Minnesota. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Biennial report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics of the State of Minnesota ... online

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Five room flat, city water, on car

line 16.00

Heven room house, city water.

bath, furnace, etc.. two blocks

from car line — ^ 28.00

Eight room house, city water, bath.

two l>locks from car line 32.00



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BUREAU OP LABOB STATISTICS



348



OneMOe.

Six room house, citv water, bath,

furnace, etc., one block from car

line 120.00

Six room house and barn, well, two

blocks from car line 20.00

Fire room flat, city water and bath,

one block from car line 16.00

Bix room flat, city water and bath,

one block from car line 90.00

Eight room house, city water, bath,

one block from car line 28.00

Eight room house, city water, bath,

one block from car line , 90.00

One and Ontrfourth Miles.

Four rooms, down stairs, one block
from oar line, cistern 114.00

Six room house, well, two blocks
from car line 16.00

Five room house, well and cistern,
on oar line 13.80

Seven room house, well and cis-
tern, one block from car line 18.00

Seven room house, city water, two
blocks from oar line 25.00

Six room house, city water, on car
line 22.00

Nine room house, city water and
bath, (new) one block from oar
line 31.50

Ten room house, and barn, c.ty
water, bath, cistern, etc., two
blocks from car line 36. 00

OntandOne^alf MUen.

New eight room house, well, bath.

etc., two blocks from oar line 125.00

Five room flat, city water, on oar

line 12.00

Six room house, city water, on car

Une 17.00

Eight room house, city water, on

oar line 2t.00

Nine room house, city water, bath,

furnace, etc., two blocks from

carline 30.00

Five room house, well and cistern,

two blocks from car line 16.00

Five room flat; city water, on car

line 15.00

Six room house (new,) city water,

two blocks from oar line 18.00

Seven room house, city water, two

blocks from oar line 18.00

One cmd Three^fourths MUes,

Four rooms down stairs, city water

and bath, one block from car line tlO.OO
Pour rooms up stairs, city water

and bath, one block from oar line 8.00
Nine-room house, city water and

cistern, one block from oar line . . 18.00
Six-room house, well, three blocks

from ear line 14.00



Tito MUes.

Four-room cottage, well and bam,

six bloclu from car line $10.00

Six-room house, city water, four

blocks from car line 19.00

Three rooms up stairs, well, five

bloclcs from car line 6.00

Four rooms up stairs, well, two

blocksfrom carline 8.00

Seven room house, city water and

bath, on car line 20.00

Nine room house, city water, bath,

etc., one block from car line 28.00

Two and One-fourOi MUet,
Pour room cottage, well, four

blocks from oar line 8.00

Six room house, well and cistern,

two blocks from oar line. 15.00

Eight room house, well, cistern and

bam, three blocks from car line. 20.00
Elff ht room house, well and cistern,

tnree blocks from oar line 18.00

Pour rooms, up stairs,- well, two

blocks from car line 8.00

Pour rooms, down stairs, well, two

blocks from car line 10.00

Two and One-half MUes.
Eight r(X)m house, well, one block

from car line 12.00

Eight room house, well and cistern,

four blocks from car line 10.00

Pour room cottage, well, three

blocks from oar line 6.00

Six room house, cistern, three

blocks from oar line 10.00

Five room house, no water, four

blocksfrom carline 8.00

Six room house, well and cistern,

one block from car line 16.06

Tux) and Three-fourth MUes,
Seven room house, well and cistern

two blocks from car line 15.00

Five room house, well, one block

from car line 10.00

Four rooms, up stairs, well, two

blocks from carline 8.00

Six room house, well and cistern,

two blocks from carline 15.00

Four room cottage and bam, well,

three blocks from car line 10.00

Five room house, well and cistern,

two blocks from car line 16.00

Three MUes,
Five room house, well, four blocks

from car line 10.00

Five room house, well and cistern,

eight blocks from car line 10.00

Pour room cottage, well, six blocks

from oar line 6.00

Nine room house, well and cistern,

(new) one block from car line 25.00

Four room cottage, well, two blocks

from oar line 10.00



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344



SECOND BIENNIAL REPORT



FUEL.

COAIi.

AnOvtoxiU.





Ton.


Vi Ton.


54 Ton.


Nut ;. . .


17.50
7.50
7.50
7.30
7.25
5.00
tf.OO


U,00
4.00
4.00
4.00

3.go

2.75
3.25


•3 25


stove


2 25


No. 4


2 25


Egg


2.25


Grote:.::;;;;:;:;::;; :;:;:;::::;;.:":::.;::::::::.:;:;::::::: :::


2.20


Pea


1.65


Broken Nut or Cargo Pea .. .


