THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER 28

JOHX PEXDLETOX KENNEDY

\J /^SELECTIONS FROM "SWALLOW BARN" 50

/Swallow Barn, an Old Virginia Estate 50

The Master of Swallow Barn 54

I The Mistress of Swallow Barn 57

\ Traces of the Feudal System 59

\The Quarter 64

SELECTIONS FROM " HORSESHOE ROBINSON " 68

Horseshoe Robinson 68

Capture of Butler and Horseshoe 72

Horseshoe captures Five Prisoners 77

The Battle of King s Mountain 90

WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS

SELECTION FROM "THE YEMASSEE" 105

The Attack on the Block House 105

vii



viii SOUTHERN LIFE IN SOUTHERN LITERATURE

JOHN ESTEN COOKE PAGE

SELECTIONS FROM "THE VIRGINIA COMEDIANS" 124

Mr. Champ Effingham of Effingham Hall 124

Governor Fauquier s Ball 128

HUMORISTS

AUGUSTUS BALDWIN LONGSTREET

THE HORSE SWAP . 151

THE TURN OUT 161

WILLIAM TAPPAN THOMPSON

MAJOR JONES S COURTSHIP 170

JOSEPH GLOVER BALDWIN

OVID BOLUS, ESQ 176

How THE FLUSH TIMES SERVED THE VIRGINIANS .... 180

POETS
ST. GEORGE TUCKER

RESIGNATION 188

FRANCIS SCOTT KEY

THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER 190

RICHARD HENRY WILDE

MY LIFE is LIKE THE SUMMER ROSE 192

TO THE MOCKING-BIRD . V^G^C* 193

EDWARD COATE PINKNEY

SONG 194

A SERENADE 194

A HEALTH 195

MIRABEAU BUONAPARTE LAMAR

THE DAUGHTER OF MENDOZA 197

ALBERT PIKE

To THE MOCKING BIRD 198

PHILIP PENDLETON COOKE

FLORENCE VANE 200

LIFE IN THE AUTUMN WOODS . 202



CONTENTS ix

THEODORE O HARA PAGE

THE BIVOUAC OF THE DEAD 205

ALEXANDER BEAUFORT MEEK

A SONG 209

LAND OF THE SOUTH 210

THE MOCKING BIRD 211

HENRY ROOTES JACKSON

THE RED OLD HILLS OF GEORGIA 213

MY WIFE AND CHILD 215

JAMES MAtTHEWS LEGARfi

To A LILY 217

HAW BLOSSOMS 217

WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS

OH, THE SWEET SOUTH ! 220

THE SWAMP Fox 222

EDGAR ALLAN POE

To HELEN 225

ISRAFEL 227

THE RAVEN 228

ULALUME 233

ANNABEL LEE 237

ELDORADO . . . 238

PART II. POETRY OF THE CIVIL WAR

JAMES RYDER RANDALL

MY MARYLAND 240

JOHN PELHAM 243

ALBERT PIKE

DIXIE 244

HARRY MCCARTHY

THE BONNIE BLUE FLAG 246

JOHN ESTEN COOKE

THE BAND IN THE PINES 247



x SOUTHERN LIFE IN SOUTHERN LITERATURE
JOHN REUBEN THOMPSON PAGE

ASHBY 249

Music IN CAMP 250

THE BURIAL OF LATANE 253

WILLIAM GORDON McCABE

DREAMING IN THE TRENCHES 255

CHRISTMAS NIGHT OF 62 256

JOHN PEGRAM 258

JOHN WILLIAMSON PALMER

STONEWALL JACKSON S WAY 259

HENRY LYNDEN FLASH

STONEWALL JACKSON 261

THADDEUS OLIVER

ALL QUIET ALONG THE POTOMAC TO-NIGHT 262

MARIE RAVENEL DE LA COSTE

SOMEBODY S DARLING 264

CAROLINE AUGUSTA BALL

THE JACKET OF GRAY 266

MARGARET JUNKIN PRESTON

GONE FORWARD 268

THE SHADE OF THE TREES 269

ANONYMOUS

THE SOLDIER BOY 270

"THE BRIGADE MUST NOT KNOW, SIR!" 271

THE CONFEDERATE FLAG 272

LINES ON A CONFEDERATE NOTE 273

ABRAM JOSEPH RYAN

THE CONQUERED BANNER 275

THE SWORD OF ROBERT LEE 277

HENRY TIMROD

CAROLINA 279

A CRY TO ARMS 282

CHARLESTON 284

SPRING . . 286






CONTENTS xi

C\^ /) PAGE

THE COTTON BOLL . .Nh^^^ 288

THE LILY CONFIDANTE 293

MAGNOLIA CEMETERY ODE 295

FRANCIS ORRAY TICKNOR

LITTLE GIFFEN 297

THE VIRGINIANS OF THE VALLEY 298

UNKNOWN 299

PAGE BROOK 300

LOYAL 301

PART III. THE NEW SOUTH IX LITERATURE
HUMORISTS

RICHARD MALCOLM JOHNSTON

THE GOOSEPOND SCHOOLMASTER 303

GEORGE WILLIAM BAGBY

JUD BROWNIN S ACCOUNT OF RUBINSTEIN S PLAYING . . . 308

NOVELISTS AND STORY WRITERS

GEORGE WASHINGTON CABLE

THE DANCE IN PLACE CONGO 314

JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS

BRER RABBIT GROSSLY DECEIYES BRER Fox 324

THE CUNNING Fox is AGAIN VICTIMIZED 328

MARY NOAILLES MURFREE ("CHARLES EGBERT

CRADDOCK")
THE "HARNT" THAT WALKS CHILHOWEE 332

THOMAS NELSON PAGE

MARSE CHAN (SUMMARY) 342

THE TRAINING OF THE OLD VIRGINIA LAWYER 347

JAMES LANE ALLEN

Two GENTLEMEN OF KENTUCKY 348

WILLIAM SIDNEY PORTER (" O HENRY")

