Milwaukee Chamber of Commerce Milwaukee Grain & Stock Exchange.

Annual report of the Milwaukee Grain & Stock Exchange online

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Voellings, J. G

Vogel, August H.. .

Vogel, Fred., Jr

Vollert. Wm. P

Vullmahn, Fred'ck..
Wagner, Alfred J . .
Wagner, Emil W....

Wan, E. C

Wallace, William. . .

Washburn, John

Watts, O. T

*Waugh, W. E

Webster, Douglas . .

Wegner, F. C

Wefl, A

Weil, Chas. B

Welch, Ernest L . . .

Wendt, F

Wendt, F., Jr

Wentworth, R. B. .

Wertheimer, H

Weschler D. D

Wesson, Wm. F

Wheaton. Norval E.
Whitcomb. H. F. . .
Whitnall, Jesse B. .
Wiese, Henry A. . . .

Wilde, Jos

Williams, Owen W..

Wilson, F. L

Wilson, Wm. Ross.
♦Winner, Gerhard. .
Wirth, Adolph L...
Wirtz, Raymond J..
Wissbeck, Henry . .

Wolfe, F. L

Woodbury, S. H....
Woodworth, E. S. . .
Wrenn, John H. . . .

Yore, Frank J

Zahn, Julius

Zaumeyer, Chas. . . .

Ziegler, L. C

Zimmerman, G. J...

Zinn, Albert

Zinn, Walter A. . . .



1888
1908
1867
1873
1863
1901
1873
1896
1900
1875
1907
1904
1908
1901
1867
1908
1902
1907
1887
1908
1897
1895
1897
1909
1897
1907
1878
1908
1905
1876
1902
1874
1897
1909
1875
1898
1881
1908
1896
1901
1909
1894
1906
1901
1902
1902
1904
1889
1907
1906
1878
1881
1904



Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co

The Updike Grain Co

Vance & Joys Co

F. f.' Vanstrum . . . . . . . . . . .

j. G. Voeiiings* *.!!!!!,!!!!.

Pfister & Vogel Leather Co.
First National Bank

American Malting Co

D. R. Wagner & Co

Emil W. Wagner

Milwaukee Grains & Feed Co.

Washburn-Crosby Co

With S. G. Courteen

The' McCaiiil- Webster * EleV a

F. C. Wegner

Weil Shirt Co

Benjamin M. Weil's Sons &

E. L. Welch Co

F. Wendt & Co

With F. Wendt & Co

R. B. Wentworth

Watertown Grain Co

With Geo. Bullen & Co

Wm. F. Wesson

N. E. Wheaton

Pennsylv'a Coal & Sup. Co.

Clinton Grain Co

Western Portland Cem. Co . .

With D. Vance Co

Mutual Benefit Life Ins. Co.
Geo. H. Russell & Co

Milwaukee Vinegar Co

Raymond Wirtz Grain Co . .

Henry Wissbeck & Co

Empire lane

S. H. Woodbury & Co

E. S. Woodworth & Co

John H. Wrenn & Co

F.J. Yore

With J. B. A. Kern & Sons. .

With Pabst Brewing Co

Noah Saemann & Co

Milwaukee Malting Co

Milwaukee Western Malt Co.
Milwaukee Western Malt Co.



President.

Grain merchants, Omaha, Neb.

Vessel agents and insurance.



Broker, Minneapolis.

Teaming contractor.
Vice-president and Secretary.
President.

Manager, Chicago.

Grain commission, Minneapolis.

Grain, Chicago.

Dairy feeds and brewers' grains.
Milling, Minneapolis, Minn.
Seeds.

tor Co., Grain, Minneapolis.

Grain, Menomonee Falls, Wis.

Manufacturers.
Co., Fire insurance and real estata

Grain and banking, Minneapolis.

Flour and feed.

Flour, grain and feed.

Grain dealer. Portage, Wis.

Grain, Watertown, Wis.

Maltsters, Chicago.

Real estate.

Broker.

Coal, building materials, etc.
Grain, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
Cement, Yankton, S. Dak.
Vessel agts. and insurance.
Agent, St. Paul, Minn.
Insurance.

