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SOCIAJ, SERVICES BLOCK GRANT
FOR MONTANA



CONTENTS :



1. FY 86 Intended Use Plan



2. FY 85 Expenditure Report



3. FY 84 Expenditure Report



STATE DOCUMENTS COLLECTION



MAR 2 4 W86

MONTANA STATE LIBRARY

1515 E. 6th AVE^
BEUENA, MONIANA 59620.



Department of Social and

Rehabilitation Services
P.O. Box 4210
Helena, MT 596701
406-444-5622



>



S3s,a^ANA STATE LIBRARY

pill

3 0864 00053405







c



PREFACE



Due to a change in legislative appropriations for human
services, Montana's SSBG and LIEAP 10% transfer funds
have been shifted to provide services to the development-
ally disabled. This does not mean that the child pro-
tective services, the adult protective services, and the
contracted services such as Big Brothers and Sisters will
not be provided in Montana. There has merely been a
change in sources of funding. Those services previously
provided in the Community Services Division will be fund-
ed by state general fund dollars. Where a small portion
of the SSBG funds received by Montana was used to fund
a small portion of the DD services, 64.5% of all DD oper-
ations and benefits will now be provided by SSBG funds
(including the 10% LIEAP transfer) .

This report also includes Montana's intended use plan for
the FFY 85 P.L. 9 8-4 73 funds.



CONTENTS



Page 1 Preface

Page 2 Budget

Page 3 Services for the

Development ally Disabled

Page 3 Clients To Be Served

Page 5 Definitions of Terms

Page 9 Service Descriptions

Page 27 P.L. 98-473 Plan



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

IVIontana State Library



http://www.archive.org/details/socialservicesbl1985mont



SOCIAL SERVICES BLOCK GRANT
Intended Use Plan for FY 86

SSBG AND 10% LIEAP Transfer: Developmental Disabilities

1. Administration and Operations: $ 801,871

2. Benefits: $ 10,193,188

Adult Habilitation Services
Vocational Placement and Job

Training
Senior Day Services
Children's Summer Day Services
Residential Services

Adult Community Homes

Children's Community Homes

Senior Adult Community Homes
Trnasitional Living Training
Independent Living Training
Family Training and Support Services
Specialized Family Care Services
Respite Care Services
Evaluation and Diagnostic Services
Adaptive Equipment
Intensive Adult Habilitation Services

3. Total Planned Expenditures: $ 10,995,059

4. Sources of Funds:

SSBG FFY 85: $ 626,279

SSBG FFY 86: $ 9,199,270

LIEAP FFY 86: $ 1,169,510

$10,995,059



II. P.L. 98-473 Funding Plan r

1. Assessment: $ 22,004

2. Screening: 22,004

3. Training: 42,000

4. Total: $ 86,008



SERVICES FOR THE DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED



The State of Montana provides, through its various contractors,
a variety of developmental and support services to persons with
developmental disabilities. Funding for these many different
programs is, in general terms, derived from a combination of state
and federal monies. The State delivers and/or oversees these
services on the basis of categorical disabilities and eligibility
characteristics. . . factors which are given definition by State
law and State Agency policies and procedures.

Under current statutes, the State definition profiles developmental
disabilities by "condition" or "category":

"Developmental disabilities means disabilities attributable
to mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, autism, or
any other neurological handicapping condition closely related
to mental retardation and requiring treatment similar to that
required by mentally retarded individuals if the disability
originated before the person attained age 18, has continued
or can be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitutes
a substantial handicap of the person." 53-20-202, MCA

Eligibility is determined not only on IQ (the upper level about
69) but also on adaptive behavior and appropriateness of services
offerred.

The purpose of the developmental disabilities services are to
provide quality commxinity-based services in the least restrictive
environment which promotes the principle of normalization for
citizens who are development ally disabled.

PROJECTED SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED by all sources of fvinding for
developmental disabilities services.

