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The bulletin of the School of Medicine of the University of North Carolina [serial] (Volume 5 (1957-1958)) online

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is 27 years of age and is
from Concord, N. C. He
received his B.S. degree
from Davidson College in
1953. Kappa Sigma. Phi
Chi. Dave was president of
the fir t and second year
clas es, F.nd vice-president
of the Whitehead Society last year.
Wife, Ann. He plans a straight surgical
internship at Grady Memorial Hospital
in Atlanta, Georgia next year to be
followed by specialty training in
urology. Dave will practice in Concord,
N. C. '




11




CAROLYN ELIZABETH CULBRETH:
24 years of age, from Dur-
ham, N. C. Carolyn re-
ceived her undergraduate
training at Duke Univer-
sity where she received
her A.B. degree in Zoolo-
gy in 1954. Phi Beta Kap-
pa. Alpha Omega Alpha.
Single. She will intern at
Grace Memorial-New Haven Commun-
ity Hospital (Yale University) in in-
ternal medicine. Following a residency
in internal medicine, she plans to spe-
cialize in cardiology.

JAMES RONALD EDWARDS. "Ron-
nie" is 24 years of age and
comes from Tipton Hill.
He received his B.S. de-
gree in Biology at East
Tenn. State College in
1954. Wife, Delores. He
will take a general prac-
tice internship at Michi-
gan next year and after

that plans to do general practice in

western North Carolina.





MASON DILLARD FIELD, JR.: Masor
is 26 years of age and
comes from Charlotte, N'
C. He graduated frorri
Davidson College in 1954
where he was a Sigmc
Chi. Single. Phi Chi
Mason will do a rotating
general internship at th(
University Hospital am
Hillman Clinic, Birmingham, Alabami
next year. He plans to specialize ir
either internal medicine or surgery.



CARL AUGUSTUS FURR, JR.: Car
is 24 years of age and ii
from Concord, N. C- He
obtained a B.S. degree ir
medicine in 1955. Nex
year he will have a roj
tating general internshii
at Grady Memorial Hospi'
tal. Single. Phi Chi. Hii
plans for the future art

probably to specialize in internal medi.

cine.





WILLIAM CROM ARTIE ELLIOTT:
"Bill" is 24 years of age.
and comes from Lincoln-
ton, N. C. He received his
B.S. degree from Davidson
College in 1954. Kappa
Sigma. Phi Chi. Wife,
Betty. He will do a
straight medical intern-
ship at Massachusetts
Memorial Hospital in Boston next
year. Bill plans to specialize in inter-
nal medicine.

GEORGE ELLIOTT ENNIS: George
is 24 years of age and is
from Hickory, N. C. He
graduated from Lenoir
Rhyne College in 1954
with an A.B. in Chemis-
try. Kappa Sigma Kappa.
Phi Chi. Will take a
straight medicine intern-
ship at the University of
Alabama next year, and plans to prac-
tice in Hickory after completion of his
training.




ARTHUR WYNNS GREGORY, JR.
"Doonie" is 28 years of ag
and is from Halifax, N. C
Received his B S. degrei
in medicine in 1955 fron
U.N.C. Zeta Psi. Single
Phi Chi. He will do a ro^
tating general internshij
at the Medical College o
Virginia next year. Plan

for the future are general practice ir

North Carolina.




THOMAS




MATTHEWS HAIZLIP
"Tom" is 26 years of agi
and from Leaksville, N. C
B.S. from Wake Fores
College in 1954. Sigms
Chi. He will do a mixe(
surgical internship a
Roosevelt Hospital in New
York City next year. Fu-,
ture plans undecided.



12




GEORGE WALTERS HAMBY: 26
years of age and from
Salisbury, N. C. George
received his A.B. degree in
chemistry from UNC in
1954. Single. He will do a
mixed medicine-pediatrics
internship at the Univer-
sity of Arkansas. Hospital
in Little Rock. In the fu-
ture he plans to specialize in either
pediatrics or psychiatry.



ALFRED WILSON HAMER, JR.: Al-
fred is 26 years of age and
is from Morganton, N. C.
He received an A.B. de-
gree from UNC in 1953.
Sigma Nu. Phi Chi. Wife,
Diane. Daughter, Amanda.
Will do a rotating general
internship next year at the
Medical College of South

Carolina. After that he plans to take

an Ob-Gyn residency and practice in

Morganton.





