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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES

GIFT OF



llrs. Mark Sandrich



We shall become the same, we sKall be one spirit
within two frames, oh, wherefore two ?

Page 205




(^i



<^s



LYRICS OF UOVE
AND FMDENDSHIIP
ARRANGED By

M®^ BYRON



te'



^



tfODBER^ STOUaiTON • LONDON" -NEV/yOKK TOIONTO



(in

3s '^



^



PREFATORY NOTE

nPHE following poems are arranged in a certain
sequence, so that as far as possible, they may
assimilate themselves to the order of Natme in a
garden throughout the year. They have been
selected to this end, and are, through the exigen-
cies of the subject, mainly examples of that "lyrical
cry" by which personal human emotion is ex-
pressed in rhythm and rhyme.

Though many of them are long famihar to the
lover of EngHsh literature, and none appear for the
first time, I believe this to be the most representative
collection of love-poems that has hitherto been
compiled.

The reader can hardly fail to notice with surprise
the extraordinary variety of style, thought, and
treatment which is to be met with, in dealing with
the single subject of Love in its different phases.
And this, although several aspects of Love have
purposely or of necessity been omitted.
V



^y



For kind permission to make use liere of many
copyright poems, I have to acknowledge the courtesy
of The Spectator, The Outlook, The Pall Mall Gazette,
and The Evening Standard. Thanks are due to
Messrs. Smith Elder for their permission to include
Robert Browning's poem " Greenwood Love " from
Perish tah's Fancies ; to the Houghton Mifflin Company
for the same courtesy with regard to "Toujours
Amour " (E. C. Stedman), " Bedouin Love Song "
(Bayard Taylor), "She Came and Went" (J. R.
Lowell), and "A Song of Content" (J- J- Piatt); to
Messrs. Little, Brown & Co., for the use of "At
Last " (Helen Hunt Jackson). Also to Mrs. Katharine
Tynan- Hinkson, Miss A. E. GiUington, Mr. Maurice
Clare, and other authors, for allowing me to include
various poems of theirs.

In two or three cases I have found it impossible
to trace the authorship of certain Hnes, and, there-
fore, to the unknown writers I must hereby offer

apologies and thanks.

M. B.



CONTENTS



SPRING

I. Dawn in the Garden .

(First Thoughts of Love)
II. Spring Buds ....

(The Wooing)

III. The Flower of all Flowers .

(Portrait of the Beloved)

IV. Shady Walks and Yew Hedges

(Melancholy and Wistful Love)
V. A Guest at the Gate

{Love Himself in Various Disguises]
VI. The Children's Border

(Love oj Mother and Child)



PAGE
' 19

. 31

. 45
. 65
. 81

■■ 93



SUMMER

VII. May-time in the Garden .

{The Sweetness of Love)
VIII. Old-Fashioned Blossoms .
(Old-world Love-songs)
IX. A Green Pleasance .

(Love of Friends)
X. Night and the Nightingale

(Serenades)
XI. Butterflies ....
(Lighter Love Lyrics)
vii



109
121
133
145
157



AUTUMN

PAGE

XII. The Bower 177

(The Ardent Lover)

XIII. Song Birds and Late Roses . , .193

(Little Lyncs of Happy Love)

XIV, Rosemary for Remembrance . , . 209

(Love in Absence)
XV. Rue and Thyme and other Bitter Herbs 221
(Love ReproacJiful and Cynical)

XVI. Poppies 239

(Dreams)

XVII. Rain and Wind 251

(The Doubts and Despairs of Love)
XVIII. Ripened Fruits . . .... 265

(The Happy Husband)



WINTER

XIX. A Bonfire .275

(Love's Renunciation)
XX. Faded Leaves and Withered Flowers. 289

{Ashes of Love)
XXI. A Bench in a Sunny Corner . . .301
(Wedded Lovers Groiviiig Old Together)

XXII. Twilight and Autumn Viollts . .311

(Farewells)

XXIII. Evergreens ....... 329

(Love Strong as Death)

XXIV. Lavender ...»••. 345

{Sweet Memories)



VUl



INDEX



PART I.— SPRING



I. Love-thoughts
II. The New Life

III. My Day.

IV. Endymion . ,
V. If this be Love .

VI. Madrigal
VII. First Love .
VIII. Starting from Paumanok
IX. Hidden Love
X. The Primrose
XI. The Messenger
XII. Love Looks for Love .

