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PANAMA SONGS



(Copyright, 1906.)
BY

MICHAEL DELEVANTE.



NEW YORK:

ALDEN BROTHERS,
PUBLISHERS.



To

DOCTOR AMADOR GUERRERO,
FIRST PRESIDENT

OF

THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA,,
THIS BOOK

is
SINCERELY AND RESPECTFULLY

r

DEDICATED.



My home is where the tropic glare

With glory crowns the Palms!

Where the breakers roar on the coral shore

With wondrous-sweet alarms!

Where the Trade-Winds blow through the

Summer-glow,

And Hatred builds her Shrine
Where Friendship's star, in a Cocktail Bar,
Burns bright 'neath the flush of the Wine.



CONTENTS.

PAGE

AUTHOR'S INTRODUCTION 9

PANAMA SONGS:

Oh, Panama, Brave Panama 13

Twinkle, Twinkle, Incandescent 14

So Scant of Faith Our Little Isle 15

Our Club List 16

The Christmas Tree 19

A Colon Pay-Day Incident 20

A Colon Sunset 22

The Dredges 23

An Invierno Revery 24

Our Club 25

Christina, the Mad Girl 26

Colon Light House to Point Toro Light House. 27

A Sunday Symphony , . 28

Architectural. 30

Retrenchment 31

They've got Me Hooked 31

Some Colon Conclusions 33

The Af ricanos 35

The Trade Winds and" Old Pluvius' 37

The Rains Are Falling 40

'Ere's to Us 41

There's a Man About the Town 43

Song of the Electric Light

A Song of the Weather

The Date Tree Palm 47

Reviewal 48

A Verano Ode 50

The "Panther-Boys" 52

Tete-a-Tete 53

A Ballad of the Times 55

The "Acapulco" 56

,He Just Couldn't Stay Away 57



CONTENTS.

PAGE

That's What I am 59

The Critic Criticised 60

Keep 'Em Away, for the Lord's. Sake ! 61

In Dialect 62

The Dream of a Colon-Sunshiner 64

Confessional 65

Under Two Flags 68

Songs of To-Day 69

The Unpopular Man 71

OTHER POEMS:

Our First 73

The Malevolent 73

A Fragment 74

Eddy 75

The Rejected Lover 75

Lo, Sylvanus 77

To My Sydanna 77

Gone 79

New Year, 1892 80

Our Little Lives Are Mysterious 81

Distinctions ' ^ 82

Through Life We Travel All Alone 83

Tennyson 84

Bill McKinley 86

Consuelo 87

The Dawn and Lucille 89

Truth 89

Meemy 90

The Storm 91

The Song of Silver. , 92

The Christmas Serenade 93

Midnight Ode to the Dying Year 94

My Ambition 95

I'm Going Home -.-. 96

I Love to Wander* 97

The Present.... * 98

The Past 99

The Future 100



CONTENTS.

PAGE

I Wonder 100

So They Say.... 101

Awake 102

I Dreamt of Thee 103

A Plaintive Lullaby 104

Back to My Isthmian Home 105

So You've Heard That My Heart Is Plighted.. . 107

I See Thee Now, Sydanna 108

One Year Agone , no

My Ship Sails Over the Blue in

Cuba Libre 112

Address to the Sky 113

Homeward Bound 115

There's Joy Upon the Sea To-Day 117

A Message from the Sea 121

The Opera Cloak 123

Waiting 124

The Wind, the Wave and Alethia 126

Farewell, Sweetheart ! 129

They're Going 130

A Toast 132

A Meditation 133

I've Set Myself a Lesson to Learn 134

New York 134

In Dream Land 136

The Mystic Nine 139

The Ballad of a Coal Miner f 139

So Let It Be 141

Night 142

New Year's Eve, 1903 144

A Cat's Obituary 146

Just a Woman's Way 147

To Si r Thomas Lipton 149

The Slate's Redemption 151

A Bird-Song 154

There Are 155

In Love-Land 156



INTRODUCTION.

"Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see,
Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er could be !
In every work regard the writer's end,
Since none can compass more than they intend."

The earlier poems contained in this volume,
those which date back to 1894 all of which
have since been carefully revised, and a spirit
of the new times infused in some of them
have already appeared before the public, un-
der the title of "First Blossoms." The later
poems appear for the first time in book-form.