JOHN SANDALL HOWIE: 24 years
of age and comes from Oak
Ridge, Tennessee. He re-
ceived his undergraduate
training at Southwestern
at Memphis, where he ob-
tained a B.A. in psycholo-
gy in 1954. Kappa Alpha.
Next year he will do a
rotating internship at

Queens Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Following internship, John plans a

residency in psychiatry.

JAMES RICHARD HUGHES: "Jim" is
29 years of age and comes
from Snow Hill, N. C. He
received his A.B. degree
in chemistry in 1955 from
UNC. Wife, Charlotte.
Next year he plans to do
a rotating general intern-
ship at Jackson Memorial
Hospital in Miami, Flor-
ida. After completion of his training,
Jim will enter general practice in
eastern North Carolina.




RICHARD LAWRENCE HARRIS:
"Dickie" is 24 years of age
and is single. He is from
High Point, N. C. He re-
ceived ' his B.S. in medi-
cine at U.N.C. in 1955.
Next year, Dick will take
a rotating general intern-
rhip at Grady Memorial
Hospital in Atlanta. His

plans for the future are to specialize in

internal medicine.




CHARLES CREE HUNTER, JR: .
"Charlie" is 26 years of
age and comes from Spring
Hope, N. C. He received
his undergraduate educa-
tion at UNC where he
graduated with a BS in
medicine in 1954. Wife,
Annabel. Son, Jeff. Next
year he will do a mixed

internship at North Carolina Memorial

Hospital.




ROBERT FRANKLIN HOOK: "Bob"
i; 25 years of age and is
from Raleigh, N. C. He
graduated from UNC with
a B.S. in medicine in 1955.
Single. Kappa Sigma. Phi
Chi. Next year Bob will
have a mixed surgical in-
ternship at St. Luke's Hos-
pital in New York City.
His plans for the future are to con-
tinue surgical training and eventually
to practice in North Carolina.




DAN EARNHARDT JOHNSON:
"Corky" is 25 years of age
and is from Charlotte, N.
C. He completed his
undergraduate training at
Davidson College and re-
ceived a B.S. degree in
1954. Kappa Sigma. Phi
Chi. Single. Next year he
will do a straight medical
internship at Grady Memorial Hospital
in Atlanta, Ga. Following his training
he plans to practice in North Caro-
lina.




13





ALLEN RUSSELL KOENIG: "Al" is
29, and comes from Gar-
den City, N. Y. He re-
teived his B.S. in Busi-
ness Administration at
UNC in 1951 and his B.S.
in Medicine at UNC in
1955. Wife, Laurie. Phi
Gamma Delta. Phi Chi.
Next year he will take a
rotating general internship at Green-
wich Hospital, Greenwich, Conn. Plans
for the future are to specialize in Ob-
Gyn.

GENE FONVIELLE KOONCE: Gene is
29 years of age and is from
Jacksonville, N. C. He re-
ceived his A.B. degree in
Chemistry at UNC in 1950
and was a Sigma Chi
there. Single. Phi Chi.
Veteran. Next year he will
do a rotating general in-
ternship at the Medical
College of Virginia. Plans for the fu-
ture are general practice in North
Carolina.

JESSE EUGENE LANG: "Gene" is 28
and from Ayden, North
.MM. Carolina. He received his

B.S. degree from UNC in
1951. Wife, Peggy. Phi
^ Gamma Delta. Next year
Gene will do a U.S. Naval
internship at Camp Pen-
dleton, California. He is
considering a residency in
Ob-Gyn. In the future Gene hopes to
return to North Carolina for practice.

WALTER NATHANIEL LONG, JR.:
26 years of age and from
Belmont, N. C. He re-
ceived his undergraduate
training at Mars Hill Col-
lege and at UNC where he
received his A.B. degree in
Chemistry in 1954. Wife,
Mary. No children. Phi
Beta Kappa. He will do a
mixed medical-pediatric internship at
the University of Arkansas Medical
Center next year. After completion of
his training, Walt plans to practice in
North Carolina.