Manager.

Grain commission.

Grain merchants.

Agent.

Commission, Chicago.

Commission. Minneapolis, Minn.

Stocks, grain and prov., Chicago.

Broker, Chicago.

Millers, Eagle Mills.

Buyer.

General mdse., Adell, Wis.

Maltsters.

President.

Sec'y-Treasurer.



♦Deceased



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FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL MEETING



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE



CITY OF MILWAUKEE



The Fifty-first Annual Meeting of the Chamber of Com-
merce of the City of Milwaukee, was held at 12 o'clock, noon,
April 1 2th, 1909, in the Exchange Room of the Association.

The members were called to order by President E. C.
Wall, who directed the Secretary to read the list of names
of the Officers of the Association for the ensuing year.

President Wall then took leave of his official duties and
introduced his successor in the following words:

Gentlemen of the Chamber of Commerce:

The Board of Directors have decided instead of reading the
Annual Report of the Board of Directors at this time, as has been the
custom, to mail the same to each member together with the Report of
the Treasurer, and thereby not encroach upon your time during the busy
hour of the day.

In retiring from office, permit me to thank you for the honors you
have conferred upon me and for the courtesies that I have received at your
hands during my terms of office.

It gives me great pleasure to surrender my office to a man so thor-
oughly acquainted with the affairs of this Association. Mr. Bell, whom
you have selected as your president, has served for many years on the
Board of Directors and has been particularly active in preparing rules
and regulations that have been adopted for the government of this Cham-
ber of Commerce, and you are to be congratulated in having so competent
and loyal a man as President of the Chamber of Commerce.

I now introduce to you, Mr. Wallace M. Bell, your President.

25



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26 TRADE- AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKEE.

Mr. Bell made a short address to the members, expressing
himself as follows:

"In assuming the duties of the position to which you have elevated
me, I wish to sincerely thank you for the honor thus conferred. I esteem
it the highest gift within the bestowal of any organisation in this city,
and. I will earnestly endeavor to advance in every way the best interests
of this exchange and its members.

"The keen competition of other markets and the rapid changes in
conditions taking place in the grain trade, as it endeavors to meet and ad-
just itself to the new problems constantly presenting themselves, make
it necessary for us one and all to stand together and diUgently strive for
the general welfare of the market.

"I feel certain that your officers, board of directors and different com-
mittees, will unselfishly conduct the affairs of this exchange with the aim
to aeoomphsh the greatest good for the greatest number, and request for
them the hearty and earnest support of all its members.

"If we all work together in an energetic and harmonious manner,
it is safe to predict that a large increase in the volume of grain handled
here will result, for at no point on the shores of the Great Lakes is there
a better port than exists here in our own fair city."

At the conclusion of Mr. Bell's remarks, Mr. Wall, after
explaining that the absence of First Vice-President E. J.
Furlong was unavoidable, introduced Second Vice-President
J. J. Crandall and Secretary H. A. Plumb, who appropri-
ately expressed their thanks to the members for the honor
of their election and the meeting then adjourned.



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TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKEE. 27



Annual Report of the Board of Directors



Milwaukee, April 12, 1909.
To the Members of the Cbamber of Commerce:

In accordance with the rules, the Board of Direoto»^ make the follow-
ing report for the fiscal year ending April 5th, 1909:

The financial affairs of the Association are given in detail in the
Treasurer's report herewith submitted.

The income from all sources during that time

has been $37,253.81

Balance on hand beginning of year 16 , 197 . 77

Total $53,451 .58

Total disbursements 41 ,3U . 17

Balance on hand April 5th, 1900, end of year... $12, 140. 41

A smoking, reading and writing room has been provided at a cost of
$2,222.92. This improvement was made so that a directors' room, com-
mittee room and a room for the president could be provided adjoining the
secretary and treasurer's offices; the former smoking room being taken
for that purpose. The expense of fitting up these quarters and including
certain improvements that were made in the Exchange Room proper, was
$278.91, after deducting $70.00, received from the sale of old furniture.
The total expenses of these improvements, amounting to $2,501.83, are
extraordinary expenditures and do not represent a permanent expense.
The fact is that the money paid for the smoking room really amounts to an
increased rental of the Chamber of Commerce of about $171.00 per year.