Two RENEGADES 363



xii SOUTHERN LIFE IN SOUTHERN LITERATURE

ESS A YISTS AND DESCRIPTIVE WRITERS

SUSAN DABNEY SMEDES PAGE

A SOUTHERN PLANTER S IDEALS OF HONOR 373

v/BASIL LANNEAU GILDERSLEEVE

f\ THE CREED OF THE OLD SOUTH 377

WILLIAM PETERFIELD TRENT

THE DIVERSITY AMONG SOUTHERNERS 389

POETS

PAUL HAMILTON HAYNE

A DREAM OF THE SOUTH WINDS 400

ASPECTS OF THE PINES 401

MACDONALD S RAID 1780 . . , 402

THE PINE S MYSTERY . . vfecLOt r 405

THE WILL AND THE WING 405

THE AXE AND PINE 407

MIDSUMMER IN THE SOUTH 407

IRWIN RUSSELL

NEBUCHADNEZZAR ". . . 410

SELLING A DOG 412

DAT PETER 413

SIDNEY LANIER

THE TOURNAMENT 416

ONG OF THE CHATTAHOOCHEE 419

THE CRYSTAL 421

SUNRISE 422

JOHN BANISTER TABB

MY STAR 429

KILLDEE 430

CLOVER 430

FAME 431

JOHN HENRY BONER

MOONRISE IN THE PlNES 431

THE LIGHT OOD FIRE 434

POE S COTTAGE AT FORDHAM 435



CONTENTS xiii

WILL HENRY THOMPSON PAGE

THE HIGH TIDE AT GETTYSBURG 437

SAMUEL MINTURN PECK

A SOUTHERN GIRL 44<>

THE GRAPEVINE SWING 441

AUNT JEMIMA S QUILT 443

WILLIAM HAMILTON HAYNE

A MEADOW SONG 445

WHEN DOGWOOD BRIGHTENS THE GROVES OF SPRING . . 447

ROBERT BURNS WILSON

To A CROW 448

BALLAD OF THE FADED FIELD 448

FRANK LEBBY STANTON

A PLANTATION DITTY 450

THE GRAVEYARD RABBIT 450

ANSWERING TO ROLL CALL 451

MADISON JULIUS CAWEIN

THE WHIPPOORWILL 453

EVENING ON THE FARM 454

JOHN CHARLES McNEILL

AWAY DOWN HOME 456

Ax IDYL 458

BAREFOOTED 459

SUNDOWN 460

WALTER MALONE

OCTOBER IN TENNESSEE 461

SURYIVALS OF OLD BRITISH BALLADS

BARBARA ALLEN 462

LORD THOMAS AND FAIR ELEANOR 464

THE HANGMAN S TREE 467

THE WIFE OF USHER S WELL 469

GEORGE COLLINS 470

NOTES 473

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF SOUTHERN

LITERATURE 528



ILLUSTRATIONS

PAGE

The Lanier Oak Frontispiece

Edgar Allan Poe 27

John Pendleton Kennedy 51

Major Butler and Horseshoe Robinson 73

William Gilmore Simms 105

John Esten Cooke 124

The Raleigh Tavern in Old Williamsburg, and its Famous Apollo

Room 129

Blossom and his Horse, Bullet 152

Michael St. John, the Schoolmaster, effecting an Entrance by

Storm 1 68

Tom Edmundson as Schoolmaster 186

Francis Scott Key 190

Woodlands, the Country Estate of William Gilmore Simms . . 221

Poe s Room at the University of Virginia, No. 13 West Range . 226

John Reuben Thompson 248

Henry Timrod 278

Francis Orray Ticknor 296

George Washington Cable 313

Joel Chandler Harris 324

Mary Noailles Murfree 332

Thomas Nelson Page 342

James Lane Allen 349

Paul Hamilton Hayne 399

Copse Hill, the Home of Paul Hamilton Hayne 406

Irwin Russell 410

Sidney Lanier 415

Poe s Cottage at Fordham 435

William Hamilton Ilayne 445

Madison Julius Cawein 452

John Charles McNeill 457

xiv



SOUTHERN LIFE IN SOUTHERN
LITERATURE

PART I. THE OLD SOUTH IN
LITERATURE

ESSAYISTS AND DESCRIPTIVE WRITERS

WILLIAM WIRT

[William Wirt was born at Bladensburg. Maryland, in 1772. He
was admitted to the bar in 1792 and began practice at Culpeper
Court-House, Virginia. After 1799 ne resided chiefly at Richmond
until his appointment as Attorney-General of the United States in
1817. This position he held for twelve years, and upon his retire
ment from office he resided in Baltimore. He died at Washington
in 1834. During Wirt s practice of law in Virginia his best-known
legal argument was his celebrated speech in 1807 against Aaron
Burr at the latter s trial for treason. In addition to success at the
bar Wirt had the distinction of being regarded for many years as