1 90







Cto9» Creek Lehigh.



Nut...
Stove

Orate



r.75


U.IO


7.75


4.10


7.75


4.10


7.75


4.10



«2.ao

2 30
280
2.30



BUuminous Coalu and Coke.



Id and like grades.,









At yard


Ton.


'/i Ton.


>4 Ton.


Ton.


S5.00


12.75


$1.65


$4.50


7.60


4.00


2.25


7.00


7.00


3.76


2.15


6.50


6.00


3.26


1.90


5.50


600


3.25


1.90


5.50


5.75


3.15


1.80


5.25


4.50


2.50


1.50


4.00


6.75


3.65


205


6.-25


6.75


365


2.05


6.25


7.00


3.75


2.15


6.50


9.00


4.75


2.65


8.50



Aty'd.per
l(»lb6.in
lots less
than 500
pounds.



.40
.50
.50
.30
.50
.40
.40
.50
.30
.50
.60



Chai-ciidl.

Per barrel at yard $1.00

Per barrel delivered 1.26

Per bushel 25

Per bushel, delivered in lot.s not less Mian 10 bushels 25



P»*ic€« for Carryiuu.



Ton.


ViTon.


$ .50


$ .25


.75


.40


1.00


.60


1.50


.75



}4Ton.



Ground floor,

1 flight

2flight6

Sflights



$ .25



.35

.40



In lots of 4^tons and upward coal may be carried at the rate of $2.00 per day.



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iAjreau of labor statistics



345



WOOD.

DryMfU.







o


1

O


GO

1


1




§


a
o




&




GaDgwood


11.15


tl.75


$B.20


•4.50


IB.OO


Mixed wood


1.25
1.40


2.00
2.25


3.70

4ao


5.26

(tao


9.60


Slabwood


12.60


Dimension wood


1.40


2.26


4.ao


6.80


12.60



All orders for two, three, or six loads, at above prices, must be for immediate de-
livery to one place and at one time.



Dimension

Gang blocks all long

Gang blocks, short, 16 in. and under .

Dimension blocks, all lengths

Dimension blocks, sawed



12.25

1.75

2.00

2.25

2.60

Cord.

Four foot edgings, tied 18.25

FOur foot edgings, loose 1.90

Four foot slab : <i,50

Four foot mixed 3.25

CatTvinv Dry MtU Wotnl.

Cart
Lioad.

Ground floor 50

One flight 75

Two flightH $1.00

Three flights 1.25



$1.35
1.15
1.25
1.36
1.50

HOord.
$1.85

1.20
2.00
1.90



40art

Load.

40

iW

75

$1.00



Cord Wood.





rOITR FOOT.


8AWED.


RAWKD AND SPLIT.




1


4


$2.00
1.75
1.60


1


S


H,


1

$8.00
7.00
6.00
8.50
7.50


•«


U


Maple


$6.50
5.50
4.50


$3.50
3.00
2.50


$7.25
6.25
5.25
7.50
6.50
5.00
7.00
6.00


$3.90
3.40
2.90
4.00
3.50
2.75
3.75
3.25


$2.20
1.96
1.7D
2.25
2.00
1.65
2.15
1.90


$4.25
3.75
3.25
4.50
4.00


$2.40


Birch and Oak


2 15


Bass

Maple, 3 cut


2.40
2.50


Oax, 3cut








2 25


Bass, 1 cut...










Mapie, 1 cut














Oak,l cut





























Carnfino Cord Wood.

Ground floor 75 40

Oneflight $1.00 60

Twofl^hts 1.25 TO

Threeflights 1.50 $1.00



35
40
60



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346 SECOND BIENNIAL KEPORT



CHAPTER V.



MINE INSPECTION.



In June, 1889, complaint came to this office that the mines at
Ely, in this state, were not conducted with proper regard to
the safety of the men employed therein. Fatal accidents were
said to be too common, and a request was made that an in-
spector should visit the mines.

I accordingly went, in person, to the mines at Ely, and was
shown through a part of them by Capt. Roberts, of the Chand
ler mine.

After I had been through the mine I told Capt. Roberts that,
not being an experienced miner, I would not undertake to make
a report upon the condition of the mine until I had gone through
it with an expert miner and taken his testimony.

I accordingly sought for such a man that evening at Ely, but
found none who were willing to do the work, for the reason, as
one of them expressed it, that **the company would say they
were interfering in a matter that was none of their business."