To explain: The proposition of the Central Investment Co. was that
they would make the improvements desired and divide the expense thereof
into thirteen equal annual payments (beipg the unexpired term of our
lease) and after charging 5 per cent, interest thereon, add the same to the
rental we now pay. As we had a surplus in the treasury, the Board thought
best to pay cash for the improvements and thereby make 5 per cent, for
the Association.

The Central Investment Company cleaned, repaired the walls and
made other improvements at no expense to the Chamber of Commerce.

The general expenses of the Association have been increased and
perhaps permanently by a more liberal policy of general information and
business methods. The quotation service has been made more liberal,
and one item in particular that costs $2,400 per annum is the continuous
quotations received of the Minneapolis future market. '



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28 TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKEE.



Two daily papers at Sioux City are furnished at our expense with the
closing prices of cash grain in this market. This is regarded as a benefit
to the receivers of grain in Milwaukee.

The Chamber of Commerce was represented at the National Rivers
and Harbors Congress at Washington, D. C, by a delegation which made
a very complete and valuable report of the proceedings of that most im-
portant gathering, and was also represented at the Omaha Com Exposition.

Mr. Schroeder has several times appeared before committees of the
legislature at Madison to explain bills that were before them; the passage
of which would be detrimental to the interests of this organization and to
the grain trade in general.

The weighing department for the year shows a loss of $236.50.

The Gratuity Fund amounts to $128,556, well invested.

The heirs of each decedent member entitled to participate in this
fund will be paid $568.18.

The number of deaths of those entitled to participate in the Gratuity
Fund was 11. During the year the total number of deaths of members
was 15.

Of the total membership of the Association, only 356 have availed
themselves of the benefits of the Gratuity Fund.

The thanks of the members of the Chamber of Commerce are due to
the Trustees of the Gratuity Fund, for the able manner in which they have
conducted the affairs of the Fund, and for their gratuitous services.

The number of members of the Association is 604.

The number of resident members of this organization is 439.

The number of non-resident members is 165.

One membership was forfeited for non-payment of dues. The same
will be sold and the proceeds distributed in accordance with the rules.

The number of memberships transferred during the year was 79.

Memberships during the year have sold at prices varying from $300
to $150.

The price at the present time is about $175.

Usually there have been on January 1st, about 60 members who have
not paid their dues for the year. By a resolution of the Board of Directors,
all dues not paid by May 5th, will be $35.00 instead of $25.00, if paid be-
fore that date.

The Chamber of Commerce the past year manifested its interest in
the growers of grain, by offering as prizes, to be competed for by the Wis-
consin Agricultural Experiment Association (an organization composed
of about 2,000 members) five silver trophies for the best samples of wheat,
com, oats, barley, and rye grown by its members. Interest in the com-
petition for these trophies was very keen.



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TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKEE. 29



A number of amendments to our rules have been passed, the most
important being a change in the weighing and inspection departments.
Both departments are now under the direction of the Board of Directors
and the heads of both are salaried employes of the Chamber of Commerce.
The revenue from both departments will be paid into the treasury of the
Chamber of Commerce.

The total receipts of grain of all kinds during 1908 were 47,295,000
bushels; practically the same as received during the year 1907.

The Board of Directors have, during the year, held the regular meet-
ings required by the rules and in addition have had twenty-three special
meetings, all of which have been well attended.

The Freight Bureau has been revived at the request of the receiving
and shipping interests. Mr. Greo. A. Schroeder was appointed manager
at a moderate salary. This bureau has been under the direct charge of
the Committee on Transportation. The work done by this committee
and bureau is partly as follows:

A decision by the Inter-State Commerce Commission compelled
the Rock Island Railway to put into effect at an early date joint
through rates on all kinds of grain from stations on its lines in Iowa,
Minnesota and South Dakota, to Milwaukee, the same as the rates
in effect to Chicaga

A rule of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company charging
the minimum capacity of large cars furnished to the shipper, regard-
less of the actual weight of grain loaded into such cars, was taken up
with the Railway Commission of Wisconsin, resulting in an order by
the Commission to change the rule and refund the overcharge on all
cars in excess of the actual weight.