Literature is not my vocation : I am simply a
devotee before its glorious shrine a wor-
shiper of that which lifts men's souls up to the
higher and sublimer life ! I am but a toiler of
the Desk; and this volume is simply the work
of forced leisure nights and Sundays borrowed.

I have written under severe difficulties
even under domestic protests, entered and ex-
tended to the fullest measure ; for jealous Love
would invariably step in and divorce me from
Pegasus just when I thought I had caught him
by his wing, and held him in securely! It,



I0> . . . INTRODUCTION.

therefore, happened that, oftentimes, I was
compelled to hide myself and wait to catch
him again on the "fly" ; for, despite of inter-
ruptions, I had determined, come what may, to
accomplish this much, however little it might
be.

Then, again, when I tell my readers that this
book has been conceived and written in a house
where the noise and laughter of happy little
children have swelled all other dins above
with no particular apartment dedicated to me
exclusively writing any and everywhere
they will not wonder at rinding defects innum-
erable.

Be that as it may, however, I send my "Pan-
ama Songs" out seeking no special public
commendation whatever expecting only the
just and impartial criticism of my readers.
MICHAEL DELEVANTE.

Colon, Republic of Panama, December, 1903.



SONGS OF THE PANAMA ISTHMUS.



OH. PANAMA, BRAVE PANAMA.

Oh, Panama brave Panama !
Full weaned from thy late sires

I sing to thee, dear Panama,
The song my soul inspires.

I wing the anthem wild and free

Across the boundless blue,
Till, 'long thy marge of murmuring sea,

My song come back to you

Till, on the pinions of the breeze,

It reach thy furthest Bays
Be scattered o'er the briny seas '

Tossed on the silver-sprays!

Gifts within gifts are thine thou hast

Thy storied rivers of gold ;
And, in thy virgin forests vast,

A Nation's wealth untold.

Thou hast the secret of two seas

Within thy jungles dense
Thou art the keeper of the keys

Of two great Continents.



14 PANAMA SONGS.

Thou nast, unbosomed in the Past,

My Boyhood's golden dreams ;
But all the hopes my soul had massed

Are vanished like sunbeams!

tThou hast thy sons the dauntless, true

Thy mighty Ministers,
iWhom God this all-great hour lead through

With Wisdom's wisest powers!

Ten thousand golden Years be thine!

From Strife, the sweet surcease;
Above thy new-born banner shine,

The glorious stars of peace.



TWINKLE, TWINKLE, INCANDES-
CENT.

Twinkle, twinkle, Incandescent,
How you jump and toss incessant !
As the breezes 'gainst you dash,
Down you tumble with a crash!
Late your lights are very poor,
They scarcely "see" us to the door:
Now they flicker now they're bright,
Till, like a ghost, they take their flight,
And leave us in the darkness groping
O, we count it most provoking,
Just when at our dinners seated



PANAMA SONGS. 15

'Fore our meals are half completed
To be thus, so badly treated!
Twinkle, twinkle, Incandescent !
Why so stubborn, so persistent?
I have told you, of times a score,
That your costly light was poor;
And I tell you once again,
That your star is on the wane.

February, 1901.



SO SCANT OF FAITH OUR LITTLE
ISLE.

So scant of faith our little Isle;
So prodigal of craft and guile,
And war-like spirits a lovely pile!
We fight, and, fighting, fight in style !
We woo the False, eschew the Truth;
Our Janus-natures, born, in sooth,
Of Hate enough a horse to kill,
Take arms and, with malicious will,
Ten thousand plots of wrong fulfil!
Not wholly haters of our kind,
But, like the boy, who leads the blind,
We seek for peace, that lags behind,
The peace we ne'er shall find.

September, 1801.



l6 PANAMA SONGS.

OUR CLUB LIST.

A stands for Anderson, whom the Schot-

tische delights,
And Ashby who seeks for his subjects

their rights.
B stands for Blixt, and Beveridge, the

Scotch
Bermudez, who makes of the English a

botch !

C stands for Cecil, who has lots of fun ;
D for Delevante, Dolphy, Degallon,

Deboteau, Dogherty, Uriah DeLeon.
E stands for Evans, who of Mars all can tell,
And Ehrman, who tries to outdo Philo-
mel!