PAUL SWICEGOOD McCUBBINS:
"Pete" is 24 years of age,
and is from Salisbury, N. !
C. He received his under-
graduate education from
UNC. Sigma Nu. Next
year he will take a ro-
tating internship at the
University Hospital in
Augusta, Ga. His plans

for the future are for further training

in internal medicine.



VERNON WENDELL McFALLS: Ver-
non is 24 years old, from:
Greensboro, N. C. He re-
ceived his A.B. degree'
from UNC. Phi Beta Kap-^
pa. Alpha Kappa Kappa.!
Wife, Laura. DaughterJ
Susan. Will take a straight]
pediatric internship at thei
University of Arkansas.]
Plans for the future are the practice'
of pediatrics. j



JOHN ASBURY McGEE: John is 24
years of age, from Char-
lotte. Received his B.S. de-
gree from Davidson Col-
lege in 1954. Kappa Sigma.
Phi Chi. Next year he will
do a rotating internship at
the Medical College of
South Carolina Hospital.
Plans to train in OB-Gyn

in the future.



PETER DILLARD McMICHAEL, JR.:
"Pete" is 25 years old,
from Reidsville, N. C. He
completed his undergrad-
uate education at UNC
with a BS in medicine ir
1955. Beta Theta Pi. Phi
Chi. Pete will do a straight
medical internship al
Jackson in Miami, Fla. His
plans for the future are to take OB-
Gyn training and to practice in North'
Carolina at the completion of this.





14




CHARLES THOMAS MACY: 24 years

of age, from Morehead

-"-^ir~-' - City, N. C. Received his

JF**^ \ A.B. degree in chemistry

f from UNC in 1954. Beta

^^"^^^ Theta Pi. Phi Chi. Wife,

Nancy. No children. Char-

A^ . iij^^ lie will do a straight medi-

H^ l^^l ^^^^ internship at Jackson

Memorial Hospital in

Miami, Florida next year. He plans a

residency in internal medicine.

ADDISON GOODLOE MANGUM:
"Addie" is 24 years of age,
from Gastonia, N. C. He
completed his undergrad-
uate education at UNC in
1955 with a B.S. in medi-
cine. Alpha Kappa Kap-
pa. Single. He will do a
straight surgical intern-
, ship at Barnes Hospital in

St. Louis, Mo. After he completes his
residency in surgery, Addie plans to
practice general surgery in North
Carolina.

' LUTHER SULLIVAN NELSON:
"Sully" is 31 years of age
and is from Jackson, N. C.
He received his A.B. and
B.S. degrees in science
and mathematics at East
Carolina College in 1949.
Phi Chi. Wife, Thelma.
Children, Jimmy and
Stuart. Will take a gen-
eral practice internship at the Univer-
sity of Michigan Hospital in Ann
Arbor, Mich, next year. Plans to do
general practice in eastern North
Carolina.

THOMAN LANE ORMAND: Lane is
24 years old, comes from
Monroe, N. C. He re-
ceived his undergraduate
degree at UNC where he
was a Chi Phi and Phi
Beta Kappa. Phi Chi. Wife,
Sara. He will do a rotat-
ing internship at Cincin-
n a t i General Hospital.

After that his plans are to specialize in

either internal medicine or obstetrics

and gynecology.







BARRY REEVES PATE: 24 years of
age, from Canton, N. C. He
completed his undergrad-
uate education at UNC.
Single. Phi Chi. Next year
he will do a rotating gen-
eral internship at Grady
Memorial Hospital in At-
lanta, Ga. He plans to
specialize in ENT and to
practice in North Carolina at the com-
pletion of his training.

DEWEY HARRIS PATE: 25 years of
age, from New Bern, N. C.
He received his B.S. de-
gree in medicine from
UNC in 1954. Pi Kappa
Phi. Phi Beta Kappa.
Wife, Patricia. Children,
Nancy and Steven. Dewey
will have a straight sur-
gical internship at North

Carolina Memorial Hospital next year.

He plans a residency in surgery.