XIII. One Word is too Often

Profaned .

XIV. A Cavalier's Wooing .

XV. Because
XVI. Untimely Love
XVII. Love ....
XVIII. The "Je ne sais quoi " .
XIX. The Perfection of Her .
XX. A Nut-Brovvn Maid
XXI. She was a Phantom of

DeHght
XXII. My Sweet Sweeting .
ix



. Lord Houghton


PAGE
23


. Daiife Alii^hicri


24


i Lord Tennyson


25


, H. W. Longfellow .


26


George Lyttleton


27


Marston Moore


28


Samuel Daniel


29


Walt Whitman .


29


John Donne .


30


Thomas Carew


33


Lord Tennyson


33


Robert Herrick


35


P. B. Shelley .


35


TJie Marquis of




Montrose


36


Edward Fitzgerald.


37


Author Unknown .


39


S. T. Coleridge


40


William Whitehead


47


Dante Alighieri


48


Musica Transalpina


48


Wm. Wordsworth .


49


Sir f. Hawkins .


50



XXIII

XXIV

XXV.

XXVI.

XXVII,

XXVIII



XXIX.
XXX.

XXXI.

XXXII,

XXXIII,

XXXIV.

XXXV.

XXXVI.

XXXVII,

XXXVIII.

XXXIX.

XL.

XLI.

XLII.

XLIII.

XLIV.

XLV.

XLVI.

XL VI I,

XLVIII.

XLIX,

L.

LI.



She Walks in Beauty
. Her Face .

Who is the Maid ? .

The Only She .

Her Right Name
. Description of such a
One as he could
Love

Annie Laurie . .

So White, so Soft, so
Sweet is She .

Whom I Love .

A Steadfast Mind .
. Praise of my Lady .

The Lover beseecheth
his Mistress .

Inclusions.

Tenebrae .

From the Arabic

To Electra

Auld Robin Gray

Love Untold

At Last .

Sorrow

Come, Rest in this
Bosom .

Foreknowledge

Too Late .

A Dying Fall .

The Banks o' Doon .
True and False Love

The Ungentle Guest

The Wayfarer .

What the Mighty
Love has Done
X





PAGE


Lo;-(/ Byron .


• 51


Pliilip Rossettcr


. 52


Thorn US Moore


. 53


John Dowland


. 54


Matthew Prior


. 55


Sir Thomas IVyatt


. 56


Lady John Scott


. 57


Ben Jonson .


. 58


William Broivnc


. 59


Thomas Carcw


. 60


William Morris


. 61



Sir Thomas Wyatt . 67

E. B. Browning . 68

Thomas Campion . 69

P. B. Shelley . . 70

Robert Herrick . 70

Lady A nne Barnard 7 1

Joanna Baillie . 73

Helc n Hn n t J a ckso n 74

Ricliard Crashaw . 76



Thomas Moore


' 77


John Donne .


. 77


Matthew Arnold .


. 78


Thomas Campion


. 79


Robert Burns .


• 79


William Blake


. 80


Robert Herrick


. 83


Dante Alighicri ,


. 84


John Fletcher


. 85









PAGE


LII.


, Upon Cupid


. Robert Hcirick


86


LIII.


Hush, Hush ! .


Tlionias Moore


87


LIV.


Love will Find out Seventeenth Century






the Way


Poem .


87


LV.


The Mariner .


William Byrd


89


LVI.


Love, like a Gypsy .


Robert Herrick


90


LVII.


Love's Treachery


Robert Greene


90


LVIII.


Love the Conqueror .


May Byron


91


LIX.


The Shower of Blos-








soms


Robert Herrick


92


LX.


At Bay .


May Byron


95


LXI.


A Cradle Song .


William Blake


97


LXII.


The Goal .