F stands for Eraser, our Waltzer the best
Faulette, 'gainst whose height there are

few to contest!
G stands for Gilbert, our President Ex;

Of Presidents he is the Right Royal Rex!
H stands for Humphreys and Hambrook and

Horn
Herrera, who, if you'll let him, will dance

until morn !
And Halstead and Hollier appear on the

List,
And Haffeman, too, whom we lately Have

missed ;
Another Herrera adorns our page



PANAMA SONGS. 17

If I don't put him down he'll get in a

rage!
I is not in it / is sorry to say ;

But when / is dancing, get out of Fs way !
J stands for James, who pays highest Ex-
change,
But never comes up to the Club it is

strange !
K shares the same fate as I on the List ;

May K-us forever keep 'way from our

midst !
L stands for Levi, Limberi, Lebeuff

The last mentioned gent, sure he serves us
enough !

M stands for Mott, our President new

The revision of Article Four he would rue !

And Mendes, Messias, come under the
M

Messias, though last, is not least among

them.
N like the / and the K, it seems is non est;

N says that / Kan be none of the best !
O like the I,N and K, is not in, I think

O says that I-N-K always spells INK.
P stands for Pasos Pepito that's clear

Pepito is running for President's Chair.
Q on the Q-T, I find is quite blank ;

So, with O, I, N, K, Q will fall into rank.
R stands for Raillac, we don't often see,



l8 PANAMA SONGS.

And Russell, who think's he's the boss of

the Glee!
S stands for Sarria, Shaffer, Soracco

Stevenson, too, and our friend Moritz

Sasso.
Istands for "Tolo" in full, Toledano,

And Taylor of "Man in the Moon" fame,

you know.
U as you no doubt will see at a glance,

Like O, I, N, K, Q, has made no advance.
V Fve searched, and can find nothing there

Like 7. Q, U KNO, V is not a compeer.
W stands for Wardlaw, who, you all will re-
member,
His bachelor days brought to end last

September.
X as Xpected, is out there is none;

But V, Q, U, I KNO that X has no fun!
Y Y hide the truth ? Y is out, I admit ;

He once was amongst us, but made his

exit.
Z say that Z IZ not here at the feast

Vy, NO QUIZ, XKUse me, this Z(e-
bra)'s a beast.

October, 1892.



PANAMA SONGS. 1 9

THE CHRISTMAS TREE.

'Twas Christmas Eve, and every heart was
glad,

As forth the music streamed!
The Christmas Tree, with gewgaws dight,

In gorgeous splendor gleamed.

Then came the little revellers

The beauties of this Isle !
Their cheeks, like the early flowers of Spring,

All tinged with a sunny smile.

In Youth's fresh bloom arrayed they came
Their footsteps all blithe and gay

Like beings strayed from their native stars,
They wandered this sinful way.

Oh, how they revelled in .the dance !,

Did ye hear their mirthful noise
As 'round the Christmas Tree they swung,
Those bright-eyed girls and boys.

Saw ye their sweet seraphic forms?

The effulgence of their eyes?
Heard ye their laughter, prattle swell

To exulting harmonies?

I watched them in the game of Chance
Some faces radiant with glee;



2O PANAMA SONGS.

On others I read, "Oh, Santa Claus,
Have you got nothing for me ?"

And then I fell to dreaming dreams
Of my past romps and plays,

Until my thoughts went back again
To dead old Christmas days.

December, 1902.



A COLON PAY-DAY INCIDENT.*

Miss KATE.

Mista ! whe' de dime you owe me ?

Jus' gimme me money, I say!
S' 'elp me God ef you no pay me

I wi' tek you a Jail dis day !
Den pay me 'fo' I raise one row

So mek Policia come :
Dis long, long time you owe me now

You tek me money buy Rum!

JOHNSON.

Le' go me shut, I say, Miss Kate!
Or else I wi' chop you, you know!



* Dramatic scene between Miss Kate, the Ginger
Beer and Bun Seller, and her debtor, Jeremiah John-
son, who has just received his pay from the Pay Car.



PANAMA SONGS. 2Ii

Me no been ax you, gall, fe wait
Nex' Pay-Day me pay you, no?

Miss KATE.

God blind me I not gwine wait at all!

For promise can't bwile de pot;
Jus' pay me now befo' I call

De Constab f e mek you trot !
You ebba see me trial, eh ?

Him well nyam me sinting done,
And now de brute him no wan' fe pay

Fe me Ginger Beer an' Bun!
You teefin niggah ! You well an' cheat !

JOHNSON.

Jus' mind how you talks to me now!