JOHN RICHARD PATTERSON:
"Dick" is 25 years of age
and is from Chevy Chase,
Maryland. He received an
A.B. degree in chemistry
from UNC in 1954. Beta
Theta Pi. Single. Chi Phi.
He will do a rotating gen-
eral internship at the
Medical College of Vir-
ginia next year. Dick plans to train in
Ob-Gyn in the future and to do pri-
vate practice in this field when he com-
pletes his training. |

CHARLES WOODROW PHILLIPS,
JR.: "Charlie" is 25 years
of age and comes from
Elon College, N. C. He re-
ceived his undergraduate
degree, A.B. in chemis-
try, from Elon in 1954.
Morehead scholar. Alpha
Omega Alpha. Next year,
Charlie will take a straight
surgical internship at North Carolina
Memorial Hospital. After taking basic
surgical training, he plans to specialize
in neurosurgery.





15





NANCY LEE PRITCHETT: Nancy is
from Brown Summit, N. C.
She received her A.B. de-
gree in 1954 from the
Woman's College of UNC.
Next year she plans to do
a straight pediatrics in-
ternship at Buffalo Chil-
dren's Hospital. After
completion of training she

plans to practice pediatrics.



DANIEL WETMORE RADER: Dan is
24 years of age and is
from Graham, N. C. He re-
ceived his B.S. degree in
medicine from UNC in
1954. Delta Upsilon. Alpha
Kappa Kappa. Will do a
straight surgery intern-
ship at Grady Memorial
Hospital in Atlanta, Ga.
next year. Future plans are to enter
private practice in North Carolina.



WILLIAM ROBERT STORY: "Bob" is
27 years of age, from
Wilkesboro, N. C. He re-
ceived his A.B. degree in
chemistry from UNC in
1954. Phi Beta Kappa. Phi
Chi. Bob will take a ro-
tating general internship
at Walter Reed Army Hos-
pital next year. After com-
pletion of Air Force requirements. Bob
plans to enter general practice in
North Carolina.



CHARLES WALTER STOUT: 25 years
of age from High Point,
N. C. He received his A.B.
in chemistry from UNC in
1954. Phi Beta Kappa.
Wife, Barbara. No chil-
dren. Will do a rotating
general internship at Let-
terman Army Hospital in
San Francisco, California
next year. After a stay in the Army,
Charlie plans to enter general prac-
tice in North Carolina.







FRED REECE STOWE, JR.: Fred is 26
years of age and is from
Belmont, N. C. He re-
ceived his B.S. degree in
pre-med from Davidson
College. Sigma Phi Epsi-
lon. Omicron Delta Kappa.
Wife, Barbara. He will do
a straight pediatrics in-
ternship at Johns Hopkins

Hospital next year. Fred plans to do

research in the Air Force after one or

two years at Johns Hopkins.

BENJAMIN EVERETT THOMPSON,
JR.: "Pop" is 33 years of
age and is from Rocky
Mount, N. C. He received
his A.B. degree from l^NC
in 1949 then taught school
for several years. Single.^
He will take a rotatini
general internship at th(
University of South Caro-
lina next year. Plans to do general
practice in North Carolina on comple-
tion of his training.

JOE WAYNE THOMPSON: Wayne is
25 years of age and is
from viooresville, N. C.
He rec nved his A.B. de-
gree iJi chemistry from
UNC in 1954. Phi Beta
Kappi-. Wife, Elizabeth.
He will do a mixed medi-
cine-pediatrics internship
at th^ University of Ar-
kansas Hospital next year. After com-
pletion of his training he plans to
enter general practice in North Caro-
lina.

CHARLES DIXON WALLACE: "Dick''
is 25 years of age and is
^^ i from Smithfield, N. C. He
pHP^ received his B.S. in medi-
cine from UNC in 1955
Wife, Helen. Son, Dixon

I a^sBg He wjll do a straight sur-
■^'jKm gical internship at Nortl
^^^^H Carolina Memorial Hospi-
"^^^^^ tal next year. Plans to . e-
ceive further surgical training in im
future.





16



'AUL MARTIN WEEKS: Paul is 25
yeai's of age and is from
Clinton, N. C. He grad-
uated from Duke Univer-
sity in 1954 with an A.B.
degree in Zoology. Wife,
Pamela. Children, Christo-
pher and Heather. He will
take a straight surgery in-
ternship at North Caro-
lina Memorial Hospital next year. Paul
plans to go into academic surgery in
the future.