the chief man of letters in the South.]

THE BRITISH SPY S OPINION OF THE SPECTATOR

In one of my late rides into the surrounding country, I
stopped at a little inn to refresh myself and my horse ; and,
as the landlord was neither a Boniface nor " mine host of the
garter," I called for a book, by way of killing time while the
preparations for my repast were going forward. He brought
me a shattered fragment of the second volume of The Spectator,



? SOUTHERN LIFE IN SOUTHERN LITERATURE

which he told me was the only book in the house, for * he
never troubled his head about reading " ; and by way of con
clusive proof, he further informed me that this fragment, the
only book in the house, had been sleeping unmolested on the
dust of his mantelpiece for ten or fifteen years. I could not
meet my venerable countryman, in a foreign land, and in this
humiliating plight, nor hear of the inhuman and gothic con
tempt with which he had been treated, without the liveliest
emotion. So I read my host a lecture on the subject, to which
he appeared to pay as little attention as he had before done
to The Spectator-, and, with the sang froid of a Dutchman,
answered me in the cant of the country, that he " had other
fish to fry," and left me.

It had been so long since I had had an opportunity of open
ing an agreeable collection, that the few numbers which were
now before me appeared almost entirely new ; and I cannot
describe to you the avidity and delight with which I devoured
those beautiful and interesting speculations.

Is it not strange, my dear S , that such a work should

have ever lost an inch of ground ? A style so sweet and simple,
and yet so ornamented ! a temper so benevolent, so cheerful,
so exhilarating ! a body of knowledge, and of original thought,
so immense and various, so strikingly just, so universally useful !
What person, of any age, sex, temper, calling, or pursuit, can
possibly converse with The Spectator without being conscious
of immediate improvement ?

To the spleen he is as perpetual and never-failing an anti
dote as he is to ignorance and immorality. No matter for the
disposition of mind in which you take him up ; you catch, as
you go along, the happy tone of spirits which prevails through
out the work ; you smile at the wit, laugh at the drollery, feel
your mind enlightened, your heart opened, softened, and refined ;
and when you lay him down, you are sure to be in a better



WILLIAM WIRT (3

^S^x

humor, both with yourself and everybody else. I have never
mentioned the subject to a reader of The Spectator who did not
admit this to be the invariable process ; and in such a world
of misfortune, of cares and sorrows and guilt, as this is, what
a prize would this collection be if it were rightly estimated !

Were I the sovereign of a nation which spoke the English
language, and wished my subjects cheerful, virtuous, and en
lightened, I would furnish every poor family in my dominions
(and see that the rich furnished themselves) with a copy of
The Spectator, and ordain that the parents or children should
read four or five numbers aloud every night in the year. For
one of the peculiar perfections of the work is, that while it
contains such a mass of ancient and modern learning, so much
of profound wisdom and of beautiful composition, yet there is
scarcely a number throughout the eight volumes which is not
level to the meanest capacity. Another perfection is, that The
Spectator will never become tiresome to anyone whose taste
and whose heart remain uncorrupted.