I wi' lick you 'prawlin* in a de 'treet,
So mek you go bawl like cow.

Miss KATE.

Hi ! man, cho ! de fight you wan' fight ?

Mek I fetch "grass" bottle fuss!
No 'tinkin' shame me can't seek me right

Widout me get beatin' and cuss?



A VOICE FROM THE CROWD.

Dat 'nough now! no lick him no mo'!
You wi' go a "Cage" 'fo' you done;



22 PANAMA SONGS.

Cho ! you no hear Policia de blow ?
Get up, you chupids, so run.



A COLON SUNSET.

Like forest-fires, illuming, far and wide,

Some sylvan scene and desert leagues away,
Last evening shone, all radiant on the tide,

The last expiring embers of the day!
Soft clouds of crimson, floating down the

West,
With glory crowned the distant bluffs and

high;

All flushed and dreamy sank the day to rest
In twilight's arm outstretched athwart the

sky.

Yon "Toro Point," that skirts the watery way,
With soft suffusion 'neath the Heavens

glowed ;

What wondrous hues reflected o'er the Bay
As Night came stealing up the starry road!
Calm was the eve peace brooded on

the deep;

The stars, all shining, warned the hour
of sleep.

April, 1893.



PANAMA SONGS. 2$

THE DREDGES.

Oh, ye Dredges leap

From your long, long sleep !

Awaken, nor dream ye again,
Till your work is done
Gained your homeward run,

The glorious task of men!

Awake from the wreck
Of the years, and deck

Ye with triumphs all fresh and new!
Like cormorants dash
In the stream with a splash,

For the prey that awaiteth you.

Let the forests ring

With your clink-clank-clink

Oh, we long for that old refrain!
Let your monster scoops,
That the wild vine loops, ,

Swing merrily 'round their chain.

On on, nor relent
Till the bonds are rent,

And the chivalrous deed is done!
Till Atlantic rear
A triumphant cheer

For his bride, the Pacific, won.

Then the waves will prance,
And carouse and dance,



24 PANAMA SONGS.

As the stately ships line the Bay;
While foremost, elate,
'Mongst the Nations great,

The U. S. in gorgeous array.

November, 1903.



AN INVIERNO REVERY.

How switly come the drear Invierno days!

When, lo ! the tropic lluvias descend,
And mists grow thick athwart the arching
ways,

And threatening rain-clouds bend.

Within their caves the balmy Trade-Winds

rest;
The sweet Verano days have spent their

sum;

The waves are pillowed on the Ocean's breast,
And broad Caribbean's dumb.

What fearful silence broods upon the deep,
Filling my soul with spells akin to pain!

I all but sit and sigh and mourn and weep
While I explore the main;

For in the stillness rapt, I dream and muse
Of days long buried in the faded past.

Till, faint and dim, like swift dissolving views,
Before me crowd, at last,



PANAMA SONGS. 25

Visions of Love, once beings of form and
speech,

But spirits now inhabiting the skies ;
Alas! alas! the tender voice of each

Those dear departed ties

Bursts o'er my spirit in the stilly air

Like sweet seraphic melodies from high !

ii catch the strain, and intercept the tear
That lurks within mine eye.

September, 1893.

OUR CLUB.

Say, lads, Oh, what's gone wrong
With that dear old Club of ours ?
Will ye see her droop through the Seasons

long,

And her glory fade like the flowers,
Nor heave one sigh'
As ye pass her by,
That once beguiled the hours?

Oh, desolate abode!

Come, lads, uplift the crumbling pile!
Shall the Summer come with her garnered load
Of flowers that bloom and smile,
Without one more
Sweet Chaplet o'er
Her portals as erewhile?



26 PANAMA SONGS.

Hushed is she now and still ;

Dispersed the merry band and gone :
No more the voice of the music shrill
Streams through her Halls forlorn:
The Ballad is dead,
And the mirth has fled
From our dear "Club-Colon."

October, 1893.



CHRISTINA, THE MAD GIRL.*

Senor, I am not mad!

Why wouldst thou deem me so?
Because thou seest me scant'ly clad,

And indigent and low ?
Dios me libre, Senor!

In sooth, Senor, I feign:

I have but lost my way
In the labyrinth of my brain,

Wherein my senses stray
Hi! Que es esof musical


List to the Musical

I'll put my bundle down
And dance for you the Cunibia,

As they dance it in my town,
Por un real, Senor!