Projected
FY 85 FY 86 Total
I. Adult Habilitation Services
(includes II. Vocational
Placement & Job Training and
XVI. Intensive Adult Habilita-
tion Services)

III. Senior Services

IV. Children's Summer Day Services

V. Residential-Adult Community Homes

VI. Residential-Children's Community

Homes

VII. Residential-Adult Intensive

Training Homes



100


34


1134


50


15


65


45


-


45


400


12


412


62


5


67


64


12


76



VIII. Residential-Senior Adult

Community Home

IX. Transitional Living Training

X. Independent Living Training

XI. Family Training and Support

XII. Specialized Family Care

XIII. Respite Care

XIV. Evaluation and Diagnosis

XV. Adaptive Equipment



32



32



54





54


180


-


180


450


22


472


35


10


45


450


-


450


212


70


282


250





250



TOTAL SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED:



3384



180



3564



UNDUPLICATED CLIENT COUNT:



1934



100



2034



NOTE * * * *

These services are being provided to these clients through various
funding sources of which SSBG and the 10% LIEAP funds constitute
64%. The total expenditure for these services in Montana will be
$15,934,408 in SFY 86.



DEFINITION OF TERMS



1. Client (s)

An individual or family who has been determined eligible to
receive developmental disability services and who is
officially enrolled in the contractor's program of service.

2 . Home and Community-Based Services

Individual (s) who are eligible for the Medicaid Waiver and
who are receiving home and community-based services under
the terms of contract #84-075-1404 with the CMT and the
terms of the this contract.

3. Unit of Service - Adult Habilitation

A unit of service is one day in which one (1) client was in
attendance for at least six hours.

4. Unit of Service - Senior Day

A unit of service is one day in which one (1) client was in
attendance for at least six hours.

5. Unit of Service - Children's Summer Day

A unit of service is one day in which one (1) client was in
attendance for at least six hours.

6. Unit of Service - Adult Community Home

A unit of service is one (1) day in which one (1) client is
present in the community home and receiving training includ-
ing days when a client is on a short-term leave (e.g.,
weekend absences) and no permanent vacancy is thereby
created.

7 . Unit of Service - Children Community Home

A unit of service is one (1) day in which one (1) client is
present in the community home and receiving training includ-
ing days when a client is on a short-term leave (e.g.,
weekend absences) and no permanent vacancy is thereby
created.

8 . Unit of Service - Senior's Community Home

A unit of service is one (1) day in which one (1) client is
present in the community home and receiving training includ-
ing days when a client is on a short-term leave (e.g.,
weekend absences) and no permanent vacancy is thereby
created.



9 . Unit of Service - Intensive Conununity Home

A unit of service is one (1) day in which one (1) client is
present in the coirmunity home and receiving training includ-
ing days when a client is on a short-term leave (e.g.,
weekend absences) and no permanent vacancy is thereby
created.

10 . Unit of Service - Family Training and Support

A unit of service is at least one (1) contact v/ith or on the
behalf of a child and/or family to carry out and/or develop
a Family Service Plan.

11. Unit of Service - Respite

A unit of service is one (1) hour of Respite care provided
to an individual determined eligible to receive Respite
services.

12. Unit of Service - Independent Living and Training

A unit of service is one (1) contact per month with a client
to develop and carry out an IHP objective relative to the
six (6) Service Component areas. In addition, a unit of
service will be given for each evaluation performed by
Independent Living Staff.

13 . Unit of Service - Transitional Living Training

A unit of service is one (1) direct contact per day with a
client to develop or implement an IHP objective within the
context of Appendix Dl , for a minimum of five (5) days per
week. In addition, a unit of service will be given for each
evaluation perfoinned at the Transitional Living Training
Facility.

14 . Unit of Service - Transportation

A unit of service for transportation is one ride per client
from point A to point B.

15 . Unit of Service - Specialized Family Care

Within the context of Specialized Family Care, the following
definitions of service units apply:



a) Case Management

A unit of service is a twenty-four (24) hour day when
the individual client is formally enrolled on the case
load of the CMT.



b) Respite (provided under the Specialized Family Care

Program)

A unit of service for respite is one (1) hour of
Respite Care provided to an individual determined
eligible to receive Respite Services.

c) Habilitation (other than Family Training and Support)

A unit of service for habilitation is one (1) hour of
service provided to an eligible individual.

d) Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy

A unit of service is one (1) hour of service provided
to an eligible individual.

e) Homemaker Services

A unit of service is one (1) hour of service provided
to an eligible individual.

f) Personal Care Attendant Services

A unit of service is one (1) hour of service provided
to an eligible individual.