I do not mean that this author should be read to the ex
clusion of others ; much less that he should stand in the way
of the generous pursuit of science, or interrupt the discharge
of social_pr pn vatp Hiiti^s, All the counsels of the work have a
directly reverse tendency. It furnishes a store of the clearest
argument and of the most amiable and captivating exhortations,
" to raise the genius, and to mend the heart." I regret only
that such a book should be thrown by, and almost entirely
forgotten, while the gilded blasphemies of infidels, and the
" noontide* trances " of pernicious theorists, are hailed with rap
ture and echoed around the world. For such, I should be
pleased to see The Spectator universally substituted ; and,
throwing out the question of its morality, its literary infor
mation, its sweetly contagious serenity, and pure and chaste
beauties of its style, and considering it merely as a curiosity,



4 SOUTHERN LIFE IN SOUTHERN LITERATURE

as concentering the brilliant sports of the finest cluster of
geniuses that ever graced the earth, it surely deserves per
petual attention, respect, and consecration.

There is, methinks, my S , a great fault in the world,

as it respects this subject: a giddy instability, a light and
fluttering vanity, a prurient longing after novelty, an impa
tience, a disgust, a fastidious contempt of everything that is
old. You will not understand me as censuring the progress
of sound science. I am not so infatuated an antiquarian, not
so poor a philanthropist, as to seek to retard the expansion of
the human mind. But I lament the eternal oblivion into which
our old authors, those giants of literature, are permitted to sink,
while the world stands open-eyed and open-mouthed to catch
every modern, tinseled abortion as it falls from the press. In
the polite circles of America, for instance, perhaps there is no
want of taste, and even zeal, for letters. I have seen several
gentlemen who appear to have an accurate, a minute, acquaint
ance with the whole range of literature, in its present state of
improvement ; yet you will be surprised to hear that I have not
met with more than one or two persons in this country who
have ever read the works of Bacon or of Boyle. They delight
to saunter in the upper story, sustained and adorned, as it is,
with the delicate proportions, the foliage and flourishes, of the
Corinthian order ; but they disdain to make any acquaintance,
or hold communion at all, with the Tuscan and Doric plainness
and strength which base and support the whole edifice. . . .



AN OLD VIRGINIA PREACHER

It was one Sunday, as I traveled through the county of
Orange, that my eye was caught by a cluster of horses tied
near a ruinous old wooden house in the forest, not far from
the roadside. Having frequently seen such objects before, in



WILLIAM WIRT 5

traveling through those states, I had no difficulty in understand
ing that this was a place of religious worship.

Devotion alone should have stopped me, to join in the duties
of the congregation ; but I must confess that curiosity to hear
the preacher of such a wilderness was not the least of my
motives. On entering, I was struck with his preternatural
appearance. He was a tall and very spare old man ; his
head, which was covered with a white linen cap, his shriveled
hands, and his voice were all shaking under the influence
of a palsy ; and a few moments ascertained to me that he was
perfectly blind.

The first emotions that touched my breast were those of
mingled pity and veneration. But how soon were all my
feelings changed ! The lips of Plato were never more worthy
of a prognostic swarm of bees than were the lips of this holy
man ! It was a day of the administration of the sacrament ;
and his subject was, of course, the passion of our Saviour. I
have heard the subject handled a thousand times ; I had
thought it exhausted long ago. Little did I suppose that in
the wild woods of America I was to meet with a man whose
eloquence would give to this topic a new and more sublime
pathos than I had ever before witnessed.

As he descended from the pulpit to distribute the mystic
symbols, there was a peculiar, a more than human, solemnity
in his air and manner which made my blood run cold and my
whole frame shiver.

He then drew a picture of the sufferings of our Saviour:
his trial before Pilate, his ascent up Calvary, his crucifixion,
and his death. I knew the whole history ; but never until then
had I heard the circumstances so selected, so arranged, so
colored ! It was all new ; and I seemed to have heard it for
the first time in my life. His enunciation was so deliberate that
his voice trembled on every syllable ; and every heart in the



6 SOUTHERN LIFE IN SOUTHERN LITERATURE

assembly trembled in unison. His peculiar phrases had the
force of description, that the original scene appeared to be at
that moment acting before our eyes. We saw the very faces
of the Jews : the staring, frightful distortions of malice and
rage. We saw the buffet ; my soul kindled with a flame of
indignation, and my hands were involuntarily and convulsively
clinched.