For many years the Omaha and Northwestern Railways had
charged 2 cents per 100 pounds for the privilege of stopping ship-
ments of barley in transit from Minneapolis at Milwaukee and other
Wisconsin points to be malted in transit. This charge was abrogated
on April 1st, last, through the efforts of our Freight Bureau.

In the early part of the present year a decision of the Interstate
Commerce Commission was rendered which was of great importance
to this market. The milling interests of Kansas, Missouri, and Okla-
homa, sought to have the rate on flour from the Missouri River to
Chicago reduced to 4J^ per cwt., to equal the rate from Minneapolis
to Chicago. The Milwaukee Chamber of Commerce, together with
the Minneapolis Chamber of Commerce, the St. Louis Merchants
Exchange, the Kansas City Board of Trade and the Chicago Board
of Trade, were allowed to intervene; this Chamber being represented
by Messrs. Bell and Schroeder at the hearing. The Interstate Com-
merce Commission denied the petition of the Southwestern Millers



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30 TRADE AND COMMERCE OP MILWAUKEE.



and ruled that the difference in rates as stated was justified by the
competition of water routes from Minneapolis to Chicago.

The Manager of this Bureau has appeared before the Interstate
Commerce Commission on various occasions to give testimony on subjects
of importance affecting the trade of our city.

Negotiations are now pending through this Bureau with the railway
companies for the establishment of through rates on grain from Chicago
to Eastern trunk Une territory, via Milwaukee, which, if successful will
enable the trade of this city to enter the Chicago grain market on the same
basis, as either Chicago or Manitowoc now enters the Milwaukee market
for Eastern business.

Our Manager is a member of the National Industrial Traffic League,
an organization, the object of which is an interchange of ideas concerning
traffic matters.

On February 18th, last, Mr. W. J. Langson, ^ ho had been the Secretary
and Treasurer for 44 years, died. He was during that time a most efficient
officer, a lovable man and one who commanded the respect not only of
every member of this organization, but had a high reputation throughout
the land on matters pertaining to commerce and trade. His loss will be
felt by all.

The rulings of the Interstate Commerce Commission, the laws that
compel equal rates and privileges to be granted to all individuals and
locations, are beneficial to the traffic of our city, and your Board of Di-
rectors look forward to a prosperous future for the Chamber of Commerce.

Respectfully submitted in behalf of the Board of Directors.

E. C. WALL,

President.



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TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKEE. 31



Treasurer's Report

Annual Report of the Treasurer of the Chamber of Commerce

of the City of Milwaukee, for the Fiscal

Year Ended April 5th, 1909.

RECEIPTS.

From $15,100 00

1,785 00

939 00

314 00

213 75

69 00

75 00

70 00

4 00

120 00

590 85 .

11 25

$19,291 85
From weighing department 17 , 961 96

Total income $37 , 253 81

Balance beginning of year 16 , 197 77

$53,451 58
Transfer fees and surplus proceeds of forfeited mem-
bership paid Gratuity Fund 350 67

Proceeds forfeited memberships 375 00

$54,177 25

DISBURSEMENTS.

Current expenses Chamber of Commerce $23 , 112 71

Expenses Weighing Department 18 , 198 46

Total expenses $41,311 17

Paid Gratuity Fund, transfer fees and surplus pro-
ceeds of forfeited memberships 350 67

Disbursed — Proceeds forfeited memberships 375 00

$42,036 84
Balance end of fiscal year 12 , 140 41

$54,177 25

DISBURSEMENTS IN DETAIL. "^

For Telegraphic service $5 , 285 37

" Salaries 7 ,046 00

•* Janitor 840 00

" Itent of exchange room 3 ,000 00

*• Smoking Room ! 2 ,000 00

" Counsel fees 510 50

" Printing 292 65

" Books, papers, and circulars 136 26

" Telephones 114 46

" Spring water 96 00

" Stationery 94 21

" Electric light 236 96

" Postage 143 47

" Gas 72 25

** Tellers' fees and lunch 97 00

" City directories 12 00

" Typewriter 54 00

*• Typewriting 29 70

" Laundry Ill 50

** Advertising elections 23 19

" Testimony I. C. Commission hearing 26 37

" Repairs 353 21



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32 TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKEE.