Maurice Clare


98


LXIII.


The Mother's Lullaby


Author UnknoivH .


99


LXIV.


Mothering Sunday .


M. C. Gilliiigton


99


LXV.


A Slumber Song


William Blake


101


LXVI.


The Wood Song


May Byron


102


LXVII.


Parental Recollec-








tions


Mary Lamb ,


103


LXVIII.


Two Against Fate .


May Byron


104


LXIX.


CawnBawnDhcelish Maurice Clare


107



PART II.— SUMMER



LXX.


In May


Alice E. Gillington .


■ 113


LXXI.


Three Kisses


E. B. Browning


■ "5


LXXH.


Love Me if I Love .


Barry Cornwall


115


LXXin.


Greenwood Love


Robert Browning ,


. n6


LXXIV.


The Posie .


Robert Burns .


117


LXXV.


Garden Fancies


Robert Browning .


119


LXXVL


Since First I Saw








Your Face .


Thomas Ford .


123


LXXVII.


Phillida's Love-call to








her Corydon .


Ignoto


124




xi







PAGE

LXXVIII. An Odd Conceit . Nicholas Breton . 126
LXXIX. The Bailiff's Daugh-
ter of Islington . Old Ballad . . 127
LXXX. The Singing Shep-
herd . . . John Woofton . 129
LXXXI. Madrigal , . . John Wilbye . 130
LXXXII. A Dialogue between

Him and His Heart W. Davidson . 130
LXXXni. The Praise of Love . Tobias Hume . 132
LXXXIV. The Friendship-
Flower. . . Lord Houghton . 135
LXXXV. The Meeting of the

Waters . . . Thomas Moore . 136
LXXXVI. The Best of Friends . Author Unknoivn. 137
LXXXVn. I Saw in Louisiana . Walt Whitman . 137
LXXXVIIL To a Friend . . Kathcrine Philips ij8
LXXXI X. A Temple to Friend-
ship . . . Thomas Moore . 139
XC. Friendship . . R. W. Emerson . 140
XCI. Farewell!— but when-
ever you Welcome

the Hour . . Thomas Moore . 141
XCI I. Of the Terrible Doubt

of Appearances . Walt Whitman . 142
XCIII. The Night Piece . Robert Hcrrick . 147
XCIV. Cleveland's Serenade Sir Walter Scott . 148
XCV. Now Sleeps the Crim-
son Petal . , Lord Tennyson . 149
XCVI. While She lies Sleep-
ing . . . John Dowland . 149
XCVI I. Bedouin Love Song . Bayard Taylor . 150
XCVIII. Spanish Serenade . H. W. Longfellow 151
XCIX. An Elizabethan Sere-
nade . . . Sir Philip Sidney 152
C. Were I a Drop of Dew Maurice Clare . 154
xii



CI.


Indian Serenade


P. B. Shelley .


154


CII.


The Clown's Song .


Wm. Shakespeare .


159


cm.


Song by a Person of








Quality .


Lord Peterborough .


160


CIV.


Phillis is My only








Joy ...


Sir Charles Scdley .


161


cv.


Love-Thoughts .


Lord Houghton


162


CVI.


The Promise


William Byrd


163


evil.


Last May a Braw








Wooer .


Robert Burns .


163


CVIII.


The Dissembler


Matthew Prior


165


CIX.


When Love is Kind.


Thomas Moore


166


ex.


A Hymn to Love


Robert Hcrrick


167


CXI.


Sympathy


Reginald Hcber


167


CXII.


The Stolen Heart .


Sir John Suckling .


169


CXI 1 1.


Dear Fanny


Thomas Moore


170


CXIV.


The Deceiver .


W. S. Landor


170


cxv.


Phillida Flouts Me .


Seventeenth Century








Poem .


171


CXVI.


Tarn Glen


Robert Burns .


172


CXVII.


The Despairing Lover William Walsh


^7Z


CXVIII.


Thought from Catul-








lus .


Robert Lloyd .


175


CXIX.


Cean Dubh Dheelish SirSamuelFer^itson


179


CXX.


To Celia .