16. At Risk



"At Risk" means a child who is betv/een birth and five years
of age who may become developmentally delayed or develop-
mentally disabled due to: Established Risk; Environmental
Risk; and Biological Risk.

a) Risk-Environmental

A biologically sound infant for whom life experiences
including maternal and family care, health care, oppor-
tunities for expression of adaptive behaviors, and
patterns of physical and social stimulation are suffi-
ciently limiting to the extent that, without corrective



intervention, they impart high probability for develop-
mental delay.

b) Risk-Established

An infant whose early appearing aberrant development is
related to diagnosed medical disorders of known retiol-
ogy bearing relatively well known expectancies for
developmental outcome within specified developmental
delay (e.g., Down's Syndrome).

c) Risk-Biological

An infant presenting a history of prenatal, perinatal,
neonatal, and early development events suggestive of
biological insult (s) to the developing central nervous
system and which either singly or collectively,
increase the probability of later appear aberrant
development.

17 . Transportation Services

Transportation services are for the conveyance of develop-
mentally disabled persons from a residential setting to a
work setting and back; from a residential or work setting to
another site in which they receive services such as medical,
dental, physical therapy or leisure time services.



I. ADULT HABILITATION SERVICES

The purpose of Adult Habilitation Services is to provide
functional training in non-residential settings which is
based on the Individual Habilitation Plans of Developmental-
ly Disabled Adults. Adult Habilitation Services include
training which address basic life skills, pre-vocational
skills, work activities and sheltered employment skills.
Training is generally directed toward skills pre-requisite
or integral to vocational activities. Adult Habilitation
Services direct their training activities toward movement of
individuals to increasingly higher levels of independence.

Within this framework the following types of training are
provided to Developmentally Disabled individuals based on
their individual needs:

1) Self Help Skills, such as eating, toileting, dressing,
hygiene and grooming, and clothing selection and care.

2) Motor/Physical Developm.ent , such as locomotion, body
posture/control, motor coordination, and physical
conditioning .

3) Communication Skills, such as pre-language , receptive
language, expressive language, and control of
inappropriate verbalization.

4) Functional Academics, such as pre-reading and reading,
number concepts, numlaer recognition, and survival word
recognition.

5) Community Life Skills, such as orientation to the
community, travel, social behavior, sexual behavior,
community recreation, and safety.

6) Work Skills, such as attention span/attending,
following instructions, matching, sorting, simple
assembly, quality of work, quantity of work, general
worker habits, and obtaining employment

7) Leisure Skills, such as crafts, individual games, and
group games.



II. ADULT HABILITATION SERVICES VOCATIONAL PLACEMENT AND JOB
TRAINING

The purpose of Vocational Placement and Job Training is to
provide an alternative to workshop/work activity centers as
a site for DD individuals needing long-term vocational
services. Therefore, the target population is people who



are in workshops or work activity centers under DD funding
or who would be if they didn't receive this service. The
people on the waiting list for just this project will be the
second priority. This is done by locating paid jobs in com-
munity employment, selecting appropriate clients through
screening committees, training them to do the job, providing
needed supportive and advocacy services to the employer and
individual as long as the IHP team deems necessary, with
provisions for referral to appropriate DD services should
the need arise. Services of residential/semi-independent
living staff, social work, and other community agencies are
coordinated through the IHP team.

Vocational Placement and Job Training provides the following
service components:

1) Contacting employers in local businesses and corpora-
tions to discuss the program and to determine their
potential as job sites; locating job sites with immedi-
ate openings; prior to selecting client, doing a poten-
tial job himself in order to assess skills involved and
make initial task analysis; evaluating client strengths
and job requirements in order to make an appropriate
match.