For Returned badges, and clerks' tickets 13 00

** Uniform, etc 41 75

** Maps 6 95

•* Book binding 23 00

** Soap and towels, etc 76 77

" Delegates 272 20

" Flag 12 40

" Printing Annual Report. 336 92

" Defending elevator allowance, I. C. Com. Ck)m 500 00

" Ice 20 00

" Furniture and carpets 332 45

" Glass for Smoking Room 25 00

•* Gas log 15 67

" Chandelier 33 00

" Trophies Wis. Agricultural Ex. Assn 100 00

" Funeral Secretary W. J. Langson 236 50

" Membership National Traffic League 25 00

" Safety deposit box 2 00

" Painting 20 50

*• Traffic matters 287 55

" Sundries 157 95

$23,112 71

Expenses of Wei^ng Department $18,198^46

Income of Weighmg .Department 17 ,961^.96



H. A. PLUMB,

Treasurer



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TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKEE.



33



Ctiamber of Commerce Weighing Department

Receipts and Expenses, Fiscal Tear 1908-1909.



Months.


SUPERVISING.


TEAM SCALES


TOTALS,


1908.


Fees.


Expenses.


Fees.


Expenses.


Fees.


Expenses.


June

July

August

September..

October

November.. .

December. . .

1909.

January

February. . .
March


S 802 86

789 82
852 92
782 60
1,211 30
1.080 70
1.665 35
1,453 09
1.547 91

1,286 07

971 43

1,275 91


$1,061 68
1,005 06
1,004 52
995 15
1,049 31
1,419 41
1,337 06
1,357 62
1,372 92

1,234 04
1,171 16
1,129 05


$ 231 35

235 15
289 85
243 65
237 15
304 20
377 90
291 95
308 70

286 95
246 40

288 75


$ 304 51

316 69
301 11
289 63
349 41
322 91
306 28
308 85
326 38

484 67
376 50
374 55


$ 1.034 21
1,024 97
1,142 77
1,026 25
1,448 45
2.284 90
2,043 25
1,745 04
1,856 61

1,573 02
1,217 83
1,564 66


$1,366 19
1,321 75
.1,305 63
1.284 78
1,398 72
1,742 32
1,643 34
1,666 47
1.699 30

1,718 71
1,547 65
1,503 60


Totals


$14,619 96


$14,136 97


$3,342 00


$4,061 49


*$17,961 96


$18,198 46



Respectfully submitted,

H. A. PLUMB,

Treasuber.



♦I^hereby certify that the total amount of weighing fees collected by
me for^the Chamber of Commerce, for the year ending April 5, 1909, and
paid to the Treasurer, was Seventeen Thousand Nine Hundred Sixty-one
and;;96-100 dollars, ($17,961.96.)



F.



F. CLAPP,
Chiep Weigher.



Examined and found correct:
E. H. Dadmtjn,
C. W. Schneider,
E. J. Furlong,

Finance Committee.



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34 TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKEE.



Annual Report of the Trustees of the
Gratuity Fund

Milwaukee, April 8th, 1909.
To the Board of Directors of the Chamber of Commerce:

Gentlemen: The Trustees of the Gratuity Fund of the Chamber
of Commerce beg to submit the following report upon the matters concern-
ing the fund for the fiscal year of the Association ended April 5th, 1909.