Ben Jonson .


180


CXXI.


There's a Woman like








a Dew-drop .


Robert Browning .


180


CXXII.


Faith's Avowal


John D owl and


181


CXXIII.


Love's Philosophy .


P. B. Shelley .


182


CXXIV.


To Anthea


Robert Herrick


183


CXXV.


Maid of Athens


Lord Byron .


184


CXX VI.


Come, O Come !


Thomas Campion .


185


CXX VI I.


Love Inveterate


J. Sylvester ,


18S


CXXVIII.


O Wert Thou in the








Cauld Blast .


Robert Burns •


186




xiii







PAGB

CXXIX. A Man's Require

ments . . . E. B. Brownittg , 187

CXXX. How Many Times ? T. L. Beddocs . . 188

CXXXI. Life in a Love . Robert Brownitig . 189

CXXXIL Asli Me no More . Lord Tennyson . 190

CXXXin. A Red, Red Rose . Robert Burns . . 191

PART III.— AUTUMN

CXXXIV. A Birthday . . Christina Rossctti . 197

CXXXV. Tlie Time of Roses Thomas Hood . 198

CXXXVL The Tryst . . Jean Ingelow . .198

CXXXVn. Love's Bird . . Katharine Tynan . 200

CXXX VI n. Finland Love Song Thomas Moore . 201

CXXXIX. Were I a Cloudlet . May Byron . . 202

CXL. Only We . . Lord Houghton . 202

CXLL To Althea, from

Prison . . . Richard Lovelace . 203

CXLIL The Monopolist . Tliomas Moore . 204

CXLIIL This Heart o' Mine Maurice Clare . 204

CXLIV. The Summit . P. B. Shelley . . 205

CXLV. She is Mine . , Thomas Campion . 206

CXLVL I'd Mourn the Hopes Thomas Moore . 206

CXLVII. The Stewardship , M. C. Gillington . 207

CXLVIII. Alter Ego . . Author Unknown . 211

CXLIX. The Lonely Road . IF. S. Landor . .212

CL. In Three Days . Robert Browning . 212

CLI. You and the Spring Wm. Shakespeare . 214

CLII. Wandering Willie . Robert Burns . . 214

CLIII. Memory. . . William Broicnc . 215

CLIV. The Anxious Lover Sir Philip Sidney . 216

CLV. Love in Absence . Katherine Tynan . 217

CLVI. Absence . . . Richard Jago . 218

CLVII. Separation . . W.S. Landor . .218

CLVIII. If , . . . S.T. Coleridge . 218

xiv



PAGE

CLIX. Remembrance . Win. Shakespeare . 219

CLX. The Pilijrimage . Sir Waller Raleigh 223

CLXI. The Triumph . Thomas Campion . 225

CLXII. The Mournful Moon Sir Philip Sidney . 225

CLXIII. Change upon

Change . . E. B. Browning . 226
CLXIV. Kind are Her

Answers . . Thomas Campion , 227
CLXV. Perjury Excused . Wtn. Shakespeare . 228
CLXVI. The Eternal Femi-
nine . . . Tobias Smollett , 228
CLXVII. A Dirge . . . Sir Philip Sidney . 229
CLXVIII. Where did you
Borrow that Last

Sigh? . . . Sir Wm. Berkeley . 231

CLXIX. Love Disposed of , T. L. Beddocs . .231

CLXX. To Cloe . . . Thomas Moore . 233

CLXXL I was in Love . Robert Jones . . 233

CLXXH. What Care I ? . George Wither . 235

CLXXIIL When I Loved You Thomas Moore . 236

CLXXIV. The Prediction , Thomas Campion . 237

CLXXV. Longing. . . Matthew Arnold . 241

CLXXVL The House of Love Marston Moore . 242

CLXXVn. The Traveller's

Dreams . . P. B. Shelley . . 243

CLXXVIII. Tlie Turret . . May Byron . . 243

CLXXIX. Dream-Love . . Christina Rossetti . 244

CLXXX. The One Dream . W. S. Landor. . 247

CLXXXI. Reincarnation . Maurice Clare . 247

CLXXXn. In a Dream . . M. C. Gillington . 249

CLXXXni. Echo . . Christina Rossetti . 249

CLXXXIV. The Lover Com-

plaineth . . Sir Thomas Wyatt . 253
CLXXXV. When the Lamp is

Shattered . . P. B. Shelley . . 255

XV









PAGE


CLXXXVI.