2) Training directed toward development of all skills
necessary to succeed in the particular paid job that
the individual is hired to do. Training occurs v/ithin
the actual job environment and addresses naturally
occurring demands and contingencies. Trainer will
assist the client in completing the job until the
client can do all tasks independently.

3) Supportive and advocacy services may include but are
not limited to:

a) Ongoing assessment of the client's performance in
meeting employer expectations.

b) Trouble shooting with on-the-job problems.

c) Arranging for wage subsidies.

d) Assistance in application for tax credit benefits.

e) Assisting the client in arranging long-term trans-
portation to and from work.

f) Providing any adaptive equipment and materials or
tools necessary to do the job.

g) Arranging for occupational therapist or physical
therapist evaluation to help client adapt to job
requirements.



h) Orienting employee to his co-workers and surround-
ings.

i) Teaching immediate supervisors realistic expecta-
tions .

j) Involving immediate supervisors in basic training
procedures.

k) Teaching co-workers and supervisors how to inter-
act with the client.

1) Coordinating new income for individual, and its
effect on SSI, SSDI , and Medicaid benefits.

m) Discussion of effects of employment with family or
residence.

n) Assisting the client to arrange his schedule so
there is opportunity for socialization with peers
and friends.

o) Long-term advocacy for client and employer.

4) Service coordination involves assisting other providers
and/or social service staff in locating, developing,
and coordinating services which enhance employment for
DD adults and may include but is not limited to:

a) Providing information or training to other
agencies or organizations who assist in serving an
individual.

b) Assisting in the planning and development of voca-
tional goals for clients wishing to be included in
this program or who are referred to this program.

c) Providing professional inter-agency communication
to promote the interests and needs of the indi-
vidual.



III. SENIOR DAY SERVICES

The purpose of Senior Day Services is to provide informal,
but functional, training and age appropriate activities to
developmentally disabled adults who are determined to be
appropriate for such services by their Individual Habilita-
tion Planning Teams by virtue of their age, functioning
levels and desires. Senior Day Services include the
provision of organized group activities, maintenance of



10



previously acquired self-help and social skills, formal
training in leisure-type activities, etc. The main purpose
of Senior Day Services is to offer group and individual
leisure and recreational activities; to teach constructive
use of an individuals personal tim.e; maintenance of indepen-
dence; and, finally, to prevent needless institutionaliza-
tion (e.g. nursing homes) through the provision of these
services. Senior Day Services should be flexible enough to
provide for an individual's personal needs, goals and
desires, both with regard to service offered and with regard
to client attendance and participation.

The following types of training and activities should
generally be offered to eligible clients based upon the
clients IHP:

1) Maintenance of self-help, motor, communication and
community life skills.

2) Informal training directed toward the independent use
of free time, both through individual and group
activities.

Recreational events will be scheduled, provided and docu-
mented to all clients by the contractor on a weekly basis.
Leisure-type activities which involve the active participa-
tion of each client will be provided and documented on a
daily basis. Attendance and participation level will be
documented for each client in all regularly scheduled events
and activities.



IV. CHILDREN'S SUMMER DAY SERVICES

The purpose of Children's Summer Day Services is to provide
day services to children v/ith developmental disabilities in
communities where the local school district suspends educa-
tional services during the summer months. Children's Summer
Day Services provide functional training (formal and infor-
mal) and leisure/recreational activities designed to promote
development, independence and individual skills. Training
includes areas such as self-help, social, language, pre-aca-
demic/academic, motor and prevocational skills and is based
on the objectives set by each Child's Individual Habilita-
tion Planning Team or Individual Education Planning Team.



11



V. RESIDENTIAL SERVICES - ADULT COMMUNITY HOME

The purpose of Residential Services is to provide a continu-
um of living arrangements to meet the needs of developmen-
tally disabled client's and to facilitate their integration
into community life with each client's health, safety and
well-being insured in each residential setting. Opportuni-
ties for socialization and the development of leisure time
skills are also available.

The primary goal of Residential Services is the provision of
instruction and intervention in accordance with the develop-
mental model and the principal of normalization. The pro-
vision of service is directed towards maximum skill acquisi-
tion in order to increase personal independence.