The total net income from the invested fund during the past year
was $5,750.00. This income divided by the average annual death rate
of participating -members for the past ten years in proportion to the "
number of such members at the end of each year, gives $568.18 as the
gratuity payable upon the death of each of the members who were qual-
ified for participation in the fund. The death rate is 10.12, and the num-
ber of deaths of members whose widows and heirs will receive this gratuity
was eleven, .88 (t^) above the ten year average. It will require the total
income of the fund and $499.98 drawn from the reserve or surplus, or in
other words, the sum of $6,249.98 to pay the eleven gratuities, due to the
increased death rate over the average for the ten year period. The re-
serve thus reduced still has te,036.15 available, which may be drawn
upon whenever the number of deaths for any year is greater than the aver-
age for the preceding ten years.

At par value, the Gratuity Fund amounts to the total sum of $128,-
556.00, the amount held subject to payment to beneficiaries, and the
reserve being included. Since the establishment of the Fund in 1880,
$147,312.98 has been paid out in gratuities, including those of the year
just closed.

The following statement is presented, from which may be seen the
annual income, dividends, number of deaths, principal of fund at par values
and amount of reserve at the close of each year since the fund was estab-
lished:



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TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKEE.



35



Fiscal Year.


Income.


Dividends


No. of
Deaths


Principal at
par Values.


Reserve.


1880-1881


$2,553 00


$510 60


6


$ 45,000 00




1881-1882


2.903 75


563 83


4


66,600 00


$ 648 43


1882-1883


4,300 00


494 84


10


69,750 00




1883-1884


4,365 00


485 09


9


70,000 00




1884-1885


4,334 00


541 75


8


72.500 00




1885-1886


4,455 99


679 26


5


74,000 00


1,069 69


1886-1887


4,511 00


669 28


6


74,000 00


2.224 39


1887-1888


4,378 64


611 54


11


74,000 00


2.387 66


1888-1889


4,583 62


288 94


16


74,000 00


39 46


1889-1890


4,650 00


422 73


11


76,000 00




1890-1891


4,767 67


529 74


13


77,000 00




1891-1892


4,770 00


433 63


11


77,000 00




1892-1893


6,130 00


320 62


16


84.000 00




1893-1894


5,330 00


$59 28
608 64


4


89,467 00


3.092 88


1894-1895


5,188 13


13


90,962 92


1.668 69


1895-1896


5,394 85


543 36


13


94,027 92




1896-1897


5,775 82


412 56


14


99,006 12




1897-1898


6,008 90


400 59


16


104,486 36




1898-1899


6,034 00


431 00


14


111,316 59




1899-1900


6.202 46


587 91


6


112,107 60


2.675 00


1900-1901


6,440 00


364 60


25


112.414 17




1901-1902


6,240 00


416 00


15


114.961 42




1902-1903


6,158 60


686 53 .


6


114.166 42


2.639 32


1903-1904


6,200 00


529 91


11


115,360 06


3.010 31


1904-1905


5,910 00


585 16


7


117,065 06


4.824 26


1905-1906


5,943 80


571 52


11


118,108 45


4.481 34


1906-1907


6,040 00


575 24


11


118,647 45


4.193 70


1907-1908


6,040 00


608 87


11


118,866 45


3,536 13


1908-1909


5,750 00


568 18


11


119,269 87


3.036 15



The Treasurer's statement, which accompanies this report, will show
the manner in which the fund is invested.

Respectfully submitted in behalf of the Trustees,

J. W. P. Lombard,
Wm. Bigelow,
L. J. Petit,
Jas. K. Ilsley,
Trustees of the Gratuity Fund.



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36



TRADE AND COMMERCE OF MILWAUKEE.



Chamber of Commerce Gratuity Pund.



Securities April 5, 1909.



Par Value.



C. M. & St. P. S. M. Div due 1910 6'8

Chi. & St. L. R. R. (Atchison Sys.) " 1915 6's

Cin., Findlay & Ft. W. Ry. lets " 1923 4*8

Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Ry. Ists " 1941 5's

Mason City & Ft. Dodge Ry " 1955 4's

Milwaukee Light, Heat and Traction Co " 1929 5's

Milwaukee & Northern R. R " 1913 6*8

Mo., Kans. & Oklahoma R. R. Ists " 1942 5's

Mo., Kans. «fe Texas R. R " 1990 4's

Ohio River R. R. Ist mortgage " 1936 5's

Schuyler School District *• 1914 6's



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