One experienced man told me that, as a general rule, only the
new men were killed, for experienced men would not go into
dangerous places, and for himself, if he was ordered to do so,
he simply refused. Desiring to have his opinion as an expert,
I told him that, while in the mine, I had seen two young men
picking the dirt out from under a large stone at the end of a
drift, and had, at the time, asked Captain Roberts if he did not
consider that dangerous work, and he had replied that it would
be for inexperienced men. I had asked the miners what they
proposed to do in case the rock fell, and they had told me that
they would watch which way it was coming and jump aside.

It seemed to me that there was little chance for the men to get
out of the way in case there was a heavy fall of earth with the
stone. The miner refused to express an opinion, merely stat-
ing that he did not want to say anything about it.

As I could not secure the services of any man in Ely, I went



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BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS. 347

to Duluth and employed Captam James A. Nichols, a miner of
thirty years experience, and, with him, returned to Ely.

Capt. Roberts, upon seeing us, pretended to be very much of-
f ended on account of the conversation I had with the miner
about the falling stone. I then went to Supt. Pingilly, and
told him that I had with me Capt. Nichols, an exi)ert miner,
with whom I desired to go through the mine. Capt. Pingilly
also affected great indignation, and flatly told me thart I could
not go through, and that he refused to recognize me as a state
officer; adding that, if I attempted to oppose him, he would
run me out of town. As I had no legal authority to bring Capt.
Nichols into the mine, and, as it would have been useless and
' impossible for me to go through alone, I decided to secure the
testimony of some miners, under oath, as to the condition of
the mine, but could not find any who were willing to testify.

I concluded, however, that the mine needed inspection, and
that it would have to be inspected. So just previous to the issu-
ance of this report, I went to Duluth and secured the services
of two experienced miners, August Wickstrom and Eric Carl-
son, who proceeded to Ely and made the inspection without
consulting Mr. Pingilly.

I present below their sworn testimony :

STATE OF MINNESOTA, { ^
County of St. Louis. f

We, the undersigned, August Wickstrom and .Eric Carlson, being each
duly sworn, each for himself, deposes and* says:

That we have inspected the mines at Ely and find their condition to be
as follows :

CHANDLEIl MINE.

Shaft No. i.— The outside part of this shaft is very well timbered, but
the man-way is in very bad shape. There are some places where there is
no lining between the man-way and the cage-way. This lining is very
necessary. There are no safety hooks on the cages and no guards on tres-
tle. Clear creek water is used in the boiler at this engine-house. There
is no work being done in level No. 1. Level No. 2 is in very bad shape.
The timber is breaking right as we are in here. There are men here fix-
ing up the cave, so we can not get in where the biggest part of the mining
is going op. Level No. 3 is more solid, but the timber is very weak, so if
the ground commences to settle down there would be nothing to hold it.
Level No. 4 is in bad shape. The timber is broken off , and pressed in
tram the sides so that they cannot get through with the cars. They have
cut some of the broken timbers out, and there does not seem to be any-
thing holding the ground. Will have to be re-timbered.

Shaft No. ;.''.— In this shaft the man-way is all right down to the third
level, but between the third and fourth level the men have to get out Into
the hoisting shaft for a distance of 30 or 40 feet to get down to the fourth
level. There are no safety hooks on cages or guards on trestle. A man
could walk light off and fall down trestle. In the engine-house for this
shaft the water is dirty. It is taken right out from the mine, and the fire-
man complains that he cannot keep the boilers clean. The boilers are
foaming. There is no work being done in Levels Nos. 1 and 2 of this shaft.



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L



348 SECOND BIENNIAL BEPOBT

They are worklDg in Level No. 3, but it is Id very bad shape. The timber
is breaking and uie ground is falling right as we are in here. Level No. 4
is more solid, but is very wide. There is some loose rock in the roof. Can
be barred down and made solid. The facings in the drift are in pretty
good shape, but the timber is a little beftind. It will have to be followed
up closer.

There is not a set of solid mining timber in the Chandler mine so far as
the stopping is concerned.

PIONEEB MINE.

Shaft No, i.— The ladders in man-way are good, but there is no lining
between the cage- way and the ladder-way. There is a space from twelve
to fifteen inches wide between the man-way and the wall of the shaft
which is not guarded in some parts of the shaft. Down near the bottom
there is a very close place to get down in case the pump is standing right
in the man- way. No cage hooks on cages and no guards on trestle. Dirty
water used in boilers. There is no work being done in the first and second
levels. They are working in the third level, and it is in pretty good con-
dition.