But when he came to touch on the patience, the forgiving
meekness of our Saviour ; when he drew, to the life, his blessed
eyes streaming in tears to heaven, his voice breathing to God
a soft and gentle prayer of pardon on his enemies, " Father,
forgive them, for they know not what they do," the voice
of the preacher, which had all along faltered, grew fainter and
fainter, until, his utterance being entirely obstructed by the
force of his feelings, he raised his handkerchief to his eyes
and burst into a loud and irrepressible flood of grief. The
effect is inconceivable. The whole house resounded with the
mingled groans, and sobs, and shrieks of the congregation.

It was some time before the tumult had subsided, so far as
to permit him to proceed. Indeed, judging by the usual, but
fallacious standard of my own weakness, I began to be very
uneasy for the situation of the preacher. For I could not
conceive how he would be able to let his audience down from
the height to which he had wound them, without impairing the
solemnity and dignity of his subject, or perhaps shocking them
by the abruptness of the fall. But no ; the descent was as
beautiful and sublime as the elevation had been rapid and
enthusiastic.

The first sentence with which he broke the awful silence
was a quotation from Rousseau : " Socrates died like a phi
losopher, but Jesus Christ, like a God ! "

I despair of giving you any idea of the effect produced by
this short sentence, unless you could perfectly conceive the



DAVID CROCKETT f

whole manner of the man as well as the peculiar crisis in the
discourse. Never before did I completely understand what
Demosthenes meant by laying such stress on deliver)-. You
are to bring before you the venerable figure of the preacher;
his blindness, constantly recalling to your recollection old Homer,
Ossian, and Milton, and associating with his performance the
melancholy grandeur of their geniuses; you are to imagine
that you hear his slow, solemn, well-accented enunciation, and
his voice of affecting, trembling melody ; you are to remember
the pitch of passion and enthusiasm to which the congregation
were raised ; and then the few moments of portentous, death
like silence which reigned throughout the house ; the preacher,
removing his white handkerchief from his aged face (even yet
wet from the recent torrent of his tears) and slowly stretching
forth the palsied hand which holds it, begins the sentence,
" Socrates died like a philosopher," then, pausing, raising
his other hand, pressing them both, clasped together, with
warmth and energy to his breast, lifting his " sightless balls "
to heaven, and pouring his whole soul into his tremulous voice,
" but Jesus Christ like a God ! " If it had indeed and in
truth been an angel of light, the effect could scarcely have been
more divine.



DAVID CROCKETT

[David Crockett, the noted American pioneer and politician, was
born in Tennessee in I 786. He was a typical backwoodsman, un
lettered but shrewd, skillful as a hunter, and fond of an out-of-doors
life. He served under Jackson in the war against the Creek Indians,
and in 1826 was elected to Congress. At the close of his third term
in Congress he enlisted with the Texan forces then at war with
Mexico, and in 1836 was one of the defenders of the Alamo, where,
on March 6th, with the rest of the garrison, he was killed by Santa
Anna s troops.]



8 SOUTHERN LIFE IN SOUTHERN LITERATURE

THE BEAR HUNT

In the morning I left my son at the camp, and we started
on towards the harricane, and when we had went about a
mile, we started a very large bear, but we got along mighty
slow on account of the cracks in the earth occasioned by the
earthquakes. We, however, made out to keep in hearing of
the dogs for about three miles, and then we come to the harri
cane. Here we had to quit our horses, as old Nick himself
couldn t have got through it without sneaking it along in the
form that he put on to make a fool of our old grandmother
Eve. By this time several of my dogs had got tired and come
back ; but we went ahead on foot for some little time in the
harricane, when we met a bear coming straight to us, and not
more than twenty or thirty yards off. I started my tired dogs
after him, and McDaniel pursued them, and I went on to
where my other dogs were. I had seen the track of the bear
they were after, and I knowed he was a screamer. I followed
on to about the middle of the harricane, but my dogs pursued
him so close that they made him climb an old stump about
twenty feet high. I got in shooting distance of him and fired,
but I was all over in such a flutter from fatigue and running
that I could n t hold steady; but, however, I broke his shoulder,
and he fell. I run up and loaded my gun as quick as possible,
and shot him again and killed him. When I werjt to take out
my knife to butcher him, I found that I had lost it in coming
through the harricane. The vines and briars was so thick that



Online LibraryMaurice G. (Maurice Garland) FultonSouthern life in southern literature; selections of representative prose and poetry → online text (page 1 of 35)