Lewti .


S. T. CoJcridj^c


.256


CLXXXVII.


Edward Gray


Lord Tennyson


• 259


CLXXXVI 1 1.


Two in the Cam-








pagna . .


Robert Browning


. 261


CLXXXIX.


Sometimes with








One I Love .


Walt Whitman


. 264


cxc.


The Anniversary .


John Donne .


. 267


CXCI.


The Happy Hus-








band .


S. T. Coleridge


. 268


CXCII.


The Exchange .


Sir Philip Sidney


. 269


CXCIII.


Love and Nature .


Lord Honghton


, 269


CXCIV.


You .


Robert Browning


. 270


CXCV.


A Song of Content


John James Piatt


. 271


CXCVI.


To His Wife, with








a Ring


Samuel Bishop


• 271


CXCVII.


Home .


Dora Greenwcll


• 273



PART IV.— WINTER

CXCVIII. Give all to Love . R. W. Emerson . 279
CXCIX. The King's Cup-
bearer . May Byron . 281
CC. The Last Ride

Together . . Robert Browning . 282
CCI. The Ever-fixed

Mark. . . Wm. Shakespeare . 286
CCn. One Way of Love Robert Browning . 287
CCin. Separation . . Matthew Arnold . 291
CCIV. When we Two

Parted . . Lord Byron . . 291
CCV. In a Year . . Robert Browning . 293
CCVI. When Passion's
Trance is Over-
past . . . P. B. Shelley . . 296
xvi



CCVII


. In a Drear-Nighted






December .


. John Reals ,


• 297


CCVIII,


, The Time Will








Come .


May Byron .


. 298


CCIX,


. A Parting


. Michael Diaylon


. 298


ccx.


A Dead March


M. C. Gilliiiglon


• 299


CCXI.


Love's House .


, Katharine Tynan


• 303


CCXII.


Wrinkles


W. S. Landor .


. 303


CCXIII.


The Refuge ,


Maurice Clare


. 304


CCXIV.


Autumnal Beauty .


John Donne .


. 305


CCXV.


John Anderson, My








Jo . . .


Robert Burns .


. 306


CCXVI.


To Biancha .


Robert Herrick


• 307


CCXVII.


Unchanging Love .


Thomas Moore


. 307


CCXVIII.


Immortal Youth


Wm. Shakespeare


. 308


CCXIX.


Toujours Amour .


E. C. Stedman


. 308


CCXX.


The Measurement .


E. B. Browning


. 310


CCXXI.


Remain, ah ! not in








Youth Alone


W. S. Landor .


. 310


CCXXII.


Then Fare Thee








well .


Thomas Moore


. 313


CCXXIII.


Exit


Wm. Shakespeare


• 314


CCXXIV.


The Lost Mistress .


Robert Browning


• 315


ccxxv.


Highland Mary


Robert Burns .


.316


CCXXVI.


Love's Secret .


William Blake


. 317


CCXXVII.


Four Years


D. M. Mulock .


318


CCXXVI 1 1.


The Sailing of the








Sword .


William Morris


■ 319


CCXXIX.


A Valediction


E. B. Broxvning


. 321


ccxxx.


We Two Together


Walt Whitman


. 322


CCXXXI.


Farewell to Nancy .


Robert Burns .


.326


CCXXXII.


Farewell ! If Ever








Fondest Prayer .


Lord Byron .


■ 327


CCXXXIII.


The Blessed Damo-








zel . . .


D. G. Rossctti .


• 331



xvu



CCXXXIV.


At the Mid Hour








of Night .


Thomas Moore


• 337


ccxxxv.


Evelyn Hope


Robert Browning


. 337


CCXXXVI.


A Spirit Present .