Shaft No. .^.— The shaft is very small for the first sixty feet down, and
then It gets wider. A man has to go into the hoisting shaft, the ladder-
way being in the cage-way, and there is not room for the man and the
cage at the same time. The water used in boilers is dirty. There are no
hooks on cages and no guards on trestle. There is no work in the first
and second levels. The work in the third level is done in good order,
the shaft is well timbered, except at the bottom, where the drift cuts out,
there should be another set of timbers put in. There are some loose rocks.

Subscribed and sworn to before me, and in my presence, this September
17 1890

.JNO. JENSWOLD, Jr..
Notary Public, St. Louis Coumy, Minn.

After leaving the Chandler mine, I went with Capt. Nichols
to the mines at Tower. Here the shafts were well timbered,
their mouths guarded by gates, and the ladders in good shape.
Men are constantly employed barring the loose rock from the
walls of the open pits. So far as I could judge, reasonable
precautions were taken for the safety of the men. Capt. Nich-
ols, after spending a day with me in the mine, submitted the fol-
lowing report:

DuLUTH, Minn., August 9th, 1889.
John Lartih^ Cammiititmiei' of Labor:

Dbau Sik— In my visit and goint? through the Minnesota Company's
mines at Tower, will say, I think the present company are using all neces-
sary care and precaution in working the mine, as to safety and comfort of
men employed. Yours truly, JAMES A. NICHOLS.

The following is a list of fatal accidents which occurred at
the Chandler mine during the first six months of the year 1889:

February 1, 1889, John E. Ogren, killed by putting his head
in the hoisting shaft, taking out a plank, himself, to look in.

April 4, 1889, John Erickson, foreman, killed by a fall of
ground in No. 1 Skip Road pit, by going into his place after
blasting.

June 13, 1889, Nat. Hanala. a Pinlander, killed by a fall of
ground in No. 1, open pit. by going in after a blast.



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BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS.



349



June 22, 1889, Louis Hanson, killed by putting his head in
No. 2 cag6 shaft, while on his way to the surface ahead of
time. In trying to avoid detection of foreman he crawled in on
the wall plate of shaft.

Record of fatal accidents occurring at the Tower mines dur-
ing the first six months of the year 1889:

March 6, 1889, Henry Corpe, trammer, killed by a falling
rock from hanging wall in No. 8 pit.

May 6, 1889, Matt. Wilson, miner, killed by a falling rock
from hanging wall in No. 1 pit.

June 1. 1889, Nels Hendrickson, pit boss, killed by a fall of
rock striking him on back and legs.

June 10. 1889. Charles Johnson, lander, killed by falling into
shaft, while shoving car onto cage; cage having been sent
down previously by himself.

July 30, 1889, Prank Mismas, trammer, killed by a piece of
ore falling out of the roof and striking him on the head.

There were about three times as many men employed at the
Tower mines, when these accidents occurred, as there were at
the Chandler. The percentage of fatal accidents at the Chand-
ler was. therefore, much higher during the six months con-
sidered. *

It is proper to state that this Bureau has no legal authority
at present to order any improvements in workshops, mines, or
factories. It has merely the right of inspection. The Factory
Inspection Act, which was intended to give the necessary au-
thori^ to the commissioner, failed of passage in the last legis-
lature. That such a law is needed, and urgently needed, there /- -
can be no question. One of the inspectors should be an expert /
miner. The law should be so carefully framed that the penalty /
for its violation could be imposed promptly and certainly, and
without tedious litigation. The law under which this Bureau!
is acting makes it the duty of the commissioner to **see to itj
that all laws regulating the employment of children, minors, \
and women, and all laws established for the protection of the ^
health and lives of operatives in workshops, factories, and all
other places, where labor is employed, are enforced.'' This
phraseology gives the impression that there are some such en-
actments on the statute books of the state; but the number and
importance of such laws, at present in force, dwindle materially
when they come to be examined. The best that we have on
the subject of child labor is a proviso that children shall not
be permitted to work more than ten hours per day! The best



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1^



350 SECX)ND BIENNIAL REPORT

for the protection of wage working women is that they shall
not be compelled to work more than ten hours daily; and one em-
ployer, whom I ordered to desist from working his female help
twelve and one-half hours per day, simply discharged them,
and, in hiring again, required them to sign a voluntary agree-
ment to work twelve hours and one half . Literally, this would
not be compulsion, for, by the terms of their engagement, they
volimtarily agreed to work the extra hours.
^ Mining is dangerous work at best, and it is inevitable that ac-
cidents will occur. Some accidents are clearly traceable to the
carelessness of the men themselves, some to the inevitable risks
of mining, but others, not few in number, are traceable to lack
of proper safeguards for life and limb^ There is no excuse for
these latter cases, except sheer greed or carelessness, and such
reckless indifference to the loss of human life should be rigor-
ously checked by the collective authority of the whole people.