Each person's Individual Habilitation Planning Team provides
the general goals and specific objectives towards which each
residential sezrvice directs it's efforts. The IHP, based
upon the results of a formal assessment and identification
of each client's needs, also specifies the appropriate
residential alternative in which services will be provided.

Each residential service coordinates its service activities
with those of other specialized services such as: day habil- (
itation, special education and other generic community
services.

Adult Community Homes are licensed family-oriented living
arrangement in which two to eight clients, not less than
sixteen years of age, reside under supervison of community
group home trainers. Each client is provided habilitation
services which include general care, supervision and
guidance, and training.

Training focuses on the skills necessary for individual self
help, functioning within the home, and interaction with the
social and physical community environment. When appropri-
ate, training also focus on the skills necessary for
independent living.

Residential Services provides at least the following areas
of training:

1) Individual Self Help Skills, such as toileting, eating,
dressing, bathing, hair care, grooming, health care,
motor skills, social interaction, and sexual awareness.

2) Home Related Skills, such as clothing care and
selection, household chores, cooking, response to
emergencies, home repair and maintenance, time telling, ^
leisure and recreational skills, and telephone use. v



12



3) Community Awareness Skills, such as shopping skills,
transportation, restaurant use, and safety and traffic
signs.

4) Leisure and Recreational Skills, such as hobbies,
sports and games.

A minimum number of IHP objectives shall be established
through the Individual Habilitation process. However, any
IHP Team which recommends that a client has no need for
training objectives must have a DDD staff person as a
member.

Recreational outings (i.e. picnics, parties, etc.) will be

scheduled, provided and made available to all clients,

supervised by the provider on a monthly basis and
documented.

Home-oriented leisure time activities which involve the
active participation of each client will be documented on a
weekly basis.



VI. RESIDENTIAL SERVICES - CHILDREN'S COMMUNITY HOME

The purpose of Residential Services is to provide a continu-
um of living arrangements to meet the needs of developmen-
tally disabled children and to facilitate - their integration
into community life with each client's health, safety and
well-being insured in each residential setting. Opportuni-
ties for socialization and the development of leisure time
skills are also available.

The primary goal of Residential Services is the provision of
instruction and intervention in accordance v/ith the develop-
mental model and the principal of normalization. The pro-
vision of service is directed towards maximum skill acquisi-
tion in order to increase personal independence.

Each child's Individual Habilitation Planning Team provides
the general goals and specific objectives towards which each
residential service directs it's efforts. The IHP, based
upon the results of a formal assessment and identification
of each child's needs, also specifies the appropriate
residential alternative in which services will be provided.

Each residential service coordinates its service activities
with those of other specialized services such as: day habil-
itation, special education and other generic community
services .



13



Children Community Homes are licensed family-oriented living
arrangement in which two to five severely, multiply handi-
capped individuals, ages five to twenty-one (unless other-
wise agreed upon by the Contractor and the Department) ,
reside under the general care and supervision of community
home staff. A home-like atmosphere is achieved while con-
currently providing physical care and training in the areas
of self help skills, socialization, and community inter-
action.

Residential Services provides at least the following areas
of training:

1) Individual Self Help Skills, such as toileting, eating,
dressing, bathing, hair care, grooming, health care,
motor skills, social interaction, and sexual awareness.

2) Home Related Skills, such as clothing care and
selection, household chores, cooking, response to
emergencies, home repair and maintenance, time telling,
leisure and recreational skills, and telephone use.

3) Community Awareness Skills such as shopping skills,
transportation, restaurant use, and safety and traffic
signs.

4) Leisure and Recreational Skills, such as hobbies,
sports, and games.



VII. RESIDENTIAL SERVICES ADULT INTENSIVE TRAINING COMMUNITY HOME

The purpose of Residential Services is to provide a continu-
um of living arrangements to meet the needs of developmen-
tally disabled clients and to facilitate their integration


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Online LibraryMontana. Dept. of Social and Rehabilitation ServicSocial services block grant for Montana / Dept. of Social and Rehabilitation Services (Volume 1985) → online text (page 1 of 3)