D. M. Mtiloch .


• 3\o


CCXXXVII.


Remembrance


Emily Bronte


34T


CCXXXVIII.


The Cross Roads .


May Byron


. 343


CCXXXIX.


The Memory of








Love


Lord Hough Ion


. 347


CCXL.


You Remain


Antlior Unlinown


. 347


CCXLI.


Sighs and Memo-








ries .


Dante Alighieri


. 348


CCXLII.


Parted and Met .


Lord Honghton


. 349


CCXLIII.


Love's Young








Dream


Thomas Moore


. 349


CCXLIV.


My Kate


E. B. Browning


• 350


CCXLV.


One Day


Christina Rossetti


• 352


CCXLVI.


Rose Aylmer


W.S. Landor.


. 353


CCXLVII.


She Came and








Went


J. R. Lowell .


• 354


CCXLVIII.


My Letters .


E. B. Browning


• 355


CCXLIX.


Golden Guendolen William Morris


. 355


CCL.


Durisdeer


Lady John Scott


.356


CCLI.


Once More .


Lord Tennysoji


357


CCLII.


The Mother's








Visits


D. M. Mulock .


. 358


CCLIII.


Memory


Christina Rossetti


• 359


CCLIV.


The Vista .


Author Unknown


. 360


CCLV.


Echoes and Me-








mories , ,


P. B. Shelley ■


. 360



XVlll



I/^2T\n




I.

Dawn in the Garden

First Thoughts of Love



T T E was not yet in love, but very near ... for
■' - '■ he thanked God that He had made such
beautiful beings to walk this earth. . . . O, there is
nothing holier in this hfe of ours, than the first
consciousness of love — the first fluttering of its
silken wings — the first sound and breath of that
wind which is so soon to sweep through the soul !
H. W. Longfellow, " Hyperion."







I. Love-thoughts Jt Jt Ji Jb

A LL fair things have soft approaches,
■^^ Quiet steps are still the sure ;
It were hard to point aright
At what instant morning light,
Shy and solemn-paced, encroaches
On the desolate obscure ; —
Who can read the growth of flowers
Syllable by syllable?
Who has sight or ear to tell,
Or by moments or by hours,
At what rate the sappy tree
Full of hfe, and life in spring,
Every sleekest limb embosses
With the buds its vigour glosses, —
At what rate the buds with glee
Burst, and show the tender wing
Of the leaf that hardly dares
Trust to inexperienced airs ?
Who can measure out the pace
Of the smiles on Nature's face?
23



ci



Thou loveliest of the thoughts of God,

Creation's antitype and end !

Thou treadest so the vernal sod

That slimmest grasses hardly bend ; —

I feel thy presence sensible

On my ideal supervene,

Yet just the moment cannot tell

That lies those two bright states between :—

No memory has an arm to reach

The morning-twilight of our thought, —

The infant's use of sight and speech

Is all unchallenged and unsought ;

And yet thou askest, winning one.

That I should now unriddler be,

To tell thee when I first begun

To love and honour Thee !

Lord Hoiighfon.

II. The New Life Jk Jt ^ J^ Jk

I FELT a spirit of love begin to stir
Within my heart, long time unfelt till then ;
And saw Love coming towards me fair and fain,
(That I scarce knew him for his joyful cheer).
Saying, " Be now indeed my worshipper !"

And in his speech he laughed and laughed again.
Then, while it was his pleasure to remain,
I chanced to look the way he had drawn near,
And saw the Ladies Joan and Beatrice
Approach me, this the other following,
24



One and a second marvel instantly.
And even as now my memory speaketh this,
Love spake it then : "The first is christened Spring;
The second Love, she is so like to me."

Danie Alighieri, trans. D. G. Rossetti.

III. My Day jt j* ^ j* ^ .^

OLET the solid ground
Not fail beneath my feet
Before my life has found

What some have found so sweet ;
Then let come what come may,
What matter if I go mad,
I shall have had my day.

Let the sweet heavens endure,

Nor close and darken above me,
Before I am quite sure

That there is one to love me ;
Then let come what come may
To a Hfe tliat has been so sad,
I shall have had my day.