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BUREAU OP LABOR STATISTICS. 361



CHAPTER VI.



LABOR LAWS,



CHAPTER 24.

GEKERAL STATUTES OF 1878.

BegukUion of Labor:

Section 1. In all manufactories, workshops, and other places used for
mechanical and manufacturing purposes in this state, where children
under the age of eighteen years and women are employed, the time of
labor of the persons aforesaid shall not exceed ten hours for each day; and
any owner, stockholder, or over8eer,employer,clerk or foreman who compels
any woman or any child under eighteen years of age to labor in any day ex-
ceeding ten hours, or permits any child under the age of fourteen to labor
in any factory, worlcshop, or other place used for mechanical or manufact-
uring purposes, for more than ten hours in any one day, where such
owner, stockholder, overseer, clerk, or foreman has control, such person
so offending shall be liable to a prosecution in the name of the State of
Minnesota, before any justice of the peace, or court of competent juris-
diction, of the county wherein the same occurs, and, upon conviction
thereof, shall be fined in any sum not less than ten or more than one
hundred dollars.

Sec. 2. In all engagements to labor in any mechanical or manufactur-
ing business, a day's work, when the contract of labor is silent upon the
subject, or when there is no express contract, shall consist of ten hours,
and all agreements, contracts, or engagements, in reference to such labor,
shall be so construed.

CHAPTER 205.
AN ACT TO REGULATE EMPLOYMENT BUREAUS OR OFFICES.

Section 1. No person shall engage in the business of keeping an em-
ployment bureau or office, or agency, for the purpose of hiring men to
work for others, and receive a compensation for such hiring, without first
having obtained a license so to do, as hereinafter provided; and any per-
son who shall engage in such business without sucn license shall be guilty
of a misdemeanor, and shall, upon conviction thereof, be punishea by a
fine not exceeding one hundred ( 100) dollars, or Imprisonment lu the
county jail not exceeding ninety (90) days, or both.

Sec. 2. Any person who desires to engage In said business may apply
to the common council, If such business is to be carried on In a city, or
to the village council. If In a village, or to the county commissioners of
the county In which such business is to be carried on. If In the country, for
such license, and upon paying Into the treasury of such city, village, or
county the sum of one hundred (100) dollars, and upon executing and de-
livering to such common council, village council, or county commissioners,
a bond in the penal sum of ten thousand (10,000) dollars, with sufficient
sureties, to be approved by such common or village council or county com-
missioners, he shall be entitled to such license.

Sec. 3. The bond shall run to the state of Minnesota, and shall be
conditioned for the payment of any damage which any person secured or



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352 SECOND BIENNIAL BEPORT

engaged to labor for others by the obligor may sustain by reason of any
unauthorized act, fraud, or misrepresentation on the part of such agent,
for such hiring. The bond shall be filed with the city clerk, if approved
by the common council, with the village recorder, if approved by a village
council, and with the county auditor, if approved by the board of county
commissioners. Any person licensed and having given bond, as herein
provided, may, while continuing to reside or maintain his office at the
place mentioned in such license, prosecute his said business in any part
of the state.

Sec. 4. Any person hired or engaged to work for others, by one so
licensed, as aforesaid, who shall fail to get employment according to the
terms of such contract of hire or engagement by reason of any unauthor-
ized act, fraud, or misrepresentation on the part of such agent, may bring
an action up^n said bond, and may recover in such action against the
principal and sureties the full amount of his damages sustained by reason
of sucn unauthorized act, fraud, or misrepresentation, together with his
cost and disbursement in such action.

Approved February 28, 1886.



CHAPTER 206.

AN ACT TO REGULATE THE LABOR OF LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS AND

FIREMEN.

Section 1. On 'all lines of railroad operated in this state the time of
labor of the locomotive enigneers and firemen employed in ruaning or
operaticg the locomotive engines on or over such roads shall not at any
time exceed eighteen (18) hours during one day; prcvidedf however, that
nothing in this section shall be construed as allowing any locomotive
engineer or fireman to desert his locomotive in case of accident or other
unavoidable delay.

Sec. 2. Any officer, director, superintendent, master mechanic, fore-
man, agent, or employe who compels any locomotive engineer or fireman
to labor, in running or operating any locomotive engine on or over such,
roads, for more than eighteen (18) hours during one day, except as pro-
vided in section one (1) of this act, or in cases of urgent necessity, such
person so offending shall Ik? deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on con-
viction thereof, shall be punished by a fine of not less than twenty-five
(25) or more than one hundred (100) dollars.



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