*A familiar figure about the streets of Colon.



PANAMA SONGS. 2?

I can read, too Senor:

Here's my Breviary!
And count my Rosary, too, Senor,

And sing my Ave Mary
'Mejor que Ud f Senor!

What sayest thou now, Senor *?\

I've sung my Ave well,
And read my Santa Biblia o'er;

For I am no infidel
'Diga, Senor! soy local

I am not mad, I swear !

Hi ! see, the crowd gathers !
For the mummers are passing there

With their painted masks and feathers;
Y me voy a verlas! adios!

November, 1893.



COLON LIGHT HOUSE TO POINT
TORO LIGHT HOUSE.

Hello! my friend, across the Bay
You that lure the ships to the strand;

That flirt with the mariners, so they say,
With the flash of your orb from land

If you don't quit a-cutting your eye at me,

v You prodigal charge for a light,



28 PANAMA SONGS.

And a-winkin' and blinkin' all night at me,
There's bound to be bloodshed and fight!

How came you, Sir, on yonder Point?

And what is your mission? Oh, speak!
If you can without winkin' your eye out o'
joint

Are you merely the child of a freak ?
Be you Christopher's ghost I see?

Oh, you Brobdignagian pile!
Go tend to the toros: you can't shine with me :

I'm Lord of this sea and Isle.

That's what I am, you parvenu !

That's what I'll be to the end;
So, pack up your traps, and be off, and quick,
too,

My blinky-eyed, sleepy-head friend ;
For the people say you've no right here

The neighbors protest, so do I!
Unwelcomed you came, like a dreaded night-
mare

So, good-riddance to you, and good-bye.

November, 1893.



PANAMA SONGS. 29

A SUNDAY SYMPHONY.

Oh, those parrots! how they both yell

All day long above my head!
Hear the ringing of that church bell!

Loud enough to wake the dead.
Now the Loros start a-singing,

And the peacock's shriek is heard
Soon you'll hear a gun-shot ringing

Through the air to down a bird !

Hear that tricycle above me,

Pounding on the attic floor!
And the "kid" that's riding, how he

Screams till all his throat is sore!
I am reading what I'm reading

I'll be hanged if I can tell,
For the tricycle that's wheeling

O'er my aching head like well,

Now my "kids" take up the chorus,

And the noises swell to bad !
Parrots, tricycle the whole house

And the children drive me mad!
This is how I spend my Sundays

Talk about your "Bedlams Loose!"
This one takes the palm by long ways

Oh! my head the noise, the deuce.

March, 1894.



3O PANAMA SONGS.

ARCHITECTURAL'.
(To I. L. M.)

Say, when are you going to finish that house
That stands by the track line so near

That once Jackson-famous old "Boston Ice

House,"
That sold ice to the thousands down here?

O, when will you finish, for heaven's sake say ?

I long for some sparkling Old Mumm;
But it seems to me, Sir, as I pass every day,

The "Wetting-tide" never will come!

For each day something new an improvement

or two

Some new work or other begun
Greet mine eyes as I raise them the structure

to view;
But the answer comes back, "Not yet done!"

So, pray let me ask, have you any new

schemes ?

More filigree work 'round the Gable?
You soon will be wanting some strong, heavy

beams;
For the house grows above quite unable!

So, let me exHort you to finish" tfie Bam ;
For, I swear, all top-heavy she's getting!



PANAMA SONGS. 3!;

Just give her a coat of the best paint and

warn

All your friends to come 'round to t.Ji* "Wet-
ting."

March, 1894.

RETRENCHMENT.

The impending blow, that hath fallen at last,

Hath my old-time stipend sundered!
I feel the "cut" of the ten-per-cent. blast

On my three score pesos and hundred!
I'll have to do some "home cutting" too,

To the tune of sixteen gold dollars :
Eat one meal a day till they raise my pay

Wash my own clothes, my cuffs and my
collars,

July, 1894. *t



THEY'VE GOT ME HOOKED.

They've got me hooked they've got me
booked

To the lass across the way;
They've got my heart a-thumping so,

I can't hear what they say!
They've got a "case" against me,

And they're looking for the dart



32 PANAMA SONGS.

They're bringing Doctor Roentgen's Hays
To navigate my heart!