JOHN LINDSAY WINSTEAD, JR.: 23
years of age, from Green-
ville, N. C. John took his
undergraduate training at
Duke University where he
received his A.B. degree in
1954. Alpha Kappa Kappa.
Wife, Jean. He will do a
straight pathology in-
ternship at North Caro-
lina Memorial Hospital next year. In
the future, he plans to go into sur-
gery.




WHERE THE SENIORS WILL INTERN



NUMBER



INSTITUTION



University of Alabama, Birmingham

University of Arkansas, Little Rock

Barnes Hospital, St. Louis

Brooke General, Army Hospital, San Antonio

Buffalo Children's Hospital, N. Y.

Camp Pendleton, Navy Hospital, California

Chelsea, Navy Hospital, Massachusetts

City Memorial Hospital, Winston-Salem

C ncinatti General Hospital, Ohio

L v.ke University, Durham, N. C.

Grace-New Haven, Yale University

Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta

Greenwich Hospital, Conn.

University of Georgia, Augusta

Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami

Johns Hopkins, Baltimore

Letterman, Army Hospital, San Francisco

Medical College of South Carolina

Medical College of Virginia

Michigan, Ann Arbor

Massachusetts Memorial, Boston

North Carolina Memorial, Chapel Hill

Roosevelt, New York City

St. Luke's Hospital, New York City

Queens Hospital, Honolulu

Walter Reed, Army Hospital, Washington



17



On the Lantern Slide Lecture

Lewis R. Beam'""

The class of 1958, like any other medical school class, has
been given lectures on a variety of subjects. The lectures have
been delivered by house officers, faculty members, visiting pro-
fessors, and by students in the class. Among the first of these
lectures was one delivered by Dr. Lawrason, past Assistant Dean
of the Medical School. His opening remarks were that there are
two kinds of lectures, the lecture which delivers a message and
the lantern slide lecture. By this statement he implied that the
lantern slide lecture is of inferior quality.

One does not wish to differ with Dr. Lawrason and his firm
stand on this matter. One is obligated, however, to meticulously
point out the values of the use of lantern slides.

Lantern slides can be used to present photographs. They can
be used to present pages from textbooks and journals and to show
charts, graphs, and diagrams. The lantern slide lecture can be
used to confuse the audience completely.

The confused audience is a thing of value. From the con-
fused audience new thoughts and ideas arise. A common way to
create confusion is to show slides illustrating a subject unrelated
to the lecture. For example, the psychiatrist lecturing on early
development of the personality, may by mistake show a set of
lantern slides concerning inflammations of the oral cavity.
Similarly, he may show slides on inflammations of other anatomic
areas from which various facets of the personality arise. The
bewildered listener may be stimulated to think of theretofore
undescribed relationships between these areas. There are other
reasons why it is desirable to confuse the audience. Important
among these is the fact that the confused audience never detects
unpreparedness on the part of the lecturer. If the medical stu-
dent has forgotten to prepare his Preventive Medicine lecture, his
fellow students will never suspect his blunder, provided that he
blunders well in presenting the lantern slides. The same concept
holds true for other lecturers.

The technique of presenting the lantern slide lecture comes
naturally to most lecturers. Years of clinical experience and



18



extensive laboratory research give a person little advantage over
the freshman medical student. By following a few simple rules
the above mentioned benefits, plus many others, can be achieved.
Acting as a well coordinated team, the lecturer and the slide pro-
jector operator can give a wonderfully confusing lantern slide
lecture. A third member of the team can add to things by turning
the lights on when the lecturer wishes to show a slide. Of course,
he should turn the lights off when the lecturer wishes to refer
to his notes.

Improper lighting conditions and adequate projector noise
should be prearranged. If the projector is out of order the entire
lecture period can be devoted to searching for extension cords,
replacing the projector bulb, or to disgracing the crippled projec-
tor. Pertinent data should be projected off the screen and print
should be too small for the audience to read. The operator of the
projector should project slides in improper order, upside down,
and wrongside out. He is in an excellent position to provide pro-
longed periods of waiting for the next slide. The operator can
singlehandedly cause the lantern slide lecture to achieve its goal.
Along with lantern slides the lecturer may wish to employ the
blackboard or X-ray viewer with improper lighting conditions.
Perfectly adequate confusion can be produced in just this manner.