Lord Tennyson.



The Garden of Poets. 25



IV. Endymion J- J' J- ^ ^ .:^

THE rising moon has hid the stars;
Her level rays, like golden bars,
Lie on the landscape green,
With shadows brown between.

And silver white the river gleams,
As if Diana, in her dreams,

Had dropt her silver bow

Upon the meadows low.

On such a tranquil night as this

She woke Endymion with a kiss,

When, sleeping in the grove,

He dreamed not of her love.

Like Dian's kiss, unasked, unsought, ^
Love gives itself, but is not bouglit ;

Nor voice, nor sound betrays

Its deep, impassioned gaze.

It comes — the beautiful, the free,
The crown of all humanity —

In silence and alone

To seek the elected one.

It lifts the boughs, whose shadows deep
Are Life's oblivion, the soul's sleep.
And kisses the closed eyes
Of him who slumbering lies.
26



O weary hearts ! O slumbering e\es I
O drooping souls, whose destinies

Are fraught with fear and pain,

Ye shall be loved again !

No one is so accursed by fate,
No one so utterly desolate,

But some heart, though unknown.

Responds unto his own :

Responds— as if, with unseen wings,
An angel touched its quivering strings;
And whispers, in its song,
" Where hast thou stayed so long ? "
H. W. LongfcUoiv



V. If this be Love? jt jt jt ^ ^

"IITHEN Delia on the plain appears

Aw'd by a thousand tender fears,
I would approach, but dare not move:
Tell me, my heart, if this be love ?

Whene'er she speaks, my ravish'd ear
No other voice but hers can hear.
No other wit but hers approve :
Tell me, my heart, if this be love ?

If she some other youth commend,
Though I was once his fondest friend,
27



His instant enemy I prove :

Tell me, my heart, if this be love?

When she is absent, I no more
Delight in all that pleas'd before,
The clearest spring, or shadiest grove:
Tell me, my heart, if this be love ?

When, fond of power, of beauly vain,
Her nets she spread for every swain,
I strove to hate, but vainly strove :
Tell me, my heart, if this l-.e love ?

George Lyttldon.

VI. Madrigjal ^ Ji d^ Ji d^ J^

* I ''HE rooks are seeking in wood and waste
-*■ The rafter-stuff for their robber castles ;
The hazel boughs in a fever of haste
Hang out their tassels.

The clouds go by like a fleece of wool;

The rills, at end of their frozen waiting
Scamper and chuckle : the air is full

Of courting and mating.

But my heart, like a little lost child astray,
It cries and bewails, with no one to mind it :

Sweeter than spring 1 Wiien you come this way,
Could you but find it !

Maiston Moore,

28



VII. First Love ^ J* ^ ot ^

A H ! I rciiieinbcr well (aiul how can I

But evermore reincnibcr well ?) when first
Our flame bes^an, when scarce we knew what was
Tiie flame we felt ; when as we sat and sighed
And looked upon each other, and conceived
Not what we ail'd — yet something we did ail ;
And yet were well, and yet we were not well,
And what was our disease we could not tell.
Then would we kiss, then sigh, then look ; and

thus
In that first garden of our simpleness
Wc spent our childhood. But when years began
To reap the fruit of knowledge, ah, how then
Would she with graver looks, with sweet stern

brow
Check my presumption and my forwardness ?
Yet still would give me flowers, still would me

show
What she would have me, yet not have me know.

Samuel Daniel.



VIII. Starting from Paumanok jt

"VXTHAT do you seek so pensive and silent?

What do you need camerado ?
Dear son, do you think it is love ?
29



.^



Listen, dear son — listen, America, daughter or son,
It is a painful thing to love a man or woman to

excess, and yet it satisfies, it is great,
But there is something else very great, it makes

the whole coincide.
It, magnificent, beyond materials, with continuous

hands sweeps and provides for all.

Walt Whitman.

IX. Hidden Love Jk Jt J> Jk j.

T F, as I have, you also do
•*• Virtue in woman see,
And dare love that, and say so too.
And forget the He and She —


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