But it's just like folks in Colon :

They know a thing or two!
Can tell you more about yourself

Than you ever dreamt or knew :
They get it straight from Tom Eaves

Have your ear-strings never rung?
And all because there are no laws

To amputate a tongue !

They've got it dead, I'm going to wed ;

And I wish they hadn't now;
For they'll find me 'commodating

In a hell-split, firing row!
They've got me alj a-thinking;

For I want to know don't you ?
If to chin a "boofer lady" means

To work the Rule o' Two?

But it's just like folks in Colon:

They're bound to talk or die ;
And I'm thinking, Sir, it's part of their

Anatomies to lie!
They've worked this Rule o' Two, Sir,

Till my Muse's ears have rung!
And all because there are no laws

To amputate a tongue.

May, 1896.



PANAMA SONGS. 33

SOME COLON CONCLUSIONS.
(Air, Killaloo.)

If you'd have of truths a dose,
I could give you, Sir, a gross ;

For I've seen the gamut rise and topple

over

I could tell you things, my friend,
That would start your hairs on end

They're rougher than the passage o'er to
Dover !

But the reason of this Rhyme
Is to sing of present time

To leave the dead Past buried for a minute
Just to tell you, one by one,
Some conclusions of Colon

Your wise men from the East, Sir, are not
in it!

~ r

The first conclusion is,

If a damsel you should quiz

As you meet her in the moonlight with her

mother ;

Just as sure as eggs are eggs
With the art of Silas Wegg(s)

They'll swear you must be sweet on one an-
other!

Which conclusion, I must tell
Is another name for well,



34 PANAMA SONGS.

It rhymes with "eye" and ""sigh" ; and, by

the by, Sir,

It's a case of Verbum sat,
With a bow drawn long as that,
To flaunt the Ninth Commandment in dis-
guise, Sir!

The second is, I ween,

Cause of many a home-made scene,

Of which I've had, Oh, Lord, a dose ap-
palling !

It's a fight to go to Lodge
Thinks your wife 'tis just a dodge

For a time out with the boys until the morn-
ing.

Why you can't go to a bar
E'en to buy you a cigar,

Or stop and with the barman have a laugh-
ter;

But, as one and one make two,
They'll have something up 'gainst you:
A cocktail or a Scotch they'll swear you're
after!

When you come back to Colon,
After your vacation's done,

And from the Press you get no "Personal

Mention" ;
Oh, you'll kick and swear and fuss



PANAMA SONGS. 35

Say, each editor is a cuss,

And conclude, for sure, the slight was of in-
tention.

I've conclusions by the score;
But my Muse's throat is sore,

Or else this song I'd keep up for a whole

week!

So, I'll only add to-day,
My Conclusion, by the way,

I've never struck a place like this for Logic.

June, 1896.

THE AFRICANOS.

Did you see those Africanos

Out the "Castle Eden" pour,
With their pantaloons of gingham,

And their shirt-tails out o' door? <

Didn't you see them? What a gang, Sir,

Each a tin trunk and a straw,*
And I'd blush to tell you, hombrt,

All the funny sights I saw!

Some wore wrappers; some wore breeches
Some had gambled all their "wears;"

Some wore just what Nature' d wove them
In the deft loom of the years!

* Straw mat.



36 PANAMA SONGS.

They were lined off every man, Sir!

Pobrecitos, what a crew!
Tore the Medical Profession

Whole anatomies in view!

It was, "Muzza!" it was "Johnson!"
It was, "Chooko!" step this way

Have your carcasses examined
By the doctors of the Bay !

It was "Joseph!" it was "Sambo!"
It was "Samuel!" "MacBain!"

Till the pobre Africanos

Were all huddled in the train

Some a-dreaming of their mothers

In dear Afric far away!
Some a-thinking of the digging

Of the Isthmus' Highway

Some a-thinking of the "Eden,"

And the engineer, and how
With a red-hot poker he, Sir,

Quelled their contumacious row'!

But they've come amongst us, strangers ;

Let us take them by the hand
Whisper, "Johnson, Muzza, welcome

To this hospitable land."

December, 1896.



PANAMA SONGS. 37

THE TRADE WINDS AND OLB

PLUVIUS.
(After Kipling.)

"What are ye Trade Winds blowin' for?"
Said Pluvius-on-Parade.
"To run you out, to run you out,"
The Balmy Trade Winds said.
"What makes ye 'owl so loud, so loud?"
Said Pluvius-on-Parade.


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