The lantern slide lecture can produce beneficial results, even
without the employment of technically complicated methods.
Other teaching aids such as movies and tape recordings are not
herein discussed. However, their utilization to achieve a similar
result is in no way unsatisfactory.



The author, Mr. Beam, is a member of the class of 195 8.



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19



Portrait Presentation Ceremonies

Remarks of Dr. Francis M. Clarke, '20, of New Brunswick, New Jersey,
at his presentation to the School of Medicine of the group portrait of Drs.
Manning, Mangiim, Bullitt and MacNider.if

Dr. Clark''", Dr. Bullitt, Miss MacNider, the Family of Dr. Man-
ning, Mr. Mangum, Dr. Berryhill, Fellow Alumni, Ladies and
Gentlemen :

That this is a sentimental occasion is attested by the large
number of alumni and friends of the University and of the School
of Medicine who have gathered here this
afternoon to affirm their loyalty, devotion,
and indebtedness to the University, and es-
pecially to the School of Medicine. This be-
ing so, I think it will be appropriate if
these short remarks of mine are largely in
the field of sentiment.
, I am proud to count myself among

^ this group and to affirm my own personal
indebtedness to that wonderful group of
^ men whose life and achievements we salute
Dr. i<BANcis M. Clarke, '20 today. It is doubtful if any other such small
group of men in the entire history of medicine ever labored
more constructively or to a better effect than did Doctors
Manning, Mangum, Bullitt, and MacNider. Contemplation of
their work and achievement makes it impossible to sum up ade-
quately their invaluable contribution to medical education in
the South, in the State of North Carolina, and indeed, through-
out America. For almost fifty years this small group collectively
conducted a school of the first two years of medicine and
through their hands passed a tremendous number of young
men, who leaving here, entered other first class medical schools
throughout the nation, where they were welcome and where they
generally did very well. They taught not only the basic sciences
of medicine, but constantly implied the proper clinical applica-
tion of medicine. Casual conversation with each and all revealed
their admiration for skillful and helpful practice and it was




t Anyone desiring a photograph of the portrait see note, page 38.

'■' Dr. Milton Clark, '3 5, outgoing president of the Medical Alumni Association.



20



evident that they all regarded such practice as the logical purpose
of their efforts. Following graduation from these other schools,
their students have taken places among the leaders of clinical
medicine in their respective communities and in untold instances
have become outstanding leaders among their professional col-
leagues. Many of the senior members of the faculty of this
present great school were of this group. Such an unique achieve-
ment has been the lot of few teachers of medicine. The work
which they did individually was done also singlehandedly, and
during my time in the school, not a single one of them had a
fuUtime associate, assistant, technician, or even a secretary. Again,
it is beyond comprehension how they could have accomplished
what they did under such circumstances. This present great new
school must certainly stand in part as a monument to their reports
and as a fruition of the ideas, ideals, and services which they so
faithfully and devotedly performed.

Some years ago, while being shown through the new medical
building by my friend, Dr. Berryhill, I was overtaken by thoughts
of this sort, and it seemed to me that it would be particularly
appropriate to have displayed in the school a group portrait as
a small token of the appreciation and indebtedness which all of
us feel. Certainly no group, individually so different, ever collec-
tively produced more. Dean Berryhill, Chancellor House, Dr.
Bullitt, and the families of Dr. MacNider and Dr. Mangum and
Dr. Manning, all graciously assented, and Mr. Francis Vandeveer
Kughler of New York was engaged to execute the commission.
He was provided with character sketches by Dr. Berryhill and
me, and he was astonished at the exact similarity from the two
sources. Mr. Kughler is not only an artist of the brush, but an
artist of the spirit, and his interest has been to produce an effect
worthy of a work of art as such, an authentic likeness in each
instance, and especially to portray the inner spirit and character
of each of his subjects. We think that he has succeeded in all
three efforts. He has produced not a photograph, but a true


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Online LibraryMedical Foundation of North CarolinaThe bulletin of the School of Medicine of the University of North Carolina [serial] (Volume 5 (1957-1958)) → online text (page 12 of 15)